liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 82
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Cutaneous microdialysis: Is it worth the sweat?2006In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, E-ISSN 1523-1747, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 1207-1209Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis is a minimally invasive technique for chronological study of metabolic, biochemical, and pharmacological events in living tissue. In the skin, probes are placed in the dermis or subcutis for research in two main areas, percutaneous penetration and various aspects of inflammation. Advances in technique, and the concept of data generation and analysis are leading to new areas of application.

  • 2.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Dermato-Venereological Research at Linköping University2011In: Forum for Nordic Dermato-Venereology, ISSN 1402-2915, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 16-17Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    JUST A LITTLE PRICK WITH A NEEDLE in WOUND REPAIR AND REGENERATION, vol 18, issue 4, pp 65-2010In: WOUND REPAIR AND REGENERATION, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 65-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Anderson, Chris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Lindén, Maria
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    High resolution laser Doppler perfusion imaging for visualisation of changes in skin circulation after microdialysis probe insertion1996In: Jadassohn Centenary Congress,1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anderson, Chris
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Analysis of laser Doppler perfusion images from contact reactions1996In: Jadassohn Centenary Congress,1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quirk, Chris
    Royal Perth Hospital, WA Australien.
    Sullivan, John
    Liverpool Hospital, NSW Australien.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Cutaneous manifestations of internal disease2008In: Drug Discovery Today : Disease Mechanisms, ISSN 1740-6765, E-ISSN 1740-6765, Vol. 5, no 1, p. e113-e123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The skin mirrors the individual's well being. Visible for both the patient and the attending physician, it can be a source of information for the diagnosis of multi-system diseases and diseases of internal organs. Therapy is usually directed at the primary disease. Pharmaco-therapeutic options for internal diseases are at present not always optimal and specific management of side effects of drugs with vital indication may be necessary. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the cutaneous manifestations may help develop more efficacious, better tolerated therapy and improve the patient's situation.

  • 7. Aspres, Nicholas
    et al.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Continuing professional development program. Malassezia yeasts in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis2004In: Australasian Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0004-8380, E-ISSN 1440-0960, Vol. 45, p. 199-207Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Carlsson, Annica
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
    Gånemo, Agneta
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Svensson, Åke
    Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Research in Malmö, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö.
    Scoring of hand eczema: good agreement between patients and dermatological staff2011In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 165, no 1, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Assessment of hand eczema in a clinical study has been achieved using a scoring system which documents extent of eczema on different areas of the hand. Objectives To investigate whether the same scoring system could be used by patients to communicate current status of hand eczema. Methods In a study of 62 patients (36 women and 26 men, age range 1975 years), the patients own assessment was compared with the assessment by a dermatologist and a dermatological nurse. Standardized information was given to the patient and the form was filled in independently by the patient, the nurse and the dermatologist, during the patients visit to the clinic. Individual area scores were summed to a total score. Results The overall agreement was good, with an interclass correlation (ICC) of 0.61 between patient and dermatologist for the total score. The ICC between nurse and dermatologist was 0.78. Differences between observers were more pronounced for the more severe cases - those with higher numerical scores as assessed by the dermatologist. There was a tendency for women and for patients over the median age of 44 years to set a lower point score than the dermatologist. The concordance of observations from individual anatomical areas was higher for fingertips and nails and lower for the palm and dorsum of the hand. Conclusions Patients are able to report the extent of hand eczema with good accuracy. Self-assessment protocols for hand eczema may well have a place in the monitoring of hand eczema extent over time.

  • 9.
    Christiansen Clifford, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Färm, Gunilla
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Eid-Forest, Ruth
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology.
    Interferon-gamma secreted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a possible diagnostic marker for allergic contact dermatitis to gold2006In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    10% of patch-tested patients have a positive reaction to gold. Most lack clinical symptoms, but allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to gold is increasing. In this study, 77 dermatological outpatients were divided into 3 groups depending on epicutaneous patch test outcomes: a group positive to gold (EPI+), a group negative to gold (EPI-), and a group with irritant reactions to gold (EPI-IR). Lymphocytes were stimulated in vitro with gold sodium thiosulfate. Proliferation was assessed using the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and cytokine secretion was assessed using a multibead array (Luminex; Linco Research Inc., St. Charles, MO, USA), in order to evaluate whether an in vitro method with high diagnostic accuracy could be devised. The EPI+ group showed a significantly increased secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-13 and also showed a significantly higher stimulation indexes for LTT, compared to the other 2 subject groups. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for all methods individually and combined, but IFN-gamma assessment alone was the most accurate method for identifying ACD to gold, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 82.1%, respectively. This method also identified 87.5% of the EPI-IR subjects as non-allergic. Therefore, assessment of secretion of IFN-gamma should be a valuable complement to patch test for diagnosing gold allergy.

  • 10. Clancy, N.
    et al.
    Leahy, MJ.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Non-invasive assessment of the mechanical properties of human skin - investigation of effective age using an optical method2006In: Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland, Section of Biomedical Sciences, University of Limerick, Summer Meeting,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Clancy, Neil T.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Leahy, Martin J.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Analysis of skin recovery from mechanical indentation using diffuse lighting and digital imaging2007In: Diffuse Optical Imaging of Tissue / [ed] Brian W. Pogue; Rinaldo Cubeddu, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007, p. 66291G-1-66291G-10Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin behaves as a viscoelastic material, having mechanical properties composed of elastic and fluid components. Upon indentation, the fibres are stretched and fluid displaced from the compressed region. The rate of recovery from this imprint is therefore dependent on the hydration and elasticity of the skin. A reliable measurement could be applied to the assessment of clinical conditions such as oedema, rare genetic disorders such as cutis laxa  and the evaluation of the 'effective age' of skin in vivo . This paper describes a new approach to the non-invasive indentation technique and a novel method of analysis. A method is proposed that tracks the skin's recovery optically from an initial strain made using a mechanical indentor, diffuse side-lighting and a CCD video-capture device. Using the blue colour plane of the image it is possible to examine the surface topography only, and track the decay of the imprint over time. Two algorithms are discussed for the extraction of information on the skin's displacement and are analysed in terms of reliability and reproducibility.

