liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 127
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Alm, I
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Persson, U.B
    Dahlgren, L.O
    Gillström, Å
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Ausmeel, Heino
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Metakognitiv utveckling (Metacognitive development)1988Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Arnett, Anett
    et al.
    University of Denver, CO, USA.
    Pennington, Bruce
    University of Denver, CO, USA.
    Friend, Angela
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, Boulder and Linköping university.
    The SWAN captures variance at the negative and positive ends of the ADHD Symptom dimension2013In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 152-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behavior (SWAN) Rating Scale differs from previous parent reports of ADHD in that it was designed to also measure variability at the positive end of the symptom spectrum. Method: The psychometric properties of the SWAN were tested and compared with an established measure of ADHD, the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale (DBRS). Results: The SWAN demonstrates comparable validity, reliability, and heritability to the DBRS. Furthermore, plots of the SWAN and DBRS reveal heteroscedasticity, which supports the SWAN as a preferred measure of positive attention and impulse regulation behaviors. Conclusion: The ability of the SWAN to measure additional variance at the adaptive end of the ADHD symptom dimensions makes it a promising tool for behavioral genetic studies of ADHD.

  • 3.
    Arnett, Anne
    et al.
    University of Denver, USA.
    Pennington, Bruce
    University of Denver, USA.
    Willcutt, Erik
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Dmitrieva, Julia
    University of Denver, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Armidale, Australia .
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    A cross-lagged model of the development of ADHD inattention symptoms and rapid naming speed2012In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1313-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research has identified contemporaneous associations between cognitive deficits and symptom phenotypes in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, no studies have as yet attempted to identify direction of effect. The present study used cross-lagged path modeling to examine competing hypotheses about longitudinal associations between rapid naming speed and symptoms of inattention in children. 1,506 school-age twins from Australia and the U.S. were tested for inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and rapid naming speed at three and four time points, respectively. Symptom severity of inattention from Kindergarten to fourth grade is consistently predicted by previous rapid naming, over and above auto-regressive and correlational associations in the model. Likewise, inattention symptoms have a small but significant predictive effect on subsequent rapid naming. The findings support a reciprocal relationship between naming speed and ADHD inattentive symptoms.

  • 4.
    Brian, Byrne
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Khlentzos, Drew
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado at Boulder.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Evolutionary and genetic perspectives on educational attainment2010In: International handbook of psychology in education / [ed] Karen Littleton; Clare Wood; Judith Kleine Staarman, Bingley: Emerald Publishing Limited , 2010, 1, p. 3-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "The International Handbook of Psychology in Education" provides researchers, practitioners and advisers working in the fields of psychology and education with an overview of cutting-edge research across a broad spectrum of work within the domain of psychology of education. The chapters in the handbook are authored by internationally recognised researchers, from across Europe, North America and the Pacific Rim. As well as covering the latest thinking within established areas of enquiry, the handbook includes chapters on recently emerging, yet important, topics within the field and explicitly considers the inter-relationship between theory and practice. A strong unifying theme is the volume's emphasis on processes of teaching and learning. The work discussed in the handbook focuses on typically developing school-age children, although issues relating to specific learning difficulties are also addressed.

  • 5.
    Bylund, Bengt
    et al.
    Västerviks sjukhus.
    Cervin, Torsten
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mård, Selina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sandstedt, Per
    Wärngård, Olof
    Very low birth weight children at 9 years:  School performance and behaviour in relation to risk factors2000In: Prenatal and Neonatal Medicine, ISSN 1359-8635, E-ISSN 1473-0774, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 124-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To investigate the school performance and behavior of very low-birth-weight children in comparison with controls, and relate the findings to risk factors.

    Methods All children with birth weight below 1501 g (VLBW) and normal birth weight (NBW) controls, born in the south-east region of Sweden during a 15-month period in 1987-88, were enrolled in a prospective follow-up study; 81 % (n = 70) and 82% (n = 72), respectively, were re-examined at the age of 9 years regarding growth, neurological status, neurofunctional classification and academic achievement tests (Raven's matrices, mathematics, vocabulary, reading ability). The need for special education at school was assessed and four behavioral problem scores were also assessed (hyperactivity, fine motor skills, gross motor skills, social skills). Children with known handicaps were not re-examined.

    Results VLBW children were shorter and lighter than controls, and differed from them with regard to neurological functional classification. As a group, they produced poorer results in all academic achievement tests except vocabulary, and also in two out of four behavioral subscales (hyperactivity and fine motor skills). When the comparison was restricted to children with normal Raven scores, almost all the differences disappeared. VLBW children had more reading difficulties but were less often than expected defined as dyslexic compared to NEW children.

  • 6.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Coventry, William L
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard K
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Willcutt, Erik G
    University of Colorado.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado.
    DeFries , John C
    University of Colorado.
    Genetic and environmental influences on aspects of literacy and language in early childhood: Continuity and change from preschool to Grade 22009In: JOURNAL OF NEUROLINGUISTICS, ISSN 0911-6044 , Vol. 22, no 3, p. 219-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early literacy and language skills of twin children in the USA, Australia, and Scandinavia were explored in a genetically sensitive design (maximum N = 615 pairs). For this article, we report aspects of preschool and Grade 2 data. In Grade 2, there were strong genetic influences on word reading, reading comprehension, and spelling. Vocabulary was about equally affected by genes and shared environment. Multivariate analyses indicated substantial genetic overlap among the Grade 2 literacy variables. Longitudinal analyses showed that genetic factors evident at the preschool stage continued to affect literacy and vocabulary three years later in Grade 2, but there was also evidence of new genetic factors coming into play over the time interval, at least for literacy. Suggestions are made about the search for underlying biological and cognitive processes, and educational implications are explored.

  • 7.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Coventry, William L.
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado.
    Wadsworth, Sally J.
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Petrill, Stephen A.
    Ohio State University.
    Willcutt, Erik G.
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Teacher Effects in Early Literacy Development: Evidence From a Study of Twins2010In: Journal of Educational Psychology, ISSN 0022-0663, E-ISSN 1939-2176, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 32-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often assumed that differences in teacher characteristics area major source of variability in childrens educational achievements. We examine this assumption for early literacy achievement by calculating the correlations between pairs of twin children who either shared or did not share a teacher in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. Teacher effects-or, more strictly, classroom effects-would show up as higher correlations for same-class than for different-class twin pairs. Same-class correlations were generally higher than different-class correlations.. though not significantly so on most occasions. On the basis of the results, we estimate that the maximum variance accounted for by being assigned to the same or different classrooms is 8%. This is an upper-bound figure for a teacher effect because factors other than teachers may contribute to variation attributable to classroom assignment. We discuss the limitations of the study and draw out some of its educational implications.

  • 8.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Coventry, William
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Willcutt, Erik
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    A behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding2008In: Journal of research in reading (Print), ISSN 0141-0423, E-ISSN 1467-9817, Vol. 31, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of a longitudinal twin study of literacy and language, we conducted a behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding in Grade 2 children (225 identical and 214 fraternal twin pairs) in the United States and Australia. Each variable showed significant genetic and unique environment influences. Multivariate analyses revealed very high genetic correlations among the variables, indicating that the same genes are involved in their aetiology. These genes are partly independent of those contributing to intelligence. A further analysis indicated that the covariation between decoding and orthographic learning is mediated by shared genes rather than by a direct causal path. The authors argue that a learning parameter, most directly assessed by orthographic learning in this study, underlies all three literacy variables. The results are also discussed in relation to Share's self-teaching hypothesis, which may require modification. © United Kingdom Literacy Association 2008.

  • 9.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    Department of Psychology University of New England.
    Delaland, Cara
    Department of Psychology University of New England.
    Fielding-Barnsley, Ruth
    Department of Psychology University of New England.
    Quain, Peter
    Department of Psychology University of New England.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Hoien, Torleiv
    Dysleksistiftelsen i Stavanger.
    Corley, Robin
    Institute for Behavioral Genetics Colorado University.
    DeFries, John. C
    Institute for Behavioral Genetics Colorado University.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    Institute for Behavioral Genetics Colorado university.
    Willcutt, Eric
    Department of Psychology Colorado university.
    Olson, Richard. K
    Department of Psychology Colorado university.
    Preliminary results from a longitudinal preschool twin study of early reading development2002In: Annals of Dyslexia, ISSN 0736-9387, E-ISSN 1934-7243, Vol. 52, p. 49-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The longitudinal perspective on developmental disorders2012In: Current issues in developmental disorders / [ed] Chloë R. Marshall, Hove: Psychology Press, 2012, 1, p. 73-92Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "Cognitive development in children is a highly complex process which, while remarkably resilient, can be disrupted in a variety of ways. This volume focuses on two types of neurodevelopmental disorder: syndromic conditions, such as fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Williams syndrome and Velocardiofacial syndrome; and non-syndromic conditions including dyslexia, specific language impairment, autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This book provides a state-of-the-art review of current research and covers key topics across the full range of developmental disorders. Topics covered include: diagnosis and comorbidity genetics longitudinal studies computational models distinguishing disorder from deprivation/delay language and culture the history of research into developmental disorders The book also looks at how the study of developmental disorders has contributed to our understanding of typical development, and themes emerge that are common across chapters, including intervention and education, and the neurobiological bases of developmental disorders. The result is a fascinating and thought-provoking volume that will be indispensable to advanced students, researchers and practitioners in the fields of developmental psychology, neuropsychology, speech and language therapy and other developmental disorders"-- 

