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  • 1.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ölvander, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Alcohol use among university students in Sweden measured by an electronic screening instrument2009In: BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electronic-based alcohol screening and brief interventions for university students with problem drinking behaviours forms an important means by which to identify risky drinkers. Methods: In this study an e-SBI project was implemented to assess drinking patterns, and to provide personalised feedback about alcohol consumption and related health problems, to students in a Swedish university. In this study, third semester university students (n = 2858) from all faculties (colleges) at the University were invited to participate in e-SBI screenings. This study employed a randomised controlled trial, with respondents having a equal chance of being assigned to a limited, or full-feedback response. Results: The study shows that high risk drinkers tend to underestimate their own consumption compared to others, and that these high risk drinkers experience more negative consequences after alcohol intake, than other respondents. There was a strong belief, for both high-and low-risk drinkers, that alcohol helped celebrations be more festive. This study also confirms findings from other study locations that while males drank more than females in our study population; females reached the same peak alcohol blood concentrations as males. Conclusion: Obtaining clear and current information on drinking patterns demonstrated by university students can help public health officials, university administration, and local health care providers develop appropriate prevention and treatment strategies.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Kristin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Implementing healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care: a quasi-experimental cross-sectional study evaluating a team initiative2015In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 15, no 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Non-communicable diseases are a leading cause of death and can largely be prevented by healthy lifestyles. Health care organizations are encouraged to integrate healthy lifestyle promotion in routine care. This study evaluates the impact of a team initiative on healthy lifestyle promotion in primary care.

    Methods: A quasi-experimental, cross-sectional design compared three intervention centres that had implemented lifestyle teams with three control centres that used a traditional model of care. Outcomes were defined using the RE-AIM framework: reach, the proportion of patients receiving lifestyle promotion; effectiveness, self-reported attitudes and competency among staff; adoption, proportion of staff reporting regular practice of lifestyle promotion; implementation, fidelity to the original lifestyle team protocol. Data collection methods included a patient questionnaire (n = 888), a staff questionnaire (n = 120) and structured interviews with all practice managers and, where applicable, team managers (n = 8). The chi square test and problem-driven content analysis was used to analyse the questionnaire and interview data, respectively.

    Results:Reach: patients at control centres (48%, n = 211) received lifestyle promotion significantly more often compared with patients at intervention centres (41%, n = 169). Effectiveness: intervention staff was significantly more positive towards the effectiveness of lifestyle promotion, shared competency and how lifestyle promotion was prioritized at their centre. Adoption: 47% of staff at intervention centres and 58% at control centres reported that they asked patients about their lifestyle on a daily basis. Implementation: all intervention centres had implemented multi-professional teams and team managers and held regular meetings but struggled to implement in-house referral structures for lifestyle promotion, which was used consistently among staff.

    Conclusions:Intervention centres did not show higher rates than control centres on reach of patients or adoption among staff at this stage. All intervention centres struggled to implement working referral structures for lifestyle promotion. Intervention centres were more positive on effectiveness outcomes, attitudes and competency among staff, however. Thus, lifestyle teams may facilitate lifestyle promotion practice in terms of increased responsiveness among staff, illustrated by positive attitudes and perceptions of shared competency. More research is needed on lifestyle promotion referral structures in primary care regarding their configuration and implementation.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health related quality of life in Crohn's proctocolitis does not differ from a general population when in remission2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  All treatment in Crohn's disease, although palliative, aims at restoring full health. The objective of this study was to compare health-related quality of life and psychosocial conditions in patients with Crohn's proctocolitis with a general population.

    Patients and methods  One hundred and twenty-seven patients with Crohn's proctocolitis (median age 44 years, 44.1% men) were compared with 266 controls (median age 45 years, 50.7% men). A questionnaire consisting of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluating general health as well as questions regarding psychosocial conditions was used. Disease activity was evaluated by Best's modification of the classical Crohn's Disease Activity Index.

    Results  Patients in remission had a health related quality of life similar to controls according to the SF-36 apart from general health where scores were lower (P < 0.01). Patients with active disease scored lower in all aspects of the SF-36 (P < 0.001 or P < 0.0001) as well as the PGWB (P < 0.0001). In a model for multiple regression including age, gender, concomitant small bowel disease, permanent stoma, previous colonic surgery, disease activity, duration, and aggressiveness, disease activity was the only variable negatively predicting all 8 domains of the SF-36 in the patient group (P < 0.001). The mean annual sick-leave for patients and controls were 33.9 and 9.5 days (P < 0.0001), respectively. Sixty-eight percent of the patients and 78.4% of the controls (P = 0.04) were married or cohabited, 67.7% and 78.0% (P = 0.04), respectively, had children.

    Conclusion  The health related quality of life for patients with Crohn's proctocolitis in remission does not differ from the general population. The disease has, however, a negative impact on parenthood, family life and professional performance.

  • 4. Balldin, J
    et al.
    Berglund, M
    Borg, S
    Mansson, M
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency.
    Franck, J
    Gustafsson, L
    Halldin, J
    Nilsson, LH
    Stolt, G
    Willander, A
    A 6-month controlled naltrexone study: Combined effect with cognitive behavioral therapy in outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence2003In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 1142-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In several studies, patients with alcohol dependence treated with the opioid antagonist naltrexone have shown fewer relapses to heavy drinking than those receiving placebo. An interaction between the naltrexone effect and the type of psychological therapy has been observed. Methods: A 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was performed at 10 different investigation sites. After a placebo run-in period of 1 week, 118 patients were randomized into 4 treatment groups - 50 mg of naltrexone daily or placebo in combination with either cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or supportive therapy. The CBT was performed over nine sessions according to the manual of Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity). The supportive therapy was defined as "the treatment as usual." Alcohol consumption, craving, carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, medication compliance by tablet count, and adverse clinical events were assessed at all visits. Other liver enzymes and psychiatric symptoms were also determined. Results: Ninety-one (77%) patients completed the study, and 92 (78%) were 80% compliant with the medication regimen. A lower percentage of heavy-drinking days was shown in the naltrexone group (p = 0.045) compared with the placebo group, as was a lower craving score (p = 0.029). These results are supported by the lower levels of liver enzyme activities (p < 0.010 for aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and ?-glutamyltransferase), but not by the carbohydrate-deficient transferrin levels, in the naltrexone group. The mean time period before the first day of heavy drinking was longer for the group treated with CBT (p = 0.010), especially in combination with naltrexone (p = 0.007). Naltrexone was well tolerated, and no patients discontinued the study due to side effects. Conclusions: This study supports the effect of naltrexone in outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence and suggests that a beneficial interaction effect with CBT can be expected.