  • 12.
    Clancy, Neil T.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Leahy, Martin J.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Nilsson, Gert E.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Analysis of skin recovery from mechanical indentation using diffuse lighting and digital imaging. in Diffuse Optical Imaging of Tissue.2007In: Proceedings of SPIE - Diffuse Optical Imaging of Tissue / [ed] Brian W. Pogue, Rinaldo Cubeddu, Bellingham, WA, United States: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007, p. 66291G-1-66291G-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin behaves as a viscoelastic material, having mechanical properties composed of elastic and fluid components. Upon indentation, the fibres are stretched and fluid displaced from the compressed region. The rate of recovery from this imprint is therefore dependent on the hydration and elasticity of the skin. A reliable measurement could be applied to the assessment of clinical conditions such as oedema, rare genetic disorders such as cutis laxa and the evaluation of the 'effective age' of skin in vivo . This paper describes a new approach to the non-invasive indentation technique and a novel method of analysis. A method is proposed that tracks the skin's recovery optically from an initial strain made using a mechanical indentor, diffuse side-lighting and a CCD video-capture device. Using the blue colour plane of the image it is possible to examine the surface topography only, and track the decay of the imprint over time. Two algorithms are discussed for the extraction of information on the skin's displacement and are analysed in terms of reliability and reproducibility.

  • 13.
    Clancy, Neil T
    et al.
    University of London Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Leahy, Martin J
    University of Limerick.
    A new device for assessing changes in skin viscoelasticity using indentation and optical measurement2010In: SKIN RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY, ISSN 0909-752X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 210-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims Skin is a viscoelastic material, comprised of fluidic and fibrous components. Changes in viscoelasticity can arise due to a number of conditions including dehydration, swelling (associated with injury or disease), impaired heart function, rehydration therapy, ageing, scarring, sun exposure and genetic conditions affecting connective tissue. Quantification of changes in skin viscoelasticity due to these processes is of great clinical interest in the fields of therapy monitoring, wound healing and disease screening. However, devices currently available to measure aspects of the mechanical properties of skin have limitations in ease-of-use, accessibility, and depth of measurement. This paper describes a new technique to follow changes in the viscoelasticity of the skin, using a novel approach to an indentation manoeuvre. The device is portable, low-cost and easy to use while at the same time providing rich information on the mechanical response of the skin. Methods The method proposed optically tracks the skins recovery from an initial strain, made with a novel linear indentor, using diffuse side-lighting and a CCD video camera. Upon indentation, the skins elastin fibres are stretched and fluid is displaced from the compressed region. When the indentor is removed, the rate of recovery of the skin from this imprint is therefore principally dependent on its hydration and elasticity. Using the blue colour plane of the image and polarisation filtering, it is possible to examine the surface topography only, and track the decay of the imprint over time. Results The decrease in size of the imprint over time (decay curve) recorded by the device is shown to agree with the theoretical predictions of an appropriate viscoelastic model of skin mechanical behaviour. The contributors to the response measured using the indentation device are fully characterised and evaluated using separate measurement techniques including high-frequency ultrasound, polarisation spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography. Conclusion The device developed is capable of tracking the viscoelastic response of skin to minimal indentation. The high precision achieved using low-cost materials means that the device could be a viable alternative to current technologies.

  • 14. Clancy, NT.
    et al.
    Leahy, MJ.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Analysis of mechanical imprints in human skin using an optical technique. in Fission Impossible?2007In: IOPI Spring Weekend Meeting,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Clifford, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    Karin, Cederbrant
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    T-cells expressing CD4, CD45RO and CLA from gold-allergic but not healthy subjects react to gold sodium thiosufate in vitroManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patch test positivity to gold is common in western societies, but in contrast to nickel (Ni) allergy it is uncommon that the patch test positive patient shows any clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated cytotoxic effects of gold sodium thiosulphate (GSTS) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), including different T-cell subsets. We also separated lymphocytes from allergic and non-allergic subjects into CD45RA and CD45R0 cell fractions. We also expressed CLA. The fraction of analyzed the effects of GSTS using lymphocyte transformation test, propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry to determine lymphocyte memory status, expression of chemokine receptors and cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA), and compared the results to what has previously been reported on Ni allergy. We found that only the cells from the allergic subjects proliferated in the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and in the CD45R0 fraction there was a dose-dependent increase in the fraction of CD3/CD4 cells. Similar to Ni-allergy, these CD3/CD4/CD45R0 cells also expressed CLA. The fraction of CD3/CD8 in the CD45R0 enriched fraction decreased with GSTS exposure. In contrast to Ni allergy, however, we found no differences between the allergic and non-allergic subjects regarding the chemokine receptors CCR4, CXCR3 and CCR10.

  • 16. Corrie, S R
    et al.
    Fernando, G J P
    Crichton, M L
    Brunck, M E G
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Kendall, M A F
    Surface-modified microprojection arrays for intradermal biomarker capture, with low non-specific protein binding2010In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 10, p. 2655-2658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Minimally invasive biosensors are of great interest for rapid detection of disease biomarkers for diagnostic screening at the point-of-care. Here we introduce a device which extracts disease-specific biomarkers directly from the upper dermis, without the needle and syringe or resource-intensive blood processing. Using antigen-specific antibodies raised in mice as a model system, we confirm the analytical specificity and sensitivity of the antibody capture and extraction in comparison to the conventional methods based on needle/syringe blood draw followed by processing and antigen-specific ELISAs.

