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  • 1. Andersson, A
    et al.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Management perspective on Information and Communication Technology - Requirement specification for process-oriented healthcare2001In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 854-854Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Management demands on information and communication technology in process- oriented health-care organizations: The importance of understanding managers expectations during early phases of systems design2002In: Journal of Management in Medicine, ISSN 0268-9235, Vol. 16, no 2-3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are numerous challenges to overcome before information and communication technology (ICT) can achieve its full potential in process-oriented health-care organizations. One of these challenges is designing systems that meet users’ needs, while reflecting a continuously changing organizational environment. Another challenge is to develop ICT that supports both the internal and the external stakeholders’ demands. In this study a qualitative research strategy was used to explore the demands on ICT expressed by managers from functional and process units at a community hospital. The results reveal a multitude of partially competing goals that can make the ICT development process confusing, poor in quality, inefficient and unnecessarily costly. Therefore, from the perspective of ICT development, the main task appears to be to coordinate the different visions and in particular clarify them, as well as to establish the impact that these visions would have on the forthcoming ICT application.

  • 3. Bergström, E.
    et al.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Arbetet med att motverka brott inom socialförsäkringsförmånerna, förstudie, 20062006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 4.
    Demiris, G.
    et al.
    University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.
    Afrin, L.B.
    Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States.
    Speedie, S.
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
    Courtney, K.L.
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Sondhi, M.
    Health Care Analytics Group, Boston, MA, United States.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Lovis, C.
    University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Goossen, W.
    Results4Care, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Lynch, C.
    University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States.
    Patient-centered Applications: Use of Information Technology to Promote Disease Management and Wellness. A White Paper by the AMIA Knowledge in Motion Working Group2008In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances in information technology (IT) enable a fundamental redesign of health care processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to patient-centric applications. This white paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of patient-centered technologies for disease management and prevention. It reviews current and emerging trends, highlights challenges related to design, evaluation, reimbursement and usability, and reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain. © 2008 J Am Med Inform Assoc.

  • 5.
    Ilhström, Carina
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Lundberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, CSELAB - Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On-line newspapers in search for profitable services2002In: E-business and E-work Conference, 2002, p. 1455-1462Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today online newspapers are putting a lot of resources into their news sites without profiting from them. They have to find ways to gain from them in order to keep them going. Lately there has been a move from print to multimedia, i.e. news is only a part among other services at the news sites and is presented as audio and video as well. We have conducted interviews at nine local newspapers in Sweden about their current situation and future plans. We have also used a cooperative scenario building technique aiming at finding new online services that could be profitable with both newspaper management and end users. The objective of this paper is to describe the current situation for these newspapers and to discuss possible new future services. Examples of services from the workshops are e.g. advertisement on demand and intermediary services.

  • 6.
    Koch, Sabine
    et al.
    Health Informatics Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Center of Information Technology and Information Systems, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Critical Advances in Bridging Personal Health Informatics and Clinical Informatics2012In: IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics, ISSN 0943-4747, Vol. 7, p. 48-55Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To provide a survey over significant developments in the area of linking personal health informatics and clinical informatics, to give insights into critical advances and to discuss open problems and opportunities in this area. Methods: A scoping review over the literature published in scientific journals and relevant conference proceedings in the intersection between personal health informatics and clinical informatics over the years 2010 and 2011 was performed. Results: The publications analyzed are related to two main topics, namely "Sharing information and collaborating through personal health records, portals and social networks" and "Integration of personalhealth systems with clinical information systems". For the first topic, results are presented according to five different themes: "Patient expectations and attitudes", "Real use experiences", "Changes for care providers", "Barriers to adoption" and "Proposed technical infrastructures". For the second topic, two different themes were found, namely "Technical architectures and interoperability“"and "Security, safety and privacy issues". Discussion: Results show a number of gaps between the information needs of patients and the information care provider organizations provide to them as well as the lack of a trusted technical, ethical and regulatory framework regarding information sharing. Conclusions: Despite recent developments in the areas of personal health informatics and clinical informatics both fields have diverging needs. To support both clinical work processes and empower patients to effectively handle self-care, a number of issues remain unsolved. Open issues include privacy and confidentiality, including trusted sharing of health information and building collaborative environments between patients, their families and care providers. There are further challenges to meet around health and technology literacy as well as to overcome structural and organizational barriers. Frameworks for evaluating personal health informatics applications and pervasive health technology are needed to build up an evidence basis.

  • 7.
    Mettler, T.
    et al.
    University of St Gallen.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Understanding business intelligence in the context of healthcare2009In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 254-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In todays fast changing healthcare sector, decision makers are facing a growing demand for both clinical and administrative information in order to comply with legal and customer-specific requirements. The use of business intelligence (BI) is seen as a possible solution to this actual challenge. As the existing research about BI is primarily focused on the industrial sector, it is the aim of this contribution to translate and adapt the current findings for the healthcare context. For this purpose, different definitions of BI are examined and condensed in a framework. Furthermore, the sector-specific preconditions for the effective use and future role of BI are discussed.

  • 8.
    Mettler, Tobias
    et al.
    Institute of Information Management, University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Evaluation of E-Health Strategies: A Portfolio Approach2011In: Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Health Information Management Research - ISHIMR 2011 / [ed] Bath, Peter A.; Mettler, Tobias; Raptis, Dimitri A. & Sen, Barbara A., 2011, p. 296-305Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today it is a general belief that e-health has a positive effect on costs as well as on quality of health service delivery. Nevertheless, lots of projects failed in the past to clearly demonstrate a positive value proposition. Difficulties arise especially when not only evaluating a single action but a whole strategy for adopting national or provincial e-health. Grounding on the experience of an ex ante evaluation of the Swiss e-health strategy, a first attempt how to practically demonstrate the value of the planned health system’s changes is discussed in this article. On the basis of a “utility” and a “readiness” portfolio, generic allocation decisions are formulated for prioritising investments as well as for identifying weak points in the defined e-health strategy.

  • 9.
    Mettler, Tobias
    et al.
    SAP Research Centre St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The need of a multi-actor perspective to understand expectations from virtual presence: managing elderly homecare informatics2011In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, ISSN 1753-8157, E-ISSN 1753-8165, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 220-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Different studies have analysed a wide range of use cases and scenarios for using IT-based services in homecare settings for elderly people. In most instances, the impact of such services has been studied using a one-dimensional approach, either focusing on the benefits for the patient or health service provider. Purpose. The objective of this contribution is to explore a model for identifying and understanding outcomes of IT-based homecare services from a multi-actor perspective. Methods. In order to better understand the state of the art in homecare informatics, we conducted a literature review. We use experiences from previous research in the area of informatics to develop the proposed model. Results. The proposed model consists of four core activities identify involved actors, understand consequences, clarify contingencies, take corrective actions, and one additional activity brainstorming IT use. Conclusion. The primary goal of innovating organisations, processes and services in homecare informatics today, is to offer continued care, better decision support both to practitioners and patients, as well as effective distribution of resources. A multi-actor analysis perspective is needed to understand utility determination for the involved stakeholders.

  • 10.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Economic analyses for ICT in elderly healthcare: Questions and challenges2005In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 309-321Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Elderly healthcare is a likely arena for extensive change in years to come, and information and communication technology (ICT) will be an important enabler of such change. Before investing in new systems and practices, there will be a call for evaluations. To date, economic evaluations of ICT applications in healthcare have been rare, and a literature review did not turn up any examples of such evaluations of elderly care. The options for elderly care will often have to transcend organization boundaries, as the point of many ICT initiatives now being discussed is to make healthcare institutions, home care, and self-administered care interact in new ways. Analysts performing evaluations of such complex changes will have to be very specific about such classic issues in economic analysis as defining alternatives, the basis for comparison, and combining different indicators into an overall evaluation. Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications.

  • 11.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Elderly Healthcare, Collaboration and ICT - Enabling the Benefits of an Enabling Technology. Final Report.2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 12.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Evaluation as multi-actor trade-off - a challenge in introducing ICT innovations in the health sector2005In: 4th WSEAS Int.Conf. on E-ACTIVITIES E-Learning, E-Communities, E-Commerce, E-Management, E-Marketing, E-Governance, Tele-Working,2005, WSEAS:s tidskrift , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economic Information Systems.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Locating ICT's benefits in elderly care2005In: Medical informatics and the Internet in medicine (Print), ISSN 1463-9238, E-ISSN 1464-5238, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 297-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of information and communication technology (ICT) is indirect and depends on redesign of practices and structures also outside health care. Improvements will only be realized if all parties involved can coordinate their efforts to take advantage of new technology. A 'package' of changed work practices and structures extending across organizational boundaries needs to be designed and implemented. This is very different from the common conception of introducing new ICT tools. Calls for 'evaluation of benefits' before new ICT systems are introduced need to recognize this complexity. This article investigates how analysis and economic evaluations can be used to improve decision-making when new applications are proposed. This is done by drawing parallels with experiences from other industries. We conclude that the entire 'change package' should be analysed for its consequences on the well-being of care recipients, and the requirements it presents for capital investments and changed labour inputs, in particular changed competence needs. Some concepts and structures are suggested for such evaluations. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 14.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Moberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Implementing an integrated computerized patient record system: Towards an evidence-based information system implementation practice in healthcare2008In: AMIA 2008 Annual Symposium, Biomedical and Health Informatics:form foundations to applications to policy. Washington DC. 8-12 November 2008, 2008, p. 616-620Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large number of health information system (HIS) implementations fail due to insufficient organizational harmonization. The aim of this study is to examine whether these problems remain when implementing technically integrated and more advanced generations of HIS. In a case study, data from observations, interviews, and organizational documents were analyzed using qualitative methods. We found that critical issues in the case study implementation process were the techniques employed to teach the staff to use the integrated system, involvement of the users in the implementation process, and the efficiency of the human computer interface. Comparisons with a literature review showed both recurrence of previously reported implementation problems and new issues specific to the integrated system context. The results indicate that the development of evidence-based implementation processes should be considered.

  • 15.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Moberg, Anna
    Vårdprocesscentrum Landstinget Östergötland.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    The voices are the same2008In: Medical Informatics Association,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 16.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uppugunduri, Srinivas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Svensson, Mikael
    Östergötland County Council, Drug and Therapeut Comm, Linkoping, Sweden .
    Organization-wide adoption of computerized provider order entry systems: a study based on diffusion of innovations theory2009In: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, ISSN 1472-6947, E-ISSN 1472-6947, Vol. 9, no 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been introduced to reduce medication errors, increase safety, improve work-flow efficiency, and increase medical service quality at the moment of prescription. Making the impact of CPOE systems more observable may facilitate their adoption by users. We set out to examine factors associated with the adoption of a CPOE system for inter-organizational and intra-organizational care. Methods: The diffusion of innovation theory was used to understand physicians and nurses attitudes and thoughts about implementation and use of the CPOE system. Two online survey questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and nurses using a CPOE system in county-wide healthcare organizations. The number of complete questionnaires analyzed was 134 from 200 nurses (67.0%) and 176 from 741 physicians (23.8%). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytical statistical methods. Results: More nurses (56.7%) than physicians (31.3%) stated that the CPOE system introduction had worked well in their clinical setting (P andlt; 0.001). Similarly, more physicians (73.9%) than nurses (50.7%) reported that they found the system not adapted to their specific professional practice (P = andlt; 0.001). Also more physicians (25.0%) than nurses (13.4%) stated that they did want to return to the previous system (P = 0.041). We found that in particular the received relative advantages of the CPOE system were estimated to be significantly (P andlt; 0.001) higher among nurses (39.6%) than physicians (16.5%). However, physicians agreements with the compatibility of the CPOE and with its complexity were significantly higher than the nurses (P andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: Qualifications for CPOE adoption as defined by three attributes of diffusion of innovation theory were not satisfied in the study setting. CPOE systems are introduced as a response to the present limitations in paper-based systems. In consequence, user expectations are often high on their relative advantages as well as on a low level of complexity. Building CPOE systems therefore requires designs that can provide rather important additional advantages, e. g. by preventing prescription errors and ultimately improving patient safety and safety of clinical work. The decision-making process leading to the implementation and use of CPOE systems in healthcare therefore has to be improved. As any change in health service settings usually faces resistance, we emphasize that CPOE system designers and healthcare decision-makers should continually collect users feedback about the systems, while not forgetting that it also is necessary to inform the users about the potential benefits involved.

  • 17.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Introduction of an Integrated ElectronicPrescribing System: The Pharmacies StaffDimension2009In: The 14th International Symposium for Health Information ManagementResearch (ISHIMR), Kalmar, Sweden, 14-16 October, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An integrated electronic prescribing system allows the transfer of pharmaceutical prescriptionsfrom doctors to pharmacies. Using a questionnaire, we gathered data from the pharmacies staffin a Swedish county council. We found that most of the pharmacists have positive opinions aboutthe system. The participants in the survey indicated, as important issues, the safety of the systemcompared to a paper-based one; impact on customer relations with the pharmacy; and preventionof errors. However, it was stated that errors occur due to similar drug names, codes, or due theinability of doctors to cancel the prescription once it is send to the pharmacy. Future feasibility ofthis technology will be determined by whether several obstacles can be resolved such ascorrection or cancellation of prescriptions by physicians, decreasing the computer problems, andattending different risks related to the prescriptions including confusion between different patientsand different drugs.

  • 18.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Methods to Evaluate Health information Systems in Healthcare Settings: A Literature Review2007In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 397-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although information technology (IT)-based applications in healthcare have existed for more than three decades, methods to evaluate outputs and outcomes of the use of IT-based systems in medical informatics is still a challenge for decision makers, as well as to those who want to measure the effects of ICT in healthcare settings. The aim of this paper is to review published articles in the area evaluations of IT-based systems in order to gain knowledge about methodologies used and findings obtained from the evaluation of IT-based systems applied in healthcare settings. The literature review includes studies of IT-based systems between 2003 and 2005. The findings show that economic and organizational aspects dominate evaluation studies in this area. However, the results focus mostly on positive outputs such as user satisfaction, financial benefits and improved organizational work. This review shows that there is no standard framework for evaluation effects and outputs of implementation and use of IT in the healthcare setting and that until today no studies explore the impact of IT on the healthcare system’ productivity and effectiveness.

  • 19.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mokhtari, Rahman
    Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital, Linköping.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Integrated electronic prescribing systems: pharmacists’ perceptions ofimpact on work performance and patient safety2009In: Proceedings of the 9th WSEAS International Conference on APPLIED INFORMATICS AND COMMUNICATIONS (AIC '09), 2009, p. 299-304Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrated electronic prescribing systems (IEPSs) are expected to improve efficiency and safety inthe management of pharmaceuticals throughout the healthcare sector. We examined the introduction of anIEPS into pharmacists’ work performance with regard to impact on efficiency and patient safety. Aquestionnaire was distributed to all pharmacists (n = 85) in a Swedish municipality (pop. 145,000) where anIEPS had recently been introduced. The response rate was 74%. We found that, in general, the IEPS wasperceived to have expedited the processing of prescriptions and reduced the risk for prescription errors, as wellas the handing over of erroneous medications to patients. Pharmacists were more cautious about the residualrisks for making mistakes than the pharmacist’s assistants. We conclude that the introduction of an IEPS waswell received by local-level pharmacy staff, but that an IEPS does not automatically reduce the need forqualified personnel in the management of pharmaceuticals.

  • 20.
    Rahimi, Bahlol
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Health Information System Implementation: A Qualitative Meta-analysis2009In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 359-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare information systems (HISs) are often implemented to enhance the quality of care and the degree to which it is patient-centered, as well as to improve the efficiency and safety of services. However, the outcomes of HIS implementations have not met expectations. We set out to organize the knowledge gained in qualitative studies performed in association with HIS implementations and to use this knowledge to outline an updated structure for implementation planning. A multi-disciplinary team performed the analyses in order to cover as many aspects of the primary studies as possible. We found that merely implementing an HIS will not automatically increase organizational efficiency. Strategic, tactical, and operational actions have to be taken into consideration, including management involvement, integration in healthcare workflow, establishing compatibility between software and hardware and, most importantly, user involvement, education and training. The results should be interpreted as a high-order scheme, and not a predictive theory.

  • 21.
    Söderberg, Elsy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of professionals participating in inter-organisational cooperation aimed at promoting clients' return to workManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Over the past decade, sickness absence has increased in Sweden and other Western European countries, with regard to both the number of people claiming sickness benefits and the length of the sick-leave spells. In Sweden, the activities initiated to promote RTW are performed in parallel by four different public organisations: the health services, the social services, the employment and the social insurance authorities. The present study focused on cooperation between professionals affiliated to the employment and social insurance authorities.

    Aim: To gain deeper understanding on the experiences of professionals involved in cooperative projects aimed at promoting RTW among unemployed sickness benefit recipients.

    Method: Qualitative analyses were performed of transcribed data from interviews of professionals participating in cooperative projects.

    Result: The analyses identified four impmtant areas of the experiences of such cooperation. First, the daily collaboration on the same cases enabled development of good relationships and cooperative competence, which improved the contact with clients. Second, the cooperative projects made it possible to include only clients perceived motivated for RTW measures. Third, the closer and more frequent interaction with clients proved to be constmctive in that it facilitated recognition and mobilisation of the strengths and abilities of the clients in the RTW process. Fotnih, the differences in rules and regulations between the social insurance and the unemployment insurance standards was often mentioned, and were perceived to induce problems, for example, on how to assess the work capacity of clients.

    Conclusion: The direct cooperation between the professionals from two different authorities was found to improve the application of RTW measures. The assessments of work capacity represent both important and complex tasks that professionals must perfonn without having access to either scientific knowledge or consensus agreement on which to base their decisions. Finally, it is important to gain further knowledge on how to create, develop, and maintain the 'cooperative competence' developed in the projects.

  • 22.
    Söderberg, Elsy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institute.
    Experiences of professionals participating in inter-organisational cooperation aimed at promoting clients return to work2010In: WORK-A JOURNAL OF PREVENTION ASSESSMENT and REHABILITATION, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the activities initiated to promote return to work (RTW) are performed in parallel by four different public organisations: the health services, the social services, the employment and the social insurance authorities. The aim was to gain deeper understanding on the experiences of professionals involved in cooperative projects aimed at promoting RTW among unemployed sickness benefit recipients. Qualitative analyses were performed of transcribed data from interviews of professionals participating in cooperative projects. First, the analysis identified that the daily collaboration on the same cases enabled development of good relationships and cooperative competence, which improved the contact with clients. Second, the cooperative projects made it possible to include only clients perceived motivated for RTW measures. Third, the closer and more frequent interaction with clients proved to be constructive in that it facilitated recognition and mobilisation of strengths and abilities. Fourth, the differences in rules and regulations between the social insurance and the unemployment insurance standards were often perceived to induce problems, for example, on how to assess the work capacity of clients. The assessments of work capacity represent important and complex tasks that professionals must perform without having access to either scientific knowledge or consensus agreement on which to base their decisions.

  • 23.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An economic perspective on the analysis of impacts of information technology: from case studies in health-care towards general models and theories1999Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizations of all types want to have individuals utilize the Information Technology (IT) they purchase. For this reason, the identification of factors that cause individuals to use IT, factors that are important when developing IT, and factors that influence organizations' performance when IT is implemented, provides helpful guidelines for decision-makers.

    The empirical studies included in this thesis refer to health-care organizations and cover a span from the presentation of the economic effects of the implementation of computer based patient records, and the perceived risk that can arise during the development of IT, to the importance of stimulating direct user participation in system development processes. In the theoretical studies, basic techniques are suggested for the analysis of the economic effects of the use of methods that stimulate users' involvement, e.g. Participatory Design. Furthermore, this part also proposes an IT maturity indicator that can be used to analyze the fulfillment of integration and sophistication in the use of IT in contemporary organizations.

    The results which emphasize the interaction between IT, human, and economic aspects, indicate the need to include measures of user preferences in system development and implementation processes. They also suggest that successful IT strategies almost inevitably involve simultaneous investment in organizational change, innovative business strategies, and employee human capital. The fmdings provide new insights into problems that forced organizations to re-examine criteria for investing resources when choices related to the development, introduction and use of IT are made, or when it is necessary to select approaches to system development. They also raise questions regarding resource scarcity and alternative use of invested resources.

  • 24.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Elderly Health, Homecare and Information Technology (IT).2008In: Healthcare IT management, ISSN 1782-8406, Vol. 3 3, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 25.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Informatics and Healthcare Redesign: Using ICT to Move from an Evolutionary to a Revolutionary Stage2007In: The Human and Social Side of Health Information Systems / [ed] Andre W. Kushniruk, Elizabeth M. Borycki, USA: IDEA Group Inc. , 2007, 1, p. -395Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

    Human, Social, and Organizational Aspects of Health Information Systems offers an evidence-based management approach to issues associated with the human and social aspects of designing, developing, implementing, and maintaining health information systems across a healthcare organization specific to an individual, team, organizational, system, and international perspective. Integrating knowledge from multiple levels, this book will benefit scholars and practitioners from the medical information, health service management, information technology arenas.

  • 26.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDA - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olve , Nils-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scandurra , Isabella
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Koch , Sabine
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Organizational effects of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in elderly homecare: A case study2008In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 195-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) to support integrated healthcare services in elderly homecare is becoming a self-evident part of home healthcare services. Especially, when it comes to information exchange, knowledge sharing and documentation at the point-of-care (POC), ICT is an enabling technique. The aim of this study was to explore the effects from the use of the OLD@HOME-prototype. 

    The results shown that the OLD@HOME prototype was perceived to contribute in developing horizontal links for communication between individuals who work together, independent of geographical distance or organizational affiliation, and to contribute to increased work efficiency. The prototype was further seen to reduce professional isolation by providing a holistic overview of the care process. User centred design and implementation of the OLD@HOME prototype was considered a key issue to facilitate acceptance of organizational changes. Participation of care professionals not only led to a better understanding of the needs of involved organizations, it also increased end-users’ involvement and commitment, stimulating them to test and improve the prototype until the final version.

  • 27.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. International Business School, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Davoody, Nadia
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Koch, Sabine
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Steps to Consider for Effective Decision Making when Selecting and Prioritizing eHealth Services2013In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 192, p. 239-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Making the best choice for an organization when selecting IT applications or eHealth services is not always easy as there are a lot of parameters to take into account. The aim of this paper is to explore some steps to support effective decision making when selecting and prioritizing eHealth services prior to implementation and/or procurement. The steps presented in this paper were identified by interviewing nine key stakeholders at Stockholm County Council. They are supposed to work as a guide for decision making and aim to identify objectives and expected effects, technical, organizational, and economic requirements, and opportunities important to consider before decisions are taken. The steps and their respective issues and variables are concretized in a number of templates to be filled in by decision makers when selecting and prioritizing eHealth services.

  • 28.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Economic motives to use participatory design approach in the development of public health information systems2001In: Proceedings of Medinfo 2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Gäre, Klas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Samverkan mellan offentliga organisationer.2004Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Gäre, Klas
    Internationella handelshögskolan i Jönköping.
    Moberg, Anna
    Landstinget i Östergötland.
    Andersson, Boel
    Landstinget i Jönköping.
    Akenäs, Linda
    Växjö universitet.
    Dynamisk utvärdering för effektiv användning av ICT baserade sjukvårdssystem2007In: SHI2007,2007, Kalmar: ehälsoinstitutet , 2007, p. 31-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hägglund, Sture
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, ASLAB - Application Systems Laboratory. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Communicating in the Home. A research Agenda for the Emerging Area of Home Informatics2003In: Proc of the 10th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCII2003), 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Research Center of Information Technology and Information Systems, Department of Informatics, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Koch, Sabine
    Health Informatics Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Identifying Where the Values Come from IT-Innovations in Health and Social Care2012In: Intelligent Information Management, ISSN 2160-5912, Vol. 4, no 5A, p. 296-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies aimed to capture the effects of IT-innovations in health and social care have shown that there is a gap between expected and factual outcomes. Many decision makers feel the need to articulate an ideal end-state for their organizations. Striking the balance between novelty and believability of such an ideal end-state is often tricky and they become neither satisfied with the ideal not the visioning. In this study, we explore the contribution of IT-innovations to health and social care. The results showed that coherence between context and IT-innovation is important to capture effects and outcomes. Being coherent rather than visionary contributes to identify where you are, as an organization, and to capture effects and outcomes that “make sense” in the context in question. The paper makes an exposition from the model building, algorithm design to performance analysis and contributes to the academic prosperity in Intelligent Information Management The knowledge generated is expected to provide input when identifying goals that IT-investments are supposed to achieve.

  • 33.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Le Rouge, Cynthia
    School of Public Health, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
    Barriers and opportunities to the widespread adoption of telemedicine: a bi-country evaluation2013In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 192, p. 933-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognizing that current practices for healthcare delivery are no longer sustainable, OECD governments are focusing more and more on how to leverage ICT to facilitate superior healthcare delivery. One such possibility is the use of Telemedicine. A major goal of telemedicine today is to develop next-generation telemedicine tools and technologies. However, key andquot;classicandquot; barriers continue to challenge widespread telemedicine adoption by health care organizations. These barriers include technology, financial, legal/standards, business strategy, and human resources issues. This comparative study explores the current status of barriers and opportunities to the widespread adoption of telemedicine in two different countries: Sweden, and USA.

  • 34.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mettler, Tobias
    University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.
    Understanding Business Intelligence in the Context of Healthcare2008In: ISHIMR 2008 / [ed] Peter A. Bath, Massey: Massey University , 2008, p. 61-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 35.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Olve, Nils-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Using ICT to Transform Elderly Healthcare2007In: International Symposium for Health Information Management- Research,2007, 2007, p. 127-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 36.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Sjöberg, Cecilia
    Swedish Agency for Innovation Systems, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    A theory for classification of health care organizations in the new economy2003In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 465-473Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderberg, Elsy
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stöd för uppföljning av kontakter mellan handläggare på Försäkringskassan och läkare på vårdcentral i sjukskrivningsårenden2002Other (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Changes in the roll of IT in primary healthcare2004In: Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 0195-4210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proceeding of 11th Conference on Medical Informatics, Medinfo-San Francisco, Cal. (Eds) Edward Shortliffe et.al .Amsterdam: IOS. Press, 2004

  • 39.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Design participation as an insurance: Risk-management and end-user participation in the development of information systems in healthcare organizations2002In: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 76-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this paper is to build a theoretical framework for analysis of when decision-makers should use end-user participation as a form of insurance for unforeseen consequences of implementing information systems in healthcare organizations. Method: Data were collected in a case study of an information system development project in a small clinical setting. During the initial phase, the future end-users of the system were allowed to actively influence the system design and test every new tool that was considered for implementation. Results: The results of the case study suggest that when time and effort are invested in allowing healthcare staff to participate in information system development processes, the benefits can well exceed the costs throughout the life cycle of the project. Risk-averse decision-makers fearing negative secondary consequences of a HIS, with regard to clinical work flow, will always adopt measures to prevent future failures, if they can find a possibility of shifting these risks. Therefore, they calculate the present discounted value of the effects accrued over time to the unit and predict the amount of resources they are willing to pay to acquire an insurance (such as design participation) that will protect the organization from future losses. Conclusions: End-user participation in the design process can be the key positive influence on the quality of the service and, thereby, organizational effectiveness. Investments in broad design participation can, consequently, be a productive activity that transforms potential current income into future benefits.

  • 40.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, EISLAB - Economic Information Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Individual Preferences and On-line Public Health Services2002In: Proceedings of AMIA annual fall Symposium in San Antonio Texas Nov 9-13, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    To choose to be poor today but have good future prospects: Consumer participation in the development of information systems in healthcare organizations.2000In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 1150-1150Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Healthcare professional's demand for knowledge in informatics. 1999In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 53, p. 107-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Patel, VL
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Social Med, Linkoping, Sweden McGill Univ, Montreal, PQ, Canada Linkoping Univ, Dept Comp Sci, MDA, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Information technology and knowledge exchange in health-care organizations1999In: JAMIA Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, ISSN 1067-5027, E-ISSN 1527-974X, p. 632-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the increasing global interest in information technology among health care institutions, little has been discussed about its importance for the effectiveness of knowledge management. In this study, economic theories are used to analyze and describe a theoretical framework for the use of information technology in the exchange of knowledge. The analyses show that health care institutions would benefit from developing global problem-solving collaboration, which allows practitioners to exchange knowledge unrestricted by time and geographical barriers. The use of information technology for vertical integration of health-care institutions would reduce knowledge transaction costs, Le. decrease costs for negotiating and creating communication channels, and facilitating the determination of what, when, and how to produce knowledge. A global network would allow organizations to increase existing knowledge, and thus total productivity, while also supporting an environment where the generation of new ideas is unrestricted Using all the intellectual potential of market actors and thereby releasing economic resources can reduce today's global budget conflicts in the public sector, Le. the necessity to choose between health care services and for instance, schools and support for the elderly. In conclusion, global collaboration and coordination would reduce the transaction costs inherent in knowledge administration and allow a more effective total use of scarce health-care resources.

  • 44.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Warden, Nancy
    Davis Medical Center University of California, Davis.
    Walters, Richard
    Dep of COmputer and Information Science UC Davis.
    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Distance Consultations2007In: SHI2007,2007, Kalmar: ehälsoinstitutet , 2007, p. 72-76Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wass, Sofie
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living2014In: IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics, ISSN 0943-4747, Vol. 9, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To discuss how current research in the area of smart homes and ambient assisted living will be influenced by the use of big data. Methods: A scoping review of literature published in scientific journals and conference proceedings was performed, focusing on smart homes, ambient assisted living and big data over the years 2011-2014. Results: The health and social care market has lagged behind other markets when it comes to the introduction of innovative IT solutions and the market faces a number of challenges as the use of big data will increase. First, there is a need for a sustainable and trustful information chain where the needed information can be transferred from all producers to all consumers in a structured way. Second, there is a need for big data strategies and policies to manage the new situation where information is handled and transferred independently of the place of the expertise. Finally, there is a possibility to develop new and innovative business models for a market that supports cloud computing, social media, crowdsourcing etc. Conclusions: The interdisciplinary area of big data, smart homes and ambient assisted living is no longer only of interest for IT developers, it is also of interest for decision makersas customers make more informed choices among today’s services. In the future it will be of importance to make information usable for managers and improve decision making, tailor smart home services based on big data, develop new business models, increase competition and identify policies to ensure privacy, security and liability.

  • 46.
    Wang, Weixing
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Information Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Zhao, Weisen
    School of Information Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Huang, Lingxiao
    School of Information Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Zhiwei
    School of Information Engineering, Chang’an University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China.
    Applications of terrestrial laser scanning for tunnels: a review2014In: Journal of Traffic and Transportation Engineering (English Edition), ISSN 2095-7564, Vol. 1, no 5, p. 325-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the use of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) technique in engineering surveys is gaining an increasing interest due to the advantages of non-contact, rapidity, high accuracy, and large scale. Millions of accurate 3D points (mm level accuracy) can be delivered by this technique with a high point density in a short time (up to 1 million points per second), which makes it a potential technique for large scale applications in engineering environments such as tunnels, bridges, and heritage buildings. Tunnels, in particular those with long lengths, create great challenges for surveyors to obtain the satisfactory scanned data. This paper presents a short history of TLS techniques used for tunnels. A general overview of TLS techniques is given, followed by a review of several applications of TLS for tunnels. These applications are classified as: detecting geological features of drilling tunnels, monitoring the geometry of tunnels during excavation, making deformation measurements, and extracting features. The review emphasizes how TLS techniques can be used to measure various aspects of tunnels. It is clear that TLS techniques are not yet a common tool for tunnel investigations, but there is still a huge potential to excavate.

  • 47.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Bertil
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Korkmaz, Seher
    E-health and Strategic IT, Public Health Care Administration, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Schemeikka, Tero
    E-health and Strategic IT, Public Health Care Administration, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vég, Anikó
    Department of Healthcare Development, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Exploring the effects of eHealth service innovation2015In: Health Systems, ISSN 2047-6965, E-ISSN 2047-6973, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 212-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To analyse the impact of implementation and use of eHealth services is fraught with difficulty, and there is often a gap between expected and identified outcomes. In this paper, we identify innovation effects of an eHealth service by applying a framework that focusses on the expected coherent impacts of implementing an IT innovation and contributes to the body of knowledge on tracking innovation effects of services in eHealth. A case study examines four different care units in a government-funded health-care setting. The results show that the effects in the first two contexts of the framework, the micro level and intra-/interorganisational level, could be clearly identified with regard to the physicians and the organisation. However, effects were lacking in the virtual context when looking beyond the involvement of the stakeholders in the eHealth service. The connections between effects for societal groups and larger societal systems simply could not be made in a satisfactory manner.

  • 48.
    Wass, Sofie
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Vimarlund, Vivian
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Jönköping International Business School, Sweden.
    Challenges of Stimulating a Market for Social Innovation: Provision of a National Health Account2015In: Digital Healthcare Empowering Europeans / [ed] Ronald Cornet, Lăcrămioara Stoicu-Tivadar, Alexander Hörbst, Carlos Luis Parra Calderón, Stig Kjær Andersen, Mira Hercigonja-Szekeres, IOS Press, 2015, Vol. 210, p. 546-550Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in healthcare can be associated with social innovation and the mission to contribute to a shared value that benefits not only individuals or organizations but the society as a whole. In this paper, we present the prerequisites of stimulating a market for social innovations by studying the introduction of a national health account. The results show that there is a need to clarify if a national health account should be viewed as a public good or not, to clarify the financial responsibilities of different actors, to establish clear guidelines and to develop regulations concerning price, quality and certification of actors. The ambition to stimulate the market through a national health account is a promising start. However, the challenges have to be confronted in order for public and private actors to collaborate and build a market for social innovations such as a national health account.

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