  • 5. Barnett, NP
    et al.
    Monti, PM
    Cherpitel, C
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency.
    Borges, G
    Colby, SM
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Identification and brief treatment of alcohol problems with medical patients: An international perspective2003In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 262-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium at the 2002 RSA meeting in San Francisco, California. The chair was Peter Monti and co-chair was Nancy Barnett. The aim of the symposium was to bring together researchers from the United States, Sweden, and Mexico to present current findings on the development and implementation of screening and intervention research in Emergency Departments (ED). Cheryl Cherpitel presented findings on the performance of the Rapid Alcohol Problems Screen (RAPS4), a 4-item instrument used for screening for alcohol dependence and harmful drinking in the ED. Dr. Cherpitel also presented for her collaborator, Guilherme Borges, their research on the performance of a number of screening measures including the RAPS among Mexicans and Mexican-Americans with alcohol-related disorders in the ED. Preben Bendtsen described the implementation of an alcohol screening and intervention procedure delivered by ordinary ED staff in Sweden. Nancy Barnett presented data on characteristics related to readiness to change alcohol use in a sample of young adults who were treated in an ED for injury or intoxication.

  • 6.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Feasibility of a Fully Automated Multiple Session Alcohol Intervention to University Students, Using Different Modes of Electronic Delivery: The TOPHAT 1 Study2013In: Journal of Software Engineering and Applications, ISSN 1945-3116, E-ISSN 1945-3124, no 6, p. 14-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In recent years more and more electronic health behaviour interventions have been developed in order to reach individuals with an unhealthy behaviour such as risky drinking. This is especially relevant in university students who are among those who most frequently are risky drinkers. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility, in an unselected group of university students, of a fully automated multiple session alcohol intervention offering different modes of delivery such as email, SMS and Android.

    Material and Methods: A total of 11,283 students at Linköping University in Sweden were invited to perform a single session alcohol intervention and among those accepting this (4916 students) a total of 24.7% accepted to further participate in the extended multiple intervention lasting 3 - 6 weeks. The students could choose mode of delivery, total length of the intervention (between 3 - 6 weeks) and number of messages per week (3, 5, or 7 per week). A follow-up questionnaire was applied after the intervention to which 82.7% responded.

    Results: most students wanted to receive the messages by email with the shortest intervention length (3 weeks) and as few messages as possible per week (3 messages). However, no major difference was seen regarding satisfaction with the length and frequency of the intervention despite chosen length and frequency. Most students also expressed satisfaction with the content of the messages and would recommend the intervention to a fellow student in need of reducing drinking.

    Discussion and Conclusion: Based upon feedback from the students, a multiple push-based intervention appears to be feasible to offer additional help for those who have interest after a single session alcohol intervention. In a forthcoming study we will further explore the optimal mode of delivery and length of intervention and number of messages per week.

  • 7.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Feasibility and user perception of a fully automated push-based multiple-session alcohol intervention for university students: randomized controlled trial.2014In: JMIR mhealth and uhealth, E-ISSN 2291-5222, Vol. 2, no 2, p. e30-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, many electronic health behavior interventions have been developed in order to reach individuals with unhealthy behaviors, such as risky drinking. This is especially relevant for university students, many of whom are risky drinkers.

    OBJECTIVE: This study explored the acceptability and feasibility in a nontreatment-seeking group of university students (including both risk and nonrisk drinkers), of a fully automated, push-based, multiple-session, alcohol intervention, comparing two modes of delivery by randomizing participants to receive the intervention either by SMS text messaging (short message service, SMS) or by email.

    METHODS: A total of 5499 students at Luleå University in northern Sweden were invited to participate in a single-session alcohol assessment and feedback intervention; 28.04% (1542/5499) students completed this part of the study. In total, 29.44% (454/1542) of those participating in the single-session intervention accepted to participate further in the extended multiple-session intervention lasting for 4 weeks. The students were randomized to receive the intervention messages via SMS or email. A follow-up questionnaire was sent immediately after the intervention and 52.9% (240/454) responded.

    RESULTS: No difference was seen regarding satisfaction with the length and frequency of the intervention, regardless of the mode of delivery. Approximately 15% in both the SMS (19/136) and email groups (15/104) would have preferred the other mode of delivery. On the other hand, more students in the SMS group (46/229, 20.1%) stopped participating in the intervention during the 4-week period compared with the email group (10/193, 5.2%). Most students in both groups expressed satisfaction with the content of the messages and would recommend the intervention to a fellow student in need of reducing drinking. A striking difference was seen regarding when a message was read; 88.2% (120/136) of the SMS group read the messages within 1 hour in contrast to 45.2% (47/104) in the email group. In addition, 83.1% (113/136) in the SMS group stated that they read all or almost all the messages, compared with only 63.5% (66/104) in the email group.

    CONCLUSIONS: Based on the feedback from the students, an extended, multiple-session, push-based intervention seems to be a feasible option for students interested in additional support after a single-session alcohol intervention. SMS as a mode of delivery seems to have some advantages over email regarding when a message is read and the proportion of messages read. However, more students in the SMS group stopped the intervention than in the email group. Based on these promising findings, further studies comparing the effectiveness of single-session interventions with extended multiple-session interventions delivered separately or in combination are warranted.

  • 8.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rheumatoid arthritis - patient perception of disease, care, quality of life, coping and well-being: a study from a Swedish health care district1994Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past decades, the focus of outcome studies in chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has changed from a technical and biological preoccupation towards a more patient-concemed psychosocial perspective. The changing paradigm of chronic disease impact has been conceptualised in a number of self-report health status and outcome measurements that have been called 11one of the primary achievements of rheumatology in the 1980s". The overall aim of the study was to make a broad elucidation of the perceived selfMreported impact of rheumatoid arthritis in a representative group of individuals from a health care district, with regard to treatment and care, quality oflife, coping and well-being.

    A total of 321 patients from a health care district in the northern part of Kalmar county, Sweden, with both early/mild and more severe disease were enrolled in the first part of the study, in which the medical records of these individuals were scrutinised for information about previous treatment and care. In the second part of the study, 222 of the initial 321 persons participated in an extensive postal survey exploring perceived impact of RA by self-report.

    The uncertain outcome of RA disease was emphasised by a high frequency of discontinuations of drug therapy due to lack of effect or side-effects. Underlining the lack of a medical cure for RA, more than 40% of the individuals had undergone some kind of surgical procedure due to the disease. The rehabilitation services to individuals with RA appear to be functioning fairly adequately since those still working were employed in administrative work rather than in production. The participants indicated a preference for a good reception by health care workers rather than technically correct care. Only a minority of the patients who had been treated as in-patients felt that they had been involved in the planning of the care. Also, the physicians seemed to underestimate the patients desire for information concerning both medical and social aspects of the disease.

    Quality of life scores exhibited a change for the worse with increasing self-reported functional disability. Physical, psychological and social life domains were fairly highly interrelated and all revealed lower levels with increasing self-reported functional disability. Also, lower levels of well-being were closely associated with a more severe RA disease, in particular loneliness, indolence, tension, security, future-orientation and endurance. Coping and wellMbeing were only weakly interrelated, but individuals who declared an active lifostyle exhibited a better well-being with a higher basic mood, greater fotureorientation and less indolence, loneliness and inferiority. Individuals accepting the RA disease displayed less guilt and tension, and greater endurance and basic mood.

    The study depicts how individuals with RA in a health care district are provided with both the basic treatment and more specialised care in a collaboration between medical and surgical specialists. In general, satisfaction with the care provided was more closely related with clinical signs rather than self-reported functional performance, although the latter might more adequately reflect the perceived need of the patients. Thus, the results support the application of self-reported functional disability assessment in routine clinical rheumatological practice. The study displays methods that measure and quantify the increasing negative psychosocial impact of RA with increasing functional disability. Some evidence was also found supporting the inclusion of coping enhancement elements in health care programmes targeting patients with RA. Consequently, the inclusion of counselling enhancing acceptance of the RA and encouraging decisions about new relevant goals might, at least theoretically, increase well-being in patients with RA.

  • 9.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency in Linköping.
    Sekundärprevention av alkoholproblem inom hälso- och sjukvården2002In: Den svenska supen i det nya Europa: nya villkor för alkoholprevention : en kunskapsöversikt / [ed] Sven Andréasson, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2002, p. 159-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En kunskapsöversikt som tar upp olika risk- och skyddsfaktorer för alkoholproblem och beskriver vilka åtgärder som har bäst förebyggande effekt. Boken är skriven av några av landets mest framstående alkohol- och preventionsforskare

  • 10.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, England; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wojnar, Marcin
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland; University of Michigan, MI 48109 USA.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Newcastle University, England.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Colom, Joan
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brzozka, Krzysztof
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Newcastle University, England.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Katarzyna
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    Parkinson, Kathryn
    Newcastle University, England.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Ronda, Gaby
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Segura, Lidia
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Palacio, Jorge
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Baena, Begona
    Govt Catalonia, Spain.
    Slodownik, Luiza
    State Agency Prevent Alcohol Related Problems, Poland.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Wolstenholme, Amy
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Laurant, Miranda G. H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands; HAN University of Appl Science, Netherlands.
    Gual, Antoni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Professionals Attitudes Do Not Influence Screening and Brief Interventions Rates for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Results from ODHIN Study2015In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 430-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the relation between existing levels of alcohol screening and brief intervention rates in five European jurisdictions and role security and therapeutic commitment by the participating primary healthcare professionals. Health care professionals consisting of, 409 GPs, 282 nurses and 55 other staff including psychologists, social workers and nurse aids from 120 primary health care centres participated in a cross-sectional 4-week survey. The participants registered all screening and brief intervention activities as part of their normal routine. The participants also completed the Shortened Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), which measure role security and therapeutic commitment. The only significant but small relationship was found between role security and screening rate in a multilevel logistic regression analysis adjusted for occupation of the provider, number of eligible patients and the random effects of jurisdictions and primary health care units (PHCU). No significant relationship was found between role security and brief intervention rate nor between therapeutic commitment and screening rate/brief intervention rate. The proportion of patients screened varied across jurisdictions between 2 and 10%. The findings show that the studied factors (role security and therapeutic commitment) are not of great importance for alcohol screening and BI rates. Given the fact that screening and brief intervention implementation rate has not changed much in the last decade in spite of increased policy emphasis, training initiatives and more research being published, this raises a question about what else is needed to enhance implementation.

  • 11.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England.
    McCambridge, Jim
    University of York, England.
    Online Alcohol Assessment and Feedback for Hazardous and Harmful Drinkers: Findings From the AMADEUS-2 Randomized Controlled Trial of Routine Practice in Swedish Universities2015In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 17, no 7, p. e170-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research on the effectiveness of online alcohol interventions for college students has shown mixed results. Small benefits have been found in some studies and because online interventions are inexpensive and possible to implement on a large scale, there is a need for further study. Objective: This study evaluated the effectiveness of national provision of a brief online alcohol intervention for students in Sweden. Methods: Risky drinkers at 9 colleges and universities in Sweden were invited by mail and identified using a single screening question. These students (N=1605) gave consent and were randomized into a 2-arm parallel group randomized controlled trial consisting of immediate or delayed access to a fully automated online assessment and intervention with personalized feedback. Results: After 2 months, there was no strong evidence of effectiveness with no statistically significant differences in the planned analyses, although there were some indication of possible benefit in sensitivity analyses suggesting an intervention effect of a 10% reduction (95% CI -30% to 10%) in total weekly alcohol consumption. Also, differences in effect sizes between universities were seen with participants from a major university (n=365) reducing their weekly alcohol consumption by 14% (95% CI -23% to -4%). However, lower recruitment than planned and differential attrition in the intervention and control group (49% vs 68%) complicated interpretation of the outcome data. Conclusions: Any effects of current national provision are likely to be small and further research and development work is

  • 12.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Gronbeck, M
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Kjaer, SK
    Danish Cancer Society.
    Munk, C
    Danish Cancer Society.
    Linneberg, A
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Tolstrup, JS
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Alcohol consumption and the risk of self-reported perennial and seasonal allergic rhinitis in young adult women in a population-based cohort study2008In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1179-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Alcohol consumption has been suggested to be associated with the development of allergic rhinitis (AR), but there is limited data on the topic.

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of developing AR among young women.

    Methods Five thousand eight hundred and seventy Danish women aged 20–29 years participated in a prospective cohort study, and were free of seasonal and perennial AR at baseline (1991–1993). Alcohol consumption was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. The main outcome measures were self-reported information on seasonal and perennial AR debuting during a mean follow-up period of 7.8 years.

    Results During follow-up, 831 women developed seasonal AR and 523 women developed perennial AR, corresponding to 14% and 9%. Alcohol consumption was positively associated with the risk of developing perennial AR. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for perennial AR was 1.78 (95% CI, 1.13–2.80) among women drinking more than 14 drinks/week compared with women drinking <1 drink/week. There was no association between alcohol consumption and seasonal AR. Having one or two parents with asthma was, after adjustment, significantly associated with the risk of developing seasonal (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.65–2.45) and perennial AR (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.70–2.74). Smoking was not associated with an increased risk of developing AR.

    Conclusion In this population of young adult women, alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk of developing perennial AR.

  • 13.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency.
    Hensing, G
    Göteborg.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Self-perceived excessive alcohol consumption among employed women: Association with health and psychosocial factors2003In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 777-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 14.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hensing, G
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Ebeling, C
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Schedin, A
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    What are the qualities of dilemmas experienced when prescribing opioids in general practice? 1999In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 82, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hensing, G
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    McKenzie, L
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Stridsman, A-K
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Prescribing benzodiazepines - a critical incident study of a physician dilemma.  1999In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 49, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Johansson, K.
    Implementation of computerized alcohol screening and advice in an emergency department - a nursing staff perspective2007In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, E-ISSN 1532-9267, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in attitudes towards alcohol prevention among nursing staff are evaluated after implementing an opportunistic computerized alcohol screening and intervention (e-SBI) at an emergency department. After having assessed the patients in the triage room the nurses asked patients to perform the e-SBI on a touch screen computer. Before the start of the project more than 60% of the nurses expected the patients to react negatively when asked about their alcohol habits. After one year of screening only 10% reported experience of negative reactions from the patients. More than 50% of the nurses found it easy or very easy to ask the patients to perform the e-SBI and more than 75% of the nurses agreed that the e-SBI did not affect their workload. The proportion of nurses who considered alcohol prevention to be part of their duties at the emergency department did not change (40%) after implementing the e-SBI. During the two-year study period, 1982 patients completed the e-SBI which constituted 10-20% of all patients between 16 and 70 years of age attending the department for a sub critical condition. The e-SBI seems to have better potential than ordinary alcohol screening and intervention for implementation into routine emergency departments due to its simplicity and low time consumption. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hultberg, J
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Carlsson, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Jones, A Wayne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry.
    Monitoring ethanol exposure in a clinical setting by analysis of blood, breath, saliva, and urine.1999In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 23, p. 1446-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Vart är alkoholpreventionen inom primärvården på väg?2004In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Beroendekliniken IHS. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dependency.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    How to implement screening for high alcohol consumption in the daily routine in an emergency department2002In: 2002 Scieentific Meeting of the RSA and the 11th Congress of the ISBRA, San Fransisco 2002,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Feasibility of an email-based electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) to college students in Sweden.2006In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 31, p. 777-787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Jones, AW
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine.
    Impact of water-induced diuresis on excretion profiles of ethanol, urin-creatinine, and urine-osmolality. 1999In: Journal of Analytical Toxicology, ISSN 0146-4760, E-ISSN 1945-2403, Vol. 23, p. 565-569Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dalal, Koustuv
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hazardous Drinking Concepts, Limits and Methods: Low Levels of Awareness, Knowledge and Use in the Swedish Population.2011In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 638-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the awareness and knowledge of hazardous drinking limits among the general population in Sweden and the extent to which people estimate their alcohol consumption in standard drinks to assess their level of drinking.

    Methods: A population-based study involving 6000 individuals selected from the total Swedish population was performed. Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. The mail survey response rate was 54.3% (n = 3200) of the net sample of 5891 persons.

    Results: With regard to drinking patterns, 10% of the respondents were abstainers, 59% were sensible drinkers and 31% were classified as hazardous drinkers. Most of the abstainers (80%), sensible drinkers (64%) and hazardous drinkers (56%) stated that they had never heard about the standard drink method. Familiarity with the hazardous drinking concept also differed between the three categories although ∼61% of sensible and hazardous drinkers expressed awareness of the concept (46% of the abstainers). Knowledge about the limits for sensible drinking was very poor. Between 94 and 97% in the three categories did not know the limit. There was a statistically significant association between having visited health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits. Similarly, there was a significant association between having had at least one alcohol conversation in health care within the last 12 months and being aware of the standard drink method and the hazardous drinking concept, but not with knowing the hazardous drinking limits.

    Conclusion: The results can be seen as a major challenge for the health-care system and public health authorities because they imply that a large proportion of the Swedish population does not know when alcohol consumption becomes a threat to their health. The current strategy to disseminate knowledge about sensible drinking limits to the population through the health-care system seems to have failed and new means of informing the population are warranted.

  • 23.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leijon, M
    Sommer, Ann-Sofie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pulmonary Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    A s6-monthcontrolled naltrexonestudy: combined effect with cognitive behavioral therapy in outpatient treatment of alcohol dependence2003In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sommer, Ann Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measuring health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a routine hospital setting: Feasibility and perceived value2003In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 1, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Assessment of health-related quality of life is so far mainly used in specific research settings and not widely accepted in the routine care of patients. Lack of trust in accuracy and reliability and lack of knowledge concerning the questionnaires used, methods, terminology, are just some of the perceived barriers for a more widespread dissemination of these instruments into routine health care. The present study was undertaken in order to test the feasibility of a computerised system for collecting and analysing health-related quality of life in a routine clinical setting and to examine the thoughts and attitudes among physicians concerning the value of these measurements.

    Methods

    Seventy-four patients with chronic pulmonary lung disease were asked to assess their health-related quality of life with a computerised version of the SF-36 questionnaire before a regular the visit to a physician. The results were immediately available for the physician during the consultation for comparison of information given by the patients and the physician's evaluation of the patients overall health status. A focus group interview with the physicians was performed before and after the implementation of routine measurements of health-related quality of life.

    Results

    The systematic assessment concept worked satisfactorily. All patients approached agreed to participate and completed the assessment on the touch screen computer. A weak correlation was found between patients' self-rated health and pulmonary function and between physicians' evaluation and pulmonary function. The physicians appreciated the SF-36 assessments and the value of the patients' perspective although only a few could pinpoint new clinical decisions based upon this new information.

    Conclusion

    Physicians' clinical evaluation and patients' self-rating of health status offer unique and important information that are complementary.

  • 25.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lejman Dahlström, M
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bjurulf, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Sociodemographic gender differences in patients attending a community-based alcohol treatment centre2002In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study included all individuals attending a community-based treatment centre during a 4-year period. Patients were referred to the treatment centre from the primary health care (17%), social insurance office (8%), social workers (19%), employers (7%), prisons and probation administration (3%), on their own initiative (25%), and by other means (21%). The participants, 355 men and 164 women, all between 18 and 64 years of age, were compared with the total population in the municipality with regards to gender differences in sociodemographic characteristics. Adult life circumstances such as legal problems, broken relationships, unemployment and lower social class, in both men and women, were clearly associated with an alcohol dependence or at least of seeking help for this problem. The study also emphasises important social consequences of alcohol dependence in women, such as legal problems and drunk driving, normally associated with male alcohol dependence. The study revealed that living with an abusing partner was associated with a higher frequency of alcohol dependence in women. The findings are important issues to address when offering treatment to women with alcohol dependence. ⌐ 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    McCambridge, Jim
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Effectiveness of a proactive mail-based alcohol Internet intervention for university students: dismantling the assessment and feedback components in a randomized controlled trial2012In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 14, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: University students in Sweden routinely receive proactive mail-based alcohol Internet interventions sent from student health services. This intervention provides personalized normative feedback on alcohol consumption with suggestions on how to decrease drinking. Earlier feasibility trials by our group and others have examined effectiveness in simple parallel-groups designs.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention, using a randomized controlled trial design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity (and other possible effects of the research process) due to the similarity between the intervention and assessment content. The design of the study allowed for exploration of the magnitude of the assessment effects per se.Methods: This trial used a dismantling design and randomly assigned 5227 students to 3 groups: (1) routine practice assessment and feedback, (2) assessment-only without feedback, and (3) neither assessment nor feedback. At baseline all participants were blinded to study participation, with no contact being made with group 3. We approached students 2 months later to participate in a cross-sectional alcohol survey. All interventions were fully automated and did not have any human involvement. All data used in the analysis were based on self-assessment using questionnaires. The participants were unaware that they were participating in a trial and thus were also blinded to which group they were randomly assigned.Results: Overall, 44.69% (n = 2336) of those targeted for study completed follow-up. Attrition was similar in groups 1 (697/1742, 40.01%) and 2 (737/1742, 42.31% retained) and lower in group 3 (902/1743, 51.75% retained). Intention-to-treat analyses among all participants regardless of their baseline drinking status revealed no differences between groups in all alcohol parameters at the 2-month follow-up. Per-protocol analyses of groups 1 and 2 among those who accepted the email intervention (36.2% of the students who were offered the intervention in group 1 and 37.3% of the students in group2 ) and who were risky drinkers at baseline (60.7% follow-up rate in group 1 and 63.5% in group 2) suggested possible small beneficial effects on weekly consumption attributable to feedback.Conclusions: This approach to outcome evaluation is highly conservative, and small benefits may follow the actual uptake of feedback intervention in students who are risky drinkers, the precise target group.Trial Registration: International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 24735383; http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN24735383 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Awq7gjXG)

  • 27.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Referral to an electronic screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care in Sweden: impact of staff referral to the computer2011In: International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, ISSN 1687-6415, E-ISSN 1687-6423, Vol. 2011, p. 1-11, article id 918763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether primary health care staff's referral of patients to perform an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for alcohol use had a greater impact on change in alcohol consumption after 3 month, compared to patients who performed the test on their own initiative. Staff-referred responders reported reduced weekly alcohol consumption with an average decrease of 8.4 grams. In contrast, self-referred responders reported an average increase in weekly alcohol consumption of 2.4 grams. Staff-referred responders reported a 49% reduction of average number of heavy episodic drinking (HED) occasions per month. The corresponding reduction for self-referred responders was 62%. The differences between staff- and self-referred patient groups in the number who moved from risky drinking to nonrisky drinking at the followup were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that standalone computers with touchscreens that provide e-SBIs for risky drinking have the same effect on drinking behaviour in both staff-referred patients and self-referred patients.

  • 28.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Acceptability of computerized self-report of alcohol habits: A patient perspective. 1999In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 34, p. 575-580Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, I
    FoU enheten Norrköping.
    Changes in attitudes and practice in primary health care with regard to early intervention for problem drinkers. 1999In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 34, p. 795-800Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Applying the RE-AIM framework to evaluate two implementation strategies used to introduce a tool for lifestyle intervention in Swedish primary health care2012In: Health Promotion International, ISSN 0957-4824, E-ISSN 1460-2245, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 167-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two implementation strategies for the introduction of a lifestyle intervention tool in primary health care (PHC), applying the RE-AIM framework to assess outcome. A computer-based tool for lifestyle intervention was introduced in PHC. A theory-based, explicit, implementation strategy was used at three centers, and an implicit strategy with a minimum of implementation efforts at three others. After 9 months a questionnaire was sent to staff members (n= 159) and data from a test database and county council registers were collected. The RE-AIM framework was applied to evaluate outcome in terms of reach, effectiveness, adoption and implementation. The response rate for the questionnaire was 73%. Significant differences in outcome were found between the strategies regarding reach, effectiveness and adoption, in favor of the explicit implementation strategy. Regarding the dimension implementation, no differences were found according to the implementation strategy. A theory-based implementation strategy including a testing period before using a new tool in daily practice seemed to be more successful than a strategy in which the tool was introduced and immediately used for patients.                 

  • 31.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Central County Primary Health Care.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    IMPLEMENTING A LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION TOOL INTO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE: IDENTIFICATION OF KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE ADOPTION in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, vol 17, issue , pp 92-922010In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 17, p. 92-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Central County Primary Health Care.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Staff perspectives on the use of a computer-based concept for lifestyle intervention implemented in primary health care2010In: HEALTH EDUCATION JOURNAL, ISSN 0017-8969, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 246-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate staff experiences of the use of a computer-based concept for lifestyle testing and tailored advice implemented in routine primary health care (PHC). Design: The design of the study was a cross-sectional, retrospective survey. Setting: The study population consisted of staff at nine PHC units in the county of Ostergotland, Sweden. Method: After a computer-based concept for lifestyle intervention had been in operation for 1 year, a questionnaire was distributed to all staff members. The questions concerned experiences of and attitudes to the concept, and comments on addressing lifestyle issues in PHC. Results: Of the 291 potential respondents, 59 per cent returned the questionnaire. Eighty-five per cent found it positive to refer to the computer-based test, and 93 per cent of those who had read the written advice generated by the computer agreed with the advice provided. Seventy-five per cent thought that the concept could have an effect on a patients lifestyle, and 78 per cent had confidence in the computer-based test. Staff at smaller PHC units had more positive attitudes (p = 0.003) and referred a higher proportion of their patients to the computer-based test than staff at larger units (p = 0.000). Follow-up rates showed no significant differences between the categories. Staff believed that inclusion of more lifestyle areas, e. g. smoking and dietary habits, would make the test more useful. More time, education and the establishment of lifestyle practices were issues suggested in order to enhance the focus on lifestyle factors. Conclusion: Staff members have confidence in the computerized test and consider it a valuable tool. A development towards more lifestyle areas will make it even more useful.

  • 33.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Central County Primary Health Care.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Key factors influencing adoption of an innovation in primary health care: a qualitative study based on implementation theory2010In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 11, no 60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bridging the knowledge-to-practice gap in health care is an important issue that has gained interest in recent years. Implementing new methods, guidelines or tools into routine care, however, is a slow and unpredictable process, and the factors that play a role in the change process are not yet fully understood. There is a number of theories concerned with factors predicting successful implementation in various settings, however, this issue is insufficiently studied in primary health care (PHC). The objective of this article was to apply implementation theory to identify key factors influencing the adoption of an innovation being introduced in PHC in Sweden.

    METHODS: A qualitative study was carried out with staff at six PHC units in Sweden where a computer-based test for lifestyle intervention had been implemented. Two different implementation strategies, implicit or explicit, were used. Sixteen focus group interviews and two individual interviews were performed. In the analysis a theoretical framework based on studies of implementation in health service organizations, was applied to identify key factors influencing adoption.

    RESULTS: The theoretical framework proved to be relevant for studies in PHC. Adoption was positively influenced by positive expectations at the unit, perceptions of the innovation being compatible with existing routines and perceived advantages. An explicit implementation strategy and positive opinions on change and innovation were also associated with adoption. Organizational changes and staff shortages coinciding with implementation seemed to be obstacles for the adoption process.

    CONCLUSION: When implementation theory obtained from studies in other areas was applied in PHC it proved to be relevant for this particular setting. Based on our results, factors to be taken into account in the planning of the implementation of a new tool in PHC should include assessment of staff expectations, assessment of the perceived need for the innovation to be implemented, and of its potential compatibility with existing routines. Regarding context, we suggest that implementation concurrent with other major organizational changes should be avoided. The choice of implementation strategy should be given thorough consideration.

  • 34.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Central County Primary Health Care.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, A
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Computerized lifestyle intervention in routine primary health care: Evaluation of usage on provider and responder levels2009In: PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, ISSN 0738-3991, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 238-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a computerized concept for lifestyle intervention in routine primary health care (PHC).

    Methods: Nine PHC units were equipped with computers providing a lifestyle test and tailored printed advice regarding alcohol consumption and physical activity. Patients were referred by staff, and performed the test anonymously. Data were collected over a period of I year.

    Results: During the study period 3065 tests were completed, representing 5.7% of the individuals visiting the PHC units during the period. there were great differences between the units in the number of tests performed and in the proportion of patients referred. One-fifth of the respondents scored for hazardous alcohol consumption, and one-fourth reported low levels of physical activity. The majority of respondents found the test easy to perform, and a majority of those referred to the test found referral positive.

    Conclusion: The computerized test can be used for screening and intervention regarding lifestyle behaviours in PHC. Responders are positive to the test and to referral.

    Practice implications: A more widespread implementation of computerized lifestyle tests could be a beneficial complement to face-to-face interventions in PHC.

  • 35.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Histopathology and Cytology, Aleris Medilab, Täby, Sweden.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Mathiesen, Ulrik L
    Department of Internal Medicine, County Hospital, Oskarshamn, Sweden.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alcohol consumption is associated with progression of hepatic fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be inversely associated with cardiovascular disease and total mortality. The importance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing and many NAFLD patients suffer from cardiovascular disease. In these patients, moderate alcohol consumption could be beneficial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low alcohol intake, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD, is associated with fibrosis progression in established NAFLD.

    Material and methods: Seventy-one patients originally referred because of chronically elevated liver enzymes and diagnosed with biopsy-proven NAFLD were re-evaluated. A validated questionnaire combined with an oral interview was used to assess weekly alcohol consumption and the frequency of episodic drinking. Significant fibrosis progression in NAFLD was defined as progression of more than one fibrosis stage or development of endstage liver disease during follow-up.

    Results: Mean follow-up (SD) was 13.8 (1.2) years between liver biopsies. At follow-up, 17 patients (24%) fulfilled the criteria for significant fibrosis progression. The proportion of patients reporting heavy episodic drinking at least once a month was higher among those with significant fibrosis progression (p=0.003) and a trend towards higher weekly alcohol consumption was also seen (p=0.061). In a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis, heavy episodic drinking (p0.001) and insulin resistance (p0.01) were independently associated with significant fibrosis progression.

    Conclusions: Moderate alcohol consumption, consistent with the diagnosis of NAFLD to be set, is associated with fibrosis progression in NAFLD. These patients should be advised to refrain from heavy episodic drinking.

  • 36.
    Geirsson, M.
    et al.
    Norrmalms Health Center, Skövde, Sweden, Ekängsvägen 15, 541 40 Skövde, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Spak, F.
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Community Medicine, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Attitudes of swedish general practitioners and nurses to working with lifestyle change, with special reference to alcohol consumption2005In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 388-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To explore the attitudes of Swedish general practitioners (GPs) a nd nurses to secondary alcohol prevention (early identification of, and intervention for, alcohol-related problems) and compare it to their attitudes to other important lifestyle behaviours such as smoking, stress, exercise, and overweight. Methods: An adjusted version of The WHO Collaborative Study Questionnaire for General Practitioners was posted to all GPs and nurses in the County of Skaraborg, Sweden, 68 GPs and 193 nurses responded. Results: The importance of drinking alcohol moderately, counselling skills on reducing alcohol consumption and perceived current effectiveness in helping patients change lifestyle behaviours ranked lower than working with all the other lifestyle behaviours. The nurses rated their potential effectiveness in helping patients change lifestyle higher than that of GPs for all the lifestyle behaviours. Nurses receiving more alcohol-related education had more positive attitudes than nurses with less education. For alcohol, the GPs assessed their role adequacy, role legitimacy and motivation higher than that of the nurses. The main obstacles for the GPs to carry out alcohol intervention were lack of training in counselling for reducing alcohol consumption, time constraints, and the fact that the doctors did not know how to identify problem drinkers who have no obvious symptoms of excess consumption. Conclusion: GPs and the nurses estimated their alcohol-related competence as lower than working with many other health-related lifestyles. These results can be explained by lack of practical skills, lack of training in suitable intervention techniques, and unsupportive working environments. All these elements must be considered when planning secondary alcohol prevention programs in primary health care. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Medical Council on Alcohol. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Department of Social Medicine, Institute of Community Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Rommelsjö, Anders
    Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geirsson, Magnus
    Norrmalms Health Center, Skövde, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Asking patients about their drinking: A national survey among primary health care physicians and nurses in Sweden2008In: Addictive Behaviors, ISSN 0306-4603, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 301-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the extent to which Swedish primary health care (PHC) general practitioners (GPs) and nurses discuss alcohol issues with their patients, their reasons for and against addressing alcohol issues, their perceived importance of these issues, and factors that could facilitate increased alcohol intervention activity among the PHC professionals.

    Methods: All Swedish GPs and nurses who have the authority to issue prescriptions were surveyed with a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire was returned by 1821 GPs (47% response rate) and 3125 nurses (55% response rate).

    Results: Fifty percent of the GPs and 28% of the nurses stated that they “frequently” discussed alcohol with their patients. The two most common reasons for asking patients about their drinking were that the GPs and nurses considered it part of their routines and the belief that the patient had alcohol-related symptoms. GPs said that improved opportunities for referral to specialists and provision of more knowledge about counselling techniques for use when alcohol-related symptoms are evident were the most important facilitators to increased intervention activity. Concerning the nurses, 93% stated that more time devoted to health-oriented work could facilitate increased alcohol intervention activity.

    Conclusions: The findings highlight a considerable gap between the recognition of the significance of the alcohol problem and Swedish PHC intervention activity.

  • 38.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Hermansson, Ulric
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Spak, Fredrik
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Alcohol prevention activity in Swedish primary health care and occupational health services: Asking patients about their drinking2008In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 489-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To investigate the alcohol preventive activity in Swedish Occupational health services (OHS) and Primary health care (PHC) in relation to education in handling risky drinking, perceived skills in achieving change in patients’ alcohol habits, and knowledge in alcohol issues among the physicians and nurses in these two settings.

    Design and Methods

    All Swedish physicians and nurses in OHS and PHC having the authority to issue prescriptions were surveyed with a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire was returned by 313 OHS physicians (response rate 54%), 759 OHS nurses (69%), 1821 PHC physicians (47%), and 3125 PHC nurses (55%). Regression analyses were used to assess the independent and interacting effects of skills, knowledge, education, sex, age, and years in practice, patient encounters per week, and location of unit.

    Results

    OHS professionals were more active in initiating discussions about alcohol with their patients than their colleagues in PHC. OHS professionals considered themselves more skilful and knowledgeable than PHC professionals. OHS nurses and PHC physicians were the professional categories that had received most education in handling risky drinking. Skills were positively associated with activity for all categories except OHS physicians. Knowledge and education were positively associated with activity for all categories except OHS nurses.

    Conclusions

    OHS professionals were more active than the PHC professionals in addressing alcohol issues with their patients. Education, knowledge, and skills were positively associated with activity for most professional categories in the two settings.

     

  • 39.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Kuja-Halkola, Ralf
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Genetic and environmental contributions to the association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and alcohol dependence in adulthood: A large population-based twin study.2015In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, ISSN 1552-4841, E-ISSN 1552-485X, Vol. 168, no 6, p. 414-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research indicates that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently co-occurs with alcohol dependence; however, the extent to which shared genetic risk factors underpin this association remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the relative importance of genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental factors for the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adults. Almost 18,000 adult twins aged 20-45 years, from more than 12,000 twin pairs (5,420 complete pairs), from the population-representative Swedish Twin Registry, were included. Self-ratings were used to assess symptoms of ADHD and alcohol dependence. Twin analysis was used to determine the role of additive genetic (A), shared (C), and nonshared environmental (E) factors. As a result, we found a significant association between ADHD and alcohol dependence (odds ratio 3.58; 95% confidence interval, 2.85-4.49). Twin analysis suggested that shared genetic risk factors explained 64% of the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. Nonshared environmental factors accounted for the remaining 36%, whereas the contribution of shared environmental factors was minimal. We found no support for statistically significant sex differences in the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence. In conclusion the overlap between ADHD and alcohol dependence in adulthood was largely explained by shared genetic risk factors. This is an important step toward understanding the underlying nature of the risk of alcohol dependence in patients with ADHD and suggests that individuals with ADHD and their family members are important targets for alcohol prevention and treatment.

  • 40.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Larsson, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Comorbidity of Adult ADHD and Its Subtypes With Substance Use Disorder in a Large Population-Based Epidemiological Study.2016In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to explore the role and possible substance preference in ADHD and subtypes in substance use disorder (SUD).

    METHOD: Using self-report data on ADHD Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) symptoms and SUD (alcohol, illicit drugs, and nicotine) in 18,167 Swedish twins, aged 20 to 45 years, we obtained odds ratios (OR) from mixed effect logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, education, and nonindependence of twin data.

    RESULTS: Increased ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with increased odds for all SUD. ORs ranged between 1.33 for regular nicotine (95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.12, 1.59]); 2.54 for multiple drug use (95% CI = [2.00, 3.23]), and 3.58 for alcohol dependence (95% CI = [2.86, 4.49]).

    CONCLUSION: ADHD symptoms and subtypes in the population are associated with increased risks for all SUD outcomes, with no difference between ADHD subtypes, no substance preference, and no sex differences for the comorbidity. Clinicians need to consider ADHD evaluation and treatment as part of management of SUD in adults.

  • 41.
    Johansson Capusan, Andrea
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    Kuja-Halkola, R.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Viding, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    McCrory, E.
    Developmental Risk and Resilience Unit, University College, London UK.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Larsson, H.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Childhood maltreatment and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in adults: a large twin study2016In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 2637-2646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. It is, however, unclear whether this association is causal or due to familial confounding.

    Method

    Data from 18 168 adult twins, aged 20–46 years, were drawn from the population-based Swedish twin registry. Retrospective self-ratings of CM (emotional and physical neglect, physical and sexual abuse and witnessing family violence), and self-ratings for DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood were analysed. Possible familial confounding was investigated using a within twin-pair design based on monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins.

    esults

    CM was significantly associated with increased levels of ADHD symptom scores in adults [regression coefficient: 0.40 standard deviations, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.43]. Within twin-pair analyses showed attenuated but significant estimates within DZ (0.29, 95% CI 0.21–0.36) and MZ (0.18, 95% CI 0.10–0.25) twin pairs. Similar results emerged for hyperactive/impulsive and inattentive ADHD symptom scores separately in association with CM. We conducted sensitivity analyses for early maltreatment, before age 7, and for abuse and neglect separately, and found similarly reduced estimates in DZ and MZ pairs. Re-traumatization after age 7 did not significantly influence results.

    Conclusions

    CM was significantly associated with increased ADHD symptoms in adults. Associations were partly due to familial confounding, but also consistent with a causal interpretation. Our findings support cognitive neuroscience studies investigating neural pathways through which exposure to CM may influence ADHD. Clinicians treating adults with ADHD should be aware of the association with maltreatment.

  • 42.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Towards implementation of alcohol preventive interventions into primary health care: testing a new model for selection of clinically meaningful patient groups for alcohol screeningManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the study was to explore alcohol consumption and drinking patterns among primary health care patients in relation to their complaints as presented to the nurse in the reception at the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful groups of patients to be included in systematic screening for hazardous alcohol consumption was empirically tested.

    Methods : The study was conducted at two primary health care centres in a large city in the county of Ostergiitland in southern Sweden. All patients 16 years or older visiting the health care centres during a 2-week period, received a questionnaire concerning their complaints and alcohol habits when registering at the reception. The patients returned the completed questionnaires in sealed boxes before leaving the health care centre. A model for identifying clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in systematic alcohol screening was developed and applied on the results from the questionmrire.

    Results: Among 358 female respondents 10.6% (38 patients) were hazardous drinkers and among the 203 male respondents 20.2% (41 patients). When applying the model on the questionnaire results, it was possible to identify the most optimal patient groups for systematic alcohol screening on basis of the patient's complaints. Among the female respondents the most optimal patient groups to screen were those presenting skin, stomach/bowel, psychological, lung, or urinary tract complaints. Among the males were the patient groups presenting complaints concerning lungs, psychological problems, back, neck or shoulder problems, hypertension or injuries found to be the most optimal. There were, however, no significant differences in the proportion of hazardous drinkers for the different complaints, with the exception of male respondents with lung complaints, where 100% were hazardous drinkers.

    Conclusions: As the proportion of hazardous drinkers among primary health care patients within each presented complaint was found to be rather low during the two week study period, it was not possible to make any definite conclusion about an optimal screening strategy. However the model presented may be useful in future research to identify clinically meaningful patient groups to be included in selective screening, although this requires a much larger data collection

  • 43.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other lifestyle habits: how patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle advice given by general practitioners (GPs) may be a cost-effective means of health promotion; however, it is not fully put into routine practice. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent GPs' patients expect and receive advice concerning alcohol, tobacco, exercise and diet in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, type of visit and patient satisfaction.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9750) of patients who had consulted GPs in a county in Sweden. The response rate was 69% (n = 6734).

    Results: Exercise was the most (16%) and alcohol the least (5%) common type of advice. The patients received advice more often than they expected in all areas except alcohol. The patients reported the highest rate of unfulfilled advice expectation and the lowest rate of unexpected advice in the case of alcohol. Male gender, poorer self-rated health and scheduled appointment were independent predictors of all types of advice. Continuity of GP contact was only favourable for exercise and diet advice. The patients who received advice were more satisfied with their visit to the doctor.

    Conclusions: A tertiary preventive perspective guides GPs' practice of giving advice. Male patients with advanced illnesses are given priority. Women and patients with long-term risk habits are more neglected. The GPs tend to misjudge the expectations and needs of their patients and are too restrained in their counselling practice. Alcohol is the most disregarded area of advice in proportion to the patients' expectations and needs.

  • 44.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Early intervention for problem drinkers: readiness to participate among general practitioners and nurses in Swedish primary health care2002In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 38-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An exploration was made of attitudes and practices of general practitioners (GPs) and nurses concerning early identification of, and intervention for, alcohol-related problems. Sixty-five GPs and 141 nurses in 19 primary health centres in a county in southern Sweden answered a 28-item questionnaire before implementation of an intervention programme. The questionnaire covered experiences with patients with alcohol-related health problems, knowledge and perceived capacity concerning early identification and intervention, attitudes towards the role of primary care staff in early identification and intervention and current intervention methods in use at the health centre. Self-reported frequency of asking about alcohol use was higher among GPs than nurses. Both groups reported more frequently asking about alcohol consumption in cases where they believed that the health status was influenced by alcohol. For both professions, knowledge and skills concerning identification were rated as better understood than that concerning intervention methods. Nurses rated their knowledge and skills less confidently than GPs. The overall attitude was fairly positive towards early identification and intervention, but nurses were more worried than GPs that patients would react negatively to questions about alcohol. Attitudes, self-rated capacity, and practice were related. The low level of early identification and intervention in primary care appears to be related more to insufficient practical skills than to attitudes. Nurses appear to be an unexploited resource, in need of training and support. Nurses may need to be convinced that an active role does not interfere with the nurse-patient relationship. Building teams of GPs and nurses in primary care might enhance the dissemination of alcohol prevention into regular practice.

  • 45.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors influencing GPs' decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption: a focus group study in Swedish primary care2005In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 119, no 9, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to explore factors that influence general practitioners' (GPs') decisions regarding screening for high alcohol consumption.

    Methods GPs working at three primary healthcare centres in Sweden participated in focus group interviews. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and a deductive framework approach was used for the analysis.

    Results The majority of the participating GPs did not believe in asking all patients about their alcohol consumption. Reported factors that influenced how many and which patients were questioned about alcohol consumption were time, age of the patient, consultation setting, patient–physician relationship, what symptoms the patient presented with, and knowledge of measures if patients appear to have a high alcohol consumption. Thus, alcohol screening and intervention were not performed in all patient groups as was originally intended, but were performed in limited groups of patients such as those with alcohol-related symptoms.

    Conclusions Although the number of participants in this study was small and the conclusions cannot be generalized, the results provide some valuable insights into why GPs are hesitant to engage in screening for high alcohol consumption. Since prevention of alcohol-related health problems is an important public health issue, many different screening and intervention strategies have to be formulated and evaluated in order to reach patients with both hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption within the healthcare system. Screening all consecutive patients for a limited period or screening patient groups known to include a fairly high frequency of high alcohol consumers are two ways of limiting the time requirements and increasing role legitimacy. Still, there is a need for a broader public health strategy involving many players in the community in alcohol preventive measures, especially in more primary preventive approaches.

  • 46.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Kartläggning av alkoholvanor bland patienter på vårdcentral i relation till besöksorsak2004In: Svenska läkarsällskapets riksstämma,2004, Katrineholm: Sörmlands grafiska Quebecor AB , 2004, p. 46-46Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Under what circumstances are nurses willing to engage in brief alcohol interventions?: a qualitative study from primary care in Swedena2005In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 1049-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve alcohol prevention in primary health care, it has been suggested that primary care nurses are an under-utilised resource. The aim of this study was to identify under what circumstances primary care nurses in Sweden are willing to engage in alcohol prevention. All nurses at three primary health care centres in Östergötland, Sweden were invited to participate in focus group interviews; 26 nurses participated. The nurses considered primary health care to be just one among other sectors within the community with responsibility for alcohol prevention. The role of health care in alcohol prevention was perceived to be important but mainly secondary preventive. The nurses felt justified screening all patients' alcohol habits only when they could refer to an obligation or a time-limited project. Otherwise, they mainly wanted to engage in screening patients with alcohol-related symptoms or diagnoses and other risk groups. Reasons for refraining from alcohol screening and intervention included lack of self-efficacy, time consumption and fear of harming their relationship with the patient. New strategies for alcohol prevention in primary care are discussed.

  • 48.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Acceptability of a computerized alcohol screening and advice routine in a emergency department setting- a patient perspective2005In: Addictive Behaviours, ISSN 0306-4603, E-ISSN 1873-6327, Vol. 30, p. 767-776Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Johansson, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Nordqvist, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Feasibility of a computorized alcohol screening and personalized written advice in the ED: opportunities and obstacles2005In: Accident and Emergency Nursing, ISSN 0965-2302, E-ISSN 1532-9267, Vol. 13, p. 44-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Keurhorst, Myrna N.
    et al.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Anderson, Peter
    Newcastle University, United Kingdom.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Segura, Lidia
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Colom, Joan
    Government of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain.
    Reynolds, Jillian
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Drummond, Colin
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Deluca, Paolo
    Kings Coll London, England.
    van Steenkiste, Ben
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Mierzecki, Artur
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Kloda, Karolina
    Pomeranian Medical University, Poland.
    Wallace, Paul
    UCL, England.
    Newbury-Birch, Dorothy
    Fac Med, England.
    Kaner, Eileen
    Fac Med, England.
    Gual, Toni
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Laurant, Miranda G H.
    Radboud University of Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Implementing training and support, financial reimbursement, and referral to an internet-based brief advice program to improve the early identification of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary care (ODHIN): study protocol for a cluster randomized factorial trial2013In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The European level of alcohol consumption, and the subsequent burden of disease, is high compared to the rest of the world. While screening and brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective, in most countries they have hardly been implemented in routine primary healthcare. In this study, we aim to examine the effectiveness and efficiency of three implementation interventions that have been chosen to address key barriers for improvement: training and support to address lack of knowledge and motivation in healthcare providers; financial reimbursement to compensate the time investment; and internet-based counselling to reduce workload for primary care providers.

    Methods/design

    In a cluster randomized factorial trial, data from Catalan, English, Netherlands, Polish, and Swedish primary healthcare units will be collected on screening and brief advice rates for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption. The three implementation strategies will be provided separately and in combination in a total of seven intervention groups and compared with a treatment as usual control group. Screening and brief intervention activities will be measured at baseline, during 12 weeks and after six months. Process measures include health professionals’ role security and therapeutic commitment of the participating providers (SAAPPQ questionnaire). A total of 120 primary healthcare units will be included, equally distributed over the five countries. Both intention to treat and per protocol analyses are planned to determine intervention effectiveness, using random coefficient regression modelling.

    Discussion

    Effective interventions to implement screening and brief interventions for hazardous alcohol use are urgently required. This international multi-centre trial will provide evidence to guide decision makers.

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