  • 17.
    Detert, H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Hedlund, S.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Rodvall, Y.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Whiteman, D. C.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 986-993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In both Sweden and Australia high incidence rates of skin cancer have become a major health problem. In prevention and risk communication, it is important to have reliable ways for identifying people with risky sun habits. In this study the validity and reliability of the questionnaire Sun Exposure Protection Index (SEPI), developed to assess individuals sun habits and their propensity to increase sun protection during routine, often brief, clinical encounters, has been evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the proposed SEPI scoring instrument, in two countries with markedly different ultraviolet radiation environments (Sweden and Australia). Method: Two subpopulations in Sweden and Australia respectively were asked to fill out the SEPI together with the previously evaluated Readiness to Alter Sun Protective Behaviour questionnaire (RASP-B) and the associated Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire. To test reliability, the SEPI was again filled out by the subjects one month later. Results: Comparison between SEPI and the questions in the Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire, analyzed with Spearmans Rho, showed good correlations regarding sun habits. Comparison between SEPI and RASP-B regarding propensity to increase sun protection showed concurrently lower SEPI mean scores for action stage, but no difference between precontemplation and contemplation stages. The SEPI test-retest analysis indicated stability over time. Internal consistency of the SEPI, assessed with Cronbachs alpha estimation showed values marginally lower than the desired >0.70 coefficient value generally recommended, and was somewhat negatively affected by the question on sunscreen use, likely related to the classic "sunscreen paradox". There were some differences in the performance of the SEPI between the Swedish and Australian samples, possibly due to the influence of "available" sunlight and differing attitudes to behaviour and protection "at home" and on vacation. Conclusions: SEPI appears to be a stable instrument with an overall acceptable validity and reliability, applicable for use in populations exposed to different UVR environments, in order to evaluate individual sun exposure and protection. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 18.
    Falk, M
    et al.
    Cty Ostergotland, Res and Dev Unit Local Hlth Care, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden .
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Influence of age, gender, educational level and self-estimation of skin type on sun exposure habits and readiness to increase sun protection2013In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sun exposure habits and the propensity to undertake sun protection differ between individuals. Not least in primary prevention of skin cancer, aiming at reducing ultraviolet (UV) exposure, knowledge about these factors may be of importance. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in a primary health care (PHC) population, the relationship between sun exposure habits/sun protection behaviour/readiness to increase sun protection and gender, age, educational level and skin UV-sensitivity. Methods: The baseline data from a previously performed RCT on skin cancer prevention was used. 415 patients, aged andgt;18 years, visiting a PHC centre in southern Sweden, filled-out a questionnaire mapping sun exposure, readiness to increase sun protection according to the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), and the above mentioned factors. Results: Female gender was associated with more frequent suntanning (p andlt; 0.001) and sunbed use (p andlt; 0.05), but also with more extensive sunscreen use (p andlt; 0.001). High age was in general associated with low level of sun exposure and high level of protection. Subjects with low educational level reported less frequent sunscreen use than those with higher educational level, and also chose lower SPF (p andlt; 0.001). For almost all parameters, high skin UV-sensitivity was associated with markedly lower sun exposure (p andlt; 0.001) and more pronounced readiness to increase sun protection. Females and subjects with high educational level reported higher readiness to increase sunscreen use than males and subjects with lower educational level (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: Gender, age, educational level and skin type appear to be important factors affecting sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour, which supports the idea of appropriate mapping of these factors in patients in order to individualise sun protection advice according to the individual patient situation and capabilities.

  • 19.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Can patients read their own UVB minimal erythema dose and irritant skin tests2010Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measuring sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour using a comprehensive scoring instrument: An illustration of a possible model based on Likert scale scorings and on estimation of readiness to increase sun protection2012In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 265-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few attempts to present a comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection have been made. The present paper aims to describe a possible set of questions suitable for such an instrument, comprising the most important aspects of sun exposure and protection. Methods: The material from a previously performed intervention study, using a questionnaire based on Likert scales and on the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), was utilised. 213 primary healthcare patients filled in the questionnaire and were randomised into two groups receiving sun protection advice, in Group 1 in letter-form, and in Group 2 orally during a doctor's consultation. In the original study, increased sun protection/readiness to increase sun protection was demonstrated for several items in Group 2, at six months. To compose a comprehensive scoring instrument, five questions concerning sun exposure/protection (intentional tanning, sunscreen use, choice of SPF, number of occasions with sunburn, and time spent in the sun at midday), were selected to give a 20 point behavioural score. Similarly, four TTM-based questions (giving up sunbathing, using clothes for sun protection, using sunscreens, and staying in the shade) gave a 16 point "propensity-to-change"-score. Results: At follow-up, increased sun protection reflected in the behavioural score occurred only in Group 2 (p<0.001). For the propensity-to-change-score, increased readiness to increase sun protection occurred in both groups, but the change was significantly higher in Group 2 (p<0.05). Categorisation of the 20 point behavioural score, into three risk levels, revealed a significantly higher shift of subjects moving to a lower risk level in Group 2 compared to Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, twinning of a summarised Likert scale behavioural score with a TTM-based propensity-to-change-score seems promising for the creation of a questionnaire-based, comprehensive scoring instrument for sun exposure and protection.

  • 21.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevention of skin cancer in primary health care: an evaluation of three different prevention effort levels and the applicability of a phototest2008In: European Journal of General Practice, ISSN 1381-4788, E-ISSN 1751-1402, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 68-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/objective: The high skin cancer incidence in western society, and its known association with sun exposure habits, makes the area an important target for prevention. We investigated, in a primary healthcare setting, differentiated levels of prevention efforts directed at the propensity of the patient to change his/her sun habits, sun protection behaviour, and attitudes, after information intervention. Additionally, the impact of the performance of a phototest to determine individual sun sensitivity was evaluated. Methods: 308 patients visiting a primary healthcare centre in southern Sweden completed a questionnaire concerning sun habits, sun protection behaviour, and attitudes, and were randomized into one of three groups, representing increasing levels of prevention effort in terms of resources. Feedback on their questionnaire and general preventive sun protection advice was given, in the first group by means of a letter, and in the second and third groups by a doctor's consultation. Group 3 also underwent a phototest, with a self-reading assessment and a written follow-up of the phototest result. Change of sun habits, behaviour, and attitudes, based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change and on Likert scale scorings, was evaluated after 6 months, by a repeated questionnaire. Results: Prevention mediated by a doctor's consultation had a clearly better impact on the subjects. The addition of a phototest did not further reinforce this effect in the group as a whole, but it did for a subgroup of individuals with high ultraviolet (UV) sensitivity, as determined by the phototest itself, suggesting that this might actually be a tool to improve outcome in this high-risk group. Conclusion: A personal doctor's consultation is a valuable tool in the effective delivery of preventive information in the general practice setting. In individuals with high UV-sensitivity and thus high risk for skin cancer the performance of a photo-test reinforces a positive outcome in habits, behaviour and attitudes.

  • 22.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Reliability of self-assessed reading of skin tests: A possible approach in research and clinical practice?2010In: Dermatologi Online, ISSN 1087-2108, E-ISSN 1087-2108, Vol. 16, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the investigation and management of skin disease, various testing protocols are of importance. The extent to which clinical judgments and decisions on therapy are supported by the performance of such testing can be affected negatively by the lack of time and resources for the performance of tests. In the present study, the possibility of utilizing self-reporting by subjects is investigated. Determination of irritation threshold for sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and minimal erythema dose for ultraviolet B were chosen as suitable self-reading protocols. Test reading by 26 subjects instructed in "present" or "absent" reporting of test reactions were compared to trained observer reading. Absolute agreement was found in 76.9 percent of the SLS reactions and in 85 percent of the UVB reactions. Weighted Kappa for the agreement between observations showed values of 0.76 for the SLS reactions and 0.83 for UVB reactions. We conclude that use of the protocols here studied, and other test protocols modified to accommodate a binomial assessment outcome ("+" or "-"), could well lead to an increase in the performance of skin testing. This could be a qualitative advantage for diagnosis and management of skin diseases. Additionally, population studies and even prevention initiatives could be facilitated. © 2010 Dermatology Online Journal.

  • 23.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Ilias, Michail
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Inter-observer variability in reading of phototest reactions with sharply or diffusely delineated borders2008In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 397-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In both clinical and experimental phototesting, naked eye assessment of erythema has been the main assessment parameter. As with all subjective assessment, variability in recorded results due to variable circumstances around the performance and reading of tests influences reliability and utility of data whether they be interpreted for an individual patient or for a group of research subjects.

    Methods: In the present study, variability in the reporting of diameter of ultraviolet B (UVB) erythema has been studied. The erythematous reactions were assessed by the naked eye and with the help of a millimetre-graded ruler by a group of dermatologists and dermatological trainees. Reaction size, objectively quantified by means of laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) using thresholding of the reaction perfusion, and known size of UVB provocation were used as yardsticks in order to quantify this variability.

    Results: Agreement between observers, against known size, was excellent for reactions with a sharp border, but for reactions with a diffuse or indistinct border there was a substantial inter-observer variability. This was also true for the comparison between naked-eye reading and LDPI assessment of the reaction size.

    Conclusion: It is concluded that if naked-eye readings are to be the outcome measurement, then provocations/protocols producing distinct borders are an advantage. If borders between provoked and unprovoked skin can be expected to be diffuse, i.e. part of a continuum of response, the use of objective, bioengineering techniques such as LDPI is required. Quantitative methods are also the basis for more detailed presentation and interpretation of test results including information on dose response above the minimal erythema dose.

  • 24.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ilias, Michail
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Phototesting with a divergent UVB beam in the investigation of anti-inflammatory effects of topically applied substances2003In: Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, ISSN 0905-4383, E-ISSN 1600-0781, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 195-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Phototesting based on a single exposure to a divergent ultraviolet B (UVB) beam with radially decreasing UVB doses can be used to determine an individual's minimal erythema dose (MED). Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) data can be combined with dosimetry data to produce objective dose–response plots in addition to the MED. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the divergent beam protocol could be used to demonstrate and quantify the anti-inflammatory effects of clobetasol diproprionate (Dermovate®), pharmaceutical-grade acetone and a gel vehicle, applied after skin provocation by UVB.

    Method: Sixteen Caucasian subjects were illuminated with the divergent beam on three areas close together on the left side of their upper backs. Two of the provoked areas on each subject were treated with acetone, gel vehicle or Dermovate®, and one area was left untreated as a control. Skin blood perfusion was assessed 6 and 24 h after UVB illumination using LDPI. The reaction diameter, the mean perfusion, and the average dose–response plots for each group and treatment were extracted from the LDPI data.

    Results: Application of the topical steroid clobetasol diproprionate after UVB provocation markedly decreased the inflammatory response. Acetone and the gel vehicle also showed mild anti-inflammmatory effects in two of the parameters but not for the mean perfusion response. The mean diameter differences between controls and treated reactions had predominantly positive 99% confidence intervals. Analysis of the dose–response data at doses higher than the MED showed a linear relationship (0.89≤R2≤0.98) for all reactions but with lower gradients in treated reactions, mostly marked for clobetasol diproprionate.

    Conclusions:  The divergent beam protocol can be used to demonstrate and quantify the effects of topical agents on the UVB reaction, in terms of reaction diameter, mean perfusion and changes in dose–response characteristics. The dose–response approach seems to be applicable even in diagnostic testing of an individual patient's response to UVB.

  • 25.
    Fernando, Germain J. P.
    et al.
    Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Australia.
    Hickling, Julian
    Working Tandem Ltd, England.
    Flores, Cesar M. Jayashi
    Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Australia.
    Griffin, Paul
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Australia; Q Pharm Pry Ltd, Australia; Mater Hosp, Australia; Mater Res Inst, Australia; Univ Queensland, Australia.
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Heart and Med Ctr, Sweden.
    Skinner, S. Rachel
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Childrens Hosp Westmead, Australia.
    Davies, Cristyn
    Univ Sydney, Australia; Childrens Hosp Westmead, Australia.
    Witham, Katey
    Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Australia.
    Pryor, Melinda
    360Biolabs Pry Ltd, Australia.
    Bodle, Jesse
    Seqirus Pty Ltd, Australia.
    Rockman, Steve
    Seqirus Pty Ltd, Australia; Univ Melbourne, Australia.
    Frazer, Ian H.
    Not Found:[Fernando, Germain J. P.; Flores, Cesar M. Jayashi; Witham, Katey; Forster, Angus H.] Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia; [Hickling, Julian] Working Tandem Ltd, Cambridge, England; [Griffin, Paul] QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Griffin, Paul] Q Pharm Pry Ltd, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Griffin, Paul] Mater Hosp, Dept Med and Infect Dieases, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Griffin, Paul] Mater Res Inst, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Griffin, Paul] Univ Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia; [Anderson, Christopher D.] Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin and Expt Med, Fac Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden; [Anderson, Christopher D.] Heart and Med Ctr, Dept Dermatol and Venereol, Region Ostergotland, Sweden; [Skinner, S. Rachel; Davies, Cristyn] Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch, Discipline Child and Adolescent Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia; [Skinner, S. Rachel; Davies, Cristyn] Childrens Hosp Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia; [Pryor, Melinda] 360Biolabs Pry Ltd, Burnet Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; [Bodle, Jesse; Rockman, Steve] Seqirus Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; [Rockman, Steve] Univ Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;.
    Forster, Angus H.
    Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Australia.
    Safety, tolerability, acceptability and immunogenicity of an influenza vaccine delivered to human skin by a novel high-density microprojection array patch (Nanopatch (TM))2018In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 36, no 26, p. 3779-3788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Injection using needle and syringe (Namp;S) is the most widely used method for vaccination, but requires trained healthcare workers. Fear of needles, risk of needle-stick injury, and the need to reconstitute lyophilised vaccines, are also drawbacks. The Nanopatch (NP) is a microarray skin patch comprised of a high-density array of microprojections dry-coated with vaccine that is being developed to address these shortcomings. Here we report a randomised, partly-blinded, placebo-controlled trial that represents the first use in humans of the NP to deliver a vaccine. Methods: Healthy volunteers were vaccinated once with one of the following: (1) NPs coated with split inactivated influenza virus (A/California/07/2009 [H1N1], 15 mu g haemagglutinin (HA) per dose), applied to the volar forearm (NP-HAIFA), n = 15; (2) NPs coated with split inactivated influenza virus (A/California/07/2009 11-11N1 I, 15 mu g HA per dose), applied to the upper arm (NP-HA/UA), n = 15; (3) Fluvaxe (R) 2016 containing 15 mu g of the same H1N1 HA antigen injected intramuscularly (IM) into the deltoid (IM-HA/D), n = 15; (4) NPs coated with excipients only, applied to the volar forearm (NP-placebo/FA), n = 5; (5) NPs coated with excipients only applied to the upper arm (NP-placebo/UA), n = 5; or (6) Saline injected IM into the deltoid (IM-placebo/D), n = 5. Antibody responses at days 0, 7, and 21 were measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and microneutralisation (MN) assays. Findings: NP vaccination was safe and acceptable; all adverse events were mild or moderate. Most subjects (55%) receiving patch vaccinations (HA or placebo) preferred the NP compared with their past experience of IM injection with Namp;S (preferred by 24%). The antigen-vaccinated groups had statistically higher HAI titres at day 7 and 21 compared with baseline (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no statistical differences between the treatment groups (p amp;gt; 0.05), although the group sizes were small. The geometric mean HAI titres at day 21 for the NP-HA/FA, NP-HA/UA and IM-HA/D groups were: 335 (189-593 95% CI), 160 (74-345 95% CI), and 221 (129-380 95% CI) respectively. A similar pattern of responses was seen with the MN assays. Application site reactions were mild or moderate, and more marked with the influenza vaccine NPs than with the placebo or IM injection. Interpretation: Influenza vaccination using the NP appeared to be safe, and acceptable in this first time in humans study, and induced similar immune responses to vaccination by IM injection. (C) 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 26.
    Fredriksson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ilias, Michail
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    New mechanical device for effective removal of skin tags in routine health care2009In: Dermatologi Online, ISSN 1087-2108, E-ISSN 1087-2108, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin tags (acrochordons) are exceedingly common benign skin lesions. A novel medical device in the form of a flat adhesive patch applies pressure to the base of a skin tag, leading to its removal within 3-6 days. The device was used in a clinical trial to treat and remove skin tags of the neck, upper torso, and axillae in volunteers. In this study, a total of 177 skin tags were treated in 32 individuals. One hundred seventy-two lesions fulfilled intention to treat (ITT) criteria. A majority of ITT lesions (90%) reached final assessment. Successful outcome was highest (90%) for lesions up to 1 mm in base. For lesions up to 2 mm, the rate of successful outcome was 76 percent. The desired outcome was seen in 65 percent of all ITT lesions. The cosmetic outcome after removal was excellent. Discomfort was assessed as minimal during all stages of the procedure. Analysis of data on blood flow in the skin tags during the treatment showed that the outcome was influenced by whether a decrease in blood flow was achieved immediately after application and at 2-3 days, but that the degree of occlusion was not critical. The results of this study illustrate that the device presents a new option for the management of unmet needs in the treatment of skin tags.

  • 27. Fullerton, A
    et al.
    Stücker, M
    Wilhelm, K-P
    Wårdell, K
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Fischer, T
    Nilsson, GE
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Guidelines for visualization of cutaneous blood flow by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. A report from the Standardization Group of the European Society of Contact Dermatitis* based upon the HIRELADO European community project2002In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report reviews how to set up a laser Doppler perfusion imaging system intended for visualization of skin blood perfusion, capture images and evaluate the results obtained. A brief summary of related papers published in the literature within the areas of skin irritant and allergy patch testing, microdialysis and skin tumour circulation is presented, as well as early applications within other fields such as diabetology, wound healing and microvascular research. ⌐ Blackwell Munksgaard, 2002.

  • 28.
    Furubacke, A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Lack of significant treatment effect of plasma exchange in the treatment of drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis? 1999In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 25, p. 1307-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Geusens, B
    et al.
    Mollet, I
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Terras, S
    Roberts, M S
    Lambert, J
    Changes in skin immunity with age and disease2010In: The Innate Immune System of Skin and Oral Mucosa: Properties and Impact in Pharmaceutics, Cosmetics and Personal Care Products / [ed] Nava Dayan and Philip Wertz, Wiley , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An in-depth look at cutting-edge research on the body's innate immune system

    Innate immunity is the body's first line of protection against potential microbial, viral, and environmental attacks, and the skin and oral mucosa are two of the most powerful barriers that which we rely on to stay well. The definitive book on the subject, Innate Immune System of Skin and Oral Mucosa: Properties and Impact in Pharmaceutics, Cosmetics, and Personal Care Products provides a comprehensive overview of these systems, including coverage of antimicrobial peptides and lipids and microbial challenges and stressors that can influence innate immunity.

    Designed to help experts and newcomers alike in fields like dermatology, oral pathology, cosmetics, personal care, and pharmaceuticals, the book is filled with suggestions to assist research and development. Looking at the many challenges facing the innate immune system, including the impact of topically applied skin products and medications, Innate Immune System of Skin and Oral Mucosa paves the way for next generation treatment avenues, preventative approaches, and drug development.

  • 30.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lassus, J.
    Sterisol AB, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Eklund, J.
    Sterisol AB, Vadstena, Sweden.
    Lassus, S.
    Cosmetox AB, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Avoidance of dermal exposure to preservatives by packaging2010In: JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY, vol 62, issue 6, pp 802-802, Pharmaceutical Press , 2010, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 802-802Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dermal exposure to chemicals in cosmetics and hygiene products (e.g. moisturising creams, soaps, shampoos) is increasingly recognized as an important area for risk assessment and regulation. The contents of such products is regulated by classification of exposure types (e.g. stay on/wash off) and regulatory concepts based on toxicological studies and manufacturing or market experience. Positive lists, negative lists or establishment of recommendations on concentration and exposure form a basis for consumer safety. Common problem areas are perfumes, preservatives and the formation of oxidation products after manufacture.

    A new patented system, suitable for packages from 100 ml to 5 l, with collapsible plastic bags and unique dosage valves prevents bacteria and air from entering the packaging. Thus the use of preservatives can be avoided.

    This may lead to a reduced risk of individual reactions to specific preservatives as well as cross-allergy reactions. The consumer no longer needs to hunt for strange names on small ingredient labels. Also, it could prevent the prospective development of allergy. The avoidance of oxidation products is another advantage.

  • 31.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    The polarization scectroscopic camera allows assessment of vasoconstriction after topical application of clobetasol2007In: 16th congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hillman, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Milos, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhengquan, Yu
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjögren, Florence
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Pekka
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Intracerebral microdialysis in neurosurgical intensive care patients utilising catheters with different molecular cut-off (20 and 100 kD)2006In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 148, no 3, p. 319-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To compare the properties of a new intracerebral micro-dialysis catheter with a high cut-off membrane (molecular cut-off 100 kDalton) with a standard catheter (CMA70, molecular cut-off 20 kDalton).

    Methods. Paired intracerebral microdialysis catheters were inserted in fifteen comatose patients treated in a neurosurgical intensive care unit following subarachnoid haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury. The high-cut-off catheter (D100) differed from the CMA 70 catheter by the length (20 mm) and cut-off properties of the catheter membranes (100 kDalton) and the perfusion fluids used (Ringer-Dextran 60). Samples were collected every 4–6 hours, analyzed bedside (for glucose, glutamate, glycerol, lactate, pyruvate and urea) and later in the laboratory (for total protein).

    Results. Fluid recovery was similar for the two types of catheters, but significantly more protein was recovered by the D100 catheter. The recovery of glycerol and pyruvate did not differ, while minor differences in recovery of glutamate and glucose were observed. The recovery of lactate was considerably lower in the D100 catheter (p < 0.01), influencing the lactate/pyruvate-ratio. The patterns of concentration changes over time were consistent for all metabolites, and independent of type of catheter.

    Conclusion. Microdialysis catheters with high cut-off membranes can be used in routine clinical practice in the NSICU, adding the possibility of macro-molecule sampling from the extracellular space during monitoring.

  • 33.
    Hillman, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Åneman, Oscar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Persson, Mikael
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Dabrosin, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Mellergård, Pekka
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Variations in the response of interleukins in neurosurgical intensive care patients monitored using intracerebral microdialysis2007In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 106, no 5, p. 820-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object. The aim of this study was to make a preliminary evaluation of whether microdialysis monitoring of cytokines and other proteins in severely diseased neurosurgical patients has the potential of adding significant information to optimize care, thus broadening the understanding of the function of these molecules in brain injury. Methods. Paired intracerebral microdialysis catheters with high-cutoff membranes were inserted in 14 comatose patients who had been treated in a neurosurgical intensive care unit following subarachnoidal hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury. Samples were collected every 6 hours (for up to 7 days) and were analyzed at bedside for routine metabolites and later in the laboratory for interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6, in two patients, vascular endothelial growth factor and cathepsin-D were also checked. Aggregated microprobe data gave rough estimations of profound focal cytokine responses related to morphological tissue injury and to anaerobic metabolism that were not evident from the concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid data. Data regarding tissue with no macroscopic evidence of injury demonstrated that IL release not only is elicited in severely compromised tissue but also may be a general phenomenon in brains subjected to stress. Macroscopic tissue injury was strongly linked to IL-6 but not IL-1b activation. Furthermore, IL release seems to be stimulated by local ischemia. The basal tissue concentration level of IL-1b was estimated in the range of 10 to 150 pg/ml, for IL-6, the corresponding figure was 1000 to 20,000 pg/ml. Conclusions. Data in the present study indicate that catheters with high-cutoff membranes have the potential of expanding microdialysis to the study of protein chemistry as a routine bedside method in neurointensive care.

  • 34.
    Häggblad, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ilias, Michail A.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A diffuse reflectance spectroscopic study of UV-induced erythematous reaction across well-defined borders in human skin2010In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 283-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction The colour of tissue is often of clinicaluse in the diagnosis of tissue homeostasis andphysiological responses to various stimuli.Determining tissue colour changes and borders,however, often poses an intricate problem and visualexamination, constituting clinical praxis, does notallow them to be objectively characterized orquantified. Demands for increased inter- and intraobserverreproducibility have been incentives for theintroduction of objective methods and techniques fortissue colour (e.g. erythema) evaluation. The aim ofthe present paper was to study the border zone of anUVB provoked erythematous response of humanskin in terms of blood volume and oxygenationmeasured by means of diffuse reflectancespectroscopy using a commercial probe.

    Material and Methods A provocation model, basedon partial masking of irradiated skin areas, definestwo erythema edges at every skin site responding tothe UV irradiation. In every subject, 5 test sites wereexposed with a constant UV light irradiance (14mW/cm2), but with different exposures times (0, 3,6, 9, 12 seconds). An analysis of the spectral datameasured across the two edges was performed for every scan line. The oxygenized and deoxygenizedhemoglobin contents were estimated in everymeasurement point, using a modified Beer-Lambertmodel.

    Results The fit of the experimental data to the model derived by the modified Beer-Lambert law was excellent (R2>0.95). Analyzing data for the chromophore content showed that the erythematous response in provoked areas is dominated by the increase in oxyhemoglobin. The width for the left and right border zone was estimated to 1.81±0.93 mm and 1.90±0.88 mm respectively (M±SD). The unprovoked area between the two edges was estimated to 0.77±0.68 mm.

    Conclusion While the chosen data analysis performed satisfactory, the ability of the probe design to differentiate spatial aspects of a reaction with abrupt borders was found to be suboptimal resulting in a probable overestimation of the erythematous edge slope. Probe modification or imaging are possible solutions.

  • 35.
    Häggblad, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Petersson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Ilias, Michail
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    A spectroscopic study of the borders of UV-induced skin erythema2003In: International Congress for Bioengineering and the Skin. Congress of the International Society for Skin Imaging,2003, 2003, p. 180-181Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Ilias, Michail A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Single exposure phototesting utilizing a divergent ultraviolet beam1999In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 255-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: Confident diagnosis of photosensitivity in patients with light dermatoses requires skin exposure to well determined ultraviolet (UV) light doses, most often from a solar simulator. The traditional test procedure results in a rough classification of skin sensitivity based on the minimal erythema dose (MED) found for each patient. The limited number of constant irradiance doses used during phototesting decreases the precision of the MED value. In the present study we aimed at developing the technical system for the determination of MED by using a single, centrifugally attenuating, UVB provocation.

    Methods: A divergent UV beam was achieved with the help of an optic lens. To investigate the irradiance profile, an irradiance acquisition system was built that produced three-dimensional intensity maps. In addition, a laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) system was introduced in the evaluation of the skin response along with visual readings of the same exposed areas, in order to add a quantitative aspect to the assessment of erythema. The procedure was used on one test subject.

    Results: The divergent UV beam showed the desired profile. With the current setup 20 different UV-dose levels could be discriminated. Relevant UV-dose levels were determined and tested on a subject, which in practice gave results in the form of visual assessment as well as LDPI-images. The visual or LDPI diameter gave the MED. Within the skin reaction, irradiance and the laser Doppler values could be compared mm for mm.

    Conclusions: A more accurate MED determination with a single UV exposure seems to be feasible by using the proposed method. Though further investigation is required, the technique appears to offer new possibilities for the association of dose to response. In addition LDPI is possibly a useful complement to the visual readings of the skin responses, since the method gives a quantification of the grade of erythema, as opposed to visual (+, ++, +++) readings that are subjective and at best semiquantitative.

  • 37.
    Ilias, Michail A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Häggblad, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visible, Hyperspectral Imaging Evaluating the Cutaneous Response to Ultraviolet Radiation2007In: Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues V / [ed] Daniel L. Farkas; Robert C. Leif; Dan V. Nicolau, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2007, p. 644103-1-644103-12Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In vivo diagnostics of skin diseases as well as understanding of the skin biology constitute a field demanding characterization of physiological and anatomical parameters. Biomedical optics has been successfully used, to qualitatively and quantitatively estimate the microcirculatory conditions of superficial skin. Capillaroscopy, laser Doppler techniques and spectroscopy, all elucidate different aspects of microcirculation, e.g. capillary anatomy and distribution, tissue perfusion and hemoglobin oxygenation. We demonstrate the use of a diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging system for spatial and temporal characterization of tissue oxygenation, important to skin viability. The system comprises: light source, liquid crystal tunable filter, camera objective, CCD camera, and the decomposition of the spectral signature into relative amounts of oxy- and deoxygenized hemoglobin as well as melanin in every pixel resulting in tissue chromophore images. To validate the system, we used a phototesting model, creating a graded inflammatory response of a known geometry, in order to evaluate the ability to register spatially resolved reflectance spectra. The obtained results demonstrate the possibility to describe the UV inflammatory response by calculating the change in tissue oxygen level, intimately connected to a tissue's metabolism. Preliminary results on the estimation of melanin content are also presented.

  • 38.
    Ilias, Michail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Single exposure phototesting: an adaptation to the CIE erythema action spectrum2002In: Proceedings on the 2nd European Medical and Biological Conference, 2002, p. 964-967Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In single exposure, divergent beam phototesting, an originally collimated ultraviolet beam is diverged by an optkal lens to give a circular ultraviolet light field with attenuating irradiance towards its periphery. The chromatic aberration, caused by the lens, and its influence on the erythemal effectiveness of the field has been investigated. Spectral measurements (250-400 nm) were performed along the 20 mm radius of the field in steps of 1 mm. The corresponding erythemal effectiveness was calculated after adjustment of the spectral irradiance according to the erythema action spectrum recommended by the Commission Internationale de l' Éclairage (CIE). The erythemal effectiveness of the irradiance field attenuated towards the periphery and stabilized at about 80% of the maximum value at the centre. Knowledge of this is important for dosimetry in skin photobiology and data interpretation. The divergent beam method was used in parallel with the traditional method on three volunteers.

  • 39.
    Ilias, Michail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Phototesting based on a divergent beam: a study on normal subjects2001In: Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, ISSN 0905-4383, E-ISSN 1600-0781, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous publication from our group, phototesting based on a single exposure to a divergent UVB beam with radially decreasing irradiance values was suggested. The aim of the present study was to evaluate technical, practical and biological aspects of the suggested method in normal subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers were provoked on the back with both a collimated beam (four fixed doses, in circular areas with a diameter of 1.5 cm) and the divergent beam (a continuous, radially attenuating dose spectrum covering an area with a diameter of 4.5 cm). Eleven of the subjects were subjected to double provocation with the divergent beam. Assessment was carried out at 6 and 24 h after exposure by measuring the diameter of the reactions both visually and by mapping the skin blood flow change with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI). Minimal erythemal dose (MED) was determined for both the collimated and the divergent provocation. The reaction diameters were used to decide MED by combination to a mm for mm mapped dose spectrum of the divergent beam profile. Dose-response curves were plotted using the quantitative response data of the LDPI-images against the corresponding dosimetry data. No systematic difference could be proven between LDPI and visual diameters and a 95% confidence interval for the mean difference was calculated to (-0.8, 2.0). Slightly greater diameters were found at the visual assessment performed at 6 h compared to 24 h (95% confidence interval (-0.1, 2.8)). Double provocation showed a good reproducibility both for the visual and the LDPI assessment (P<0.05). The divergent beam provocation allowed a more detailed discrimination of MED compared to the collimated beam provocation. The MED values determined with the divergent beam were, however, generally higher, especially in the lower range of MED values. Technical factors related to the beam divergence and the correct measurement of erythemal effective irradiance are believed to be the explanation for this phenomenon, which is thus correctable. In conclusion, the results from this study support our belief that the phototesting protocol based on a divergent beam constitutes a good opportunity for improved phototesting, since MED and dose-response characteristics may be extracted in more detail from a single UV exposure.

  • 40.
    Ilias, Michail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stücker, M.
    Department of Dermatology, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salerud, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of pigmented skin lesions in terms of blood perfusion estimates2004In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a disease of increasing clinical and economical importance. The prognosis is good with early diagnosis. The chief differential diagnosis is benign melanocytic naevus, a common lesion in Caucasians. Attempts have been made to use bioengineering techniques to aid in the initial diagnosis. The present study proposes a method of extracting possibly discriminative blood perfusion properties in pigmented skin lesions by combining information on the lesions' blood perfusion with optical or visual information of their spatial extent.

    Methods: A total of 46 blood perfusion measurements were performed on 22 pigmented skin lesions, the ultimate diagnosis of which was three histologically proven malignant melanomas, four histologically proven benign naevi and fifteen naevi assessed by two specialist dermatologists as being benign. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging gave two different types of two-dimensional data sets (64×64 pixels), one representing the total backscattered light intensity at each measurement point (TLI image) and the second corresponding to perfusion values. The boundaries of each examined lesion were derived from the TLI image employing greyscale thresholding, thus resulting in an estimated region of interest (ROI) approximating the optical extent of the lesion. The ROI was superimposed on the perfusion image and extraction of perfusion features was then performed.

    Results: The processing of the TLI images was successful in delineating the lesions' boundaries. The first hypothesis that the mean perfusion quotients in MM and benign naevi are equal could not be rejected at the chosen 5% level of significance. The second hypothesis that the mean percent-age of elevated perfusion values (image pixels) within the ROI shows no difference between MM and benign naevi could be rejected at a 5% level of significance.

    Conclusions: This study has presented a method of extracting blood perfusion parameters of pigmented skin lesions by combining blood perfusion information with information on the lesion's optical extent. The proposed method of presenting data could prove to be a useful discriminative adjunct in the assessment of pigmented skin lesions.

  • 41. Indurain, A
    et al.
    Anderson, Chris D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Uremic klåda2010In: Incitament, ISSN 1103-503XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Indurain, Ainhoa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Andersson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Uremisk klåda och mikrodialys - ett forskningsprojekt.2010In: Incitament, ISSN 1103-503X, Vol. 19, p. 66-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Indurain, Ainhoa
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Fernström, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Klåda hos dialyspatienter2007In: Dialäsen : tidningen för personal inom njursjukvård, ISSN 1104-4616, Vol. 3, p. 47-50Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Uremisk klåda är ett stort problem hos patienter med avancerad njursvikt. En enkätstudie på dialyspatienter visade att omfattningen av problemet var större än förväntat. Att tillfredställande behandla uremisk klåda är svårt och många olika behandlingsalternativ finns. Den enda behandlingen som är riktigt effektiv är njurtransplantation.

  • 44.
    Leahy, Martin J.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick Limerick, Ireland.
    O'Doherty, Jim
    Department of Physics, University of Limerick Limerick, Ireland.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    A new method for visualizing red blood cell content in the microcirculation2007In: Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging, ISSN 1605-7422, E-ISSN 1042-4687Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 45.
    Lindén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    High resolution laser Doppler perfusion imaging for visualization of skin circulation changes after microdialysis probe insertion1996In: World Congress for Microcirculation,1996, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46. Lindén, Maria
    et al.
    Andersson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Is vascular reactivity in skin predictable?2000In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 27-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: Cutaneous microdialysis can be used to follow the pharmacology and metabolism of an inflammatory reaction. It is assumed that an equilibration period compensates for the trauma of catheter insertion. Methods: In the present paper, the vascular reactivity of the skin to histamine was tested using assessment by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. In a group of six subjects, the provocation was preceded by insertion of a microdialysis catheter. In a second control group, histamine provocation alone was performed (six subjects). Results: The vascular response to histamine was greater in the microdialysis catheter group than the control group. The histamine provocation caused a greater response than catheter insertion. Further, there was a correlation between the response to catheter insertion and the histamine provocation. Conclusion: It appears that the insertion and/or presence of a microdialysis catheter increases vascular reactivity to subsequent provocation. The response to catheter insertion may predict skin reactivity in general in the individual subject. (C) Munksgaard, 2000.

  • 47.
    Lindén, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Andersson, T
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    High resolution laser Doppler perfusion imaging for the investigation of blood circulatory changes after microdialysis probe insertion1997In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 3, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Lodén, M
    et al.
    Andersson, A-C
    Andersson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Frödin, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Öhman, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Lindberg, M
    Instrumental and dermatologist evaluation of the effect of glycerine and urea on dry skin in atopic dermatitis2001In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 209-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/aims: Moisturising creams are useful treatment adjuncts in inflammatory dermatoses and have beneficial effects in the treatment of dry, scaly skin. The effects on dryness and skin permeability of a new moisturising cream with 20% glycerine was compared with its placebo and with a medicinally authorised cream with 4% urea (combined with 4% sodium chloride) in the treatment of dry skin. Methods: Patients (n=109) with atopic dermatitis were treated for 30 days with a moisturiser in a randomised, parallel and double-blind fashion. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance were assessed instrumentally, and changes in the dryness of the skin were assessed by the dermatologist. Results: No difference in TEWL was found between glycerine treatment and its placebo, whereas a lower value was found in the urea-treated area compared to the glycerine-treated area. No difference in skin capacitance was found. The clinical assessment of dryness showed urea to be superior to glycerine in treating the condition. Conclusions: Moisturising creams are different, not only with respect to composition but also with respect to their influence on skin as a barrier to water in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  • 49.
    Magnusson, B.M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Intra- and inter-individual variability in the development of erythema after application of methyl nicotinate evaluated by polarization spectroscopy imaging2010In: JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY, vol 62, issue 6, pp 801-801, ISSN: 002-3573, Pharmaceutical Press , 2010, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 801-801Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept that the time to onset of erythema after the application of the rubefacient and urticant substance methyl nicotinate (MN) indicates skin barrier competence was introduced 30 years ago. MN produces a dose-dependent erythema on topical application to intact skin, the nature of which is known to be fast moving (in the order of minutes) and variable. Using tissue viability imaging (TiVi) the time course and degree of the reaction can be conveniently followed and analysed. Inter-individual variability can be quite marked but intra-individual variability is less pronounced. At the upper end of provocation (higher doses, more sensitive individuals) urtication can occur, which decreases blood flow by increasing pressure on and thus emptying capillaries. The TiVi system can quantitate urtication and inherent (blanched) skin colour. The utility of MN application in the study of individual barrier function and microvascular reactivity is increased by the use of the TiVi system for collection and analysis of data.

  • 50. Magnusson, BM.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    The polarization spectroscopy camera - a promising tool for assessment of erythemateous reactions to topically applied agents2006In: La Grande Motte,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 82
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf