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  • 1.
    Adell, Gunnar C. E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Apoptosis in rectal carcinoma: Prognosis and recurrence after preoperative radiotherapy2001In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 1870-1875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal carcinoma is common, with considerable local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical techniques can improve local control. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between apoptosis and the outcome of rectal carcinoma, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.

    METHODS: Specimens were from 162 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region included in the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial between 1987-1990. New sections from the paraffin blocks of the preoperative biopsies and the surgical specimens were examined for apoptosis using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method.

    RESULTS: The mean percentage of apoptotic cells was 0.3% (0-4%) and 1.1% (0-14.5%) for the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen, respectively. The authors analyzed the surgical specimens from nonirradiated patients and divided them into three groups by apoptotic index (AI) as follows: 0%, 0-1%, and > 1%. A high AI was associated with a decreased local recurrence rate compared with an intermediate or a low AI (P = 0.024). There was no significant relation between AI and survival. There was a significant reduction in the local recurrence rate for irradiated patients compared with the nonirradiated in the low (P = 0.015) and intermediate (P = 0.038) AI groups. In the high AI group, there were few recurrences and no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated patients. The relative risk of death from rectal carcinoma in Dukes A-C patients was not significantly decreased by radiotherapy, but, in the intermediate AI group, there was a trend (P = 0.08) in favor of the irradiated patients.

    CONCLUSION: A high AI in rectal carcinoma indicated a decreased local recurrence rate.

  • 2.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Klintenberg, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 status: an indicator for the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.1999In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 169-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal carcinoma is a common malignancy, with a history of high local recurrence rates following surgery. In recent years. preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique have improved local control rates.

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between expression of nuclear p53 protein and the outcome in rectal carcinoma, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.

    MATERIAL: Specimens from 163 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial between 1987-1990.

    METHOD: New sections from the paraffin blocks of the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen were examined immunohistochemically using a p53 antibody (PAb 1801).

    RESULT: Expression of nuclear p53 protein was seen in 41% of the tumours. The p53 negative patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significant reduction of local failure compared with the non-irradiated p53 negative patients (P = 0.0008). In contrast, p53 positive patients showed no benefit from preoperative radiotherapy. The interaction between p53 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was statistically significant (P = 0.018).

    CONCLUSION: Expression of nuclear p53 protein in rectal carcinoma seems to be a significant predictive factor for local treatment failure after preoperative radiotherapy. Further investigations are necessary to select patients for preoperative treatment based on analysis of the preoperative biopsies.

  • 3.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer2001In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 659-663Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen.

    MATERIALS: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990.

    RESULTS: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p = 0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p = 0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates.

    CONCLUSION: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.

  • 4.
    Andreasson, Hakan
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Willen, Roger
    Uppsala University.
    Graf, Wilhelm
    Uppsala University.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University.
    Zhang, Zhi-Yong
    Tangshan Gongren Hospital.
    Mahteme, Haile
    Uppsala University.
    Histopathological Classification of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei and the Prognostic Importance of PINCH Protein2012In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 1443-1448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aims of this study were i) to assess a new and more detailed histopathological classification and to analyze concordance between pathologists in the histopathological classification of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP); ii) to analyze the expression in the stroma of the particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine (PINCH) protein and its prognostic importance in PMP. Materials and Methods: Surgical specimens from 81 patients, classified according to the Ronnett et al histopathological classification were compared to a new system with four groups ranging from indolent to aggressive growth patterns. PINCH protein expression was analyzed and was related to clinical variables. Results: The new four-group classification provided better prognostic information than the classification according to Ronnett et al. (p=0.04). Expression of the PINCH protein in the stroma was found in 83% of the cases and was associated with high tumor burden (p=0.002) and a poor prognosis (p=0.04). Conclusion: The proposed new PMP classification system may provide additional prognostic information. PINCH protein is expressed in PMP and has prognostic information.

  • 5. Andreyev, HJN
    et al.
    Norman, AR
    Cunningham, D
    Oates, J
    Dix, BR
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology.
    Urosevic, N
    Kirsten ras mutations in patients with colorectal cancer: The 'RASCAL II' study2001In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 692-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers worldwide with information about the Kirsten ras (Ki-ras) tumour genotype and outcome of patients with colorectal cancer were invited to provide that data in a schematized format for inclusion in a collaborative database called RASCAL (The Kirsten ras incolorectal-cancer collaborative group). Our results from 2721 such patients have been presented previously and for the first time in any common cancer, showed conclusively that different gene mutations have different impacts on outcome, even when the mutations occur at the same site on the genome. To explore the effect of Ki-ras mutations at different stages of colorectal cancer, more patients were recruited to the database, which was reanalysed when information on 4268 patients from 42 centres in 21 countries had been entered. After predetermined exclusion criteria were applied, data on 3439 patients were entered into a multivariate analysis. This found that of the 12 possible mutations on codons 12 and 13 of Kirsten ras, only one mutation on codon 12, glycine to valine, found in 8.6% of all patients, had a statistically significant impact on failure-free survival (P=0.004, HR 1.3) and overall survival (P=0.008, HR 1.29). This mutation appeared to have a greater impact on outcome in Dukes' C cancers (failure-free survival, P=0.008, HR 1.5, overall survival P=0.02, HR 1.45) than in Dukes' B tumours (failure-free survival, P=0.46, HR 1.12, overall survival P=0.36, HR 1.15). Ki-ras mutations may occur early in the development of pre-cancerous adenomas in the colon and rectum. However, this collaborative study suggests that not only is the presence of a codon 12 glycine to valine mutation important for cancer progression but also that it may predispose to more aggressive biological behaviour in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. ⌐ 2001 Cancer Research Campaign.

  • 6. Arlehag, L
    et al.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Knutsen Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Thorstenson, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    ATM expression in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy2005In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 313-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with ATM (Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated) mutation show increased sensitivity to radiation and have a higher risk of developing malignancies. The present study aimed to investigate whether ATM expression was related to radiotherapy, and clinicopathological and biological variables in rectal cancers. ATM expression was immunohistochemically examined in 78 rectal cancers from patients who participated in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Of 78 patients, 44 underwent surgery alone, and 34 underwent both preoperative radiotherapy and surgery. Fifty-eight cases had normal rectal mucosa adjacent to the tumour. The results showed that, compared to normal mucosa, tumours had less nuclear (p=0.03) but more cytoplasmic expression of ATM (p=0.004). In tumours, less expression of ATM, either in the nucleus (p=0.07) or in the cytoplasm (p=0.02 for staining intensity, and p=0.07 for staining percentage), tended to be correlated with male patients. Also, ATM expression was not related to radiotherapy or other clinicopathological and biological variables (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the pattern of ATM expression was changed from normal mucosa to tumour. Less expression of ATM may be related to males.

  • 7.
    Baker, Ann-Marie
    et al.
    University of Aberdeen.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Southall, Stacey M
    Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wilson, Jon R
    Institute for Cancer Research.
    Erler, Janine T
    Institute for Cancer Research.
    The Role of Lysyl Oxidase in SRC-Dependent Proliferation and Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer2011In: JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE, ISSN 0027-8874, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 407-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Emerging evidence implicates lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme, in promoting metastasis of solid tumors. We investigated whether LOX plays an important role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We analyzed LOX expression in a patient CRC tissue microarray consisting of normal colon mucosa (n = 49), primary (n = 510), and metastatic (n = 198) tissues. LOX was overexpressed in CRC cell line SW480 (SW480+LOX), and the expression was knocked down in CRC cell line SW620 using LOX-specific short hairpin RNA (SW620+shLOX). Effect of LOX manipulation on three-dimensional cell proliferation and invasion was characterized in vitro. Effect of LOX manipulation on tumor proliferation and metastasis was investigated in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model (n = 3 mice per group) and in an intrasplenic metastatic mouse model (n = 3 mice per group). The mechanism of LOX-mediated effects via v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) was investigated using dasatinib, an inhibitor of SRC activation. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with normal colon tissue (n = 49), LOX expression was statistically significantly increased in tumor tissues (n = 510) of CRC patients (P andlt; .001), and a greater increase was observed in metastatic tissue (n = 198). SW480+LOX cells showed a statistically significantly increased three-dimensional proliferation (P = .037) and invasion (P = .015), whereas SW620+shLOX cells showed reduced proliferation (P = .011) and invasion (P = .013) compared with controls. Subcutaneous tumor growth in mice was statistically significantly increased in SW480+LOX tumors (P = .036) and decreased in SW620+shLOX tumors (P = .048), and metastasis was statistically significantly increased in SW480+LOX tumors (P = .044) and decreased in SW620+shLOX tumors (SW620 control vs SW620+shLOX, mean = 1.0 luminescent signal, 95% confidence interval = 0.3 to 1.7 luminescent signal, vs mean = 0.3 luminescent signal, 95% confidence interval = 0.1 to 0.5 luminescent signal; P = .035) compared with controls. LOX-mediated effects on tumor progression were associated with SRC activation, and these effects were inhibited by dasatinib. Conclusions LOX showed an important role in CRC cell proliferation and metastasis and was dependent on the activation of SRC. These results have the potential to identify patients with high SRC activity, who may benefit from dasatinib treatment.

  • 8.
    Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Gan, Lisha
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Knutsen Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Rearden, Ann
    Fagerholm, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Ophthalmology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL.
    Expression of the focal adhesion protein PINCH in normal and alkali-injured corneas and the role of PMNs2007In: Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1395-3907, E-ISSN 1600-0420, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 395-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine-rich protein (PINCH) in corneal wound healing and early neovascularization and to assess the influence of granulocytes. Methods: A standardized corneal alkali wound was inflicted under general anaesthesia to the right eye of 14 New Zealand White rabbits. Seven of the rabbits received i.v. 5 mg/kg fucoidin every 2 hours to prevent granulocytes from entering the wound area. After 36 hours, the rabbits were killed, the corneas excised, fixed in 4% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. The sections were double-stained with antibodies against PINCH and with haematoxylin. Results: In the normal cornea and limbus, PINCH was weakly expressed in the corneal epithelium and in a wedge of the conjunctival stroma. In the wounded corneas, PINCH expression was seen in the frontline of repopulating endothelial and epithelial cells, and in active keratocytes. The vascular endothelium and the granulocytes expressed PINCH, as did the conjunctival epithelium. In the fucoidin-treated rabbits, PINCH expression was markedly reduced. The vascular endothelial cells and the few granulocytes did not express PINCH in these rabbits. Conclusions: PINCH is only slightly expressed in the normal cornea. A corneal wound induces PINCH expression in the repopulating cells, in the vascular endothelial cells of the limbus, in the limbal epithelium and in the granulocytes. Exclusion of granulocytes reduces expression of PINCH and there is no expression at all in the vascular endothelium. © 2007 The Authors Journal compilation 2007 Acta Ophthalmol Scand.

  • 9.
    Bruun, Jarle
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kolberg, Matthias
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Ahlquist, Terje C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Royrvik, Ellen C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oxford, England.
    Nome, Torfinn
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Leithe, Edward
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Lind, Guro E.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Merok, Marianne A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Rognum, Torleiv O.
    University of Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway.
    Bjorkoy, Geir
    University of Coll Sor Trondelag, Norway.
    Johansen, Terje
    University of Tromso, Norway.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Svindland, Aud
    University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Liestol, Knut
    University of Oslo, Norway; Fac Math and Nat Science, Norway.
    Nesbakken, Arild
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Skotheim, Rolf I.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Fac Math and Nat Science, Norway.
    Lothe, Ragnhild A.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 2 Identifies High-Risk Patients within Both Major Phenotypes of Colorectal Cancer2015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 16, p. 3759-3770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer has high incidence and mortality worldwide. Patients with microsatellite instable (MSI) tumors have significantly better prognosis than patients with microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. Considerable variation in disease outcome remains a challenge within each subgroup, and our purpose was to identify biomarkers that improve prediction of colorectal cancer prognosis. Experimental Design: Mutation analyses of 42 MSI target genes were performed in two independent MSI tumor series (n = 209). Markers that were significantly associated with prognosis in the test series were assessed in the validation series, followed by functional and genetic explorations. The clinical potential was further investigated by immunohistochemistry in a population-based colorectal cancer series (n = 903). Results: We identified the cell-cycle gene regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2) as a cancer biomarker. We found a mutation in the 50 UTR region of RCC2 that in univariate and multivariate analyses was significantly associated with improved outcome in the MSI group. This mutation caused reduction of protein expression in dual luciferase gene reporter assays. siRNA knockdown in MSI colon cancer cells (HCT15) caused reduced cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased apoptosis. Massive parallel sequencing revealed few RCC2 mutations in MSS tumors. However, weak RCC2 protein expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis, independent of clinical highrisk parameters, and stratifies clinically important patient subgroups with MSS tumors, including elderly patients (greater than 75 years), stage II patients, and those with rectal cancer. Conclusions: Impaired RCC2 affects functional and clinical endpoints of colorectal cancer. High-risk patients with either MSI or MSS tumors can be identified with cost-effective routine RCC2 assays. (C) 2015 AACR.

  • 10. Bu, H
    et al.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Holmdahl-Källén, K
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology.
    Significance of glutathione S-transferases M1, T1 and P1 polymorphisms in Swedish melanoma patients.2007In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 859-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 were examined in melanoma patients and tumor-free individuals. Relationships between the polymorphisms and tumor characteristics and pigment phenotypes of the patients were analyzed. There was no significant difference in GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes nor GSTP1 GG genotype between melanoma patients and controls. In melanoma patients, these polymorphisms were not correlated with early or later onset of melanomas or gender of the patients. Frequency of GSTM1 null genotype was higher in patients with melanoma >2.5 mm than in those with tumors <1.0 mm, and higher frequency was found in nodular melanoma than in the other tumor types. GSTP1 GG genotype was more often found in the patients with brown and mixed eye color or brown and black hair than those with blue and green eyes or blond hair. It is unlikely that polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 are general risk factors for melanoma in the Swedish population. GSTM1 null genotype was correlated with Breslow thickness and tumor type, which might serve as an additional biomarker for a rapid tumor progression. GSTP1 GG increases risk for melanoma in the subgroup of individuals with dark eyes or hair.

  • 11.
    Bu, Huajie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Holmdahl-Källenand, Katarina
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Importance of polymorphisms at NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes in melanoma risk, clinicopathological features and tumor progression in Swedish melanoma patients2007In: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0171-5216, E-ISSN 1432-1335, Vol. 133, no 11, p. 859-866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, functional polymorphisms of NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes were examined in 185 melanoma patients and 438 tumor-free individuals. Associations of the polymorphisms with melanoma risk, age and pigment phenotypes of the patients and clinico-pathological tumor characteristics were analyzed. DNAs were isolated from mononuclear cells of venous blood. Polymorphisms of the genes were genotyped by a PCR-RFLP technique, and transcription level of NF-κBIα was examined by a quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. Results showed that both ATTG insertion polymorphism of NF-κB1 and A to G polymorphism of NF-κBIα genes were correlated with melanoma risk, especially, in a combination of ATTG2/ATTGT2 and GG. NF-κB1 ATTG2/ATTG2 and NF-κBIα GG genotypes were associated with male gender and age > 65 years (at diagnosis). Patients with ATTG1/ATTG1 genotype had thinner tumors and lower Clark levels at diagnosis. Frequency of ATTG1/ATTG1 genotype was higher in patients with melanomas on intermittently sun-exposed pattern of the body and NF-κBIα GG was more frequent in the patients with melanomas at rarely exposed sites. There were no differences in the gene transcription level between patients with different NF-κBIα genotypes. These data suggest that NF-κB1 and NF-κBIα genes might be susceptible genes for melanoma risk and functional polymorphisms of these genes might be biological predictors for melanoma progression.

  • 12.
    Bu, Huajie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Genotype < 21CAs/>= 21CAs and allele < 21CAs of the MANBA gene in melanoma risk and progression in a Swedish population2009In: Molecular medicine reports, ISSN 1791-2997, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 259-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cutaneous melanoma is characterized by poor patient outcome in its later stages. The search for genetic markers is therefore crucial for the identification of populations at risk for melanoma. Highly polymorphic CA repeats in 3 proximity in the MANBA gene were examined by PCR-capillary electrophoresis in 185 Swedish melanoma patients and 441 tumor-free age- and gender-matched individuals. The associations of the polymorphisms with melanoma risk, the pigment phenotypes of the patients and tumor characteristics were analyzed. A significant difference in allelic distribution between melanoma patients and tumor-free individuals was observed. The frequency of the MANBA genotype <21CAs/>= 21CAs was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in the controls. When comparing allele distribution in patients and their matched controls, the allele <21 CAs was found to be associated with the female gender (39.8 vs. 31.2%, P=0.041, OR=1.46, 95% Cl 1.02-2.10), but not with male gender (34.4 vs. 30.9%, P=0.39). Within the melanoma group, there were no differences in the distribution of the MANBA alleles associated with patient gender or age before or after 55 years at diagnosis, nor was there any association between the MANBA genotype and pigment phenotype or tumor sites. The MANBA allele <21CAs was, however, associated with thin melanomas at diagnosis (Breslow thickness <= 1.5 mm and Clark levels I and II). In conclusion, these data suggest that MANBA polymorphisms might be an indicator of tumor growth and progression and, together with other markers, could be used to identify individuals at increased risk of melanoma.

  • 13.
    Chen, Yun
    et al.
    Department of Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Department of Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, SE 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lasaitiene, Daina
    Department of Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gabrielsson, Britt G.
    RCEM, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Lena M. S.
    RCEM, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Billig, Håkan
    Department of Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Björn
    RCEM, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Marcussen, Niels
    Institute of Pathology, Aarhus Kommunehospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, KC - Kirurgi- och onkologicentrum, Onkologiska kliniken.
    Friberg, Peter
    Department of Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Neonatal Losartan Treatment Suppresses Renal Expression of Molecules Involved in Cell-Cell and Cell-Matrix Interactions2004In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 1232-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of neonatal angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1) stimulation produces renal abnormalities characterized by papillary atrophy and impaired urinary concentrating ability, but the mechanisms involved are still unclear. DNA microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed in renal medulla in response to neonatal treatment with AT 1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg per d), which commenced within 24 h after birth. The data showed that losartan treatment for 48 h downregulated 68 genes, ~30% of which encode various components of cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-associated proteins, extracellular matrix, and enzymes involved in extracellular matrix maturation or turnover. With the use of immunohistochemistry and Western immunoblot, the microarray data were confirmed and it was demonstrated that losartan suppressed renal expression of syndecan 2, a-smooth muscle actin, MHC class II, and leukocyte type 12-lipoxygenase by day 4. In addition, losartan inhibited medullary expression of integrin a6 and caused relocalization of integrins a6 and a3. Moreover, losartan inhibited cell proliferation in medullary tubules by day 9, as detected by Ki-67 immunostaining. This study provides new data supporting the contention that a lack of AT1 receptor stimulation results in abnormal matrix assembly, disturbed cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and subsequent abnormal tubular maturation. Moreover, regulation of the expression of leukocyte type 12-lipoxygenase and a-smooth muscle actin by the renin-angiotensin system in the immature kidney adds new knowledge toward the understanding of renal vascular development.

  • 14.
    Ding, Jun-Li
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Zong-Guang
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Xiang-Yu
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Bin
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Wang, Ling
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Wang, Rong
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhan, Lan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Li, Yuan
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Attenuation of Acute Pancreatitis by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α in Rats: The Effect on Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathways2013In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 114-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) has attracted considerable attention for its anti-inflammatory properties; however, Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways have an essential proinflammatory role in acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to evaluate the attenuation of inflammation by PPAR-α and to investigate the interaction between PPAR-α and TLR pathways in AP.

    Methods: Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by administration of cerulein. The PPAR-α agonist WY14643 and/or antagonist MK886 was administered. The severity of AP was determined by measuring serum amylase, lipase, Ca2+, pathological changes, myeloperoxidase activity, serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). The TLR2 and TLR4 messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteins were determined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The mRNA expressions of target molecules of TLR pathways, including IL-6, IL-10, ICAM-1, and tumor necrosis factor α were also measured.

    Results: Treatment with WY14643 significantly decreased amylase, lipase, myeloperoxidase activity, pathological scores, IL-6, and ICAM-1 levels. The TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and proteins were markedly decreased after treatment with WY14643, along with IL-6, ICAM-1, and tumor necrosis factor α mRNA levels. However, these effects were completely reversed by the coadministration of MK886.

    Conclusions: Activation of PPAR-α played a protective role in AP, partially mediated by modulation of TLR pathways.

  • 15.
    Ding, Zhen-Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liu, Gui-Hong
    Sichuan University, China.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Upregulation of the antiapoptotic factor Livin contributes to cisplatin resistance in colon cancer cells2013In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 683-693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The antiapoptotic factor Livin has been considered critical for tumor progression and poor prognosis for variant types of tumors. However, there are only limited reports regarding its expression and biological functions in colon cancer. Here, we examined Livin expression in four colon cancer cell lines (HCT116, RKO, KM12C, and SW620) in the presence or absence of cisplatin that was used as a model reagent. We found the different response to cisplatin was related to endogenous Livin expression level. From among a panel of apoptosis-related factors (p53, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, BAX, and survivin), the expression of Livin was upregulated after cisplatin treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Both immunocytochemistry and nuclear cytoplasmic fractionation indicated Livin remained in the cytoplasm after treatment with cisplatin. In an attempt to explore the mechanism, we found the elevated expression of Livin was not due to the decreased degradation by proteosome but was enhanced at the mRNA level. Besides, cisplatin treatment activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as shown by increased phosphorylation of Akt1, mTOR, S6K, and 4E-BP1, together with the elevated Livin. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 inhibited both the phosphorylation of mTOR and upregulation of Livin. The stable overexpression of Livin inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and led to resistance to cisplatin, while the knockdown of Livin by siRNA rendered colon cancer cells more sensitive to cisplatin. Our study, along with others, highlighted the potential of Livin for cancer therapy in colon cancer.

  • 16.
    Ding, Zhen-Yu
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Adell, Gunnar
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Livin expression is an independent factor in rectal cancer patients with or without preoperative radiotherapy2013In: Radiation Oncology, ISSN 1748-717X, E-ISSN 1748-717X, Vol. 8, no 281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study was aimed to investigate the expression significance of Livin in relation to radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological and biological factors of rectal cancer patients. Methods: This study included 144 primary rectal cancer patients who participated in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative radiotherapy. Tissue microarray samples from the excised primary rectal cancers, normal mucosa and lymph node metastases were immunostained with Livin antibody. The proliferation of colon cancer cell lines SW620 and RKO was assayed after Livin knock-down. Results: The expression of Livin was significantly increased from adjacent (P = 0.051) or distant (P = 0.028) normal mucosa to primary tumors. 15.4% (2/13) and 39.7% (52/131) patients with Livin-negative and positive tumors died at 180 months after surgery, and the difference tended to be statistically significant (P = 0.091). In multivariate analyses, the difference achieved statistical significance, independent of TNM stage, local and distant recurrence, grade of differentiation, gender, and age (odds ratio = 5.09, 95% CI: 1.01-25.64, P = 0.048). The in vitro study indicated colon cancer cells with Livin knock-down exhibited decreased proliferation compared with controls after RT. Conclusions: The expression of Livin was was independently related to survival in rectal cancer patients, suggesting Livin as a useful prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients.

  • 17. Emterling, A
    et al.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Clinicopathological significance of microsatellite instability and mutated RIZ in colorectal cancer2004In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 242-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies have shown that microsatellite instability (MSI) is related to favourable survival in colorectal cancer patients but there are controversial results. Tumour suppressor gene RIZ is a susceptible mutational target of MSI. However, its clinicopathological significance has not been investigated. We investigated the prognostic significance of MSI in Swedish colorectal cancer patients and the clinicopathological significance of RIZ mutations. Patients and methods: We analysed 438 colorectal adenocarcinomas for MSI by microsatellite analysis. Among them, 29 MSI and 28 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours were examined for RIZ mutations by DNA sequencing. Results: MSI (13% of 438 cases) was not associated with survival (rate ratio=0.97, 95% confidence interval =0.57-1.64, P=0.90), although it was related to proximal tumour (P <0.001), poor differentiation and mucinous carcinomas (P <0.001), multiple tumours (P=0.01) and negative/weak expression of hMLH1 (P=0.03). RIZ mutations were detected in 31% of 29 MSI tumours but in none of the 28 MSS tumours. The mutations were related to female (P=0.01), proximal tumour (P=0.01), stage B (P=0.01) and poor differentiation (P=0.047). Conclusions: MSI was not a prognostic factor in the Swedish patients included in this study. Clinicopathological variables associated with RIZ mutations might be a consequence of the MSI characteristics.

  • 18.
    Emterling, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Schneider, José
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinicopathological significance of Nup88 expression in patients with colorectal cancer2003In: Oncology, ISSN 0890-9091, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 361-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The nucleoporin Nup88 is overexpressed in a series of human malignancies, however, its clinicopathological significance has not been studied. Our aims were to analyze Nup88 expression in normal mucosa, primary tumors and metastases from colorectal cancer patients and further to identify relationships of Nup88 expression with clinicopathological and other factors.

    Materials and Methods: Using immunohistochemistry, we investigated Nup88 expression in 198 primary colorectal tumors, 96 normal mucosa samples and 35 lymph node metastases.

    Results: The results showed that the intensity of Nup88 expression increased from the normal mucosa to the primary tumors (p < 0.0001) and tended to increase from the primary tumors to the metastases (p = 0.15). Both primary tumors and metastases presented stronger expression in the invasive margin and vascular-invaded areas. Nup88 expression was positively related to distal tumor location (p = 0.01), infiltrative growth pattern (p = 0.04) and higher proliferative activity (p = 0.04) and reversely to the grade of differentiation (p = 0.02) and apoptosis (p = 0.049). Strong expression of Nup88 predicted a worse outcome in the patients with distal tumors during the follow-up period of up to 3 years (p = 0.02).

    Conclusions: It seems that overexpression of Nup88 was involved in the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of colorectal cancers, and Nup88 may be used as a prognostic factor in patients with distal tumors.

  • 19.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bartik, Zsuzsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Apoptosis in relation to proliferating cell nuclear antigen and Dukes' stage in colorectal adenocarcinoma1999In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 53-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer is a disease that is associated with default in the balance of apoptotic regulation. In the present study apoptosis was examined in 158 colorectal adenocarcinomas using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. The median apoptotic index (AI) was 0.95% (range 0-6. 68%). Eighty-two tumours exhibited AI 0.95%. We revealed a positive correlation between apoptosis and proliferation determined as the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, p=0.002). The frequency of apoptosis increased from Dukes' stage A, B, C to D (p=0.01). No correlations were found between apoptosis and the patients' sex, age, tumour location, growth pattern, differentiation, prognosis, bcl-2, p53 or K-ras. Our findings suggest that we should further investigate the relationship between apoptosis and cellular proliferative activity in colorectal cancer to evaluate whether this might provide additional information in the selection of patients for effective adjuvant therapy.

  • 20.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblom, A
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    APC I1307K and E1317Q variants are rare or do not occur in Swedish colorectal cancer patients2001In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 499-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, a germ line mutation of the APC gene, I1307K, was discovered in a subset of Ashkenazi jews. The mutation involves an amino acid exchange and creates a tract consisting of eight contiguous adenosine residues believed to cause hypermutability in this region. Another germ line missense variant, E1317Q, not restricted to a certain ethnic population, could functionally alter the protein. These APC variants have been linked with increased colorectal cancer risk in several studies. However, they have not yet been investigated in Swedish colorectal cancer patients. Thus, our aim was to investigate the prevalence of I1307K and E1317Q in Swedish colorectal cancer patients in order to determine if these genetic variants are important predisposing factors to colorectal cancer in this population. To this end, sequence analysis was carried out of the APC gene in order to identify any I1307K and E1317Q variants in 106 unselected cases and 88 hereditary/familial colorectal cancer cases including 22 cases of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria. Out of a total of 194 cases examined, we did not find any variants. It seems that these alterations are rare or absent in the Swedish population.

  • 21.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Protein expression of NF-KB in human colorectal adenocarcinoma2002In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 10, p. 547-550Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wallin, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Rütten, Sabine
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Emterling, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Microsatellite instability and MBD4 mutation in unselected colorectal cancer2003In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 3569-3574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the prognostic significance of microsatellite instability (MSI) and the association with clinicopathological factors in colorectal cancer, and further identified MBD4 mutations and their clinicopathological significance.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: MSI was analyzed in 201 colorectal cancers. Sequencing analysis of MBD4 was performed in 26 MSI and 28 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors.

    RESULTS: Twenty-seven tumors (13.4%) were MSI but did not correlate with improved survival. MSI was significantly correlated with proximal colon tumors (p < 0.001), poor differentiation or mucinous type (p = 0.005) and multiple tumors (p = 0.04). MBD4 mutations were found in 15% MSI but not in MSS tumors. The mutated cases showed female overrepresentation, proximal site and poorly-differentiated/mucinous type.

    CONCLUSION: MSI was not correlated with survival, but shared other features associated with MSI in colorectal cancer as demonstrated by others. The clinicopathological variables associated with the MBD4 mutations were probably the reflection of MSI features.

  • 23.
    Fan, C-W
    et al.
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Chen, T
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Shang, Y-N
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Gu, Y-Z
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhang, S-L
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Lu, R
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    OuYang, S-R
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, X
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Li, Y
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Meng, W-T
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Hu, J-K
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Lu, Y
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bu, H
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Zhou, Z-G
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Mo, X-M
    Sichuan University, Peoples R China .
    Cancer-initiating cells derived from human rectal adenocarcinoma tissues carry mesenchymal phenotypes and resist drug therapies2013In: Cell Death and Disease, ISSN 2041-4889, E-ISSN 2041-4889, Vol. 4, p. e828-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are responsible for cancer initiation, relapse, and metastasis. Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is typically classified into proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancer. The gradual changes in CRC molecular features within the bowel may have considerable implications in colon and rectal CICs. Unfortunately, limited information is available on CICs derived from rectal cancer, although colon CICs have been described. Here we identified rectal CICs (R-CICs) that possess differentiation potential in tumors derived from patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. The R-CICs carried both CD44 and CD54 surface markers, while R-CICs and their immediate progenies carried potential epithelial–mesenchymal transition characteristics. These R-CICs generated tumors similar to their tumor of origin when injected into immunodeficient mice, differentiated into rectal epithelial cells in vitro, and were capable of self-renewal both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, subpopulations of R-CICs resisted both 5-fluorouracil/calcium folinate/oxaliplatin (FolFox) and cetuximab treatment, which are the most common therapeutic regimens used for patients with advanced or metastatic rectal cancer. Thus, the identification, expansion, and properties of R-CICs provide an ideal cellular model to further investigate tumor progression and determine therapeutic resistance in these patients.

  • 24.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology .
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    He, L..
    Zhang, Zhiyong
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology .
    Zhao, Z.
    Rosell, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    MANBA polymorphism was related to increased risk of colorectal cancer in Swedish but not in Chinese populations2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    β-mannosidase, encoded by MANBA, has been suggested to be implicated in cancers, while genetic variations in the MANBA in relation to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the relationship of a polymorphic CA repeat in MANBA gene with CRC risk in 152 Swedish CRC patients and 441 Swedish controls, and 196 Chinese CRC patients and 577 Chinese controls, as well as the clinicopathologic significance of this polymorphism on CRC patients, by using capillary electrophoresis. The MANBA genotypes were related to CRC risk in the Swedish population (p=0.03), but not in the Chinese population. In the Swedish population, individuals with < 22 CAs/> 22 CAs had significantly increased risk for CRC compared with those with ≥22 CAs/≥ 22 CAs (gender-age-adjusted analysis: OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.06-3.51). There was no relationship between the polymorphism and clinicopathologic variables. These findings suggest the different susceptibilities of this polymorphism to CRC development in the two populations. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  • 25.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rearden, Ann
    Department of Pathology, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stromal staining for PINCH is an independent prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer2004In: Neoplasia, ISSN 1522-8002, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 796-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine-rich protein (PINCH), a LIM domain adapter protein that functions in the integrin and growth factor signal transduction pathway, is upregulated in stroma associated with many common cancers. The finding suggested that PINCH may be involved in promoting tumor-stromal interactions that support tumor progression, and, if so, tumors with abundant PINCH stromal staining may have a worse prognosis. To test this hypothesis, 174 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas with 39 distant normal mucosa samples and 26 metastases in the lymph nodes were studied by immunohistochemistry, and 7 additional colon tumors were studied by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. The abundance of PINCH protein in stroma increased from normal mucosa to primary tumor to metastasis (P < .05), and was more intense at the invasive margin than it was in the intratumoral stroma. Strong stromal immunostaining for PINCH was shown to predict a worse outcome (rate ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.16-3.37, P = .01), independent of Dukes stage, growth pattern, and tumor differentiation. PINCH was detected in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and a proportion of endothelial cells of the tumor vasculature, supporting the involvement of PINCH in promoting tumor-stromal interactions that support tumor progression. Interestingly, stromal staining for PINCH was an independent prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer.

  • 26.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wadhra, Tabasum Imran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Relationships of tumor inflammatory infiltration and necrosis with microsatellite instability in colorectal cancers2005In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, Vol. 11, no 14, p. 2179-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The relationships between microsatellite instability (MSI) and survival in colorectal cancer patients are not consistent. The favorable survival of patient with MSI has been suggested to be related to pronounced inflammatory infiltration; however, the reason for non-association of MSI with survival is unclear. Our aims were to investigate the associations of inflammatory infiltration and tumor necrosis (TN) with microsatellite status and clinicopathological factors in colorectal cancer patients in whom MSI was not related to survival.

    Methods: Three hundred and one colorectal adenocar-cinomas were evaluated for inflammatory infiltration and 300 for TN under light microscope.

    Results: Low infiltration at invasive margin (c2 = 3.94, P = 0.047) and in whole tumor stroma (c2 = 3.89, P = 0.049) was associated with MSI, but TN was not (c2 = 0.10, P = 0.75). Low infiltration was related to advanced stage (c2 = 8.67, P = 0.03), poorer differentiation (c2 = 8.84, P = 0.03), DNA non-diploid (c2 = 10.04, P = 0.002), higher S-phase fraction (c2 = 11.30, P = 0.004), positive p53 expression (c2 = 7.94, P = 0.01), and worse survival (P = 0.03 for both univariate and multivariate analyses). Abundant TN was related to advanced stage (c2 = 17.74, P = 0.001) and worse survival (P = 0.02 for univariate, and P = 0.05 for multivariate analysis).

    Conclusion: The result that high inflammatory infiltration was not related to MSI might help explain the non-association of MSI with survival in colorectal cancer patients.

  • 27.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Knutsen Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Franlund, B
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Clinical and biological significance of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in colorectal cancer2009In: DIGESTIVE AND LIVER DISEASE, ISSN 1590-8658, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 116-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to get a deeper understanding into how adults with cerebral palsy (CP) experience physiotherapy and physical activity in a perspective from childhood to adulthood; and how personal and environmental factors influence possibilities for physiotherapy and physical activity. Method. Data was collected through interviews with 22 community-living adults (35-68 years) with CP, from five counties in Sweden. The questions were open-ended and the interviews were taped and transcribed to written language. The material was analysed through qualitative content analysis, a classification process resulting in different themes. Results. The narratives from the 22 informants, based on experiences from childhood to adulthood, resulted in a description of prerequisites for carrying out physiotherapy and physical activity. Five different themes were identified: (i) Being enjoyable, (ii) Giving effects, (iii) Being comprehensible, (iv) Being integrated in daily life, and (v) Supportive healthcare with competent professionals. Conclusion. The information from the interviews elucidates the importance of a lifelong support from healthcare professionals. Physiotherapists with attentiveness to different life situations in combination with good understanding and knowledge in CP could facilitate continuous physical activity in people growing up and ageing with CP.

  • 28.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Pfeifer, Daniella
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    He, Lu-Jun
    Qiao, Fang
    Zhang, Zhiyong
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Wang, Zhen-Lei
    Jia, Cun-Rong
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Association of NFKBIA polymorphism with colorectal cancer risk and prognosis in Swedish and Chinese populations2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The inhibitory proteins, IκBs, regulate the activity of nuclear factor kappa-beta (NF-κB), which is implicated in tumorigenesis by regulating expression of a variety of genes involved in cellular transformation, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Variants in the genes encoding IκBs may be involved in cancer development through the activation of NF-κB. The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of an A to G variation (rs696) in the 3′ UTR of NFKBIA (encoding IκBα) to colorectal cancer (CRC) and the association of this polymorphism with clinicopathologic variables in CRC patients. Material and methods. A case-control study was carried out on a Swedish (155 CRCs, 438 controls) and a Chinese population (199 CRCs, 577 controls). The genotype of NFKBIA was determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results. The frequency of the AG genotype was increased in the Chinese patients ≥50 years of age compared with the Chinese controls (odds ratio (OR) = 3.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.55-6.02, p=0.001), even when adjusted for age (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 1.61-6.38, p=0.001). The GG genotype of NFKBIA was related to a poorer survival rate in the Swedish patients, independent of gender, age, tumour location, Dukes' stage and differentiation (hazard ratio = 3.10, 95% Cl = 1.28-7.60, p=0.01). Conclusions. Chinese individuals ≥50 years of age carrying the AG genotype of NFKBIA may be at an increased risk of developing CRC, and the GG genotype of NFKBIA may be considered as a prognostic factor for Swedish CRC patients. © 2007 Taylor & Francis.

  • 29.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Division of Biomedicine, School of Life Science, Skövde University, Skövde, Sweden.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 proteins in relation to tumour development and prognosis in patients with microsatellite stable colorectal cancer2008In: Histology and Histopathology, ISSN 0213-3911, E-ISSN 1699-5848, Vol. 23, p. 1495-1502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex is essential for DNA double-strand break repair and for maintaining genomic integrity. In this study, we immunohisto-chemically examined MRE11, NBS1 and RAD50 expression in primary CRCs (n=208), the corresponding distant (n=41) and adjacent normal mucosa (n=130), and lymph node metastases (n=26), and investigated their clinicopathological significance in colorectal cancers (CRCs). We found that the intensity and percentage of MRE11 and NBS1 in primary CRCs were positively correlated with each other and with RAD50 (P<0.0001). Strong expression of MRE11, NBS1 or combined RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 was related to MSS, positive hMLH1 expression, earlier tumour stage (TNM stage I and II) and favourable survival (P<0.05). A high percentage of MRE11 expression was associated with less local recurrence and high apoptotic activity (P<0.05). In MSS CRCs, the expression of MRE11 and NBS1 was stronger than that in normal mucosa (P<0.05), and strong expression of NBS1 in primary tumour was related to favourable survival of patients in TNM stage I and II (univariate analysis: P=0.03; multivariate analysis: P=0.07). In MSI CRCs, neither MRE11 nor NBS1 expression showed differences among normal mucosa, primary tumour and metastasis, or among clinicopathological variables. In conclusion, RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 proteins interacted with each other, which had different clinicopathlogical significance in MSS and MSI CRCs, and further, each component of the complex might have additional roles. NBS1 might be a prognostic factor for patients with MSS tumour in TNM stage I and II.

  • 30.
    Gao, Jingfang
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The different roles of hRAD50 in microsatellite stable and unstable colorectal cancers2008In: Disease Markers, ISSN 0278-0240, E-ISSN 1875-8630, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 127-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RAD50 protein is essential for DNA double-strand break repair and maintaining genomic integrity. In this study, we investigated the clinicopathological significance of hRAD50 expression and mutation in microsatellite stable (MSS) and unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers (CRCs). hRAD50 expression was examined in primary CRC (n=268), the corresponding distant (n=69) and adjacent normal mucosa (n=138), and lymph node metastasis (n=44) by immunohistochemistry. hRAD50 mutation was analyzed in 87 primary CRCs by PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing. hRAD50 expression was increased in MSS primary CRCs, but not MSI ones, compared with distant/adjacent normal mucosa (p<0.05). There was no difference in the hRAD50 expression between primary and metastatic CRCs. The increased hRAD50 expression in MSS primary CRCs was related (p<0.05) or tended to be related (p=0.05) to early tumor stage, better differentiation, high inflammatory infiltration, p53 overexpression. Frameshift mutations of (A)_{9} at coding region of hRAD50 were only found in MSI CRCs. Our results suggest that hRAD50 may play different roles in the development of MSS and MSI CRCs: increased hRAD50 expression in MSS CRCs {may be a cellular response against tumor from further progression}, while hRAD50 mutation may be involved in the development of MSI CRCs.

  • 31.
    Gao, Xueshan
    et al.
    University of Louisville.
    Li Campian, Jian
    University of Louisville.
    Qian, Mingwei
    University of Louisville.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Wallace Eaton, John
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mitochondrial DNA Damage in Iron Overload2009In: JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, ISSN 0021-9258, Vol. 284, no 8, p. 4767-4775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic iron overload has slow and insidious effects on heart, liver, and other organs. Because iron-driven oxidation of most biologic materials (such as lipids and proteins) is readily repaired, this slow progression of organ damage implies some kind of biological "memory." We hypothesized that cumulative iron-catalyzed oxidant damage to mtDNA might occur in iron overload, perhaps explaining the often lethal cardiac dysfunction. Real time PCR was used to examine the " intactness" of mttDNA in cultured H9c2 rat cardiac myocytes. After 3 -5 days exposure to high iron, these cells exhibited damage to mtDNA reflected by diminished amounts of near full-length 15.9-kb PCR product with no change in the amounts of a 16.1-kb product from a nuclear gene. With the loss of intact mtDNA, cellular respiration declined and mRNAs for three electron transport chain subunits and 16 S rRNA encoded by mtDNA decreased, whereas no decrements were found in four subunits encoded by nuclear DNA. To examine the importance of the interactions of iron with metabolically generated reactive oxygen species, we compared the toxic effects of iron in wild-type and rhoo cells. In wild-type cells, elevated iron caused increased production of reactive oxygen species, cytostasis, and cell death, whereas the rhoo cells were unaffected. We conclude that long-term damage to cells and organs in iron-overload disorders involves interactions between iron and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species resulting in cumulative damage to mtDNA, impaired synthesis of respiratory chain subunits, and respiratory dysfunction.

  • 32.
    Gao, Xueshan
    et al.
    University of Louisville.
    Li Campian, Jian
    University of Louisville.
    Qian, Mingwei
    University of Louisville.
    Willer, Sharon S
    University of Louisville.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Eaton, John W
    University of Louisville.
    DNA Damage Underlies the Cytotoxic Effects of Free Iron2008In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine: Volume 45, Supplement 1: SFRBM's 15th Annual Meeting, 2008, Vol. 45, p. S144-S144Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Gao, Xueshan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qian, Mingwei
    James Graham Brown Cancer Centre.
    Li Campian, Jian
    James Graham Brown Cancer Centre.
    Marshall, James
    University of Louisville.
    Zhou, Zhanxiang
    University of Louisville.
    Roberts, Andrew M.
    University of Louisville.
    Kang, Y. James
    University of Louisville.
    Prabhu, Sumanth D.
    University of Louisville.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Eaton, John W.
    University of Louisville.
    Mitochondrial dysfunction may explain the cardiomyopathy of chronic iron overload2010In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 401-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In patients with hemochromatosis, cardiac dysfunction may appear years after they have reached a state of iron overload. We hypothesized that cumulative iron-catalyzed oxidant damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) might explain the cardiomyopathy of chronic iron overload. Mice were given repetitive injections of iron dextran for a total of 4 weeks after which the iron-loaded mice had elevated cardiac iron, modest cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac dysfunction. OCR amplification of near-full-length (similar to 16 kb) mtDNA revealed greater than50% loss of full-length product, whereas amounts of a OCR product of a nuclear gene (13 kb region of beta globin) were unaffected. Quantitative rtPCR analyses revealed 60-70% loss of mRNA for proteins encoded by mtDNA with no change in mRNA abundance for nuclear-encoded respiratory subunits. These changes coincided with proportionate reductions in complex I and IV activities and decreased respiration of isolated cardiac mitochondria. We conclude that chronic iron overload leads to cumulative iron-mediated damage to mtDNA and impaired synthesis of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits. The resulting respiratory dysfunction may explain the slow development of cardiomyopathy in chronic iron overload and similar accumulation of damage to mtDNA may also explain the mitochondrial dysfunction observed in slowly progressing diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders.

  • 34.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Capodanno, Alessandra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahl Ejby Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 49, p. 81634-81644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. Several studies have shown that radiation enhances migration and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model.

    Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected the cells in zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail.

    Results Migration and invasion was decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown could abolish this effect. The results from the zebrafish model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells.

    Conclusion Our results demonstrate that AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced migration and invasion. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression. The zebrafish model can be used to study early events in radiation-enhanced invasion.

  • 35.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shen, Yang Mei
    Sichuan University, China.
    Wang, Chao-Jie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Skövde University, Sweden.
    Stratmann, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery VHN.
    Expression of AEG-1 mRNA and protein in colorectal cancer patients and colon cancer cell lines2012In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 10, no 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Astrocyte elevated gene 1 (AEG-1), an important oncogene, has been shown to be overexpressed in several types of cancers. In colorectal cancer (CRC), the protein level of AEG-1 is up-regulated in tumour tissue compared to normal mucosa, showing prognostic significance. Since little is known about the transcriptional level of AEG-1 expression and its biological pathway in CRC the aim of the present study was to examine the relationship of AEG-1 mRNA expression, the protein level and clinicopathological variables as well as its biology pathway in CRC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterial and methods: The mRNA expression of AEG-1 was analysed by qPCR in fresh frozen patient samples including 156 primary tumours, along with the corresponding normal mucosa, and in five colon cancer cell lines, SW480, SW620, KM12C, KM12SM and KM12L4a. AEG-1 protein expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded materials from 74 distant normal mucosa, 107 adjacent mucosa, 158 primary tumour, 35 lymph node metastasis and 9 liver metastasis samples. In addition, the AEG-1 protein expression was elucidated in the cell lines by Western blot. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The lymph node metastatic cell line SW620 had a significantly higher AEG-1 mRNA (0.27 +/- 0.02) expression compared to the primary tumour cell line SW480 (0.17 +/- 0.04, p = 0.026). AEG-1 expression at the mRNA level and/or the protein level was significantly up-regulated gradually from normal mucosa to primary CRC, and then to lymph node metastasis and finally to liver metastasis (p andlt; 0.05). There were significant associations of AEG-1 mRNA expression with tumour location (p = 0.047), as well as mRNA and protein expression with the tumour stage (p andlt; 0.03). Furthermore AEG-1 protein expression was positively related to biological variables including NF-kappa B, p73, Rad50 and apoptosis (p andlt; 0.05). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: AEG-1 is up-regulated, at the mRNA and the protein level, during CRC development and aggressiveness, and is related to tumour location and stage. It may play its role in CRC through the NF-kappa B signaling pathway.

  • 36.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ticha, Ivana
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Institute of Pathology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Haapaniemi, Staffan
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    MTDH genetic variants in colorectal cancer patients2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer worldwide and accounts for around 8.5% of all cancer related death. The colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex process of genetic alterations. For better prognosis it is very important to understand the composition of genetic alterations in a tumor. Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) has been shown to be overexpressed in CRC and had prognostic significance. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and the spectrum of MTDH variants, and their relationship to clinicopathological variables in CRC patients. The study included tumors from 356 unselected CRC patients. Mutation analysis of the MTDH gene, including coding region and adjacent intronic sequences, was performed by direct DNA sequencing. We detected 42 intronic variants, whereby 25 were novel. Furthermore, we found eight exonic variants of which four, one missense (c.977C>G) and three frameshift mutations (c.533delA, c.1731delA, c.1340dupA), were novel. In silico prediction analyses revealed that four variants c.232G>T, c.533delA, c.1340dupA and c.1731delA were deleterious. There were no correlations between the MTDH variants and tumor stage, differentiation or patient survival. The detection of pathogenic mutations and alterations in functional protein domains suggest their involvement in tumorigenesis, although none of the variants had prognostic potential.

  • 37.
    Gnosa, Sebastian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, H.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Brodin Patcha, Veronika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adell, G.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    AEG-1 expression is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy: a study in a Swedish clinical trial2014In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 166-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used to downstage rectal tumours, but the rate of recurrence varies significantly. Therefore, new biomarkers are needed for better treatment and prognosis. It has been shown that astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a key mediator of migration, invasion, and treatment resistance. Our aim was to analyse the AEG-1 expression in relation to RT in rectal cancer patients and to test its radiosensitising properties.

    METHODS:

    The AEG-1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 158 patients from the Swedish clinical trial of RT. Furthermore, we inhibited the AEG-1 expression by siRNA in five colon cancer cell lines and measured the survival after irradiation by colony-forming assay.

    RESULTS:

    The AEG-1 expression was increased in the primary tumours compared with the normal mucosa independently of the RT (P<0.01). High AEG-1 expression in the primary tumour of the patients treated with RT correlated independently with higher risk of distant recurrence (P=0.009) and worse disease-free survival (P=0.007). Downregulation of AEG-1 revealed a decreased survival after radiation in radioresistant colon cancer cell lines.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The AEG-1 expression was independently related to distant recurrence and disease-free survival in rectal cancer patients with RT and could therefore be a marker to discriminate patients for distant relapse.

  • 38.
    He, Lu-Jun
    et al.
    Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China..
    Yu, Yue-Ming
    Hospital of Hebei Medical University.
    Qiao, Fang
    Hebei Province Blood Center.
    Liu, Jing-Shan
    Hebei Province Blood Center.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jiang, Ling-Ling
    Hebei Medical University.
    Genetic polymorphisms of N-acetyltransferase 2 and colorectal cancer risk.2005In: World Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 1007-9327, E-ISSN 2219-2840, Vol. 11, no 27, p. 4268-4271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To identify the distribution of N-acetyltrasferase 2(NAT2) polymorphism in Hebei Han Chinese and the effects of the polymorphism on the development of colorectal cancer. METHODS: We performed a hospital-based case-control study of 237 healthy individuals and 83 colorectal cancer patients of Hebei Han Chinese. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and cancer tissues. The genotypes of the polymorphisms were assessed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). RESULTS: There were four NAT2 alleles of WT, M1, M2, and M3 both in the healthy subjects and in the patients, and 10 genotypes of WT/WT, WT/M1, WT/M2, WT/M3, M1/M1, M1/M2, M1/M3, M2/M2, M2/M3, M3/M3. M2 allele was present in 15.61% of healthy subjects and 29.52% of patients (chi(2) = 15.31, P<0.0001), and M3 allele was present in 30.59% of healthy subjects and 16.87% of patients (chi(2) = 25.33, P<0.0001). There were more WT/M2 (chi(2) = 34.42, P<0.0001, odd ratio = 4.99, 95%CI = 2.27-9.38) and less WT/M3 (chi(2) = 3.80, P = 0.03) in the patients than in the healthy subjects. In 70.3% of the patients, there was a difference in NAT2 genotype between their tumors and blood cells. Patients had more WT/M2 (chi(2) = 5.11, P = 0.02) and less M2/M3 (chi(2) = 4.27, P = 0.039) in their blood cells than in the tumors. Furthermore, 53.8% (7/13) of M2/M3 in tumors were from WT/M2 of blood cells. CONCLUSION: There is a possible relationship between the NAT2 polymorphisms and colorectal cancer in Hebei Han Chinese. The genotype WT/M2 may be a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

  • 39.
    Holmqvist, A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gao, Jingfang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    The location of lymphangiogenesis is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancers with or without preoperative radiotherapy2010In: ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, ISSN 0923-7534, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 512-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis are essential for tumour development and progression. The lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and blood vessel density (BVD) and their relationship to outcome have been studied extensively, however the clinical significance of the location of LVD/BVD in tumour is not known. In the present study, the location and degree of LVD/BVD and their relationship to preoperative radiotherapy (RT), clinicopathological, histopathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients participating in a Swedish clinical trial of preoperative RT. Patients and methods: The location and degree of LVD/BVD were analysed in primary tumours (n = 138/140) and in their subgroups of non-RT (n = 74) and RT (n = 64/66). Further, the degree of LVD/BVD was examined in the corresponding distant normal mucosa (n = 35/31) and adjacent normal mucosa (n = 72/91). All sections were immunohistochemically examined by using D2-40 and CD34 antibodies. Results: In the whole series of the patients, a higher LVD at the periphery was related to negative p53 expression (P = 0.03) and favourable survival independent of tumour-node-metastasis stage, differentiation and p53 expression (P = 0.03). LVD was increased in p53-negative tumours after RT (P = 0.01). Conclusion: LVD at the periphery of the tumour was an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients.

  • 40.
    Holmqvist Knutsen, Annica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Gao, Jing-Fang
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Adell, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    PINCH is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients without preoperative radiotherapy: A study in a Swedish rectal cancer trial of preoperative radiotherapy2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, no 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose: The clinical significance between particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH) expression and radiotherapy (RT) in tumours is not known. In this study, the expression of PINCH and its relationship to RT, clinical, pathological and biological factors were studied in rectal cancer patients.

    Material and Methods: PINCH expression determined by immunohistochemistry was analysed at the invasive margin and inner tumour area in 137 primary rectal adenocarcinomas (72 cases without RT and 65 cases with RT). PINCH expression in colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18 Co) was determined by Western blot.

    Results: In patients without RT, strong PINCH expression at the invasive margin of primary tumours was related to worse survival, compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage and differentiation (p = 0.03). No survival relationship in patients with RT was observed (p = 0.64). Comparing the non-RT with RT subgroup, there was no difference in PINCH expression in primary tumours (invasive margin (p = 0.68)/inner tumour area (p = 0.49).

    Conclusions: PINCH expression at the invasive margin was an independent prognostic factor in patients without RT. RT does not seem to directly affect the PINCH expression.

     

  • 41.
    Holmqvist (Knutsen), Annica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ardsby, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pathak, Surajit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    PINCH expression in relation to radiation response in co-cultured colon cancer cells and in rectal cancer patients2013In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 2097-2104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particularly interesting new cysteine-histidine rich protein (PINCH), involved in cell spreading, motility and proliferation, has been shown to enhance radioresistance in colon cancer cell lines. The expression of PINCH in relation to radiation was studied in co-cultured colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the clinical significance between PINCH and radiotherapy (RT) was analyzed in rectal cancer patients with or without RT. The relative PINCH expression in colon cancer (KM12C) cells cultured separately and in co-culture was examined by western blotting and real-time PCR, and was analyzed over a period of 8 and 24 h after radiation. PINCH expression was immunohistochemically examined in 137 primary rectal tumors for which 65 cases did not receive RT and 72 cases received RT. PINCH expression tended to decrease from that in the separately cultured KM12C cells without radiation to that in cells with radiation at 8 h (P=0.060); while in the co-cultured cells, no significant difference was found (P=0.446). In patients with RT, strong PINCH expression was related to worse survival, when compared to patients with weak expression, independent of TNM stage, degree of differentiation, age and p53 status (P=0.029, RR 4.03, 95% CI 1.34-12.1). No survival relationship for the patients without RT was observed (P=0.287). A statistical interaction analysis between PINCH, RT and survival showed a trend towards significance (P=0.057). In conclusion, PINCH predicts survival in rectal cancer patients with RT, but not in patients without RT. The expression of PINCH may be regulated by radiation and by environmental factors surrounding the cells.

  • 42. Iacopetta, B
    et al.
    Russo, A
    Bazan, V
    Dardanoni, G
    Gebbia, N
    Soussi, T
    Kerr, D
    Elsaleh, H
    Soong, R
    Kandioler, D
    Janschek, E
    Kappel, S
    Lung, M
    Leung, C-S S
    Ko, J M
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Shorthouse, AJ
    Silverman, ML
    Kato, S
    Ishioka, C
    Functional categories of TP53 mutation in colorectal cancer: results of an International Collaborative Study2006In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 17, p. 842-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 43.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    mRNA and protein expression of PUMA in sporadic colorectal cancer.2004In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1245-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PUMA is a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, up-regulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. We have investigated the mRNA expression of PUMA with real-time PCR in 94 colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Among them PUMA protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry in 23 tumours and 17 corresponding normal mucosa samples. The mRNA expression of PUMA decreased in 4% and increased in 4% of the tumours compared with the normal mucosa. The protein expression of PUMA decreased in 6% and increased in 29% of the tumours compared with the normal mucosa. Decreased PUMA expression in the tumour compared with the corresponding mucosa was correlated with the distal colon and rectum (P=0.02). We did not find any other relationship to clinical or pathological features. We suggest that the changes in PUMA expression may be of minor importance in the development of colorectal cancer.

  • 44.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Combined deficiency of hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 is an independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer2003In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined biological and clinicopathological significance of individual and combined hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6 expression with immunohistochemistry in 301 unselected colorectal cancers. Weak hMLH1 expression was correlated to microsatellite instability (P=0.04), negative p53 expression (P=0.005) and mucinous carcinomas (P=0.02). Weak hMSH2 expression was related to negative ras (P<0.001) and p53 expression (P=0.005), and better survival (P=0.03). hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, as well as hMLH1, hMSH2, hMSH3 and hMSH6, were combined into a 'functional' and a 'less-functional' group, respectively. Both 'less-functional' groups were/tended to be associated with microsatellite instability, negative ras and p53 expression, and better survival. In summary, hMLH1 and hMSH2 were more important when investigated individually, and the combined groups were more related to the mutator pathway, suggesting that combined deficiencies of the proteins are more efficiently involved in the mutator pathway. Our result from weak versus strong staining may suggest that the intensity of staining should be considered in future studies on mismatch repair proteins.

  • 45.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Emterling, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Noxa in colorectal cancer: A study on DNA, mRNA and protein expression2003In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 22, no 30, p. 4675-4678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noxa is a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, upregulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. Mutations in the BH3-only region of other BH3-only members lead to an inactive protein. We have investigated the mRNA expression of Noxa with real-time PCR in 94 unselected colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Among them, Noxa protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry in 16 tumors and six corresponding normal mucosa samples. Further, we searched for Noxa mutations in all the cases using single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The mRNA expression of Noxa was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumors, and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumors compared with the normal mucosa, however, these changes did not have any clinical or pathological significance. The protein level in most of the cases investigated was correlated with the mRNA level. We did not find any mutations in the Noxa gene. Thus, we suggest that Noxa may not be of importance in the development of colorectal cancer.

  • 46.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gentile, Massamiliano
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 mutations are present in colorectal cancer with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation2001In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 92, no 3, p. 338-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that nuclear p53 over-expression is an indicator of p53 mutations whereas cytoplasmic p53 accumulation is related to wild-type p53 in several kinds of tumors. Cytoplasmic p53 accumulation has been demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinomas. The purpose was to examine whether mutations occur in cases with p53 accumulated in the cytoplasm and whether there are any differences in the frequency and characteristics of p53 mutations in different staining patterns. In the present study, we identified p53 mutations using PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing in 75 primary colorectal adenocarcinomas with different staining patterns (negative, nucleus, cytoplasm, nucleus and cytoplasm). The results show that the frequency and nature of mutations in tumors with cytoplasmic p53 accumulation were similar to those with nuclear p53 expression. However, the tumors with accumulation in both the nucleus and cytoplasm demonstrated a higher mutation rate. We suppose that the role of cytoplasmic p53 accumulation in predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer may be dependent on both mutational and non-mutational mechanisms.

  • 47.
    Jansson, Agneta K.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Emterling, Anna M.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbman, Gunnar
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The BH3-only member Noxa may not be involved in the development of unselected colorectal cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Noxa is an BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 family, upregulated by p53 as a response to DNA damage. Mutations in the BH3-only region of other BH3-only members lead to an inactive protein. We have investigated the mRNA expression of Noxa with real-time PCR in 94 unselected colorectal adenocarcinomas and the corresponding normal mucosa. Further, we searched for mutations in the Noxa gene using single stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The mRNA expression of Noxa was weak in 9% and strong in 2% of the tumours and decreased in 9% and increased in 16% of the tumours compared to the normal mucosa, but these changes did not have any clinical or pathological significance. We did not find any mutations in the gene. Thus, our observations suggest that the variations in Noxa gene may not be of particular importance in the development of unselected colorectal cancer.

  • 48.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bax expression decreases significantly from primary tumor to metastasis in colorectal cancer2002In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 811-816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Bax is a proapoptotic member of the bcl-2 family. Previous studies about Bax have shown that the expression increases from normal to tumor tissue, but the clinical significance is contradictory. Our aims were to analyze the expression of Bax from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases in colorectal cancer patient. We further investigated whether low Bax expression in the primary tumor or changed expression from normal mucosa to primary tumor and to metastases had biologic and clinical significance.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 135 patients with primary colorectal adenocarcinoma, of whom 31 had metastases in the lymph nodes and 75 had normal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry, DNA sequencing, and microsatellite analysis were used to detect Bax expression, mutations, and microsatellite instability.

    RESULTS: The protein was observed in 132 of 135 tumors, all normal epithelial cells and metastases. The frequencies of weak expression were greater from well/moderately to poorly differentiated and to mucinous carcinomas. Bax expression was stronger from normal to tumor tissue, but subsequently decreased in metastases. The matched cases with lower expression in the metastases than in the primary tumor showed a more infiltrative growth pattern and more distal metastases.

    CONCLUSION: The association of Bax expression with tumor differentiation/histologic types and a decreased expression in the metastases, suggests that Bax expression may be involved in tumor differentiation/histologic types and metastatic progression. We also propose the novel notion that changed Bax expression in the metastases compared with the primary tumors might provide information to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics of the tumor.

  • 49.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ki-67 expression in relation to clinicopathological variables and prognosis in colorectal adenocarcinomas1997In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 730-734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ki-67 is a protein associated with cell proliferation which is expressed in all phases of the cell cycle except Go. In the present study, Ki-67 expression in 255 human colorectal adenocarcinomas was examined using immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibody MIB-1. One hundred and fifty-seven (62%) cases had more than 50% positive tumour cells and 98 (38%) cases less than 50%. The tumours showed a wide range of Ki-67 expression, from 13% to 90%, which indicated a variation in proliferative activity. There was no significant relationship between Ki-67 expression and sex, age, tumour location, Dukes' stage, growth pattern, differentiation, DNA content, S-phase fraction or survival (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the proliferative activity as measured by Ki-67 antibody was not related to clinicopathology and prognosis in colorectal cancer.

  • 50.
    Jung, Michaela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Holmqvist, Annica
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Albertsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    A clinical study of metastasized rectal cancer treatment: assessing a multimodal approach2014In: Medical Oncology, ISSN 1357-0560, E-ISSN 1559-131X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 839-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastasized rectal cancer has long been considered incurable. During recent years, the treatment of rectal cancer patients has been improved, and nowadays, a subgroup of patients might even be cured. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal timing of treatment in a multimodal therapy schedule in order to see whether the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to conventional chemotherapy was effective. The study included 39 patients with metastatic rectal cancer between 2009 and 2011, and three were excluded due to the lack of metastases or lack of follow-up information. The remaining 36 patients were divided into groups by treatment intention. The group with curative intention received mainly oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months followed by preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and surgery. Palliative patients had very different treatments depending on their needs of palliation. The median survival time for patients with curative intention was 31 months and for the palliative patients 12 months. Four of the patients (11%) with curative intention were considered cured at the end of follow-up. The response to chemotherapy after 2-month treatment is a good prognostic sign for which patients can be cured. Long-lasting palliation can be obtained with this treatment schedule. The main side effects were gastrointestinal events, including bowel perforation, neuropathy, thrombo-embolic disease and reduced general condition. All side effects are known, and the treatment is considered tolerable. We conclude that a good treatment schedule would be oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) in combination with capecitabine (Xeloda) with or without bevacizumab (Avastin) for 2 months, followed by preoperative RT and surgery.

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