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  • 1.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    The benefits of using a heart failure management programme in Swedish primary healthcare2013In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 228-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition with which high mortality, morbidity, and poor quality of life are associated. It has previously been shown that use of HF management programmes (HFMPs) in HF clinics can be beneficial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the use of HFMPs also has beneficial effects on HF patients in primary healthcare (PHC). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis is a randomized, prospective, open-label study including 160 patients from five PHC centres with systolic HF and a mean age of 75 years (standard deviation 7.8). In the intervention group, an intensive follow-up was performed by HF nurses and physicians providing information and education about HF and the optimization of HF treatment according to recognized guidelines. There was a significant improvement of composite endpoints in the intervention group. Significantly more patients with reduced N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (P 0.012), improved cardiac function (P 0.03), fewer healthcare contacts (P 0.04), and fewer emergency room visits and admittances (P 0.0002 and P 0.03, respectively) could be seen in the intervention group when compared with the control group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe use of a HFMP in a PHC setting was found to have beneficial effects in terms of reducing the number of healthcare contacts and hospital admissions, and improving cardiac function in patients with systolic HF, even if the result should be interpreted with caution. It can therefore be recommended that HFMPs should be used in PHC.

  • 2.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Cost of heart failure in Swedish primary healthcare2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 23, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To calculate the cost for patients with heart failure (HF) in a primary healthcare setting. Design. Retrospective study of all available patient data during a period of one year. Setting. Two healthcare centers in Linköping in the southeastern region of Sweden, covering a population of 19 400 inhabitants. Subjects. A total of 115 patients with a diagnosis of HF. Main outcome measures. The healthcare costs for patients with HF and the healthcare utilization concerning hospital days and visits to doctors and nurses in hospital care and primary healthcare. Results. The mean annual cost for a patient with HF was SEK 37 100. There were no significant differences in cost between gender, age, New York Heart Association functional class, and cardiac function. The distribution of cost was 47% for hospital care, 22% for primary healthcare, 18% for medication, 5% for nursing home, and 6% for examinations. Conclusion. Hospital care accounts for the largest cost but the cost in primary healthcare is larger than previously shown. The total annual cost for patients with HF in Sweden is in the range of SEK 5.0–6.7 billion according to this calculation, which is higher than previously known.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02813430500197647

  • 3.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Patients in primary health care diagnosed and treated as heart failure, with special reference to gender differences2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 14-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - The aim of the present study was to describe patients considered to have had heart failure (HF), or were being treated for HF, in a defined area in primary health care, e.g. diagnostic procedures, aetiologic diseases and management, and to evaluate whether there is a difference between the genders. Design - Descriptive retrospective investigation. Setting - ┼tvidaberg community situated in southeast Sweden, 12 400 inhabitants. Patients - 256 patients treated for symptomatic HF. Main outcome measures - Prevalence, aetiology, diagnostic procedures and management of HF and differences between the genders. Results - The diagnosis of HF was based on an objective evaluation of cardiac function in only 31% of the patients. Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) was the predominant associated disease, followed by hypertension. Therapy included diuretics (84%), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (56%) and digoxin (40%). Only 52% had optimal doses of ACE inhibitors. Women had a significantly higher mean age and their diagnoses were based on an objective diagnostic test (echocardiography) in only 20%. Women were prescribed ACE inhibitors to a lesser extent (43%) than men (64%) and with a lower optimal dose (44% versus 56% in men). Conclusion - There is still room for improvement in the management of HF in primary health care, especially in women, where the diagnosis is not generally based on an objective evaluation of cardiac function and where the treatment to a lesser extent than in men includes ACE inhibitors.

  • 4.
    Agvall, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Paulsson, Thomas
    Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Belgium.
    Foldevi, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Resource use and cost implications of implementing a heart failure program for patients with systolic heart failure in Swedish primary health care2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, p. 731-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Heart failure (HF) is a common but serious condition which involves a significant economic burden on the health care economy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cost and quality of life (QoL) implications of implementing a HF management program (HFMP) in primary health care (PHC).

    Methods and results: This was a prospective randomized open-label study including 160 patientswith a diagnosis of HF from five PHC centers in south-eastern Sweden. Patients randomized to the intervention group received information about HF from HF nurses and from a validated computer-based awareness program. HF nurses and physicians followed the patients intensely in order to optimize HF treatment according to current guidelines. The patients in the control group were followed by their regular general practitioner (GP) and received standard treatment according to local management routines. No significant changes were observed in NYHA class and quality-adjusted life years (QALY), implying that functional class and QoL were preserved. However, costs for hospital care (HC) and PHC were reduced by EUR 2167, or 33%. The total cost was EUR 4471 in the intervention group and EUR 6638 in the control group.

    Conclusions: Introducing HFMP in Swedish PHC in patients with HF entails a significant reduction in resource utilization and costs, and maintains QoL. Based on these results, a broader implementation of HFMP in PHC may be recommended. However, results should be confirmed with extended follow-up to verify  long-term effects.

  • 5.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rask, Peter
    University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of Suspected Aortic Stenosis by Auto Mutual Information Analysis of Murmurs2007In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007. EMBS 2007, 2007, p. 1945-1948Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mild sclerotic thickening of the aortic valve affects 25% of the population, and the condition causes aortic valve stenosis (AS) in 2% of adults above 65 years. Echocardiography is today the clinical standard for assessing AS. However, a cost effective and uncomplicated technique that can be used for decision support in the primary health care would be of great value. In this study, recorded phonocardiographic signals were analyzed using the first local minimum of the auto mutual information (AMI) function. The AMI method measures the complexity in the sound signal, which is related to the amount of turbulence in the blood flow and thus to the severity of the stenosis. Two previously developed phonocardiographic methods for assessing AS severity were used for comparison, the murmur energy ratio and the sound spectral averaging technique. Twenty-nine patients with suspected AS were examined with Doppler echocardiography. The aortic jet velocity was used as a reference of AS severity, and it was found to correlate with the AMI method, the murmur energy ratio and the sound spectral averaging technique with the correlation coefficient R = 0.82, R = 0.73 and R = 0.76, respectively.

  • 6.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Rask, P
    Karlsson, J-E
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Using the intelligent stethoscope for extraction of features for systolic heart murmur classification2006In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering WC2006,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ahlström, Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hult, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rask, Peter
    Örebro university.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Feature Extraction for Systolic Heart Murmur Classification2006In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 34, no 11, p. 1666-1677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart murmurs are often the first signs of pathological changes of the heart valves, and they are usually found during auscultation in the primary health care. Distinguishing a pathological murmur from a physiological murmur is however difficult, why an “intelligent stethoscope” with decision support abilities would be of great value. Phonocardiographic signals were acquired from 36 patients with aortic valve stenosis, mitral insufficiency or physiological murmurs, and the data were analyzed with the aim to find a suitable feature subset for automatic classification of heart murmurs. Techniques such as Shannon energy, wavelets, fractal dimensions and recurrence quantification analysis were used to extract 207 features. 157 of these features have not previously been used in heart murmur classification. A multi-domain subset consisting of 14, both old and new, features was derived using Pudil’s sequential floating forward selection (SFFS) method. This subset was compared with several single domain feature sets. Using neural network classification, the selected multi-domain subset gave the best results; 86% correct classifications compared to 68% for the first runner-up. In conclusion, the derived feature set was superior to the comparative sets, and seems rather robust to noisy data.

  • 8.
    Ahmad, Tariq
    et al.
    Yale Univ, CT USA; Yale Univ, CT USA.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rao, Pooja
    Qure Ai, India.
    Ghosh, Rohit
    Qure Ai, India.
    Warier, Prashant
    Qure Ai, India.
    Vaccaro, Benjamin
    Yale Univ, CT USA; Yale Univ, CT USA.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    OConnor, Christopher M.
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Felker, G. Michael
    Duke Univ, NC USA.
    Desai, Nihar R.
    Yale Univ, CT USA; Yale Univ, CT USA.
    Machine Learning Methods Improve Prognostication, Identify Clinically Distinct Phenotypes, and Detect Heterogeneity in Response to Therapy in a Large Cohort of Heart Failure Patients2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e008081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Whereas heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome, conventional approaches to its management have treated it as a singular disease, leading to inadequate patient care and inefficient clinical trials. We hypothesized that applying advanced analytics to a large cohort of HF patients would improve prognostication of outcomes, identify distinct patient phenotypes, and detect heterogeneity in treatment response. Methods and Results-The Swedish Heart Failure Registry is a nationwide registry collecting detailed demographic, clinical, laboratory, and medication data and linked to databases with outcome information. We applied random forest modeling to identify predictors of 1-year survival. Cluster analysis was performed and validated using serial bootstrapping. Association between clusters and survival was assessed with Cox proportional hazards modeling and interaction testing was performed to assess for heterogeneity in response to HF pharmacotherapy across propensity-matched clusters. Our study included 44 886 HF patients enrolled in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry between 2000 and 2012. Random forest modeling demonstrated excellent calibration and discrimination for survival (C-statistic=0.83) whereas left ventricular ejection fraction did not (C-statistic=0.52): there were no meaningful differences per strata of left ventricular ejection fraction (1-year survival: 80%, 81%, 83%, and 84%). Cluster analysis using the 8 highest predictive variables identified 4 clinically relevant subgroups of HF with marked differences in 1-year survival. There were significant interactions between propensity-matched clusters (across age, sex, and left ventricular ejection fraction and the following medications: diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, )i-blockers, and nitrates, Pamp;lt;0.001, all). Conclusions-Machine learning algorithms accurately predicted outcomes in a large data set of HF patients. Cluster analysis identified 4 distinct phenotypes that differed significantly in outcomes and in response to therapeutics. Use of these novel analytic approaches has the potential to enhance effectiveness of current therapies and transform future HF clinical trials.

  • 9.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Association Between Use of Statins and Mortality in Patients With Heart Failure and Ejection Fraction of greater than= 50%2015In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 862-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The pathophysiology of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is poorly understood, but may involve a systemic proinflammatory state. Therefore, statins might improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction defined as 50%. Methods and Results Of 46 959 unique patients in the prospective Swedish Heart Failure Registry, 9140 patients had heart failure and ejection fraction 50% (age 7711 years, 54.0% women), and of these, 3427 (37.5%) were treated with statins. Propensity scores for statin treatment were derived from 40 baseline variables. The association between statin use and primary (all-cause mortality) and secondary (separately, cardiovascular mortality, and combined all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization) end points was assessed with Cox regressions in a population matched 1:1 based on age and propensity score. In the matched population, 1-year survival was 85.1% for statin-treated versus 80.9% for untreated patients (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.89; Pless than0.001). Statins were also associated with reduced cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.98; P=0.026) and composite all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.96; P=0.003). Conclusions In heart failure with ejection fraction 50%, the use of statins was associated with improved outcomes. The mechanisms should be evaluated and the effects tested in a randomized trial.

  • 10.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Association Between Use of Statins and Outcomes in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction Prospective Propensity Score Matched Cohort Study of 21 864 Patients in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry2015In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 252-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-In heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction, randomized trials of statins did not demonstrate improved outcomes. However, randomized trials may not always be generalizable. The aim was to determine whether statins are associated with improved outcomes in an unselected nationwide population of patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction overall and in relation to ischemic heart disease (IHD). Methods and Results-In the Swedish Heart Failure Registry, 21 864 patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction (age +/- SD, 72+/-12 years; 29% women), of whom 10 345 (47%) were treated with statins, were studied. Propensity scores for statin use were derived from 42 baseline variables. The associations between statin use and outcomes were assessed with Cox regressions in a population matched 1: 1 based on propensity score and age and in the overall population with adjustment for propensity score and age. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality; secondary outcomes were cardiovascular mortality; HF hospitalization; and combined all-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization. Survival at 1 year in the matched population was 83% for statin-treated versus 79% for untreated patients (hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.86; Pless than0.001). In the unmatched population, 1-year survival was 85% for statin-treated versus 79% for untreated patients, hazard ratio after adjustment for propensity score and age was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.80-0.89; Pless than0.001). No examined baseline variables interacted with statin use except for IHD (P=0.001), with a hazard ratio of 0.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.82, Pless than0.001) with IHD and 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-1.07; P=0.430 without IHD. Statin use was also associated with reduced risk for all 3 secondary outcomes. Conclusions-In an unselected nationwide population of patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction, statins were associated with improved outcomes, specifically in the presence of IHD. This contrasts with previous randomized controlled trials. Additional randomized controlled trials with more generalized inclusion or focused on IHD may be warranted.

  • 11.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Can NT-proBNP predict risk of cardiovascular mortality within 10 years? Results from an epidemiological study of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure2009In: International journal of cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, Vol. 133, no 2, p. 233-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure has a serious prognosis. However, among elderly patients the panorama of concomitant diseases makes it difficult to implement the results from epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different clinical variables on cardiovascular mortality during a long-term follow-up.

    Methods and results: In all, 474 elderly patients (age 65-82 years) in primary health care were evaluated and followed during a 10 year period. All patients had symptoms associated with heart failure and were examined by a cardiologist. Blood samples including NT-proBNP were analyzed, and ECG and Doppler echocardiography were assessed. Both the systolic and diastolic function was evaluated. Functional capacity was evaluated according to the NYHA classification.

    During the 10 years of follow-up those with the highest quartile of plasma concentration of NT-proBNP had almost four times increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Impaired systolic function, diabetes and reduced functional capacity were all markers of increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. All variables were also evaluated after 5 years, with higher risk ratios for a majority of variables.

    Conclusion: In this study 474 patients with symptoms of heart failure were followed during 10 years. High plasma concentration of NT-proBNP could predict almost four times increased risk of cardiovascular mortality up to 10 years. Also, impaired cardiac function according to echocardiography, and reduced functional capacity as well as diabetes all had influence on risk of cardiovascular mortality up to 10 years.

     

  • 12.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rehfeld, J. F.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Gotze, J. P.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Combined measurement of copeptin, high sensitivity Troponin T, and NT-proBNP improves the identification of elderly patients at risk of cardiovascular death in REGULATORY PEPTIDES, vol 177, issue , pp S14-S142012In: REGULATORY PEPTIDES, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 177, p. S14-S14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Cartensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Refeld, Jens
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Goetze, Jens
    Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Combined measurement of copeptin, high-sensitivity troponin T, and N-terminal proBNP improves the identification of patients at risk of cardiovascular death2012In: Cardiovascular Endocrinology, ISSN 2162-688X, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 68-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: A multimarker strategy for the handling of patients with heart failure has been suggested in the literature. Therefore, the potential prognostic relevance of combined copeptin, high-sensitivity troponin T (HS-TnT), and N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) measurement in plasma from elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure was evaluated

    Methods: This study included 470 elderly patients (mean age 73 years) from a rural municipality with symptoms of heart failure. Clinical examination, echocardiography, and biomarker measurements were performed. All patients were followed for 13 years and all mortality was registered. Cardiovascular mortality was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier plots and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses.

    Results: Copeptin, HS-TnT, and NT-proBNP measurements provided independent prognostic information in a multivariate setting over 5 years (hazard ratio, HR: 3.66; 95% confidence interval, CI 1.27-10.53, HR: 2.52; 95% CI 1.20-5.28, HR: 2.73; 95% CI 1.19-6.26, respectively). Also, the group with all three biomarkers below cut-off values had a low risk for cardiovascular death (1.8% of the patients in this group died in the 5-year follow-up period). In the 13-year follow-up, combined copeptin and HS-TnT measurement did not provide independent prognostic information.

    Conclusion: Combined copeptin, HS-TnT, and NT-proBNP plasma measurements provide prognostic information on cardiovascular mortality that is superior to single biomarker use.

  • 14.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Cystatin C and NT-proBNP, a powerful combination of biomarkers for predicting cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients with heart failure: results from a 10-year study in primary care2009In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HEART FAILURE, ISSN 1388-9842, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 354-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) is common among the elderly patients. It is essential to identify those at high risk in order to optimize the use of resources. We aimed to evaluate whether a combination of two biomarkers might give better prognostic information about the risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality in patients with symptoms associated with HF, compared with only one biomarker. Four hundred and sixty-four primary health-care patients (mean age 73 years, range 65-87) with symptoms of HF were examined. All patients were evaluated using Doppler echocardiography and blood samples, including measurement of cystatin C and NT-proBNP. The patients were followed over a 10-year period. Patients with serum cystatin C levels within the highest quartile had almost three times the risk (HR: 2.92; 95% CI: 1.23-4.90) of CV mortality compared with those patients who had levels within the first, second, or third quartiles. If, at the same time, the patient had a plasma concentration of NT-proBNP within the highest quartile, the risk increased to andgt; 13 times (HR: 13.61; 95% CI: 2.56-72.24) during 10 years of follow-up or andgt; 17 times (HR: 17.04; 95% CI: 1.80-163.39) after 5 years of follow-up. Combined analysis of cystatin C and NT-proBNP could provide important prognostic information among elderly patients in the community with symptoms of HF.

  • 15.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Elevated D-dimer level is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular death in out-patients with symptoms compatible with heart failure2004In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 1250-1258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    D-dimer, a marker of fibrin turnover, exhibits many interesting properties as a biological marker of thrombosis. Some of the properties of D-dimer might also be used to provide additional information about patients with heart failure. In this study, we evaluate the prognostic information acquired from D-dimer concerning increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population with symptoms associated with heart failure. A cardiologist examined 458 elderly patients, out of 548 invited, attending primary care for symptoms of dyspnoea, fatigue and/or peripheral oedema and assessed NYHA functional class and cardiac function. Abnormal systolic function was defined as EF <40% on Doppler echocardiography. Abnormal diastolic function was defined as reduced E/A ratio and/or an abnormal pattern of pulmonary venous flow. Blood samples were drawn, and BNP and D-dimer were analysed. D-dimer was analysed using an automated micro-latex assay. A statistical analysis was performed to identify the prognostic value of increased plasma concentration of D-dimer. Results showed that during a median follow-up period of 5.5 years, 68 (14%) patients died of cardiovascular disease. No gender difference was noted. A plasma concentration of D-dimer >0.25mg/L increased the risk almost 4-fold. In conclusion, D-dimer is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality that may be used to risk-stratify patients with heart failure. © 2004 Schattauer GmbH, Stuttgart.

  • 16.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Low plasma concentrations of coagulation factors II, VII and XI indicate increased risk among elderly with symptoms of heart failure.2010In: Blood coagulation & fibrinolysis : an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis, ISSN 1473-5733, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 62-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure is a serious condition, and it is, therefore, important to identify patients at high risk as early as possible in order to initiate appropriate treatment. The condition results in complicated disease mechanisms including disturbances in blood coagulation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether low plasma concentrations of coagulation factors (F) II, VII and XI influence cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population with possible heart failure. A cardiologist evaluated 450 elderly patients who attended primary healthcare because of symptoms associated with heart failure. He recorded new patient history, conducted a clinical examination, took blood samples, determined concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide and FII, FVII, FXI and performed Doppler echocardiography. The patients were followed over almost a 10-year period during which all mortality was registered. In patients with suspected heart failure, those with low plasma concentrations of FII, FVII, FXI or all had a significantly higher mortality rate during the follow-up period of 10 years as compared with those with higher plasma concentrations, in contrast with findings in previous reports on patients with acute coronary syndromes. In the group with a plasma concentration of the first versus the ninth decile of FII, FVII, FXI or all, the risk of cardiovascular mortality increased two to three times.

  • 17.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehfeld, Jens F
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Goetze, Jens P
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Association of Copeptin and N-Terminal proBNP Concentrations With Risk of Cardiovascular Death in Older Patients With Symptoms of Heart Failure2011In: JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, ISSN 0098-7484, Vol. 305, no 20, p. 2088-2095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context Measurement of plasma concentrations of the biomarker copeptin may help identify patients with heart failure at high and low risk of mortality, although the value of copeptin measurement in elderly patients is not fully known. Objective To evaluate the association between plasma concentrations of copeptin, a surrogate marker of vasopressin, combined with concentrations of the N-terminal fragment of the precursor to B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and mortality in a cohort of elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure. Design, Setting, and Participants Primary health care population in Sweden enrolling 470 elderly patients with heart failure symptoms between January and December 1996. Clinical examination, echocardiography, and measurement of peptide concentrations were performed, with follow-up through December 2009. Main Outcome Measures All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Results After a median follow-up of 13 years, there were 226 deaths from all causes, including 146 deaths from cardiovascular causes. Increased concentration of copeptin was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (fourth quartile vs first quartile: 69.5% vs 38.5%, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 2.04 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.38-3.02]) and cardiovascular mortality (fourth quartile vs first quartile: 46.6% vs 26.5%; HR, 1.94 [95% CI, 1.20-3.13]). The combination of elevated NT-proBNP concentrations and elevated copeptin concentrations also was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (copeptin fourth quartile: HR, 1.63 [95% CI, 1.08-2.47]; P=.01; NT-proBNP fourth quartile: HR, 3.17 [95% CI, 2.02-4.98]; Pandlt;.001). Using the 2 biomarkers simultaneously in the evaluation of cardiovascular mortality, there was a significant association for copeptin in the presence of NT-proBNP (log likelihood trend test, P=.048) and a significant association for NT-proBNP (fourth quartile: HR, 4.68 [95% CI 2.63-8.34]; Pandlt;.001). Conclusion Among elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure, elevated concentrations of copeptin and the combination of elevated concentrations of copeptin and NT-proBNP were associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality.

  • 18.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Goetze, Jens P.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Pro-A-Type Natriuretic Peptide, Proadrenomedullin, and N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Used in a Multimarker Strategy in Primary Health Care in Risk Assessment of Patients With Symptoms of Heart Failure2013In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Use of new biomarkers in the handling of heart failure patients has been advocated in the literature, but most often in hospital-based populations. Therefore, we wanted to evaluate whether plasma measurement of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), midregional pro A-type natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM), individually or combined, gives prognostic information regarding cardiovascular and all-cause mortality that could motivate use in elderly patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of heart failure in primary health care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and Results: The study included 470 elderly patients (mean age 73 years) with symptoms of heart failure in primary health care. All participants underwent clinical examination, 2-dimenstional echocardiography, and plasma measurement of the 3 propeptides and were followed for 13 years. All mortality was registered during the follow-up period. The 4th quartiles of the biomarkers were applied as cutoff values. NT-proBNP exhibited the strongest prognostic information with andgt;4-fold increased risk for cardiovascular mortality within 5 years. For all-cause mortality MR-proADM exhibited almost 2-fold and NT-proBNP 3-fold increased risk within 5 years. In the 5-13-year perspective, NT-proBNP and MR-proANP showed significant and independent cardiovascular prognostic information. NT-proBNP and MR-proADM showed significant prognostic information regarding all-cause mortality during the same time. In those with ejection fraction (EF) andlt;40%, MR-proADM exhibited almost 5-fold increased risk of cardiovascular mortality with 5 years, whereas in those with EF andgt;50% NT-proBNP exhibited andgt;3-fold increased risk if analyzed as the only biomarker in the model. If instead the biomarkers were all below the cutoff value, the patients had a highly reduced mortality risk, which also could influence the handling of patients. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The 3 biomarkers could be integrated in a multimarker strategy for use in primary health care. (J Cardiac Fail 2013;19:31-39)

  • 19.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Rehfeld, Jens F
    University of Copenhagen.
    Goetze, Jens P
    University of Copenhagen.
    Prognostic Assessment of Elderly Patients with Symptoms of Heart Failure by Combining High-Sensitivity Troponin T and N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Measurements2010In: CLINICAL CHEMISTRY, ISSN 0009-9147, Vol. 56, no 11, p. 1718-1724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a useful biomarker in heart failure assessment, whereas measurement of cardiac troponin is central in the diagnosis of patients with acute coronary syndromes. This report examined the prognostic use of combining high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and NT-proBNP measurements in elderly patients presenting to a primary care center with symptoms associated with heart failure. METHODS: A total of 470 elderly patients (age range 65-86 years) presenting with symptoms of heart failure were recruited from primary healthcare. In addition to clinical examination and echocardiography, hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP plasma concentrations were measured. All patients were followed for 10 years, and cardiovascular mortality was registered. RESULTS: By use of the hs-cTnT assay, 80.4% of the population had plasma concentrations above the lower detection limit of the assay. Of those displaying a plasma concentration of hs-cTnT andgt;99th percentile of a healthy population, 43% also had an NT-proBNP concentration in the fourth quartile (andgt;507 ng/L). In the multivariate analysis, we observed a 2.5-fold increased risk for cardiovascular mortality in individuals with a plasma NT-proBNP concentration andgt;507 ng/L (P andlt; 0.0001). Conversely, patients with hs-cTnT andgt;99th percentile displayed an approximately 2-fold increased risk for cardiovascular mortality (P = 0.0002). Combining the 2 biomarkers, NT-proBNP concentrations andgt;507 ng/L with hs-cTnT andgt;99th percentile increased the risk 3-fold, even after adjustment for clinical variables such as age, sex, impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate, and anemia (P andlt; 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: hs-cTnT and NT-proBNP measurements combined provide better prognostic information than using either biomarker separately in elderly patients with symptoms associated with heart failure.

  • 20.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ericsson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Are There Any Significant Differences Between Females and Males in the Management of Heart Failure? Gender Aspects of an Elderly Population With Symptoms Associated With Heart Failure2009In: JOURNAL OF CARDIAC FAILURE, ISSN 1071-9164, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 501-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An increasing interest has been shown in potential l., 11 With heart failure (HF), a serious condition for the individual. To evaluate whether there are any differences ill the prevalence of HF, cardiac function, biomarkers. and the treatment of HF with respect to gender. Methods and Results: All persons ages 70 to 80 in a rural municipality were invited to participate ill the project 876 persons accepted. Three cardiologists evaluated the patients including a new history, clinical examination. electrocardiogram, chest x-ray. blood samples. and Doppler echocardiography to assess both Systolic and diastolic function. The patients were followed during a mean period of 8 years. Conclusion: Females hypertension more frequently and included fewer smokers than their male Counterparts. A Female preponderance was seen in those with preserved systolic function. whereas males predominated among those with systolic dysfunction. During the follow-up period, 20% of the males and 14% of the females died of cardiovascular diseases. The results did not show any inferior treatment of females with HF. but it clearly was more difficult to correctly classify female patients presenting with symptoms of HE

  • 21.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eriksson, H
    Hall, C
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    B-type natriuretic peptides as markers of left ventricular function in the elderly2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 304-304Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eriksson, H
    Nylander, E
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Overtreatment as well as undertreatment of heart failure is common in elderly patients in primary health care. Objective diagnostics tools are needed2001In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 22, p. 143-143Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, H.
    Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hosp.-Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heart failure in the elderly: characteristics of a Swedish primary health care population2002In: Heart Drug, ISSN 1422-9528, E-ISSN 1424-0556, Vol. 2, no 5, p. 211-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a challenge to diagnose and treat according to guidelines. Few studies have been performed in elderly subjects with symptoms that might be associated with HF in primary health care.

    Objective: To study elderly patients presenting with symptoms possibly associated with HF, with respect to systolic and diastolic function, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and treatment.

    Methods: A cardiologist examined 415 elderly (65–82 years) patients with symptoms of dyspnoea, fatigue and/or peripheral oedema. All patients underwent echocardiography and plasma BNP determination. Systolic function was determined semiquantitatively, and ejection fraction (EF) <40% was considered to be reduced. Abnormal diastolic function was defined as a reduced ratio of peak early diastolic filling velocity to peak filling velocity at atrial contraction (E/A ratio; age adjusted) or an abnormal pattern of pulmonary venous flow.

    Results: Forty-eight percent of the patients showed abnormal systolic (26%) or diastolic function (22%). A majority of the patients with diastolic HF had relaxation abnormalities and neither pseudonormal nor restrictive filling patterns. Increased levels of BNP were found in the group with impaired systolic function. More than half of those with EF <40% were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitions at all, or were on a suboptimal dose, whereas others were on treatment for an HF diagnosis despite normal cardiac function.

    Conclusion: Diagnostic tools that are more objective than clinical examination are needed for the diagnosis of HF.

  • 24.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Goetze, JP
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Reference intervals and decision limits for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its precursor (Nt-proBNP) in the elderly2007In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 382, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Elderly patients have the highest prevalence of heart failure (HF). The aims of the study were to establish a reference interval for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and (Nt-proBNP) in elderly people, and to identify clinically relevant decision limits based on long-term outcome. Methods: Plasma concentrations of BNP and Nt-proBNP were measured from two elderly populations: 218 healthy subjects (mean age 73 years, population I), and 474 patients (mean age 73 years, population II) with symptoms associated with HF. Study population II was followed for 6 years with registration of all cardiovascular mortality. Results: An association between both BNP and Nt-proBNP concentrations and age was found. The upper limit for the reference intervals in the healthy elderly (population I) was: BNP ≤ 28 pmol/L (≤ 97 ng/L), and Nt-proBNP ≤ 64 pmol/L (≤ 540 ng/L). Based on cardiovascular mortality, decision limits for BNP (∼ 50 pmol/L, ∼ 170 ng/L) and Nt-proBNP (∼ 200 pmol/L, ∼ 1700 ng/L) (population II) were determined. Conclusions: Besides establishing reference intervals for BNP and Nt-proBNP in an elderly population, a higher clinically relevant decision limit for BNP and Nt-proBNP was identified, indicating additive prognostic information of the peptides on top of measurements by echocardiography. Therefore, both reference intervals and decision limits should be included in clinical practice. © 2007.

  • 25.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Björnstedt, Mikael
    Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cardiovascular mortality and N-terminal-proBNP reduced after combined selenium and coenzyme Q10 supplementation: a 5-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 167, no 5, p. 1860-1866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are essential for the cell. Low cardiac contents of selenium and coenzyme Q10 have been shown in patients with cardiomyopathy, but inconsistent results are published on the effect of supplementation of the two components separately. A vital relationship exists between the two substances to obtain optimal function of the cell. However, reports on combined supplements are lacking.

    Methods

    A 5-year prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among Swedish citizens aged 70 to 88 was performed in 443 participants given combined supplementation of selenium and coenzyme Q10 or a placebo. Clinical examinations, echocardiography and biomarker measurements were performed. Participants were monitored every 6th month throughout the intervention.

    The cardiac biomarker N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) and echocardiographic changes were monitored and mortalities were registered. End-points of mortality were evaluated by Kaplan–Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard ratios were adjusted for potential confounding factors. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses were applied.

    Results

    During a follow up time of 5.2 years a significant reduction of cardiovascular mortality was found in the active treatment group vs. the placebo group (5.9% vs. 12.6%; P = 0.015). NT-proBNP levels were significantly lower in the active group compared with the placebo group (mean values: 214 ng/L vs. 302 ng/L at 48 months; P = 0.014). In echocardiography a significant better cardiac function score was found in the active supplementation compared to the placebo group (P = 0.03).

    Conclusion

    Long-term supplementation of selenium/coenzyme Q10 reduces cardiovascular mortality. The positive effects could also be seen in NT-proBNP levels and on echocardiography.

  • 26.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindstedt, G.
    Sahlgren Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Results from a 6-year follow-up of a Swedish population in primary care regarding b-type natriuretic peptide (bnp) and the aminoterminal fragment of proBNP (n-terminal proBNP) and risk for cardiovascular death in elderly patients with possible heart failure.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Heart failure is common in the elderly population and carries a serious prognosis. Identification of risk factors for cardiovascular mortality among primary care patients is important.

    Aim

    To evaluate EDTA-plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the aminoterminal fragment of proBNP (N-terminal proBNP) as prognostic markers in elderly with symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure.

    Methods

    From 474 patients attending primary care for symptoms of dyspnoea, fatigue and/or peripheral oedema blood was sampled in plastic tubes containing EDTA in order to measure BNP by non-extraction immunoradiometric assay and of N-terminal proBNP by non-extraction radioimmunoassay. Patients were evaluated with respect to history and clinical- and laboratory examinations with particular reference to cardiac structure and function. Follow-up time was 6 years. A Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the weight of risk variables.

    Conclusion

    During the follow-up period of 6 years the total mortality was 16 % (75 patients out of 474), and cardiovascular mortality was 11% (52 patients). Cardiovascular mortality increased with increased plasma concentration of BNP or N-terminal proBNP. Both pep tides were useful prognostic markers for cardiovascular mortality in patients with heart failure. In those with the highest quartile of plasma concentration of BNP and N=terminal proBNP, 9.9 times and 5.0 times increased risk for CV death were identified respectively.

  • 27.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindstedt, G
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Risk of cardiovascular death in elderly patients with possible heart failure. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and the aminoterminal fragment of ProBNP (N-terminal proBNP) as prognostic indicators in a 6-year follow-up of a primary care population2005In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 125-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure is common in the elderly population and carries a serious prognosis. We evaluated EDTA-plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (brain natriuretic peptide, BNP) and the aminoterminal fragment of proBNP (N-terminal proBNP) as prognostic markers in elderly primary care patients with symptoms of heart failure. Methods: From 474 patients attending primary care for symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue and/or peripheral edema, blood was sampled in plastic tubes containing EDTA to measure BNP by non-extraction immunoradiometric assay and N-terminal proBNP by non-extraction radioimmunoassay. Patients were evaluated with respect to history and function by NYHA classification and Doppler echocardiography. Follow-up time was 6 years. Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the weight of risk variables. Conclusion: Total 6-year mortality was 20% (102 patients out of 510), and cardiovascular (CV) mortality was 14% (71 patients, 70% of total mortality). BNP and N-terminal proBNP were essentially equally useful as prognostic markers. In patients with the highest quartiles of plasma concentration of BNP and N-terminal proBNP, respectively, the risk of cardiovascular mortality was 10 and 4.8 times, respectively, higher than that in those in the lowest quartile. Peptide concentrations varied widely within all functional groups including those with normal echocardiographic findings. Plasma concentrations of BNP and N-terminal proBNP give important prognostic information concerning risk of cardiovascular mortality. Cost-effective "clinical pathways" should be outlined for patients with elevated peptide concentrations. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindstedt, G.
    Sahlgren Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The risk of cardiovascular death in elderly patients with possible heart failure: results from a 6-year follow-up of a Swedish primary care population2005In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the prognosis and clinical variables influencing the prognosis among elderly patients in primary health care with mild to moderate heart failure.

    Aim: To evaluate the risk of cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure with respect to systolic and diastolic function, and functional impairment. To evaluate prognostic determinants and to risk-stratify the patients.

    Methods: A cardiologist examined 510 patients, out of 548 invited, attending primary care for symptoms of dyspnoea, fatigue and/or peripheral oedema and assessed New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class. Examination by Doppler echocardiography was done in 454 patients, 56 patients being excluded because of, e.g., atrial fibrillation. Abnormal systolic function was defined as ejection fraction <40%. The diastolic function was evaluated using the mitral inflow and pulmonary venous flow variables. Different clinical and echocardiographic variables were analysed using a Cox regression analysis to identify those most influencing the risk of cardiovascular mortality.

    Conclusion: Abnormal systolic and/or diastolic function was found in 219 patients (48% of the 454 patients who could be echocardiographically completely investigated). The follow-up period was 6 years. Total mortality was 20%, and cardiovascular mortality was 14% (70% of total mortality). Cardiovascular mortality was high in patients with severely impaired functional capacity and ejection fraction <40% at the start of the study. Risk variables identified were male gender, diabetes mellitus, impaired functional capacity and abnormal cardiac function by echocardiography. A prognostic score model using simple clinical variables (gender, NYHA class, cardiac function) was developed to assess the risk of cardiovascular death in order to identify patients with high, moderate or low risk. In a ROC curve analysis, the AUC for clinical variables was only 0.75, whereas the AUC for clinical variables and echocardiography was 0.78, indicating that the additional prognostic information obtained by Doppler echocardiography was rather small.

  • 29.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindstedt, Göran
    Sahlgren Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Henry
    Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital-Östra, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utility of the amino-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide in plasma for the evaluation of cardiac dysfunction in elderly patients in primary health care2003In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 1337-1346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of this study were to measure the N-terminal fragment of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (proBNP) in plasma in medical conditions commonly found in primary care and to evaluate the utility of these measurements in identifying impaired cardiac function in elderly patients with symptoms associated with heart failure.

    Methods: We studied 415 patients (221 men and 194 women; mean age, 72 years) who had contacted a primary healthcare center for dyspnea, fatigue, and/or peripheral edema. One cardiologist evaluated the patients in terms of history, physical examination, functional capacity, electrocardiography, and suspicion of heart failure. Plasma N-terminal proBNP was measured by an in-house RIA. An ejection fraction ≤40% by Doppler echocardiography was regarded as reduced cardiac function. Abnormal diastolic function was defined as an abnormal mitral inflow defined as reduced ratio of peak early diastolic filling velocity to peak filling velocity at atrial contraction (E/A ratio), or as abnormal pulmonary venous flow pattern.

    Results: Patients with impaired functional capacity, impaired systolic function, and/or impaired renal function had significantly increased N-terminal proBNP concentrations. By multiple regression analysis, N-terminal proBNP concentrations were also influenced by ischemic heart disease, cardiac enlargement, and certain medications but not by increased creatinine. No gender differences were observed. Patients with isolated diastolic dysfunction attributable to relaxation abnormali-ties had lower concentrations than those with normal cardiac function, whereas those with pseudonormal E/A ratios or restrictive filling patterns had higher concentrations.

    Conclusions: Plasma N-terminal proBNP concentrations increase as a result of impaired systolic function, age, impaired renal function, cardiac ischemia and enlargement, and certain medications. Values are high in diastolic dysfunction with pseudonormal patterns, but not in patients with relaxation abnormalities. An increase in plasma N-terminal proBNP might be an earlier sign of abnormal cardiac function than abnormalities identified by currently used echocardiographic measurements.

  • 30.
    Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svensson, E.
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of Command and Control Systems, Department of Man-System Interaction, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Natriuretic Peptide Biomarkers as Information Indicators in Elderly Patients With Possible Heart Failure Followed Over Six Years: A Head-to-Head Comparison of Four Cardiac Natriuretic Peptides2007In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, ISSN 1071-9164, E-ISSN 1532-8414, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 452-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known about the differences between natriuretic peptides used to evaluate elderly patients with heart failure. The aim of the study was to evaluate the information and the power to predict cardiovascular mortality derived from an analysis of cardiac natriuretic peptides from the same study population and at the same time. Methods and Results: In all, 415 elderly patients (age 65-82 years) in primary health care were evaluated and followed for 6 years. All patients had symptoms of heart failure and were examined by a cardiologist. An electrocardiogram and chest x-rays were taken, and the systolic and diastolic functions were assessed using Doppler echocardiography. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), N-terminal proBNP, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and N-terminal proANP were analyzed. All 4 peptides were associated with age, and only 1 of them showed any gender difference. Three of the 4 peptides (not ANP) provided important information for identifying patients with impaired systolic function and diastolic dysfunction (pseudonormal or restrictive filling pattern), and for assessing the risk of cardiovascular death. Conclusions: Cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful tools for evaluating elderly patients with heart failure. Three of the 4 peptides were very similar. ANP exhibits inferior properties and cannot be recommended in clinical practice. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Bank, Ingrid E. M.
    et al.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Gijsberts, Crystel M.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands; ICIN Netherlands Heart Institute, Netherlands.
    Teng, Tiew-Hwa K.
    Singhealth, Singapore.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sim, David
    Singhealth, Singapore.
    Shuan Daniel Yeo, Poh
    Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.
    Yee Ong, Hean
    Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore.
    Jaufeerally, Fazlur
    Singapore Gen Hospital, Singapore.
    Leong, Gerard K. T.
    Changi Gen Hospital, Singapore.
    Ling, Lieng H.
    National University, Singapore; National University of Health Syst, Singapore.
    Richards, A. Mark
    National University, Singapore; University of Otago, New Zealand.
    de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands; National University, Singapore.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lam, Carolyn S. P.
    Singhealth, Singapore; National University, Singapore; National University, Singapore; Duke NUS Medical Sch, Singapore.
    Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Diabetes in Asian Versus White Patients With Heart Failure2017In: JACC. Heart failure, ISSN 2213-1779, E-ISSN 2213-1787, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 14-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES The study sought to compare the prevalence, clinical correlates and prognostic impact of diabetes in Southeast Asian versus white patients with heart failure (HF) with preserved or reduced ejection fraction. BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus is common in HF and is associated with impaired prognosis. Asia is home to the majority of the worlds diabetic population, yet data on the prevalence and clinical significance of diabetes in Asian patients with HF are sparse, and no studies have directly compared Asian and white patients. METHODS Two contemporary population-based HF cohorts were combined: from Singapore (n 1,002, median [25th to 75th percentile] age 62 [54 to 70] years, 76% men, 19.5% obesity) and Sweden (n =19,537, 77 [68 to 84] years, 60% men, 24.8% obesity). The modifying effect of ethnicity on the relationship between diabetes and clinical correlates or prognosis (HF hospitalization and all-cause mortality) was examined using interaction terms. RESULTS Diabetes was present in 569 (57%) Asian patients versus 4,680 (24%) white patients (p amp;lt; 0.001). Adjusting for clinical covariates, obesity was more strongly associated with diabetes in white patients (odds ratio [OR]: 3.45;. 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.86 to 4.17) than in Asian patients (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.96; P-interaction = 0.026). Diabetes was more strongly associated with increased HF hospitalization and all-cause mortality in Asian patients (hazard ratio: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.87) than in white patients (hazard ratio: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.36; P-interaction = 0.045). CONCLUSIONS Diabetes was 3-fold more common in Southeast Asian compared to white patients with HF, despite younger age and less obesity, and more strongly associated with poor outcomes in Asian patients than white patients. These results underscore the importance of ethnicity-tailored aggressive strategies to prevent diabetes and its complications. (C) 2017 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 32.
    Berg, Jenny
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; OptumInsight, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; IVBAR, Sweden.
    Mejhert, Marit
    Ersta Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Edner, Magnus
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Kahan, Thomas
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Determinants of Utility Based on the EuroQol Five-Dimensional Questionnaire in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure and Their Change Over Time: Results from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry2015In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 439-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is limited information on drivers of utilities in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Objectives: To analyze determinants of utility in CHF and drivers of change over 1 year in a large sample from clinical practice. Methods: We included 5334 patients from the Swedish Heart Failure Registry with EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire information available following inpatient or outpatient care during 2008 to 2010; 3495 had 1-year follow-up data Utilities based on Swedish and UK value sets were derived. We applied ordinary least squares (OLS) and two-part models for utility at inclusion and OLS regression for change over 1 year, all with robust standard errors. We assessed the predictive accuracy of both models using cross-validation. Results: Patients mean age was 73 years, 65% were men, 19% had a left ventricular ejection fraction of 50% or more, 23% had 40% to 49%, 27% had 30% to 39%, and 31% had less than 30%. For both models and value sets, utility at inclusion was affected by sex, age, New York Heart Association class, ejection fraction, hemoglobin, blood pressure, lung disease, diabetes, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, nitrates, antiplatelets, and diuretics. The OLS model performed slightly better than did the two-part model on a population level and for capturing utility ranges. Change in utility over 1 year was influenced by age, sex, and (measured at inclusion) disease duration, New York Heart Association class, blood pressure, ischemic heart disease, lung disease, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, and antiplatelets. Conclusions: Utilities in CHF and their change over time are influenced by diverse demographic and clinical factors. Our findings can be used to target clinical interventions and for economic evaluations of new therapies.

  • 33.
    Bergh, Claes-Hakan
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Andersson, Bert
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Forfang, Kolbjorn
    Rikshosp University Hospital.
    Kivikko, Matti
    Orion Pharma.
    Sarapohja, Toni
    Orion Pharma.
    Ullman, Bengt
    Soder Sjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Wikstrom, Gerhard
    Akad Hospital.
    Intravenous levosimendan vs. dobutamine in acute decompensated heart failure patients on beta-blockers2010In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HEART FAILURE, ISSN 1388-9842, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 404-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The aim of this study is to compare the effects of a 24 h intravenous infusion of levosimendan and a 48 h infusion of dobutamine on invasive haemodynamics in patients with acutely decompensated chronic NYHA class III- IV heart failure. All patients were receiving optimal oral therapy including a beta- blocker. Methods and results This was a multinational, randomized, double- blind, phase IV study in 60 patients; follow- up was 1 month. There was a significant increase in cardiac index and a significant decrease in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) at 24 and 48 h for both dobutamine and levosimendan. The improvement in cardiac index with levosimendan was not significantly different from dobutamine at 24 h (P = 0.07), but became significant at 48 h (0.44 +/- 0.56 vs. 0.66 +/- 0.63 L/min/m(2); P = 0.04). At 24 h, the reduction in the mean change in PCWP from baseline was similar for levosimendan and dobutamine, however, at 48 h the difference was more marked for levosimendan (23.6 +/- 7.6 vs. 28.3 +/- 6.7 mmHg; P = 0.02). No difference was observed between the groups for change in NYHA class, beta- blocker use, hospitalizations, treatment discontinuations or rescue medication use. Reduction in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was significantly greater with levosimendan at 48 h (P = 0.03). According to physicians assessment, the improvement in fatigue (P = 0.01) and dyspnoea (P = 0.04) was in favour of dobutamine treatment, and hypotension was significantly more frequent with levosimendan (P = 0.007). No increase in atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia was seen in either group. Conclusion A 24 h levosimendan infusion achieved haemodynamic and neurohormonal improvement that was at least comparable at 24 h and superior at 48 h to a 48 h dobutamine infusion.

  • 34.
    Bergström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Andersson, B
    Edner, M
    Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Gothenburg Univ, S-41124 Gothenburg, Sweden Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nylander, E
    Persson, H
    Dept Cardiol, Linkoping, Sweden Gothenburg Univ, S-41124 Gothenburg, Sweden Linkoping Univ, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Carvedilol improves diastolic function in patients with diastolic heart failure.2001In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 104, no 17, p. 3388-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bergström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Andersson, B
    Edner, M
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Persson, H
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effect of carvedilol on diastolic function in patients with diastolic heart failure and preserved systolic function. Results of the Swedish Doppler-echocardiographic study (SWEDIC)2004In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 453-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carvedilol on diastolic function (DF) in heart failure patients with preserved left ventricular (LV) systolic function and abnormal DF. Patients and Methods: We randomised 113 patients with diastolic heart failure (DHF) (symptomatic, with normal systolic LV function and abnormal DF) into a double blind multi-centre study. The patients received either carvedilol or matching placebo in addition to conventional treatment. After uptitration, treatment was continued for 6 months. Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography were used for quantification of LV function at baseline and at follow-up. Four different DF variables were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography: mitral flow E:A ratio, deceleration time (DT), isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) and the ratio of systolic/diastolic pulmonary venous flow velocity (pv-S/D). Primary endpoint was change in the integrated quantitative assessment of all four variables during the study. Results: Ninety-seven patients completed the study. A mitral flow pattern reflecting a relaxation abnormality was recorded in 95 patients. There was no effect on the primary endpoint, although a trend towards a better effect in carvedilol treated patients was noticed in patients with heart rates above 71 beats per minute. At the end of the study, there was a statistically significant improvement in E:A ratio in patients treated with carvedilol (0.72 to 0.83) vs. placebo (0.71 to 0.76), P<0.05. Conclusions: Treatment with carvedilol resulted in a significant improvement in E:A ratio in patients with heart failure due to a LV relaxation abnormality. E:A ratio was found to be the most useful variable to identify diastolic dysfunction in this patient population. This effect was observed particularly in patients with higher heart rates at baseline. © 2004 European Society of Cardiology.

  • 36.
    Bilchick, Kenneth C.
    et al.
    University of Virginia Health Syst, VA USA.
    Wang, Yongfei
    Yale New Haven Medical Centre, CT 06504 USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Cheng, Alan
    Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, MD 21205 USA.
    Curtis, Jeptha P.
    Yale New Haven Medical Centre, CT 06504 USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Dharmarajan, Kumar
    Yale New Haven Medical Centre, CT 06504 USA; Yale University, CT USA.
    Stukenborg, George J.
    University of Virginia, VA USA.
    Shadman, Ramin
    Southern Calif Permanente Medical Grp, CA USA.
    Anand, Inder
    University of Minnesota, MN USA.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sartipy, Ulrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Maggioni, Aldo
    Italian Assoc Hospital Cardiologists, Italy.
    Swedberg, Karl
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Imperial Coll, England.
    OConner, Chris
    Inova Healthcare Syst, VA USA.
    Levy, Wayne C.
    University of Washington, WA USA.
    Seattle Heart Failure and Proportional Risk Models Predict Benefit From Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators2017In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 69, no 21, p. 2606-2618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Recent clinical trials highlight the need for better models to identify patients at higher risk of sudden death. OBJECTIVES The authors hypothesized that the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) for overall survival and the Seattle Proportional Risk Model (SPRM) for proportional risk of sudden death, including death from ventricular arrhythmias, would predict the survival benefit with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). METHODS Patients with primary prevention ICDs from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (NCDR) were compared with control patients with heart failure (HF) without ICDs with respect to 5-year survival using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS Among 98,846 patients with HF (87,914 with ICDs and 10,932 without ICDs), the SHFM was strongly associated with all-cause mortality (p amp;lt; 0.0001). The ICD-SPRM interaction was significant (p amp;lt; 0.0001), such that SPRM quintile 5 patients had approximately twice the reduction in mortality with the ICD versus SPRM quintile 1 patients (adjusted hazard ratios [HR]: 0.602; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.537 to 0.675 vs. 0.793; 95% CI: 0.736 to 0.855, respectively). Among patients with SHFM-predicted annual mortality amp;lt;= 5.7%, those with a SPRM-predicted risk of sudden death below the median had no reduction in mortality with the ICD (adjusted ICD HR: 0.921; 95% CI: 0.787 to 1.08; p = 0.31), whereas those with SPRM above the median derived the greatest benefit (adjusted HR: 0.599; 95% CI: 0.530 to 0.677; p amp;lt; 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The SHFM predicted all-cause mortality in a large cohort with and without ICDs, and the SPRM discriminated and calibrated the potential ICD benefit. Together, the models identified patients less likely to derive a survival benefit from primary prevention ICDs. (J Am Coll Cardiol 2017;69:2606-18) (C) 2017 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

  • 37.
    Björck, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Debasso, Rachel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ljungberg, Liza
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gender-Specific Association of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/5G Polymorphism With Central Arterial Blood Pressure2011In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 802-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND The functional plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism has previously been associated with hypertension. In recent years, central blood pressure, rather than brachial has been argued a better measure of cardiovascular damage and clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of the 4G/5G polymorphism on central arterial blood pressure in a cohort of elderly individuals. METHODS We studied 410 individuals, 216 men and 194 women, aged 70-88. Central pressures and pulse waveforms were calculated from the radial artery pressure waveform by the use of the SphygmoCor system and a generalized transfer function. Brachial pressure was recorded using oscillometric technique (Dinamap, Critikon, Tampa, FL). PAI-1 antigen was determined in plasma. RESULTS The results showed that central pressures were higher in women carrying the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype compared to female carriers of the 5G/5G genotype, (P = 0.025, P = 0.002, and P = 0.002 for central systolic-, diastolic-, and mean arterial pressure, respectively). The association remained after adjustment for potentially confounding factors related to hypertension. No association of the PAI-1 genotype with blood pressure was found in men. Multiple regression analysis revealed an association between PAI-1 genotype and plasma PAI-1 levels (P = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS Our findings show a gender-specific association of the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with central arterial blood pressure. The genotype effect was independent of other risk factors related to hypertension, suggesting that impaired fibrinolytic potential may play an important role in the development of central hypertension in women.

  • 38.
    Björck, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rundkvist, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamsten, A
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eriksson, P
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Association of genetic variation on chromosome 9p21.3 and arterial stiffness2009In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 265, no 3, p. 373-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome wide association studies have consistently reported associations between a region on chromosome 9p21.3 and a broad range of vascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD), aortic and intracranial aneurysms and type-2 diabetes (T2D). However, clear associations with intermediate phenotypes have not been described so far. To shed light on a possible influence of this chromosomal region on arterial wall integrity, we analysed associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and degree of stiffness of the abdominal aorta in elderly individuals.

    A total of 400 subjects, 212 men and 188 women, aged 70-88 years were included. Arterial stiffness was examined at the midpoint between the renal arteries and the aortic bifurcation. Two CAD- and aneurysm-associated SNPs (rs10757274 and rs2891168) and one T2D-associated SNP (rs1081161) within the 9p21.3 region were genotyped. Aortic compliance and distensibility coefficients were higher in carriers of the rs10757274G and rs2891168G alleles in men reflecting a decrease in aortic stiffness. Adjustment for age and mean arterial pressure had no effect on these associations. The two SNPs were not associated with intima-media thickness or lumen diameter of the abdominal aorta. There were no associations between the rs10811661 SNP and any measure of aortic stiffness.

    Impaired mechanical properties of the arterial wall may explain the association between chromosome 9p21.3 polymorphisms and vascular disease.

  • 39.
    Braunschweig, Frieder
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Linde, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Benson, Lina
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhlberg, Marcus
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lund, Lars H
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    New York Heart Association functional class, QRS duration, and survival in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: implications for cardiac resychronization therapy.2017In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 366-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Symptom severity assessed by NYHA functional class and QRS duration are essential criteria for selection of heart failure (HF) patients for CRT. This study assessed the relationship between NYHA class, QRS duration, and survival in a nationwide HF registry.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 13 423 patients with HF in NYHA class II-IV and LVEF <40% in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry. Survival was followed via the Swedish Population Registry. Of 12 534 patients without CRT (age 71 ± 12 years, 29% women), 51% and 49% were in NYHA class II and III-IV, respectively. Patients in NYHA class II compared with class III-IV were younger (69 vs. 73 years), and had a better systolic function (49% vs. 58% with LVEF <30%), P <0.001 for all, and a favourable co-morbidity profile. QRS duration was 116 ± 29 ms in NYHA class II and 119 ± 29 ms in NYHA class III-IV with QRS ≥120 ms found in 37% vs. 44%, and an LBBB in 23% vs. 28% (P < 0.001 for all). Upon multivariable Cox regression adjusting for 40 clinically relevant variables, mortality risk was higher in NYHA class III-IV vs. class II, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23-1.40. Mortality was also higher with QRS prolongation ≥120 ms vs. narrow QRS. The HR in NYHA class II patients with non-LBBB was 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 - 1.36) and in those with LBBB it was 1.16 (95% CI 1.03-1.41). The corresponding HRs in NYHA class III-IV were 1.33 (95% CI 1.21-1.47) and 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.22). There was no significant interaction between the effects of NYHA class and QRS duration or morphology on mortality. Applying different scenarios to estimate guideline adherence, fewer patients with NYHA class II (range 14.4-42.6%) compared with NYHA class III-IV (18.0-45.4%) had received a CRT device when indicated.

    CONCLUSIONS: In HF with reduced LVEF, QRS prolongation is common and independently linked to worse survival. The increase in mortality risk associated with QRS prolongation of both LBBB and non-LBBB morphology is similar in NYHA class II and III-IV.

  • 40.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment in patients with severe heart failure2005In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and leads to disturbed sleep. The objective of this study was to determine the persistent effects of long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment in patients with severe HF regarding (1) objective outcomes, such as sleep, SDB, cardiac function, and functional capacity; (2) subjective outcomes, such as self-assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and (3) the relationship between objective and subjective outcomes. In this open nonrandomized experimental study, 22 patients, median age 71 years, with severe HF were studied before and after 3 months of receiving nocturnal oxygen. The measures used were overnight polysomnography, echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, self-assessed sleep difficulties (Uppsala Sleep Inventory-HF), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and HRQOL (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire). SDB, with a 90% dominance of central sleep apnea, occurred in 41% of the patients with severe HF before intervention. After intervention, functional capacity improved for both the whole group of patients with HF (P < .01) and HF patients with SDB (P < .05). No improvements regarding cardiac function, objective sleep, subjective sleep, or SDB were seen, except for a decrease of > or = 4% desaturations (P < .05). HRQOL did not differ significantly between HF patients with and without SDB before or after intervention with nocturnal oxygen. Long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment improved functional capacity in patients with severe HF, with or without SDB. No improvements were seen regarding sleep, daytime sleepiness, SDB, cardiac function, or HRQOL.

  • 41.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Kihl, J
    Forslund, P
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Fridlund, B G
    Depressive symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure - effects on insomnia, daytime sleepiness and health-related quality of life2006In: World Congress of Cardiology,2006, 2006, p. 224-224Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Congestive heart failure, spouses' support and the couple's sleep situation: a critical incident technique analysis2003In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 223-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Sleep related breathing disorders are common as well as a poor prognostic sign associated with higher mortality in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). These patients often have a shorter total duration of sleep, disturbed sleep structure and increased daytime sleepiness, which can negatively affect all dimensions of the life situation. The spouse has an important role in supporting the patient in relation to sleep disorders, but this role may be adversely affected by the sleep situation of the couple.

    •  The aim of this study was to describe decisive situations that influence spouses' support to patients with CHF in relation to the couple's sleep situation.

    • A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was employed. Incidents were collected by means of interviews with 25 spouses of patients with CHF, strategically selected from two hospital-based specialist clinics in southern Sweden.

    •  Two main areas emerged in the analysis: support stimulating situations and support inhibiting situations. Support stimulating situations described how spouses' support was positively affected by their own adaptation in psychosocial or practical situations, and receiving help from others. Support inhibiting situations described how the spouses' support was negatively affected by sleep disturbances as a result of the patient's symptoms, anxiety in relation to the disease, limitations as a result of the sleeping habits, dissatisfaction with care related to the sleep situation, and being left to cope alone with the problems.

    •  An increased understanding of the stimulating and inhibiting situations influencing spouses' support for patients with CHF can guide health care personnel in deciding if an intervention is needed to improve the sleep situation for patient and spouse.

  • 43.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patients with congestive heart failure and their conceptions of their sleep situation2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 520-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe, from a nursing perspective, how patients with CHF conceived their sleep situation.

    Background.  Sleep disturbances are very common in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Polysomnographic studies have shown that the total duration of sleep is shorter and the sleep structure disturbed, with frequent arousals and sleep stage changes.

    Methods.  A qualitative descriptive design inspired by a phenomenographic approach was employed. Conceptions were collected through interviews with 20 strategically chosen CHF patients.

    Findings.  The findings showed that the patients’ sleep was affected by their daily activities, the disease itself and cardiac symptoms. The sleep disturbances gave effects such as fatigue, listlessness, loss of concentration and loss of temper. These effects led to a need for daytime sleep, seclusion, counselling and information. Patients handled their sleep disturbances through coping mechanisms related to developed patterns of daily life and through support from their psychosocial environment.

    Conclusions. Through an increased awareness of the causes of sleep disturbances in CHF patients, nurses can more effectively meet their caring needs and reduce the psychological stressors that patients develop. Information and education, both to patients and the next of kin, about the disease and the sleep situation, especially good sleeping habits, can help patients to better cope with sleep disturbances.

  • 44.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Normal sleep changes with age in duration, fragmentation, and depth. The prevalence of insomnia is high in the elderly general population. In patients with chronic heart failure (HF) objective sleep assessments have shown disturbances such as a shorter total duration of sleep, frequent arousals, and sleep stage changes.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To describe self-assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in men and women with HF, as well as to make a comparison to data from a norm population.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional design including 223 patients with HF, New York Heart Association classification II-IV, assessed using the Uppsala Sleep Inventory-Chronic Heart Failure, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The most commonly reported sleep difficulties were initiating and maintaining sleep. The ratio of habitual sleep to the amount of estimated need for sleep was significantly shorter for women (P < .05), and the number of awakenings per night was significantly increased for men (P < .001). A total of 21% suffered from daytime sleepiness. Patients suffering from difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings reported significantly lower HRQOL in almost all dimensions of the SF-36 (P < .05-P < .001) compared to patients without sleeping difficulties, as well as to the normal population. The disease-specific Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire showed significantly reduced (P < .05-P < .001) HRQOL as measured by the total and subscale scores for patients suffering from sleeping difficulties compared to patients without sleeping difficulties.

    CONCLUSION:

    Patients with HF have a reduced HRQOL especially if difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings are involved.

  • 45.
    Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter
    et al.
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Eurlings, Luc
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
    Richards, A Mark
    National University Heart Centre, Singapore.
    Januzzi, James L
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Pfisterer, Matthias E
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Pinto, Yigal M
    Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Karlström, Patric
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jonkoping, Sweden.
    Erntell, Hans
    Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berger, Rudolf
    Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Persson, Hans
    11Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University, NC, USA.
    O'Connor, Christopher M
    LKH, St Poelten, Austria..
    Moertl, Deddo
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Gaggin, Hanna K
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Frampton, Christopher M
    University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand..
    Nicholls, M Gary
    University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand..
    Troughton, Richard W
    University of Otago Christchurch, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand..
    Which heart failure patients profit from natriuretic peptide guided therapy? A meta-analysis from individual patient data of randomized trials.2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 12, p. 1252-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Previous analyses suggest that heart failure (HF) therapy guided by (N-terminal pro-)brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) might be dependent on left ventricular ejection fraction, age and co-morbidities, but the reasons remain unclear.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine interactions between (NT-pro)BNP-guided therapy and HF with reduced [ejection fraction (EF) ≤45%; HF with reduced EF (HFrEF), n = 1731] vs. preserved EF [EF > 45%; HF with preserved EF (HFpEF), n = 301] and co-morbidities (hypertension, renal failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, cerebrovascular insult, peripheral vascular disease) on outcome, individual patient data (n = 2137) from eight NT-proBNP guidance trials were analysed using Cox-regression with multiplicative interaction terms. Endpoints were mortality and admission because of HF. Whereas in HFrEF patients (NT-pro)BNP-guided compared with symptom-guided therapy resulted in lower mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-0.97, P = 0.03] and fewer HF admissions (HR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97, P = 0.02), no such effect was seen in HFpEF (mortality: HR = 1.22, 95% CI 0.76-1.96, P = 0.41; HF admissions HR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.67-1.53, P = 0.97; interactions P < 0.02). Age (74 ± 11 years) interacted with treatment strategy allocation independently of EF regarding mortality (P = 0.02), but not HF admission (P = 0.54). The interaction of age and mortality was explained by the interaction of treatment strategy allocation with co-morbidities. In HFpEF, renal failure provided strongest interaction (P < 0.01; increased risk of (NT-pro)BNP-guided therapy if renal failure present), whereas in HFrEF patients, the presence of at least two of the following co-morbidities provided strongest interaction (P < 0.01; (NT-pro)BNP-guided therapy beneficial only if none or one of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, cardiovascular insult, or peripheral vascular disease present). (NT-pro)BNP-guided therapy was harmful in HFpEF patients without hypertension (P = 0.02).

    CONCLUSION: The benefits of therapy guided by (NT-pro)BNP were present in HFrEF only. Co-morbidities seem to influence the response to (NT-pro)BNP-guided therapy and may explain the lower efficacy of this approach in elderly patients.

  • 46.
    Cermakova, Pavla
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Int Clin Research Centre, Czech Republic; St Annes University Hospital, Czech Republic.
    Lund, Lars H.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Eriksdotter, Maria
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Religa, Dorota
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Heart failure and dementia: survival in relation to types of heart failure and different dementia disorders2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 612-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsHeart failure (HF) and dementia frequently coexist, but little is known about their types, relationships to each other and prognosis. The aims were to (i) describe patients with HF and dementia, assess (ii) the proportion of specific dementia disorders in types of HF based on ejection fraction and (iii) the prognostic role of types of HF and dementia disorders. Methods and resultsThe Swedish Heart Failure Registry (RiksSvikt) and The Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) were record-linked. Associations between dementia disorders and HF types were assessed with multinomial logistic regression and survival was investigated with Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox regression. We studied 775 patients found in both registries (55% men, mean age 82years). Ejection fraction was preserved in 38% of patients, reduced in 34%, and missing in 28%. The proportions of dementia disorders were similar across HF types. Vascular dementia was the most common dementia disorder (36%), followed by other dementias (28%), mixed dementia (20%), and Alzheimer disease (16%). Over a mean follow-up of 1.5years, 76% of patients survived 1year. We observed no significant differences in survival with regard to HF type (P=0.2) or dementia disorder (P=0.5). After adjustment for baseline covariates, neither HF types nor dementia disorders were independently associated with survival. ConclusionsHeart failure with preserved ejection fraction was the most common HF type and vascular dementia was the most common dementia disorder. The proportions of dementia disorders were similar across HF types. Neither HF types nor specific dementia disorders were associated with survival.

  • 47.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Increased IGF1 levels in relation to heart failure and cardiovascular mortality in an elderly population: impact of ACE inhibitors2011In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 165, no 6, p. 891-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are conflicting results regarding the association of circulating IGF1 with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the relationship between IGF1 levels and heart failure (HF), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and CV mortality in an elderly population taking into account the possible impact of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Design and methods: A total of 851 persons aged 66-81 years, in a rural Swedish municipality, were subjected to medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples. They were then followed for 8 years. Results and conclusion: Patients on ACE inhibitors had higher IGF1 levels compared with those without ACE inhibitors. In patients on ACE inhibitors, higher IGF1 values were found in patients with an ejection fraction (EF) less than40% compared with EF greater than= 40%, in patients with higher proBNP levels in quartile 4 vs 1, and in patients with IHD when compared to those without ACE inhibitors (P less than 0.001). In patients without ACE inhibitors, no relationship was found between IGF1 levels and HF or IHD. In multivariate regression, only ACE inhibitors, ECG changes characteristic for IHD, and gender had a significant impact on IGF1. Patients with higher IGF1 levels in quintiles 4 and 5 compared to quintiles 1 and 2 had a 50% higher risk for CV death (P=0.03). This was significant after adjustment for well-known CV risk factors and ACE inhibitors (P=0.03). Conclusions: Our results show that treatment with ACE inhibitors in an elderly population is associated with increased IGF1 levels, especially in patients with impaired cardiac function or IHD. High IGF1 levels tend to be associated with an increased risk for CV mortality.

  • 48.
    Chisalita, Ioana Simona
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Proinsulin and IGFBP-1 predicts mortality in an elderly population2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 174, no 2, p. 260-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    High IGFBP-1 in elderly subjects is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We studied the relation of IGFBP-1 to cardiometabolic risk factors and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, and also the impact of proinsulin and insulin on this association in an unselected elderly primary health care population.

    HYPOTHESIS:

    Our hypothesis was that proinsulin and insulin may have an impact on the association of high IGFBP-1 levels with all-cause and CV-mortality in elderly.

    DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

    A cross-sectional and prospective study was carried out in a rural Swedish population. 851 persons aged 66-81 years were evaluated by medical history, clinical examination, electrocardiography, echocardiography, and fasting plasma samples, and were followed prospectively for up to 12 years.

    RESULTS:

    At baseline, in a multivariate analysis, IGFBP-1 was associated with gender, N-terminal proBNP (NT pro-BNP), blood glucose, body mass index (BMI), insulin and proinsulin, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and haemoglobin (Hb). During the follow-up period there were 230 deaths (27%), of which 134 (16%) were due to CV mortality. When divided into tertiles there was a significant difference for CV mortality and all-cause mortality between tertiles of IGFBP-1 and proinsulin. For insulin there was a significant difference only for all-cause mortality. After adjustment for well-known risks factors, proinsulin and IGFBP-1 had significant impact on all-cause mortality but only proinsulin on CV mortality.

    CONCLUSION:

    Only proinsulin is an independent predictor for both all-cause mortality and CV mortality when comparing IGFBP-1, insulin, and proinsulin as prognostic biomarkers for CV and all-cause mortality in an elderly population.

  • 49. Cowie, MR
    et al.
    Jourdain, P
    Maisel, A
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Follath, F
    Isnard, R
    Luchner, A
    McDonagh, T
    Mair, J
    Nieminen, M
    Francis, G
    Clinical applications of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) testing2003In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 24, no 19, p. 1710-1718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many claims have been made in recent years regarding the utility of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration measurements in the diagnosis, risk stratification and monitoring of patients with heart failure. This paper summarizes the current evidence and provides guidance for practising clinicians. Overall, plasma BNP testing appears to be of most value in the diagnostic arena, where it is likely to improve the performance of non-specialist physicians in diagnosing heart failure. In clinical practice, BNP testing is best used as a 'rule out' test for suspected cases of new heart failure in breathless patients presenting to either the outpatient or emergency care settings, it is not a replacement for echocardiography and full cardiological assessment, which will be required for patients with an elevated BNP concentration. Although work is ongoing in establishing the 'normal' values of BNP, heart failure appears to be highly unlikely below a plasma concentration of 100 pg/ml. However, as BNP levels rise with age and are affected by gender, comorbidity and drug therapy, the plasma BNP measurement should not be used in isolation from the clinical context.

  • 50.
    Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.
    et al.
    Complexo Hospital University of A Coruna, Spain.
    Anker, Stefan D.
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen UMG, Germany.
    Maggioni, Aldo P.
    European Soc Cardiol, France; ANMCO Research Centre, Italy.
    Coats, Andrew J.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Filippatos, Gerasimos
    Athens University Hospital Attikon, Greece.
    Ruschitzka, Frank
    University of Heart Centre Zurich, Switzerland.
    Ferrari, Roberto
    University Hospital Ferrara, Italy; Maria Cecilia Hospital, Italy.
    Francesco Piepoli, Massimo
    AUSL Piacenza, Italy.
    Delgado Jimenez, Juan F.
    University Hospital 12 Octubre, Spain.
    Metra, Marco
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Fonseca, Candida
    University of Nova Lisboa, Portugal.
    Hradec, Jaromir
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Amir, Offer
    Bar Ilan University, Israel.
    Logeart, Damien
    University of Paris Diderot, France.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Merkely, Bela
    Semmelweis University, Hungary.
    Drozdz, Jaroslaw
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Goncalvesova, Eva
    National Cardiovasc Institute, Slovakia.
    Hassanein, Mahmoud
    University of Alexandria, Egypt.
    Chioncel, Ovidiu
    University of Medicina Carol Davila, Romania.
    Lainscak, Mitja
    Gen Hospital Celje, Slovenia.
    Seferovic, Petar M.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Tousoulis, Dimitris
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Kavoliuniene, Ausra
    Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania.
    Fruhwald, Friedrich
    Medical University, Austria.
    Fazlibegovic, Emir
    Clin Hospital Mostar, Bosnia and Herceg.
    Temizhan, Ahmet
    Turkey Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Turkey.
    Gatzov, Plamen
    University Hospital Lozenets, Bulgaria.
    Erglis, Andrejs
    Pauls Stradins Clin University Hospital, Latvia.
    Laroche, Cecile
    European Soc Cardiol, France.
    Mebazaa, Alexandre
    University of Paris Diderot, France.
    European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Long-Term Registry (ESC-HF-LT): 1-year follow-up outcomes and differences across regions2016In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 613-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsThe European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Long-Term Registry (ESC-HF-LT-R) was set up with the aim of describing the clinical epidemiology and the 1-year outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF) with the added intention of comparing differences between participating countries. Methods and resultsThe ESC-HF-LT-R is a prospective, observational registry contributed to by 211 cardiology centres in 21 European and/or Mediterranean countries, all being member countries of the ESC. Between May 2011 and April 2013 it collected data on 12440 patients, 40.5% of them hospitalized with acute HF (AHF) and 59.5% outpatients with chronic HF (CHF). The all-cause 1-year mortality rate was 23.6% for AHF and 6.4% for CHF. The combined endpoint of mortality or HF hospitalization within 1year had a rate of 36% for AHF and 14.5% for CHF. All-cause mortality rates in the different regions ranged from 21.6% to 36.5% in patients with AHF, and from 6.9% to 15.6% in those with CHF. These differences in mortality between regions are thought reflect differences in the characteristics and/or management of these patients. ConclusionThe ESC-HF-LT-R shows that 1-year all-cause mortality of patients with AHF is still high while the mortality of CHF is lower. This registry provides the opportunity to evaluate the management and outcomes of patients with HF and identify areas for improvement.

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