  • 11.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    New England University, Australia.
    Olson, Richard
    Colorado university, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Hulslander, Jacqui
    Colorado University, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    Colorado university.
    Willcutt, Eric
    Colorado University, USA.
    DeFries, John
    Colroado University, USA.
    Learning-based and "static" measures in early literacy: A behavior-genetic analysis2006In: Scientific Studies of Reading,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 12.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard
    Univesity of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado.
    Corely, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Quain, Peter
    University of New England.
    Longitudinal twin study of literacy and language: The first three years2005In: Society for the Scientific Studies of Reading,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    DeFries, John. C
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Genetic and environmental influences on early literacy2006In: Journal of research in reading (Print), ISSN 0141-0423, E-ISSN 1467-9817, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prereading and early reading skills of preschool twin children in Australia, Scandinavia and the United States were explored in a genetically sensitive design (max. N = 627 preschool pairs and 422 kindergarten pairs). Analyses indicated a strong genetic influence on preschool phonological awareness, rapid naming and verbal memory. Print awareness, vocabulary and grammar/morphology were subject primarily to shared environment effects. There were significant genetic and shared environment correlations among the preschool traits. Kindergarten reading, phonological awareness and rapid naming were primarily affected by genes, and spelling was equally affected by genes and shared environment. Multivariate analyses revealed genetic and environmental overlap and independence among kindergarten variables. Longitudinal analyses showed genetic continuity as well as change in phonological awareness and rapid naming across the 2 years. Relations among the preschool variables of print awareness, phonological awareness and rapid naming and kindergarten reading were also explored in longitudinal analyses. Educational implications are discussed. © United Kingdom Literacy Association 2006.

  • 14.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Rickard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Exploring environmental influences on literacy development within a genetically sensitive research design: The case of teacher effects2007In: Scientific Studies of Reading,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 15.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    New England University, Australia.
    Quain, Peter
    New England University, Australia.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado.
    DeFries, John. C
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Longitudinal twin study of literacy and language-Recent findings and implications2004In: 8th Australian twin registry conference,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado at Boulder, USA.
    Dyslexia2014In: The Routledge international companion to educational psychology / [ed] Andrew Holliman, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 297-306Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of New England, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Reading and reading acquisition in European languages2014In: South and Southeast Asian psycholinguistics / [ed] Heather Winskel and Prakash Padakannaya, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Huslander, Jacqui
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Quain, Peter
    University of New England, Australia.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado.
    Longitudinal twin study of early literacy development: Preschool through Grade 12007In: Reading and writing, ISSN 0922-4777, E-ISSN 1573-0905, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 77-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grade 1 literacy skills of twin children in Australia (New South Wales) and the United States (Colorado) were explored in a genetically sensitive design (N = 319 pairs). Analyses indicated strong genetic influence on word and nonword identification, reading comprehension, and spelling. Rapid naming showed more modest, though reliable, genetic influence. Phonological awareness was subject to high nonshared environment and no reliable genetic effects, and individual measures of memory and learning were also less affected by genes than nonshared environment. Multivariate analyses showed that the same genes affected word identification, reading comprehension, and spelling. Country comparisons indicated that the patterns of genetic influence on reading and spelling in Grade 1 were similar, though for the U.S. but not the Australian children new genes came on stream in the move from kindergarten to Grade 1. We suggest that this is because the more intensive kindergarten literacy curriculum in New South Wales compared with Colorado, consistent with the mean differences between the two countries, means that more of the genes are "online" sooner in Australia because of accelerated overall reading development. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007.

  • 19.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Boehme, Kristi
    University of New England, USA.
    Coventry, William L
    University of New England, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado, USA.
    Multivariate genetic analysis of learning and early reading development2013In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 224-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic factor structure of a range of learning measures was explored in twin children, recruited in preschool and followed to Grade 2 (N = 2,084). Measures of orthographic learning and word reading were included in the analyses to determine how these patterned with the learning processes. An exploratory factor analysis of the genetic correlations among the variables indicated a three-factor model. Vocabulary tests loaded on the first factor, the Grade 2 measures of word reading and orthographic learning, plus preschool letter knowledge, loaded on the second, and the third was characterized by tests of verbal short-term memory. The three genetic factors correlated, with the second (print) factor showing the most specificity. We conclude that genetically influenced learning processes underlying print–speech integration, foreshadowed by preschool letter knowledge, have a degree of independence from genetic factors affecting spoken language. We also argue that the psychology and genetics of associative learning be afforded a more central place in studies of reading (dis)ability and suggest some links to molecular studies of the genetics of learning.

  • 20.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado.
    Boehme, Kristi
    University of New England.
    Talk, Andrew
    University of New England.
    Coventry, Will
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    How general are the genes that influence learning to read words?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Byrne, Brian
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Quain, Peter
    University of New England.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado.
    Willcutt, Erik
    University of Colorado.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado.
    Longitudinal twin study of early literacy development: Preschool and kindergarten phases2005In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 219-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conducted behavior-genetic analyses of kindergarten reading, spelling, phonological awareness, rapid naming, and spoken sentence processing in 172 pairs of monozygotic and 153 pairs of same-sex dizygotic twin kindergarten children sampled in the United States and Australia. We also modeled progress from preschool to kindergarten in literacy-related variables, with larger numbers of twins contributing to the preschool phase. Reading, phonological awareness, and rapid naming at kindergarten showed substantial effects of genes and modest effects of shared environment, spelling was influenced by genes and environment equally, and sentence processing was affected primarily by shared environment. Longitudinal analyses indicated that the same genes affect phonological awareness in preschool and kinder garten but that a new genetic factor comes into play in rapid naming as letters and digits are introduced in kindergarten. At preschool, print knowledge and phonological awareness share one source of genetic influence, which in turn affects reading and spelling in kindergarten. Phonological awareness is subject to a second genetic factor, but only the one it shares with print also influences kindergarten reading and spelling. In contrast to the genetic effects, a single source of shared environment affects preschool print knowledge and phonological awareness and kindergarten reading. The results are discussed in the context of theoretical and practical issues in literacy development. Copyright © 2005, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

  • 22.
    Christopher, Micaela
    et al.
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Keenan, Janice
    University of Denver, USA.
    Pennington, Bruce
    University of Denver, USA.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Willcutt, Eric
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    The genetic and environmental etiologies of individual differences in early reading growth in Australia, the United States and Scandinavia2013In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 453-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This first cross-country twin study of individual differences in reading growth from post-kindergarten to post-second grade analyzed data from 487 twin pairs from the United States, 267 twin pairs from Australia, and 280 twin pairs from Scandinavia. Data from two reading measures were fit to biometric latent growth models. Individual differences for the reading measures at post-kindergarten in the United States and Australia were due primarily to genetic influences and to both genetic and shared environmental influences in Scandinavia. In contrast, individual differences in growth generally had large genetic influences in all countries. These results suggest that genetic influences are largely responsible for individual differences in early reading development. In addition, the timing of the start of formal literacy instruction may affect the etiology of individual differences in early reading development but have only limited influence on the etiology of individual differences in growth.

  • 23.
    Christopher, Micaela
    et al.
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of New England, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Keenan, Janice
    University of Denver, USA.
    Pennington, Bruce
    University of Denver, USA.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Willcutt, Erik
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Genetic and environmental etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading2015In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 342-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored the environmental and genetic etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading and spelling. Twin pairs (n = 489) were assessed before kindergarten (M = 4.9 years), post-first grade (M = 7.4 years), and post-fourth grade (M = 10.4 years). Genetic influences on five prereading skills (print knowledge, rapid naming, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and verbal memory) were primarily responsible for relations with word reading and spelling. However, relations with post-fourth-grade reading comprehension were due to both genetic and shared environmental influences. Genetic and shared environmental influences that were common among the prereading variables covaried with reading and spelling, as did genetic influences unique to verbal memory (only post-fourth-grade comprehension), print knowledge, and rapid naming.

  • 24.
    Christopher, Micaela
    et al.
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Hulslander, Jacqueline
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Keenan, Janice
    University of Denver, USA.
    Pennington, Bruce
    University of Denver, USA.
    DeFries, John
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Willcutt, Erik
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Modeling the etiology of individual differences in early reading development: Evidence for strong genetic influences2013In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 350-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explored the etiology of individual differences in reading development from post-kindergarten to post–4th grade by analyzing data from 487 twin pairs tested in Colorado. Data from three reading measures and one spelling measure were fit to biometric latent growth curve models, allowing us to extend previous behavioral genetic studies of the etiology of early reading development at specific time points. We found primarily genetic influences on individual differences at post–1st grade for all measures. Genetic influences on variance in growth rates were also found, with evidence of small, nonsignificant, shared environmental influences for two measures. We discuss our results, including their implications for educational policy.

  • 25.
    Coventry, William
    et al.
    Univ New England, Sch Behav Cognit and Social Sci, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.
    Byrne, Brian
    Univ New England, Sch Behav Cognit and Social Sci, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.
    Olson, Richard
    Univ Colorado, Dept Psychol, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Corley, Robin
    Univ Colorado, Dept Psychol, Boulder, CO 80309 USA.
    Does reading to your children moderate the genetic and environment etiology of their print knowledge and reading ability? in BEHAVIOR GENETICS, vol 39, issue 6, pp 642-6422009In: BEHAVIOR GENETICS, 2009, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 642-642Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 26.
    Coventry, William L
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England.
    Olson, Richard K
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Wadsworth, Sally
    University of Colorado.
    C DeFries , John
    University of Colorado.
    Do the Genetic Effects for Literacy in Early Childhood Differ Across Sex or Across the Disabled and Normal Range?2008In: Behavior Genetics, 2008, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 619-619Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Coventry, William L
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning.
    Dynamic and Static Assessment of Phonological Awareness in Preschool: A Behavior-Genetic Study2011In: Journal of Learning Disabilities, ISSN 0022-2194, E-ISSN 1538-4780, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 322-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic and environmental overlap between static and dynamic measures of preschool phonological awareness (PA) and their relation to preschool letter knowledge (LK) and kindergarten reading were examined using monozygotic and dizygotic twin children (maximum N = 1,988). The static tests were those typically used to assess a childs current level of PA such as blending and elision, and the dynamic test included instruction in phoneme identity to assess the childs ability to respond to this instruction. Both forms were influenced by genes and by shared and nonshared environment. The static and dynamic versions were influenced by the same genes, and part of the total genetic influence was shared with LK. They were subject to both overlapping and independent shared environment influences, with the component in common also affecting LK. Nonshared environment influences were mostly independent. Scores from dynamic assessment added only minimally to variance explained in kindergarten reading after LK and static assessment had been factored in. Although one of the genetic factors that influenced both forms of PA also affected kindergarten reading, it was only the one shared with LK. The authors conclude that dynamic assessment of PA in preschool offers little advantage over the more commonly used static forms, especially if LK scores are available, although they acknowledge its potential in cases of preschool educational disadvantage.

  • 28.
    Damber, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Taube, Karin
    Institutionen för svenska och samhällsvetenskapliga ämnen, Umeå universitet.
    Differences between over- and under-achieving classes in reading: teacher, classroom, andstudent characteristicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Since earlier research indicates a substantial linkage between SES and language background on the one hand and reading achievement on the other hand, in particular at school level, the focus in the first study was to explore factors influencing reading achievement beyond SES and language background (Scarborough, 1998).

    The initial study had two aims. The first aim was to identify classes which were performing at higher and lower levels in reading than those which would be expected with regard to the students’ socio-economic and language background. The second aim was to find student, teacher, teaching and classroom characteristics which could be linked to classes over-achieving in reading.

  • 29.
    Damber, Ulla
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Taube, Karin
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Differences between overachieving and underachieving classes in reading: Teacher, classroom and student characteristics2012In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, ISSN 1468-7984, E-ISSN 1741-2919, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 339-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the classroom, teacher and student factors distinguishing grade three classes performing at higher levels than expected, in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) and language factors, from classes performing below their potential with regard to the same factors. Data from a standardized reading comprehension test and student and teacher questionnaires covering teacher, classroom and student characteristics were collected. The participants were 1,092 grade three classes and their class teachers, from Stockholm, Sweden. By use of regression and a twin-matching procedure, one group of 94 underachieving classes and another group of 94 overachieving classes were formed for comparison. Data about extended voluntary reading, classroom climate, teacher experience and the use of authentic literature were seen to the main four indicators discriminating between over- and underachieving classes beyond the impact of SES and language background.

  • 30.
    Ebejer, Jane L.
    et al.
    University of New England.
    Coventry, William L.
    University of New England.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England.
    Willcutt, Erik G.
    University of Colorado.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado.
    Corley, Robin
    University of Colorado.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Genetic and Environmental Influences on Inattention, Hyperactivity-Impulsivity, and Reading: Kindergarten to Grade 22010In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 293-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twin children from Australia, Scandinavia, and the United States were assessed for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and reading across the first 3 school years. Univariate behavior-genetic analyses indicated substantial heritability for all three variables in all years. Longitudinal analyses showed one genetic source operating across the time span and a second entering in the second school year for each variable, though possibly not reliable for inattention. Other analyses confirmed previous findings of pleiotropy (shared genes) between inattention and reading and showed that this genetic overlap is in place from kindergarten onwards and is restricted to one of the genetic sources that affect reading and inattention. The results extend previous conclusions about the developmental trajectories of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and reading and their relationships. Limitations of this study are discussed, as are educational implications.

  • 31.
    Elwér, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Stavanger University, Norway.
    Pattern of Preschool Prediction of Reading Comprehension Impairment: A 10 Year Longitudinal Study2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Compromised reading comprehension will invariably influence future academic achievements. In reading research there has been an emphasis on early identification of poor decoders to reduce future difficulties. Only a few studies have examined preschool prediction of reading comprehension impairments beyond the first grades of school, and these studies have presented different patterns of results. As studies have mostly been conducted in English; it is unclear how the results generalize to languages with transparent orthographies. In this study, a Swedish and a Norwegian twin sample were used to predict reading comprehension and decoding impairments in grade 2, 4 and 8/9 from preschool. The results suggested an important role for RAN and verbal memory. Compromised RAN was consistently associated with the poor decoders, as well as in identifying poor reading comprehenders in grade 8/9. Verbal memory tasks at preschool contributed to the identification of children with reading comprehension impairment across grades.

  • 32.
    Elwér, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Richard K.
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Keenan, Janice M.
    University of Denver, CO 80208 USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A retrospective longitudinal study of cognitive and language skills in poor reading comprehension2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in Grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool (age 5) and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. The results revealed deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early deficits in phonological awareness in most of the SPRC sample, beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as marked in earlier assessments in Grade 1 and 2, probably because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

  • 33.
    Elwér, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Byrne, Brian
    University of New England, Australia.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Keenan, Janice
    University of Denver, CO, USA.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Stavanger University, Norway.
    A Retrospective Longitudinal Study of Cognitive and Language Skills in Poor Reading Comprehension2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool age 5 and at the end of kindergarten, grade 1 and 2. The results showed a widespread language-deficit profile in children with SPRC, including deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early phonological awareness in a large part of the sample beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as apparent in earlier assessments at grade 1 and 2, likely because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

  • 34.
    Elwér, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Keenan, Janice
    University of Denver, CO, USA.
    Olson, Richard
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Byrne, Brian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Stavanger University, Norway.
    Longitudinal stability and predictors of poor oral comprehenders and poor decoders2013In: Journal of experimental child psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-0965, E-ISSN 1096-0457, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 497-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two groups of fourth-grade children were selected from a population sample (= 926) to be either poor oral comprehenders (poor oral comprehension but normal word decoding) or poor decoders (poor decoding but normal oral comprehension). By examining both groups in the same study with varied cognitive and literacy predictors, and examining them both retrospectively and prospectively, we could assess how distinctive and stable the predictors of each deficit are. Predictors were assessed retrospectively at preschool and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. Group effects were significant at all test occasions, including those for preschool vocabulary (worse in poor oral comprehenders) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) (worse in poor decoders). Preschool RAN and vocabulary prospectively predicted Grade 4 group membership (77–79% correct classification) within the selected samples. Reselection in preschool of “at-risk” poor decoder and poor oral comprehender subgroups based on these variables led to significant but relatively weak prediction of subtype membership at Grade 4. Implications of the predictive stability of our results for identification and intervention of these important subgroups are discussed.

  • 35.
    Eriksson-Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Kartläggning av intagnas utbildningsbakgrund-studiebehov2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 36.
    Eriksson-Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Läs- och skrivsatsningar i Linköpings kommun2012Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Eriksson-Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Sverige2008In: Insatte i nordiske fengsler. Utdanning, utdanningsønske og -motivasjon., Køpenhavn: Nordisk Ministerråd , 2008, 1, p. 139-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Eriksson-Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sweden2009In: Education in Nordic Prisons: Prisoners´Educational Backgrounds, Preferences and Motivation, Copenhagen: Nordic Council of Ministers , 2009, p. 153-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1999, the Nordic Council adopted a recommendation on prison education in a Nordic perspective. In September 2001, a Nordic project group was appointed to carry out a study, with representatives from the prison and probation services and the educational authorities. The project was directed by the County Governor of Hordaland, Norway. A decision was adopted in 2007 to revise the report in relation to recent research, new surveys, and general developments in the Nordic countries.

    The purpose of the project was to provide a concise, overall and updated comparative view of education and training in prisons in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, as well as a brief description of the situation in Iceland, Greenland, the Faeroe islands and the Åland islands.

    If convicted prisoners are to be offered education on equal terms with others in society, the right to education must be clearly stipulated in the legislation.

    According to this report, good cooperation between the prison and probation services and other authorities is one of the key starting points for satisfying prisoners' educational needs. The prison education offered today does not satisfactorily correspond to prisoners' educational needs. Increased investments in prison education would probably be of added value for society as a whole.

    This report provides useful documentation for individuals working with any aspect of the wider problem complex relating to prison and probation services.

  • 39.
    Finnström, Orvar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Bylund, Bengt
    Västerviks sjukhus.
    Cervin, Torsten
    Centralsjukhuset i Kalmar.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mård, Selina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Sandstedt, Per
    hälsouniversitetet i Linköping.
    Wärngård, Olof
    Norrköpings sjukhus.
    Mycket lågviktiga barn vid 9 års ålder. De flesta klarar sig bra men barn med skolsvårigheter är överrepresenterade2000In: Svenska läkartidningen, ISSN 0371-439X, Vol. 97, p. 3492-3498Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Friend, A
    et al.
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    DeFries, J. C
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    Olson, R. K
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    Pennington, B
    Colorado University, USA.
    Harlaar, N
    King's College London, UK.
    Byrne, B
    University of New England, Australia.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Willcutt, E
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    Wadsworth, S
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    Corley, R
    Colorado University at Boulder, USA.
    Heritability of high reading ability and its interaction with parental education2009In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 39, p. 427-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moderation of the level of genetic influence on children’s high reading ability by environmental influences associated with parental education was explored in two independent samples of identical and fraternal twins from the United States and Great Britain. For both samples, the heritability of high reading performance increased significantly with lower levels of parental education. Thus, resilience (high reading ability despite lower environmental support) is more strongly influenced by genotype than is high reading ability with higher environmental support. This result provides a coherent account when considered alongside results of previous research showing that heritability for low reading ability decreased with lower levels of parental education.

  • 41.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    et al.
    Stavanger university.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming predicting early development in reading and spelling: Results from a cross-linguistic longutudinal study.2011In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the relationship between latent constructs of phonological awareness (PA) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) was investigated and related to later measures of reading and spelling in children learning to read in different alphabetic writing systems (i.e., Norwegian/Swedish vs. English). 750 U.S./Australian children and 230 Scandinavian children were followed longitudinally between kindergarten and 2nd grade. PA and RAN were measured in kindergarten and Grade 1, while word recognition, phonological decoding, and spelling were measured in kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. In general, high stability was observed for the various reading and spelling measures, such that little additional variance was left open for PA and RAN. However, results demonstrated that RAN was more related to reading than spelling across orthographies, with the opposite pattern shown for PA. In addition, tests of measurement invariance show that the factor loadings of each observed indicator on the latent PA factor was the same across U.S./Australia and Scandinavia. Similar findings were obtained for RAN. In general, tests of structural invariance show that models of early literacy development are highly transferable across languages.

  • 42.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    et al.
    University of Bergen.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Predicting Reading and Spelling Difficulties in Transparent and Opaque Orthographies: A Comparison between Scandinavian and US/Australian Children2010In: DYSLEXIA, ISSN 1076-9242, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 119-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, predictors of reading and spelling difficulties among children learning more transparent (Norwegian/Swedish) and less transparent (English) orthographies were examined longitudinally from preschool through Grade 2 using parallel versions of tests. A series of logistic regression analysis indicated three main findings. First, phonological awareness as a predictor of reading difficulties in the Scandinavian sample was time-limited to Grade 1, but remained as a significant predictor in the English-speaking sample. Second, phonological awareness predicted spelling difficulties similarly across orthographies. Third, preschool and kindergarten RAN was a significant predictor of reading and spelling difficulties at both Grades 1 and 2 across orthographies. The authors conclude that phonological awareness diminishes as a predictor of reading difficulties in transparent orthographies after the first years of schooling, that RAN is a better long-term predictor of reading difficulties, and that phonological awareness is associated with spelling difficulties similarly in transparent and opaque orthographies.

  • 43.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    et al.
    Stavanger University, Norge .
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Preschool cognitive and language skills predicting Kindergarten and Grade 1 reading and spelling: a cross-linguistic comparison2009In: Journal of research in reading (Print), ISSN 0141-0423, E-ISSN 1467-9817, Vol. 32, p. 275-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of cognitive and language skills on reading and spelling development were investigated in a cross-linguistic longitudinal study of 737 English-speaking children (US/Australia) and 169 Scandinavian children (Norway/Sweden) from preschool to Kindergarten and Grade 1. The results revealed that phonological awareness and print knowledge were the strongest predictors of early reading and spelling across orthographies. The contribution from rapid naming to literacy development was low in Kindergarten, but similar to that of phonological awareness and print knowledge in Grade 1. The present study identified a significant difference across orthographies in the effects of print knowledge and general verbal ability on spelling in Kindergarten. However, this pattern was explained by cultural rather than orthographic differences. The results indicate that cognitive and language skills underlying early reading and spelling development are similar across alphabetic orthographies.

  • 44.
    Furnes, Bjarte
    et al.
    University of Stavanger.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Risk factors for becoming reading and spelling disabled: A cross-linguistic comparison2008In: Scientific Studies of Reading,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Visual and auditory priming interacts with word decoding strategy1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Fonologiska övningar: ett sätt att stimulera läsutvecklingen hos barn i åldrarna 7-12 år1998Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Intelligence and dyslexia: Implications for diagnosis and intervention1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we critically examine theoretical issues and practical consequences of including IQ in the definition of dyslexia. According to the discrepancy criterion individuals are classified as dyslexic if their reading skills are below what would be expected from their IQ scores. However, we argue that intelligence is a fuzzy concept and that there is no clear causal relationship between intelligence level and word decoding skills. Also, high and low IQ poor readers show the same reading performance patterns, indicating that both groups might benefit from the same remedial activities. Evidence for the critical role of phonological skills in dyslexia is presented and a more recent definition of dyslexia is discussed in relation to these findings. Finally, two alternative, more outcome-based classifications of poor readers are suggested and some critical consequences for individual interventions are outlined.

  • 48.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological training and reading comprehension: Why do some resist?1997In: Reading disability and its treatment / [ed] Britta Ericson, Jerker Rönnberg, Norrköping: Läspedagogiska institutet EMIR , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Gustafson, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Why Do Some Resist Phonological Intervention?: A Swedish longitudinal study of poor readers in Grade 42000In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 145 -162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n a longitudinal intervention study, 33 Swedish poor readers in Grade 4 received phonological awareness instruction over 1 year. Three control groups were included in the study: Grade 4 controls, Grade 2 controls (both comparable in reading skill) and normal readers. The results showed that the phonological training group made the most progress in phonological awareness but did not improve their reading skills any more than the controls. However, a re-analysis of the results revealed important individual differences within the phonological training group. Some children improved their reading ability considerably, while others seemed resistant to the intervention. One critical difference between improved and resistant readers was identified. For the improved readers, both orthographic and phonological word decoding predicted text reading performance. For the resistant readers, only orthographic decoding skills predicted text reading before, during and after the intervention, in spite of a steady increase in phonological awareness.

  • 50.
    Gäddlin, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wadsby, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wang, Chen
    Department of Neuroradiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leijon, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Academic achievement, behavioural outcomes and MRI findings at 15 years of age in very low birthweight children2008In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1426-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To assess cognitive, academic, and behavioural functions in 15-year-old very low birthweight (VLBW) children and relate results to gender, neonatal risk factors, growth, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings.

    Methods: 61/86 VLBW children and 57/86 term controls born in the south-east region of Sweden were assessed regarding cognition (WISC III), school outcome, behaviour, and growth. VLBW children were examined using cerebral MRI.

    Results: VLBW children performed significantly lower than their term controls on WISC III and 49% had IQ lower than 85. Ten VLBW children with IQ <70 had not been clinically identified earlier and a majority of these children attended mainstream school. VLBW girls had significantly lower total problems scores. Using MRI, white matter damage (WMD) was detected in 16 (27%) children. VLBW boys with WMD had significantly lower IQ than those without. Small occipito-frontal circumference correlated with low IQ. Mechanical ventilation and intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) showed significant correlations with lower IQ and reading skills.

    Conclusion: VLBW children achieved poorer results compared with their controls in cognitive tests. Mechanical ventilation and IVH were related to poorer academic outcome. Many of the children with low IQ had not been identified earlier. Therefore, we recommend that VLBW children undergo an IQ test before beginning school in order to receive adequate support.

123 1 - 50 of 127
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf