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  • 1.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bilateral cochlear implants in children: Longitudinal results and parental experiences2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and Other Auditory Implantable Technologies, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the development of the bilateral benefit in children using bilateral cochlear implants by measurements of speech recognition and sound localization. Design: Bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet, in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization was measured at three occasions during a two-year period, without controlling for age or implant experience. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses were performed. Results were compared to cross-sectional data from children with normal hearing. Study sample: Seventy-eight children aged 5.1-11.9 years, with a mean bilateral cochlear implant experience of 3.3 years and a mean age of 7.8 years, at inclusion in the study. Thirty children with normal hearing aged 4.8-9.0 years provided normative data. Results: For children with cochlear implants, bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet was comparable whereas a bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization was found at all three test occasions. Absolute performance was lower than in children with normal hearing. Early bilateral implantation facilitated sound localization. Conclusions: A bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization continues to exist over time for children with bilateral cochlear implants, but no relative improvement is found after three years of bilateral cochlear implant experience.

  • 3.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

  • 4.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McMahon, Catherine M.
    Macquarie University, Sydney.
    Dowell, Richard C.
    University of Melbourne.
    Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To identify whether speech recognition outcomes are influenced by the choice of ear for cochlear implantation in adults with bilateral hearing loss who use a hearing aid in 1 ear but have long-term auditory deprivation in the other. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Retrospective matched cohort study. Speech recognition results were examined in 30 adults with monaural sound deprivation. Fifteen received the implant in the sound-deprived ear and 15 in the aided ear. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Tertiary referral centers with active cochlear implant programs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Adults with bilateral hearing loss and a minimum of 15 years of monaural sound deprivation who received a cochlear implant after meeting the traditional implantation criteria of the referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Cochlear implantation with devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure(s): Paired comparisons of postoperative monosyllabic word recognition scores obtained with the implant alone and in the usual listening condition (CI alone or bimodal). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: With the cochlear implant alone, individuals who received the implant in a sound-deprived ear obtained poorer scores than individuals who received the implant in the aided ear. There was no significant difference, however, in speech recognition results for the 2 groups when tested in their usual listening condition. In particular, poorer speech recognition scores were obtained with the cochlear implant alone by individuals using bimodal hearing. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Similar clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation can be achieved by adults with a long-term monaural sound deprivation when comparing the usual listening condition, irrespective of whether the implant is in the sound-deprived or in the aided ear.

  • 5.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptation Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How the non-implanted ear influences outcomes of cochlear implantation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Dowell, Richard
    Melbourne University, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Contribution of the non-implanted ear to Cochlear implantation Outcomes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Boisvert, Isabelle
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Macquarie University, Australia, HEARing CRC, Australia.
    McMahon, Chaterine M
    Maquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Tremblay, Genevieve
    Institute Readaptat Deficience Phys Quebec, Canada.
    Psarros, Colleen
    Sydney Area, Australia.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Multicenter Study of Cochlear Implantation Outcomes in Individuals with a Long Term Unilateral Sound Deprivation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fransen, Erik
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Lemkens, Nele
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland .
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Tropitzsch, Anke
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Occupational Noise, Smoking, and a High Body Mass Index are Risk Factors for Age-related Hearing Impairment and Moderate Alcohol Consumption is Protective: A European Population-based Multicenter Study2008In: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, ISSN 1525-3961, E-ISSN 1438-7573, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 264-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multicenter study was set up to elucidate the environmental and medical risk factors contributing to age-related hearing impairment (ARHI). Nine subsamples, collected by nine audiological centers across Europe, added up to a total of 4,083 subjects between 53 and 67 years. Audiometric data (pure-tone average [PTA]) were collected and the participants filled out a questionnaire on environmental risk factors and medical history. People with a history of disease that could affect hearing were excluded. PTAs were adjusted for age and sex and tested for association with exposure to risk factors. Noise exposure was associated with a significant loss of hearing at high sound frequencies (>1 kHz). Smoking significantly increased high-frequency hearing loss, and the effect was dose-dependent. The effect of smoking remained significant when accounting for cardiovascular disease events. Taller people had better hearing on average with a more pronounced effect at low sound frequencies (<2 kHz). A high body mass index (BMI) correlated with hearing loss across the frequency range tested. Moderate alcohol consumption was inversely correlated with hearing loss. Significant associations were found in the high

  • 9.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu.
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audiogram configurations among older adults: Prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined. Design : Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults. Study sample : The subjects (850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results : The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting. Conclusions : High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.

  • 10.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ear diseases and other risk factors for hearing impairment among adults: An epidemiological study2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of ear diseases, other otological risk factors potentially affecting hearing, and noise exposure among adults. Furthermore, subject-related factors possibly associated with hearing impairment (HI), i.e. handedness, eye color, and susceptibility to sunburn, were studied. Design: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults. Study sample: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results: Chronic middle-ear disease (both active and inactive) was the most common ear disease with a prevalence of 5.3%, while the prevalence of otosclerosis was 1.3%, and that of Menieres disease, 0.7%. Noise exposure was reported by 46% of the subjects, and it had no effect on hearing among those with no ear disease or other otological risk factors for HI. Dark eye color and non-susceptibility to sunburn were associated with HI among noise-exposed subjects. Conclusions: Common ear diseases and other otological risk factors constitute a major part of the etiologies of HI among adults. Contrary to previous studies, noise exposure turned out to have only marginal effect on hearing among those with no otological risk factors.

  • 11.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Bloigu, Risto
    University of Oulu.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-Reported Hearing Problems among Older Adults: Prevalence and Comparison to Measured Hearing Impairment2011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are not many population-based epidemiological studies on the association between self-reported hearing problems and measured hearing thresholds in older adults. Previous studies have shown that the relationship between self-reported hearing difficulties and measured hearing thresholds is unclear and, according to our knowledge, there are no previous population-based studies reporting hearing thresholds among subjects with hyperacusis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPurpose: The aim was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported hearing problems, that is, hearing difficulties, difficulties in following a conversation in noise, tinnitus, and hyperacusis, and to compare the results with measured hearing thresholds in older adults. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResearch Design: Cross-sectional, population-based, and unscreened. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Sample: Random sample of subjects (n = 850) aged 54-66 yr living in the city of Oulu (Finland) and the surrounding areas. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanData Collection and Analysis: Otological examination, pure tone audiometry, questionnaire survey less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The prevalence of self-reported hearing problems was 37.1% for hearing difficulties, 43.3% for difficulties in following a conversation in noise, 29.2% for tinnitus, and 17.2% for hyperacusis. More than half of the subjects had no hearing impairment, or HI (BEHL[better ear hearing level](0.5-4 kHz) andlt; 20 dB HL) even though they reported hearing problems. Subjects with self-reported hearing problems, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, had significantly poorer hearing thresholds than those who did not report hearing problems. Self-reported hearing difficulties predicted hearing impairment in the pure-tone average at 4, 6, and 8 kHz, and at the single frequency of 4 kHz. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The results indicate that self-reported hearing difficulties are more frequent than hearing impairment defined by audiometric measurement. Furthermore, self-reported hearing difficulties seem to predict hearing impairment at high frequencies (4-8 kHz) rather than at the frequencies of 0.5-4 kHz, which are commonly used to define the degree of hearing impairment in medical and legal issues.

  • 12.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    University of Oulu.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology .
    Majamaa, Kari
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Hearing in a 54-to 66-year-old population in northern Finland2010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1499-2027, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 920-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only a few large, population-based epidemiological studies on hearing impairment (HI) in adults. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HI and possible differences between ears in older adults. The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Another questionnaire was mailed to collect information on non-participants. The prevalence of HI averaged over the frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz for the better ear andgt;= 20 dB HL was 26.7% (men: 36.8%, women: 18.4%). There was no difference between left and right ear pure-tone averages over the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz (PTA (0.5-4 kHz)), but a significant difference of -0.8 dB HL was found for the low frequencies 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 kHz (PTA (0.125-0.5 kHz)), and 4.4 dB HL for the high frequencies over 4, 6, and 8 kHz (PTA (4-8 kHz)). In conclusion, HI was a highly prevalent finding in this age group.

  • 13.
    Hansson, Kristina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlen, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Can a 'single hit' cause limitations in language development? A comparative study of Swedish children with hearing impairment and children with specific language impairment2007In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 307-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies of language in children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI) indicate that they often have problems in phonological short-term memory (PSTM) and that they have linguistic weaknesses both in vocabulary and morphosyntax similar to children with specific language impairment (SLI). However, children with HI may be more likely than children with SLI to acquire typical language skills as they get older. It has been suggested that the more persisting problems in children with SLI are due to a combination of factors: perceptual, cognitive and/or linguistic.

    Aims: The main aim of this study was to explore language skills in children with HI in comparison with children with SLI, and how children with both HI and language impairment differ from those with non-impaired spoken language skills.

    Methods & Procedures: PSTM, output phonology, lexical ability, receptive grammar and verb morphology were assessed in a group of children with mild-to-moderate HI (n = 11) and a group of children with SLI (n = 12) aged 5 years 6 months to 9 years 0 months.

    Outcomes & Results: The HI group tended to score higher than the SLI group on the language measures, although few of the differences were significant. The children with HI had their most obvious weaknesses in PSTM, vocabulary, receptive grammar and inflection of novel verbs. The subgroup of children with HI (five out of 10) who also showed evidence of grammatical output problems was significantly younger than the remaining children with HI. Correlation analysis showed that the language variables were not associated with age, whereas hearing level was associated with PSTM.

    Conclusions: Children with HI are at risk for at least a delay in lexical ability, receptive grammar and grammatical production. The problems seen in the HI group might be explained by their low-level perceptual deficit and weak PSTM. For the SLI group the impairment is more severe. From a clinical perspective an important conclusion is that the language development in children with even mild-to-moderate HI deserves attention and support.

     

  • 14.
    Harder, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Norrköping.
    Speech-perception in elderly implant recipients2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and Other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 339-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15. Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    et al.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Velat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tropitzsch, A.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espesp, Angeles
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Diaz-Lacava, AN
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Orzan, Eva
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Familial aggregation of tinnitus: a European multicentre study2007In: B-ENT, ISSN 0001-6497, Vol. 3, no Suppl. 7 7, p. 51-60Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION AND AIM:

    Tinnitus is a common condition affecting approximately 20% of the older population. There is increasing evidence that changes in the central auditory system following cochlear malfunctioning are responsible for tinnitus. To date, few investigators have studied the influence of genetic factors on tinnitus. The present report investigates the presence of a familial effect in tinnitus subjects.

    METHODS:

    In a European multicentre study, 198 families were recruited in seven European countries. Each family had at least 3 siblings. Subjects were screened for causes of hearing loss other than presbyacusis by clinical examination and a questionnaire. The presence of tinnitus was evaluated with the question "Nowadays, do you ever get noises in your head or ear (tinnitus) which usually last longer than five minutes". Familial aggregation was tested using three methods: a mixed model approach, calculating familial correlations, and estimating the risk of a subject having tinnitus if the disorder is present in another family member.

    RESULTS:

    All methods demonstrated a significant familial effect for tinnitus. The effect persisted after correction for the effect of other risk factors such as hearing loss, gender and age. The size of the familial effect is smaller than that for age-related hearing impairment, with a familial correlation of 0.15.

    CONCLUSION:

    The presence of a familial effect for tinnitus opens the door to specific studies that can determine whether this effect is due to a shared familial environment or the involvement of genetic factors. Subsequent association studies may result in the identification of the factors responsible. In addition, more emphasis should be placed on the effect of role models in the treatment of tinnitus.

     

  • 16.
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    et al.
    University Hospital of Antwerp and University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu; and Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Northern Ostrobothnia Hospital District, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Tropitzsch, Anke
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre and Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, the Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia
    University of Bonn and German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Orzan, Eva
    IRCCS ‘‘Burlo Garofolo,’’ Trieste, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Familial Aggregation of Pure Tone Hearing Thresholds in an Aging European Population2013In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 838-844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate the familial correlations and intraclass correlation of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in specific frequencies. In addition, heritability estimates were calculated.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Multicenter survey in 8 European centers.

    SUBJECTS:

    One hundred ninety-eight families consisting of 952 family members, screened by otologic examination and structured interviews. Subjects with general conditions, known to affect hearing thresholds or known otologic cause were excluded from the study.

    RESULTS:

    We detected familial correlation coefficients of 0.36, 0.37, 0.36, and 0.30 for 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz, respectively, and correlation coefficients of 0.20 and 0.18 for 4 and 8 kHz, respectively. Variance components analyses showed that the proportion of the total variance attributable to family differences was between 0.32 and 0.40 for 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz and below 0.20 for 4 and 8 kHz. When testing for homogeneity between sib pair types, we observed a larger familial correlation between female than male subjects. Heritability estimates ranged between 0.79 and 0.36 across the frequencies.

    DISCUSSION:

    Our results indicate that there is a substantial shared familial effect in ARHI. We found that familial aggregation of ARHI is markedly higher in the low frequencies and that there is a trend toward higher familial aggregation in female compared with male subjects.

  • 17.
    Hesser, Hugo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundén, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Henrikson, Oskar
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fattahi, Kidjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johnsson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Westin Zetterqvist, Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatric Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus2012In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 649-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were significantly distressed by tinnitus were recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 32), ACT (n = 35), or a control condition (monitored Internet discussion forum; n = 32), and they were assessed with standardized self-report measures (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Quality of Life Inventory; Perceived Stress Scale; Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire) at pre-, posttreatment (8 weeks), and 1-year follow-up. Results: Mixed-effects linear regression analysis of all randomized participants showed significant effects on the primary outcome (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory) for CBT and for ACT compared with control at posttreatment (95% CI [-17.03, -2.94], d = 0.70, and 95% CI [-16.29, -2.53], d = 0.68, respectively). Within-group effects were substantial from pretreatment through 1-year-follow-up for both treatments (95% CI [-44.65, -20.45], d = 1.34), with no significant difference between treatments (95% CI [-14.87, 11.21], d = 0.16). Conclusions: Acceptance-based procedures may be a viable alternative to traditional CBT techniques in the management of tinnitus. The Internet can improve access to psychological interventions for tinnitus.

  • 18.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana
    Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA .
    Aikio, Pekka
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Stephan, Dietrich
    Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Huentelman, Matthew
    Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Genome-wide SNP analysis reveals no gain in power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami2010In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 569-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Saami from Fennoscandia are believed to represent an ancient, genetically isolated population with no evidence of population expansion. Theoretical work has indicated that under this demographic scenario, extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) is generated by genetic drift. Therefore, it has been suggested that the Saami would be particularly suited for genetic association studies, offering a substantial power advantage and allowing more economic study designs. However, no study has yet assessed this claim. As part of a GWAS for a complex trait, we evaluated the relative power for association studies of common variants in the Finnish Saami. LD patterns in the Saami were very similar to those in the non-African HapMap reference panels. Haplotype diversity was reduced and, on average, levels of LD were higher in the Saami as compared with those in the HapMap panels. However, using a 'hidden' SNP approach we show that this does not translate into a power gain in association studies. Contrary to earlier claims, we show that for a given set of common SNPs, genomic coverage attained in the Saami is similar to that in the non-African HapMap panels. Nevertheless, the reduced haplotype diversity could potentially facilitate gene identification, especially if multiple rare variants play a role in disease etiology. Our results further indicate that the HapMap is a useful resource for genetic studies in the Saami.

  • 19.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R
    et al.
    University of Antwerp.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aikio, Pekka
    University of Oulu.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu.
    Huentelman, Matthew J
    Translat Genom Research Institute, Phoenix.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp.
    A genome-wide analysis of population structure in the Finnish Saami with implications for genetic association studies2011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN GENETICS, ISSN 1018-4813, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 347-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of patterns of genetic variation within and among human populations is a prerequisite for successful genetic association mapping studies of complex diseases and traits. Some populations are more favorable for association mapping studies than others. The Saami from northern Scandinavia and the Kola Peninsula represent a population isolate that, among European populations, has been less extensively sampled, despite some early interest for association mapping studies. In this paper, we report the results of a first genome-wide SNP-based study of genetic population structure in the Finnish Saami. Using data from the HapMap and the human genome diversity project (HGDP-CEPH) and recently developed statistical methods, we studied individual genetic ancestry. We quantified genetic differentiation between the Saami population and the HGDP-CEPH populations by calculating pair-wise F-ST statistics and by characterizing identity-by-state sharing for pair-wise population comparisons. This study affirms an east Asian contribution to the predominantly European-derived Saami gene pool. Using model-based individual ancestry analysis, the median estimated percentage of the genome with east Asian ancestry was 6% (first and third quartiles: 5 and 8%, respectively). We found that genetic similarity between population pairs roughly correlated with geographic distance. Among the European HGDP-CEPH populations, F-ST was smallest for the comparison with the Russians (F-ST=0.0098), and estimates for the other population comparisons ranged from 0.0129 to 0.0263. Our analysis also revealed fine-scale substructure within the Finnish Saami and warns against the confounding effects of both hidden population structure and undocumented relatedness in genetic association studies of isolated populations.

  • 20.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Baur, Manuela
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Flaquer, Antonia
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Becker, Christian
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Nuernberg, Peter
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Genome-wide SNP-Based Linkage Scan Identifies a Locus on 8q24 for an Age-Related Hearing Impairment Trait2008In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is a very common multifactorial disorder. Despite the knowledge that genetics play an important role in the etiology of human ARHI as revealed by heritability studies, to date, its precise genetic determinants remain elusive. Here we report the results of a cross-sectional family-based genetic study employing audiometric data. By using principal component analysis, we were able to reduce the dimensionality of this multivariate phenotype while capturing most of the variation and retaining biologically important features of the audiograms. We conducted a genome-wide association as well as a linkage scan with high-density SNP microarrays. Because of the presence of genetic population substructure, association testing was stratified after which evidence was combined by meta-analysis. No association signals reaching genome-wide significance were detected. Linkage analysis identified a linkage peak on 8q24.13-q24.22 for a trait correlated to audiogram shape. The signal reached genome-wide significance, as assessed by simulations. This finding represents the first locus for an ARHI trait.

  • 21.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hansson, Kristina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Willstedt-Svensson, Ursula
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Deaf teenagers with cochlear implants in conversation with hearing peers2009In: International journal of language and communication disorders, ISSN 1368-2822, E-ISSN 1460-6984, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 319-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    This study investigates the use of requests for clarification in conversations between teenagers with a cochlear implant (CI) and hearing peers. So far very few studies have focused on conversational abilities in children with CI.

    AIMS:

    The aim was to explore co-construction of dialogue in a referential communication task and the participation of the teenagers with CI in comparison with individually matched hearing children and teenagers (HC) by studying the use of requests for clarification.

    METHODS & PROCEDURES:

    Sixteen conversational pairs participated: eight pairs consisting of a child with CI and his/her hearing conversational partner (CIP); and eight pairs consisting of an HC and a conversational partner (HCP). The conversational pairs were videotaped while carrying out a referential communication task requiring the description of two sets of pictures depicting faces. The dialogues were transcribed and analysed with respect to the number of words and turns, the time it took for each pair to complete the tasks, and the occurrence and different types of requests for clarification that were used in each type of conversational pair and in each type of dialogue.

    OUTCOMES & RESULTS:

    The main finding was that the teenagers with CI produced significantly more requests for clarification than the HCs. The most frequently used type of request for clarification in all dialogues was request for confirmation of new information. Furthermore, there was a trend for the teenagers with CI to use this type of request more often than the HC. In contrast, the teenagers with CI used significantly fewer requests for confirmation of already given information and fewer requests for elaboration than the HC.

    CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS:

    The deaf teenagers with CI in the study seem to be equally collaborative and responsible conversational partners as the hearing teenagers. The interpretation is that certain conditions in this study facilitate their participation in conversation. Such conditions might be a calm environment, a task that is structured and without time limits and that the partner is well known to the teenager with CI.

  • 22.
    Lohi, Venla
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Finland; Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland; Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Ohtonen, Pasi
    Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland; Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Hearing impairment among adults: The impact of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the influence of cardiovascular diseases on hearing impairment (HI) among adults. Furthermore, to seek other potential risk factors for HI, such as smoking, obesity, and socioeconomic class. Design: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults. Study sample: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results: Cardiovascular diseases did not increase the risk for HI in a propensity-score adjusted logistic regression model: OR 1.24, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96 for HI defined by better ear hearing level (BEHL), and OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.96 to 2.28 for HI defined by worse ear hearing level (WEHL), in the 0.5-4 kHz frequency range. Heavy smoking is a risk factor for HI among men (BEHL: OR 1.96, WEHL: OR 1.88) and women (WEHL: OR 2.4). Among men, obesity (BEHL, OR 1.85) and lower socioeconomic class (BEHL: OR 2.79, WEHL: OR 2.28) are also risk factors for HI. Conclusion: No significant association between cardiovascular disease and HI was found.

  • 23. Luxon, Linda
    et al.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advances in pediatric audiological and vestibular disorders2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 533-534Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Lunds universitet.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants:: Relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl. 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills.General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 25.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of phonological skills and working memory capacity in children with cochlear implants: Speed of performance and level of accuracy as indicators of development2007In: From Signal to Dialogue, 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and language development in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive and phonological skills in deaf children with CI2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of cognitive composite skills in deaf children with CI2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elena
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hearing and cognitive development in deaf and hearing-impaired children: effects of intervention2013In: Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing / [ed] Gastone Celesia, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. 71-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lunds universitet, Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive development, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implants.2009In: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report summarizes some of the results of studies in our laboratory exploring the development of cognitive, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implantation (CI). The children with CI performed at significantly lower levels than the hearing comparison group on the majority of cognitive tests, despite showing levels of nonverbal ability. The differences between children with CI and hearing children were most pronounced on tasks with relatively high phonological processing demands, but they were not limited to phonological processing. Impairment of receptive and productive prosody was also evident in children with CI. Despite these difficulties, 75% of the children with CI reached a level of reading skill comparable to that of hearing children. The results are discussed with respect to compensation strategies in reading.

  • 31.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    CLINTEC, Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 32.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre; Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

  • 33.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wass, Malin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asker-Arnason, Lena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Development of cognitive and reading skills in deaf children with CIs2011In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 12, no Suppl 1, p. 98-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergman, P
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Improved speech recognition and good self-reported benefit from cochlear implantation in adults2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Departmet of Otolaryngology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bergström, Pia
    Department of Otolaryngology, Ryhov Hospital Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Outcome of cochlear implants in elderly adults2011In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 89-89Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of elderly population increases and an increasing number of old adults have severe to profound hearing impairment, thus being possible cochlear implant (CI) candidates. The aim of the project was to assess the outcome of CI in terms of speech audiometric results and self-reported benefit in adults with a special emphasis on elderly adults.Subjects and methods: All 124 adult patients (≥ 18 years at implantation) who have been implanted in the Linköping CI program in 1992-2009 were eligible for the study. In addition to audiological tests, the pre-operative assessment of adult patients includes tests of working memory capacity, phonological and lexical processing skills. Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a self-assessment instrument covering general health, degree of social support and physical state, was mailed to the CI recipients.Results: Response rate was high (90%) and 43 of the participants were ≥ 65 years. The mean time the participants had used their CI was 5.1 years (SD 4, range 1.2-16.9). All patients, with one exception, reached some degree of open set speech recognition. GBI results were comparable to earlier reports in CI populations. Analyses of the cognitive test results and more detailed analyses of speech reception and GBI among the oldest olds (≥75 years) will be reported.Discussion: According to our preliminary results, CI gives good benefit in the whole group. Provided that a careful assessment of cognitive abilities has been made and general health is reasonably good, a good outcome can be expected also in the oldest part of the population.

  • 36.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Förväntningar och nytta av CI hos vuxna2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Expectations and benefit of cochlear implants in elderly adults2010In: 11th International Conference on Cochlear Implants and other Implantable Auditory Technologies, 2010, p. 111-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Måns
    Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    An office procedure to detect vestibular loss in children with hearing impairment2005In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 262, no 4, p. 328-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As coexisting vestibular and cochlear lesions are of etiological importance, evaluation of children with congenital or early acquired hearing impairment (HI) should include vestibular assessment. A rotation test requires specific equipment and allows only detection of bilateral vestibular impairment. An impulse or head thrust test allows assessment of one ear at a time, detects more pronounced caloric side differences and can be performed without any equipment. We report a consecutive series of children with profound sensorineural HI investigated at a tertiary hospital unit. Age at taking first steps without help, the results of temporal bone images (CT/MRT) and vestibular tests were collected retrospectively from patient files. The children were 12 to 90 months old at the time they attended both a rotation and an impulse test. All 14 children cooperated in the impulse test, and 12 completed the vestibular rotation test successfully. Three out of 14 children tested so far have been confirmed to have a bilaterally pathological vestibulo-ocular reflex confirmed both in the rotation test and the impulse test. Our results show that both the rotation test and the vestibular impulse test can be successfully performed on small children at a regular outpatient appointment.

  • 39.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Vestergren, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine pre-operative expectations and the postoperative experiences related to cochlear implants (CI) in CI-users and their significant others. Methods: A questionnaire was used and the responses were analysed by means of The Qualitative Content Analysis. All adults implanted between 1992 and 2010, who had had their implants for a minimum of 12 months (n = 120) were contacted. Response rate was high (90.8%), and all-inclusive answers were received from 101 CI-users (84.2%). Results: The overall sense of increased well-being and life satisfaction was described as having lived in two different worlds, one with the auditory stimulation and one without. In the overall sense of increased well-being and satisfaction three interwoven subcategories, alienation - normality, fear - autonomy, and living a social life emerged. When CI-users and their significant others recalled the time prior to receiving the CI, a sense of fear was present with origins in the concern for the respondents (CI-users) ability to cope and care independently in society. Conversely, after the implantation both parties emphasized the notion of a distinct transformation within the CI-user towards autonomy. Communication was highlighted as a large part of living social life. Conclusion: The CI increases well-being and satisfaction for both CI-users and their significant others, which is especially evident regarding enhanced autonomy, normality and living social life.

  • 40.
    Saremi, Amin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Changes in Temporal and Spectral Functions of the Auditory Periphery Due to Aging and Noise-induced Cochlear Pathologies: A Comparative Clinical Study2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study includes a battery of psychoacoustical and electrophysiological tests to quantitatively investigate the changes in the frequency and the temporal features of the human auditory periphery caused by aging (presbyacusis) and noise-induced lesions, two common types of sensorineural hearing impairments. The scores are comparatively analyzed.

    Design: These clinical experiments have been implemented in MATLAB software.

    Study sample: 20 normal hearing adults (aged 30-54), 20 older hearing-impaired subjects (aged 65-70) with no history of Ototoxic medication or noise exposure and 7 adult men with a traceable noise-induced hearing impairment.

    Results: The observed temporal and spectral declines are generally consistent with the high-frequency audiometric loss depicted by the audiogram, for each group. Moreover, the test battery provides valuable information on the frequency sensitivity, temporal resolution, loudness growth, compression and otoacoustic emissions.

    Conclusion: These scores are compared with the predictions of a physiologicallybased cochlear model to provide evidence about specific inner-ear pathologies, beyond what the audiogram can indicate. Among these 7 clinical experiments, the results from the forward temporal masking test, the categorical loudness discrimination test and the distortion product otoacoustic emission test provide the most differential information about the underlying cellular lesions. The results indicate that the reduction in the temporal resolution is substantially age-relate since the presbyacusis listeners, unlike the other groups, obtained almost no benefit from the temporal cues provided by the gap duration at any of the experiments. Moreover, the results suggest that the DPOAEs reflect the cellular lesions associated with the acoustic overstimulation rather than the age-related strial degenerations.

  • 41.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asp, Filip
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Harder, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hergils, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Klinisk utvärdering av 80 barn med bilaterala cochleaimplantat2009In: TeMA Hörsel, Jönköping, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Østergaard-Olsen, Steen
    Dept Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Lars-Holme
    Dept Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Glad, Henrik
    Dept Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Zeitooni, Mehrnaz
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Comparison Of Two Digital Bone-Conduction Hearing Aids In Experienced Users: A Two-Center Study2011In: 3rd International Symposium on Bone Conduction Hearing – Craniofacial Osseointegration, Sarasota, Florida, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Uusimaa, Johanna
    et al.
    University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
    Moilanen, Jukka
    University of Oulu and University of Tampere, Finland.
    Vainionpää, Leena
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Tapanainen, Päivi
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Lindholm, Päivi
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Nuutinen, Matti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Löppönen, Tuija
    University of Oulu and University of Kuopio, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland .
    Rantala, Heikki
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu and University of Turku, Finland.
    Prevalence, segregation, and phenotype of the mitochondrial DNA 3243A>G mutation in children2007In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 278-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    We studied the prevalence, segregation, and phenotype of the mitochondrial DNA 3243A>G mutation in children in a defined population in Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland.

    METHODS:

    Children with diagnoses commonly associated with mitochondrial diseases were ascertained. Blood DNA from 522 selected children was analyzed for 3243A>G. Children with the mutation were clinically examined. Information on health history before the age of 18 years was collected from previously identified adult patients with 3243A>G. Mutation segregation analysis in buccal epithelial cells was performed in mothers with 3243A>G and their children whose samples were analyzed anonymously.

    RESULTS:

    Eighteen children were found to harbor 3243A>G in a population of 97,609. A minimum estimate for the prevalence of 3243A>G was 18.4 in 100,000 (95% confidence interval, 10.9-29.1/100,000). Information on health in childhood was obtained from 37 adult patients with 3243A>G. The first clinical manifestations appearing in childhood were sensorineural hearing impairment, short stature or delayed maturation, migraine, learning difficulties, and exercise intolerance. Mutation analysis from 13 mothers with 3243A>G and their 41 children gave a segregation rate of 0.80. The mothers with heteroplasmy greater than 50% tended to have offspring with lower or equal heteroplasmy, whereas the opposite was true for mothers with heteroplasmy less than or equal to 50% (p = 0.0016).

    INTERPRETATION:

    The prevalence of 3243A>G is relatively high in the pediatric population, but the morbidity in children is relatively low. The random genetic drift model may be inappropriate for the transmission of the 3243A>G mutation.

  • 44.
    Van Eyken, Els
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bauer, Manuela
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Stephens, Dafydd
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Rajkowska, Elzbieta
    Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Pawelczyk, Malgorzata
    Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola
    Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Steffens, Mikael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    The Contribution of GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG to Age-Related Hearing Impairment and Noise-Induced Hearing Loss2007In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 28, no 7, p. 970-975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis: The common GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG mutation might contribute to the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).

    Background: GJB2, a gene encoding a gap junction protein expressed in the inner ear, has been suggested to be involved in the potassium recycling pathway in the cochlea. GJB2 mutations account for a large number of individuals with nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss, with 35delG being the most frequent mutation in populations of European origin. Other genes involved in potassium homeostasis have been suggested to be associated with ARHI and NIHL, and distortion product otoacoustic emission distortions indicative of hearing loss alterations have been found in 35delG carriers.

    Method: We genotyped 35delG in two distinct sample sets: an ARHI sample set, composed of 2,311 Caucasian samples from nine different centers originating from seven different countries with an age range between 53 and 67 years, and an NIHL sample set consisting of 702 samples from the two extremes of a noise-exposed Polish sample.

    Results: After statistical analysis, we were unable to detect an association between 35delG and ARHI, nor between 35delG and NIHL.

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that there is no increased susceptibility in 35delG carriers for the development of ARHI or NIHL.

  • 45.
    Van Eyken, Els
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Henricxk, Jan-Jaap
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Baur, Manuela
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy .
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy .
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy .
    Espeso, Angeles
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Stephens, Dafydd
    University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the Netherlands.
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Lacava, A.
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van Laer, Lut
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Contribution of the N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphism NAT2*6A to age-related hearing impairment2007In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 570-578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Age‐related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most common sensory impairment in older people, affecting 50% of those aged 80 years. The proportion of older people is increasing in the general population, and as a consequence, the number of people affected with ARHI is growing. ARHI is a complex disorder, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to the disease. The first studies to elucidate these genetic factors were recently performed, resulting in the identification of the first two susceptibility genes for ARHI, NAT2 and KCNQ4.

    Methods

    In the present study, the association between ARHI and polymorphisms in genes that contribute to the defence against reactive oxygen species, including GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2, was tested. Samples originated from seven different countries and were combined into two test population samples, the general European population and the Finnish population. Two distinct phenotypes for ARHI were studied, Zlow and Zhigh, representing hearing in the low and high frequencies, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed for single polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2*5A, NAT2*6A, and NAT2*7A), haplotypes, and gene–environment and gene–gene interactions.

    Results

    We found an association between ARHI and GSTT1 and GSTM1 in the Finnish population sample, and with NAT2*6A in the general European population sample. The latter finding replicates previously published data.

    Conclusion

    As replication is considered the ultimate proof of true associations in the study of complex disorders, this study provides further support for the involvement of NAT2*6A in ARHI.

                     

  • 46.
    Van Laer, Lut
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Stephan, Dietrich
    Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Aikio, Pekka
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana
    The Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Huentelman, Matthew
    Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium.
    A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami2010In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 685-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at contributing to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small, ancient, genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher extent of LD, potentially offering a substantial power advantage for association mapping. DNA samples and audiometric measurements were collected from 352 Finnish Saami individuals, aged between 50 and 75 years. To reduce the burden of multiple testing, we applied principal component (PC) analysis to the multivariate audiometric phenotype. The first three PCs captured 80% of the variation in hearing thresholds, while maintaining biologically important audiometric features. All subjects were genotyped with the Affymetrix 100 K chip. To account for multiple levels of relatedness among subjects, as well as for population stratification, association testing was performed using a mixed model. We summarised the top-ranking association signals for the three traits under study. The top-ranked SNP, rs457717 (P-value 3.55 x 10(-7)), was associated with PC3 and was localised in an intron of the IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP2). Intriguingly, the SNP rs161927 (P-value 0.000149), seventh-ranked for PC1, was positioned immediately downstream from the metabotropic glutamate receptor-7 gene (GRM7). As a previous GWAS of a European and Finnish sample set already suggested a role for GRM7 in ARHI, this study provides further evidence for the involvement of this gene.

  • 47.
    Van Laer, Lut
    et al.
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Eyken, Els
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Fransen, Erik
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Jeroen
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Topsakal, Vedat
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Hannula, Samuli
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL. University of Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Demeester, Kelly
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium.
    Baur, Manuela
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Verbruggen, Katia
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huyghe, Joke
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Huygen, Patrick
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Manninen, Minna
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Konings, Annelies
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia
    University of Bonn, Germany .
    Steffens, Michael
    University of Bonn, Germany .
    Wienker, Thomas
    University of Bonn, Germany .
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    University of Tampere, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Kremer, Hannie
    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands .
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    University Hospital of Gent, Belgium .
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Cardiff University, UK .
    Orzan, Eva
    University Hospital Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    University of Tuebingen, Germany .
    Bille, Mikael
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    University of Oulu, Finland.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    University Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Van Camp, Guy
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    The grainyhead like 2 gene (GRHL2), alias TFCP2L3,is associated with age-related hearing impairment2008In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The contribution of various environmental factors has been relatively extensively studied. In contrast, investigations to identify the genetic risk factors have only recently been initiated. In this paper we describe the results of an association study performed on 2418 ARHI samples derived from nine centers from seven European countries. In 70 candidate genes, a total of 768 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on HAPMAP data. These genes were chosen among the monogenic hearing loss genes identified in mice and men in addition to several strong functional candidates. After genotyping and data polishing, statistical analysis of all samples combined resulted in a P-value that survived correction for multiple testing for one SNP in the GRHL2 gene. Other SNPs in this gene were also associated, albeit to a lesser degree. Subsequently, an analysis of the most significant GRHL2 SNP was performed separately for each center. The direction of the association was identical in all nine centers. Two centers showed significant associations and a third center showed a trend towards significance. Subsequent fine mapping of this locus demonstrated that the majority of the associated SNPs reside in intron 1. We hypothesize that the causative variant may change the expression levels of a GRHL2 isoform.

  • 48.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sahlen, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Department of Otolaryngology/Section of Audiology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
    Cognitive and linguistic skills in Swedish children with cochlear implants - measures of accuracy and latency as indicators of development2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 559-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine working memory (WM) capacity, lexical access and phonological skills in 19 children with cochlear implants (CI) (5;7-13;4 years of age) attending grades 0-2, 4, 5 and 6 and to compare their performance with 56 children with normal hearing. Their performance was also studied in relation to demographic factors. The findings indicate that children with CI had visuospatial WM capacities equivalent to the comparison group. They had lower performance levels on most of the other cognitive tests. Significant differences between the groups were not found in all grades and a number of children with CI performed within 1 SD of the mean of their respective grade-matched comparison group on most of the cognitive measures. The differences between the groups were particularly prominent in tasks of phonological WM. The results are discussed with respect to the effects of cochlear implants on cognitive development.

  • 49.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Orthographic learning in children with hearing impairment2011In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 126-126Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early in reading development, children generally read by using phonological decoding strategies where words are read letter by letter. Later in reading development, orthographic decoding strategies are generally used by most readers. This means that whole words are recognized directly through a process of comparing written words to mental orthographic representations, i.e. long-term memories of written words.This strategy is quicker and more efficient for reading familiar words.The process of building up a mental orthographic lexicon in long term memory is often referred to as orthographic learning (e.g. Share, 2004). In children with normal hearing and typical development, those who are better at phonological decoding also become better at constructing their orthographic lexicon. Children with cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated relatively high reading skills despite less favorable cognitive prerequisites in terms of phonological representations, phonological working memory, phonological skills and lexical access (Asker-Árnason et al., 2007, Wass et al., 2010).The present study explores the acquistion orthographic representations in children who use CI and children who have moderate hearing impairments and use hearing aids (HA). The performance of each group was compared to that of hearing children matched for grade, nonverbal intelligence and gender.The results indicated that the children with CI did not have significantly different orthographic learning ability than their comparison group but had slightly poorer reading comprehension. The children with HA performed significantly poorer than their comparison group on orthographic learning but had similar reading skills as their comparison group on all measures of reading.

  • 50.
    Wass, Malin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Sahlé, Birgitta
    Deparment of Logopedics, Lund University, Sweden.
    Asker-Árnason, Lena
    Deparment of Logopedics, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Deparment of Logopedics, Lund University, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive Skills and Reading Ability in Children with Cochlear Implants2010In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 11, no Suppl. 1, p. 395-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

12 1 - 50 of 54
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