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  • 1.
    Abbasi, Mazhar Ali
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain Ibupoto, Zafar
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hussain, Mushtaque
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pozina, Galia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Decoration of ZnO nanorods with coral reefs like NiO nanostructures by the hydrothermal growth method and their luminescence study2014In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 430-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO on n-type ZnO nanorods have been decorate on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy,  high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation has shown that the adopted synthesis has led to high crystalline quality nanostructures. Morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures were dominated by a near band gap emission at 380 nm and by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence originates mainly from the ZnO nanorods.

  • 2. Abom, A.E.
    et al.
    Comini, E.
    Dipto. di Chim. e Fis. dei Materaili, INFM, Università di Brescia, Via Valotti 9, I-251 33 Brescia, Italy.
    Sberveglieri, G.
    Dipto. di Chim. e Fis. dei Materaili, INFM, Università di Brescia, Via Valotti 9, I-251 33 Brescia, Italy.
    Finnegan, N.
    Ctr. for Microanalysis of Materials, Frederick Seitz Mat. Res. Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Petrov, I.
    Ctr. for Microanalysis of Materials, Frederick Seitz Mat. Res. Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Erikssion, M.
    Experimental evidence for a dissociation mechanism in NH3 detection with MIS field-effect devices2003In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 89, no 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gas response mechanism of ammonia detection with Pt-based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) field-effect sensors was investigated. An experimental model system was designed which compares the responses of thick continuous Pt layers with controlled morphology and surface chemical composition, with the response of thin, discontinuous layers. The surface of a thick, continuous sputter-deposited Pt film is modified, either by (i) the deposition of a thin SiO2 overlayer, (ii) reactive sputter deposition of PtOx, or (iii) co-deposition of Pt with SiO2 in Ar + O2 atmospheres. We show that the ammonia response is caused by the formation of atomic hydrogen through the dissociation of NH3 at temperatures <200 °C. It is found that the modified surfaces exhibit increased ammonia selectivity compared to a pure Pt film. Results from this work indicate that the reason for the changed selectivity is the appearance of an oxidized PtOx phase or triple phase boundaries between Pt, SiO2 and the ambient gas, rather than for solely morphological reasons. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Abom, A.E.
    et al.
    Comini, E.
    Sberveglieri, G.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Thin oxide films as surface modifiers of MIS field effect gas sensors2002In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 85, no 1-2, p. 109-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The catalytic activity at the surface of Pt based MIS field effect gas sensors is modified by the deposition of thin films of SnO2, Al2O3 and SiO2, grown by reactive sputtering. It is found that a very thin layer (<10 nm) of SiO2 and SnO2 changes the catalytic activity towards higher NH3 selectivity, but with thicker films the sensor response vanishes. Since the response mechanism for these sensors is dependent on dissociation of molecules, it is likely that at low temperatures (140 °C), neither dissociation on nor transport/diffusion through the thicker films takes place. However, with Pt in conjunction with SiO2 or SnO2, the surface reactions will be altered, with enhanced NH3 selectivity as a result. A thin film of Al2O3, on the other hand, has a much smaller influence on the gas response to the test gases used in this work. Furthermore the sputtering process is found to strongly influence the sensor responses, and specifically reduce the sensitivity of the sensor. A thin intermediate layer of evaporated Pt does not completely protect the underlying structure from sputter induced damage. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4. Abom, A.E.
    et al.
    Haasch, R.T.
    Frederick Seitz Mat. Res. Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Hellgren, N.
    Frederick Seitz Mat. Res. Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Finnegan, N.
    Frederick Seitz Mat. Res. Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Characterization of the metal-insulator interface of field-effect chemical sensors2003In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 93, no 12, p. 9760-9768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metal-insulator interface of hydrogen-sensitive metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors, with SiO2 as the insulator and Pt as the metal contact, was discussed. It was found that the difference in hydrogen response between differently prepared devices was explained by a difference in concentration of available adsorption sites. The analysis showed that the concentration of Pt atoms in contact with the oxide affected both the hydrogen response and the metal-oxide adhesion.

  • 5. Abom, A.E.
    et al.
    Persson, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Influence of gate metal film growth parameters on the properties of gas sensitive field-effect devices2002In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 409, no 2, p. 233-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of Pt have been grown as gate metals on the oxide surface of gas sensitive field-effect devices. Both electron beam evaporation and dc magnetron sputtering has been used. The energy of the impinging Pt atoms, the substrate temperature and the thickness of the Pt film were used as parameters in this study. The influence of the growth parameters on the gas response has been investigated and compared with the properties of the films, studied by transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The conditions during growth of the Pt film are found to have a large impact on the properties of the device. As expected, crystallinity, morphology and the metal/substrate interfacial structure are also affected by processing parameters. Three different growth processes stand out as the most promising from gas sensor considerations, namely room temperature evaporation, sputtering at high pressures and sputtering at high temperatures. The correlation between gas responses and properties of the gas sensitive layer is discussed. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Knutsson, Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tasnádi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lind, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Phase Stability and Elasticity of TiAlN2011In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 4, no 9, p. 1599-1618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We review results of recent combined theoretical and experimental studies of Ti1−xAlxN, an archetypical alloy system material for hard-coating applications. Theoretical simulations of lattice parameters, mixing enthalpies, and elastic properties are presented. Calculated phase diagrams at ambient pressure, as well as at pressure of 10 GPa, show a wide miscibility gap and broad region of compositions and temperatures where the spinodal decomposition takes place. The strong dependence of the elastic properties and sound wave anisotropy on the Al-content offers detailed understanding of the spinodal decomposition and age hardening in Ti1−xAlxN alloy films and multilayers. TiAlN/TiN multilayers can further improve the hardness and thermal stability compared to TiAlN since they offer means to influence the kinetics of the favorable spinodal decomposition and suppress the detrimental transformation to w-AlN. Here, we show that a 100 degree improvement in terms of w-AlN suppression can be achieved, which is of importance when the coating is used as a protective coating on metal cutting inserts.

  • 7.
    Adamovic, Dragan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Münger, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Greene, J.E.
    Materials Science Department and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Kinetic pathways leading to layer-by-layer growth from hyperthermal atoms: A Multibillion time step molecular dynamics study2007In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 76, p. 115418-115425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We employ multibillion time step embedded-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the homoepitaxial growth of Pt(111) from hyperthermal Pt atoms (EPt=0.2–50eV) using deposition fluxes approaching experimental conditions. Calculated antiphase diffraction intensity oscillations, based on adatom coverages as a function of time, reveal a transition from a three-dimensional multilayer growth mode with EPt<20eV to a layer-by-layer growth with EPt≥20eV. We isolate the effects of irradiation-induced processes and thermally activated mass transport during deposition in order to identify the mechanisms responsible for promoting layer-by-layer growth. Direct evidence is provided to show that the observed transition in growth modes is primarily due to irradiation-induced processes which occur during the 10ps following the arrival of each hyperthermal atom. The kinetic pathways leading to the transition involve both enhanced intralayer and interlayer adatom transport, direct incorporation of energetic atoms into clusters, and cluster disruption leading to increased terrace supersaturation.

  • 8.
    Adamovic, Dragan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Münger, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joe
    University of Illinois.
    Enhanced intra- and interlayer mass transport on Pt(111) via 5 - 50 eV Pt atom impacts on two-dimensional Pt clusters2006In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 515, no 4, p. 2235-2243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded-atom molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effects of low-energy (5–50 eV) normally-incident self-ion irradiation of two-dimensional compact Pt3, Pt7, Pt19, and Pt37 clusters on Pt(111). We follow atomistic pathways leading to bombardment-induced intra- and interlayer mass transport. The results can be described in terms of three impact energy regimes. With E ≤ 20 eV, we observe an increase in 2D island dimensions and negligible residual point defect formation. As the impact energy is raised above 20 eV, we observe an increase in irradiation-induced lateral mass transport, a decrease in island size, and the activation of interlayer processes. For E ≥ 35 eV, this trend continues, but point defects, in the form of surface vacancies, are also formed. The results illustrate the richness of the dynamical interaction mechanisms occurring among incident energetic species, target clusters, and substrate atoms, leading to island preservation, reconfiguration, disruption and/or residual point defects formation. We discuss the significance of these results in terms of thin film growth.

  • 9.
    Adamovic, Dragan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Münger, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Chirita, Valeriu
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joe
    University of Illinois.
    Low-energy ion irradiation during film growth: Kinetic pathways leading to enhanced adatom migration rates2005In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 86, p. 211915-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effects of low-energy self-ion irradiation of Pt adatoms on Pt(111). Here, we concentrate on self-bombardment dynamics, i.e., isolating and monitoring the atomic processes, induced by normally incident Pt atoms with energies E ranging from 5 to 50 eV, that can affect intra- and interlayer mass transport.. We find that adatom scattering, surface channeling, and dimer formation occur at all energies. Atomic intermixing events involving incident and terrace atoms are observed at energies 15  eV, while the collateral formation of residual surface vacancies is observed only with E>40  eV. The overall effect of low-energy self-ion irradiation is to enhance lateral adatom and terrace atom migration. ©2005 American Institute of Physics

  • 10.
    Alami, Jones
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Emmerlich, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wilhelmsson, O.
    Department of Materials Chemistry, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jansson, U.
    Department of Materials Chemistry, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    High-power impulse magnetron sputtering of Ti-Si-C thin films from a Ti3SiC2 compound target2006In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 515, no 4, p. 1731-1736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have deposited Ti-Si-C thin films using high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) from a Ti3SiC2 compound target. The as-deposited films were composite materials with TiC as the main crystalline constituent. X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that they also contained amorphous SiC, and for films deposited on inclined substrates, crystalline Ti5Si3Cx. The film morphology was dense and flat, while films deposited with dc magnetron sputtering under comparable conditions were rough and porous. Due to the high degree of ionization of the sputtered species obtained in HIPIMS, it is possible to control the film composition, in particular the C content, by tuning the substrate inclination angle, the Ar process pressure, and the bias voltage.

  • 11.
    Albani, Giorgia
    et al.
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Perelli Cippo, Enrico
    CNR, Italy.
    Croci, Gabriele
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Muraro, Andrea
    CNR, Italy.
    Schooneveld, Erik
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Scherillo, Antonella
    Rutherford Appleton Lab, England.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden; Mittuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Kanaki, Kalliopi
    European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source ERIC, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Claps, Gerardo
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Murtas, Fabrizio
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Rebai, Marica
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Tardocchi, Marco
    CNR, Italy.
    Gorini, Giuseppe
    University of Milano Bicocca, Italy; CNR, Italy; Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Italy.
    Evolution in boron-based GEM detectors for diffraction measurements: from planar to 3D converters2016In: Measurement science and technology, ISSN 0957-0233, E-ISSN 1361-6501, Vol. 27, no 11, article id 115902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The so-called He-3-crisis has motivated the neutron detector community to undertake an intense Ramp;D programme in order to develop technologies alternative to standard He-3 tubes and suitable for neutron detection systems in future spallation sources such as the European spallation source (ESS). Boron-based GEM (gas electron multiplier) detectors are a promising He-3-free technology for thermal neutron detection in neutron scattering experiments. In this paper the evolution of boron-based GEM detectors from planar to 3D converters with an application in diffraction measurements is presented. The use of 3D converters coupled with GEMs allows for an optimization of the detector performances. Three different detectors were used for diffraction measurements on the INES instrument at the ISIS spallation source. The performances of the GEM-detectors are compared with those of conventional He-3 tubes installed on the INES instrument. The conceptual detector with the 3D converter used in this paper reached a count rate per unit area of about 25% relative to the currently installed He-3 tube. Its timing resolution is similar and the signal-to-background ratio (S/B) is 2 times lower.

  • 12.
    Alexandrou, I
    et al.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Fraunhofer Inst Mat & Beam Technol, D-01277 Dresden, Germany Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Linkoping Univ, IFM, Dept Phys, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Scheibe, HJ
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Fraunhofer Inst Mat & Beam Technol, D-01277 Dresden, Germany Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Linkoping Univ, IFM, Dept Phys, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Kiely, CJ
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Fraunhofer Inst Mat & Beam Technol, D-01277 Dresden, Germany Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Linkoping Univ, IFM, Dept Phys, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Papworth, AJ
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Fraunhofer Inst Mat & Beam Technol, D-01277 Dresden, Germany Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Linkoping Univ, IFM, Dept Phys, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Amaratunga, GAJ
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England Fraunhofer Inst Mat & Beam Technol, D-01277 Dresden, Germany Univ Cambridge, Dept Engn, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, England Linkoping Univ, IFM, Dept Phys, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    HREM and EELS analysis of fullerene-like carbon films1999In: Institute of Physics Conference Series, ISSN 0951-3248, E-ISSN 2154-6630, no 161, p. 369-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon thin films were grown by Laser-Arc deposition and their structure and bonding were examined using High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). Through focal series of HREM images reveal that the film consists of curved graphene sheets forming swirls and concentric rings with a diameter of 4-6 nm. The sheet spacing was determined by selected area diffraction to be 0.363 nm. Contrast transfer function calculations are used to explain why the pattern formed by the curved sheets is more evident at Gaussian focus rather than at Scherzer defocus, Although the films demonstrate high microhardness and elastic recovery, qualitative assessment of the EELS spectra reveals that the film consists primarily of sp(2) hybridised carbon. A model is proposed to describe how such a material made of graphene sheets can exhibit such remarkable mechanical properties.

  • 13.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultberg, L
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Strong electron correlations stabilize paramagnetic cubic Cr1-xAlxN solid solutions2013In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 102, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stability of rock salt structure cubic Cr1-xAlxN solid solutions at high Al content and high temperature has made it one of the most important materials systems for protective coating applications. We show that the strong electron correlations in a material with dynamic magnetic disorder is the underlying reason for the observed stability against isostructural decomposition. This is done by using the first-principles disordered local moments molecular dynamics technique, which allows us to simultaneously consider electronic, magnetic, and vibrational degrees of freedom.

  • 14.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Armiento, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    A theoretical investigation of mixing thermodynamics, age-hardening potential, and electronic structure of ternary (M1-xMxB2)-M-1-B-2 alloys with AlB2 type structure2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition metal diborides are ceramic materials with potential applications as hard protective thin films and electrical contact materials. We investigate the possibility to obtain age hardening through isostructural clustering, including spinodal decomposition, or ordering-induced precipitation in ternary diboride alloys. By means of first-principles mixing thermodynamics calculations, 45 ternary (M1-xMxB2)-M-1-B-2 alloys comprising (MB2)-B-i (M-i = Mg, Al, Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta) with AlB2 type structure are studied. In particular Al1-xTixB2 is found to be of interest for coherent isostructural decomposition with a strong driving force for phase separation, while having almost concentration independent a and c lattice parameters. The results are explained by revealing the nature of the electronic structure in these alloys, and in particular, the origin of the pseudogap at E-F in TiB2, ZrB2, and HfB2.

  • 15.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source ESS AB.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mixing thermodynamics of TM(1-x)Gd(x)N (TM=Ti, Zr, Hf) from first principles2011In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 98, no 24, p. 241911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mixing thermodynamics of GdN with TiN, ZrN, and HfN is studied using first-principles methods. We find that while Ti(1-x)Gd(x)N has a strong preference for phase separation due to the large lattice mismatch, Zr(1-x)Gd(x)N and Hf(1-x)Gd(x)N readily mix, possibly in the form of ordered compounds. In particular, ZrGdN(2) is predicted to order in a rocksalt counterpart to the L1(1) structure at temperatures below 1020 K. These mixed nitrides are promising candidates as neutron absorbing, thermally and chemically stable, thin film materials.

  • 16.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaev, Eyvas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics .
    Flink, Axel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics .
    Metastability of fcc-related Si-N phases2008In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 78, no 13, p. 132103-132103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of superhardening in TiN/SiNx nanocomposites and the prediction of extreme hardness in bulk gamma-Si3N4 have attracted a large interest to this material system. Attempts to explain the experimental findings by means of first-principles calculations have so far been limited to static calculations. The dynamical stability of suggested structures of the SiNx tissue phase critical for the understanding of the nanocomposites is thus unknown. Here, we present a theoretical study of the phonon-dispersion relations of B1 and B3 SiN. We show that both phases previously considered as metastable are dynamically unstable. Instead, two pseudo-B3 Si3N4 phases derived from a L1(2)- or D0(22)-type distribution of Si vacancies are dynamically stable and might explain recent experimental findings of epitaxial SiNx in TiN/SiNx multilayers.

  • 17.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics .
    Karimi, A.
    Institute of Physics of Complex Matter.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics .
    First-principles study of the effect of nitrogen vacancies on the decomposition pattern in cubic Ti1-xAlxN1-y2008In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 92, p. 071903-1-071903-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      The effect of nitrogen substoichiometry on the isostructural phase stabilities of the cubic Ti1−xAlxN1−y system has been investigated using first-principles calculations. The preferred isostructural decomposition pattern in these metastable solid solutions was predicted from the total energy calculations on a dense concentration grid. Close to the stoichiometric Ti1−xAlxN1 limit, N vacancies increase the tendency for phase separation as N sticks to Al while the vacancies prefers Ti neighbors. For nitrogen depleated conditions, N sticks to Ti forming TiN (0<<1) while Al tends to form nitrogen-free fcc-Al or Al–Ti alloys.

  • 18.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khatibi, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Theoretical investigation of cubic B1-like and corundum (Cr1−xAlx)2O3 solid solutionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    First-principles calculations are employed to investigate the stability and properties of cubic rock-salt like (Cr1−xAlx)2O3 solid solutions, stabilized by metal site vacancies as recently reported experimentally. It is demonstrated that the metal site vacancies can indeed be ordered in a way that gives rise to a favorable coordination of all O atoms in the lattice. B1-like structures with ordered and disordered metal site vacancies are studied for (Cr0.5Al0.5)2O3 and found to a have cubic lattice spacing close to the values reported experimentally, in contrast to fluorite-like and perovskite structures. The obtained B1-like structures are higher in energy than corundum solid solutions for all compositions, but with an energy offset per atom similar to other metastable systems possible to synthesize with physical vapor deposition techniques. The obtained electronic structures show that the B1-like systems are semiconducting although with smaller band gaps than the corundum structure.

  • 19.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khatibi, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Theoretical investigation of cubic B1-like and corundum (Cr1−xAlx)2O3 solid solutions2013In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 31, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-principles calculations are employed to investigate the stability and properties of cubic rock-salt-like (Cr1−xAlx)2O3 solid solutions, stabilized by metal site vacancies as recently reported experimentally. It is demonstrated that the metal site vacancies can indeed be ordered in a way that gives rise to a suitable fourfold coordination of all O atoms in the lattice. B1-like structures with ordered and disordered metal site vacancies are studied for (Cr0.5Al0.5)2O3 and found to have a cubic lattice spacing close to the values reported experimentally, in contrast to fluorite-like and perovskite structures. The obtained B1-like structures are higher in energy than corundum solid solutions for all compositions, but with an energy offset per atom similar to other metastable systems possible to synthesize with physical vapor deposition techniques. The obtained electronic structures show that the B1-like systems are semiconducting although with smaller band gaps than the corundum structure.

  • 20.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pressure enhancement of the isostructural cubic decomposition in Ti1−xAlxN2009In: Applied Physics Letters, ISSN 0003-6951, E-ISSN 1077-3118, Vol. 95, no 181906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of pressure on the phase stabilities of Ti1−xAlxN solid solutions has been studied using first principles calculations. We find that the application of hydrostatic pressure enhances the tendency for isostructural decomposition, including spinodal decomposition. The effect originates in the gradual pressure stabilization of cubic AlN with respect to the wurtzite structure and an increased isostructural cubic mixing enthalpy with increased pressure. The influence is sufficiently strong in the composition-temperature interval corresponding to a shoulder of the spinodal line that it could impact the stability of the material at pressures achievable in the tool-work piece contact during cutting operations

  • 21.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ruban, A. V.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Material Science and Engineering.
    Karimi, A
    Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, IPMC.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A unified cluster expansion method applied to the configurational thermodynamics of cubic TiAlN2011In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 104203-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a study of the cubic Ti1−xAlxN system to illustrate a practical way of combining the major methodologies within alloy theory, the Connolly-Williams cluster expansion and the generalized perturbation method, in order to solve difficult alloy problems. The configurational, concentration dependent, Hamiltonian is separated into a fixed-lattice and a local lattice relaxation part. The effective cluster interactions of the first part is obtained primarily with a GPM-based approach while the later is obtained using cluster expansion. In our case the impact on the isostructural phase diagram of considering short range clustering beyond the mean field approximation, obtained from the mixing enthalpy and entropy of the random alloy, is rather small, especially in the composition region x ≤ 0.66, within reach of thin film growth techniques.

  • 22.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ruban, A. V.
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Karimi, A.
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL).
    Peil, O. E.
    Uppsala University.
    Simak, Sergey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Abrikosov, Igor
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mixing and decomposition thermodynamics of c-Ti1-xAlxN from first-principles calculations2007In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 75, no 045123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wedescribe an efficient first-principles method that can be used tocalculate mixing enthalpies of transition metal nitrides with B1 structureand substitutional disorder at the metal sublattice. The technique isbased on the density functional theory. The independent sublattice modelis suggested for the treatment of disorder-induced local lattice relaxationeffects. It supplements the description of the substitutional disorder withinthe coherent potential approximation. We demonstrate the excellent accuracy ofthe method by comparison with calculations performed by means ofthe projector augumented wave method on supercells constructed as specialquasirandom structures. At the same time, the efficiency of thetechnique allows for total energy calculations on a very finemesh of concentrations which enables a reliable calculation of thesecond concentration derivative of the alloy total energy. This isa first step towards first-principles predictions of concentrations and temperatureintervals where the alloy decomposition proceeds via the spinodal mechanism.We thus calculate electronic structure, lattice parameter, and mixing enthalpiesof the quasibinary alloy c-Ti1−xAlxN. The lattice parameter follows Vegard'slaw at low fractions of AlN but deviates increasingly withincreasing Al content. We show that the asymmetry of themixing enthalpy and its second concentration derivative is associated withsubstantial variations of the electronic structure with alloy composition. Thephase diagram is constructed within the mean-field approximation.

  • 23.
    Alling, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Steneget, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tholander, Christopher
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tasnádi, Ferenc
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Theoretical Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrov, Ivan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Greene, Joseph E
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Configurational disorder effects on adatom mobilities on Ti1-xAlxN(001) surfaces from first principles2012In: Physical Review B. Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, ISSN 1098-0121, E-ISSN 1550-235X, Vol. 85, no 24, p. 245422-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use metastable NaCl-structure Ti0.5Al0.5N alloys to probe effects of configurational disorder on adatom surface diffusion dynamics which control phase stability and nanostructural evolution during film growth. First-principles calculations were employed to obtain energy potential maps of Ti and Al adsorption on an ordered TiN(001) reference surface and a disordered Ti0.5Al0.5N(001) solid-solution surface. The energetics of adatom migration on these surfaces are determined and compared to isolate effects of configurational disorder. The results show that alloy surface disorder dramatically reduces Ti adatom mobilities. Al adatoms, in sharp contrast, experience only small disorder-induced differences in migration dynamics.

  • 24.
    Almer, Jonathan
    et al.
    IKP, Konstruktionsmaterial Linköpings universitet.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Materials.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Håkansson, Greger
    Tixon Brukens Sverige AB Linköping.
    Microstructural evolution during tempering of arc-evaporated Cr-N coatings2000In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 121-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cr-N coatings were arc-deposited at 50 and 300 V. The changes in the coating microstructure and phase content during tempering were monitored. As a result, the phase stability and activation energies for defect diffusion were determined as a function of ion energy.

  • 25.
    Amini, Shahram
    et al.
    Drexel University.
    Cordoba Gallego, Jose M
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    McGhie, Andrew R
    University of Pennsylvania.
    Ni, Chaoying
    University of Delaware.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Oden, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On the Stability of Mg Nanograins to Coarsening after Repeated Melting2009In: NANO LETTERS, ISSN 1530-6984, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 3082-3086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report on the extraordinary thermal stability of similar to 35 nm Mg-nanograins that constitute the matrix of a Ti2AlC-Mg composite that has previously been shown to have excellent mechanical properties. The microstructure is so stable that heating the composite three times to 700 degrees C, which is 50 degrees C over the melting point of Mg, not only resulted in the repeated melting of the Mg, but surprisingly and within the resolution of our differential scanning calorimeter, did not lead to any coarsening. The reduction in the Mg melting point due to the nanograins was similar to 50 degrees C. X-ray diffraction and neutron spectroscopy results suggest that thin, amorphous, and/or poorly crystallized rutile, anatase, and/or magnesia layers separate the Mg nanograins and prevent them from coarsening. Clearly that layer is thin enough, and thus mechanically robust enough, to survive the melting and solidification stresses encountered during cycling. Annealing in hydrogen at 250 degrees C for 20 h, also did not seem to alter the grain size significantly.

  • 26.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Ju Moon, Eun
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hosler, Brian C.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Caspi, Elad N.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Nucl Research Centre Negev, Israel.
    May, Steven J.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Experimental and theoretical characterization of ordered MAX phases Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC32015In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 118, no 9, p. 094304-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report on the phase stabilities and crystal structures of two newly discovered ordered, quaternary MAX phases-Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC3-synthesized by mixing and heating different elemental powder mixtures of mMo:(3-m) Ti:1.1Al:2C with 1.5 less than= m less than= 2.2 and 2Mo: 2Ti:1.1Al:2.7C to 1600 degrees C for 4 h under Ar flow. In general, for m greater than= 2 an ordered 312 phase, (Mo2Ti) AlC2, was the majority phase; for mless than 2, an ordered 413 phase (Mo2Ti2)AlC3, was the major product. The actual chemistries determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are Mo2TiAlC1.7 and Mo2Ti1.9Al0.9C2.5, respectively. High resolution scanning transmission microscopy, XPS and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray diffraction confirmed the general ordered stacking sequence to be Mo-Ti-Mo-Al-Mo-Ti-Mo for Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo-Ti-Ti-Mo-Al-Mo-Ti-Ti-Mo for Mo2Ti2AlC3, with the carbon atoms occupying the octahedral sites between the transition metal layers. Consistent with the experimental results, the theoretical calculations clearly show that M layer ordering is mostly driven by the high penalty paid in energy by having the Mo atoms surrounded by C in a face-centered configuration, i.e., in the center of the Mn+1Xn blocks. At 331 GPa and 367 GPa, respectively, the Youngs moduli of the ordered Mo2TiAlC2 and Mo2Ti2AlC3 are predicted to be higher than those calculated for their ternary end members. Like most other MAX phases, because of the high density of states at the Fermi level, the resistivity measurement over 300 to 10K for both phases showed metallic behavior. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  • 27.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Drexel University, USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Voigt, Cooper A.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Mo2TiAlC2: A new ordered layered ternary carbide2015In: Scripta Materialia, ISSN 1359-6462, E-ISSN 1872-8456, Vol. 101, p. 5-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein we report on the synthesis of a new layered ternary carbide, Mo2TiAlC2, that was synthesized by heating an elemental mixture at 1600 degrees C for 4 h under an Ar flow. Its hexagonal, a and c lattice parameters were calculated via Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns to be, respectively, 2.997 angstrom and 18.661 angstrom. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy showed that this phase is ordered, with Ti layers sandwiched between two Mo layers in a M(3)AX(2) type ternary carbide structure. (C) 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Anasori, Babak
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Xie, Yu
    Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Beidaghi, Majid
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hosler, Brian C.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kent, Paul R. C.
    Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA; Oak Ridge National Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Two-Dimensional, Ordered, Double Transition Metals Carbides (MXenes)2015In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 9507-9516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The higher the chemical diversity and structural complexity of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the higher the likelihood they possess unique and useful properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered, carbides (MXenes), MM-2 C-2 and MM-2 C-2(3), where M and M are two different early transition metals. In these solids, M layers sandwich M" carbide layers. By synthesizing Mo2TiC2Tx, Mo2Ti2C3Tx, and Cr2TiC2Tx (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since the Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo2TiC2Tx and Ti3C2Tx. This work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.

  • 29.
    Anastasopoulos, M.
    et al.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Bebb, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Berry, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Brys, T.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Buffet, J. -C.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Clergeau, J. -F.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Deen, P. P.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Ehlers, G.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    van Esch, P.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Everett, S. M.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Guerard, B.
    Institute Laue Langevin, France.
    Hall-Wilton, R.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Herwig, K.
    Spallat Neutron Source, TN 37831 USA.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Iruretagoiena, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Issa, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Khaplanov, A.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Kirstein, O.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden; University of Newcastle, Australia.
    Lopez Higuera, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Piscitelli, F.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Robinson, L.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Stefanescu, I.
    European Spallat Source, Sweden.
    Multi-Grid detector for neutron spectroscopy: results obtained on time-of-flight spectrometer CNCS2017In: Journal of Instrumentation, ISSN 1748-0221, E-ISSN 1748-0221, Vol. 12, article id P04030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Multi-Grid detector technology has evolved from the proof-of-principle and characterisation stages. Here we report on the performance of the Multi-Grid detector, the MG. CNCS prototype, which has been installed and tested at the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer, CNCS at SNS. This has allowed a side-by-side comparison to the performance of He-3 detectors on an operational instrument. The demonstrator has an active area of 0.2m(2). It is specifically tailored to the specifications of CNCS. The detector was installed in June 2016 and has operated since then, collecting neutron scattering data in parallel to the He-3 detectors of CNCS. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of this data, in particular on instrument energy resolution, rate capability, background and relative efficiency. Stability, gamma-ray and fast neutron sensitivity have also been investigated. The effect of scattering in the detector components has been measured and provides input to comparison for Monte Carlo simulations. All data is presented in comparison to that measured by the He-3 detectors simultaneously, showing that all features recorded by one detector are also recorded by the other. The energy resolution matches closely. We find that the Multi-Grid is able to match the data collected by He-3, and see an indication of a considerable advantage in the count rate capability. Based on these results, we are confident that the Multi-Grid detector will be capable of producing high quality scientific data on chopper spectrometers utilising the unprecedented neutron flux of the ESS.

  • 30.
    Andersen, Ken
    et al.
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Bigault, Thierry
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Buffet, J. C.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Correa, Jonathan
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Hall-Wilton, Richard
    European Spallation Source ESS AB, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Guerard, Bruno
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Khaplanov, Anton
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Kirstein, Oliver
    Linköping University.
    Piscitelli, Fransesco
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    van Esch, P.
    Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Vettier, Christian
    European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden.
    10B multi-grid proportional gas counters for large area thermal neutrondetectors2013In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, ISSN 0168-9002, E-ISSN 1872-9576, Vol. 720, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3He was a popular material in neutrons detectors until its availability dropped drastically in 2008. The development of techniques based on alternative convertors is now of high priority for neutron research institutes. Thin films of 10B or 10B4C have been used in gas proportional counters to detect neutrons, but until now, only for small or medium sensitive area. We present here the multi-grid design, introduced at the ILL and developed in collaboration with ESS for LAN (large area neutron) detectors. Typically thirty 10B4C films of 1 μm thickness are used to convert neutrons into ionizing particles which are subsequently detected in a proportional gas counter. The principle and the fabrication of the multi-grid are described and some preliminary results obtained with a prototype of 200 cm×8 cm are reported; a detection efficiency of 48% has been measured at 2.5 Å with a monochromatic neutron beam line, showing the good potential of this new technique.

  • 31.
    Asif, Muhammad H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nur, Omer
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Willander, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brännmark, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Englund, Ulrika H
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Growth and Structure of ZnO Nanorods on a Sub-Micrometer Glass Pipette and Their Application as Intracellular Potentiometric Selective Ion Sensors2010In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 3, p. 4657-4667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the growth and structure of ZnO nanorods on a sub-micrometer glass pipette and their application as an intracellular selective ion sensor. Highly oriented, vertical and aligned ZnO nanorods were grown on the tip of a borosilicate glass capillary (0.7 μm in diameter) by the low temperature aqueous chemical growth (ACG) technique. The relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of ZnO nanorods makes them attractive for electrochemical sensing. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that ZnO nanorods are single crystals and grow along the crystal’s c-axis. The ZnO nanorods were functionalized with a polymeric membrane for selective intracellular measurements of Na

     

    +. The membrane-coated ZnO nanorods exhibited a Na+-dependent electrochemical potential difference versus

    an Ag/AgCl reference micro-electrode within a wide concentration range from 0.5 mM to 100 mM. The fabrication of functionalized ZnO nanorods paves the way to sense a wide range of biochemical species at the intracellular level.

  • 32.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanotribological properties of wear resistant a-CNx thin films deposited by mid-frequency magnetron sputteringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The nanotribological properties of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films deposited with mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) were investigated at the nanoscale using an in-situ technique in a Hysitron Triboindenter TI 950. The friction coefficient, wear rate, track roughness, and the track profiles were recorded as a function of the number of linear reciprocal cycles, revealing the manner that the nanotribological and surface properties change during the wear test. The surface composition of  the films was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The friction coefficient ranges between 0.05 – 0.07, while the wear coefficient ranges from 9.4 x 10-8 up to 1.5 x 10-4 mm3/Nm. Debris particles and surface modifications characterize the friction and lubrication behavior in the track. The friction and main lubrication mechanism on the modified surface changes after the removal of debris particles, while this change appears at different cycle for each CNx film depending on the substrate bias voltage. Films grown at higher bias are modified earlier than films grown at lower bias. The wear behavior can be divided into two, track roughnessdependent, regimes; (1) films with track roughness > 1 nm showed wear with obvious tracks and (2) the films with roughness < 1 nm showed negative wear at the nanometer scale with a volume of material projected in the area of the wear track. This material volume is believed to be result of a surface modification, where the molar volume of the modified surface is larger than the molar volume of the surface before the wear test.

  • 33.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ivanov, Ivan G.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering2015In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 33, no 5, article id 05E112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were deposited on steel AISI52100 and Si(001) substrates using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited at a low substrate temperature of 150 °C and a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage (Vs) was varied from 20 V to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All films possessed amorphous microstructure with clearly developed columns extending throughout the entire film thickness. Layers grown with the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the technique used. Voids closed and dense films formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at% and increases as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with stress between – 0.4 and – 1.2 GPa for all Vs values, while for CNx films deposited by MFMS σ = – 4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film hardness and reduced elastic modulus with increasing Vs for all techniques. The harder films were produced by MFMS with hardness as high as 25 GPa. Low friction coefficients, between 0.05 and 0.06, were recorded for all films. Furthermore, CNx films produced by MFMS and DCMS at Vs = 100 V and 120 V presented a high wear resistance with wear coefficients of k ≤ 2.3 x 10-5 mm3/Nm.

  • 34.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Glenat, Herve
    Technosud, France.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Grillo, Stefano
    Technosud, France; University of Perpignan, France.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Broitman, Esteban
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Comparative study of macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by HiPIMS2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macro- and microtribological properties of carbon nitride thin films deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering at different substrate bias voltages (V-b) were investigated. V-b of -100, -150, -200, and-300 V were used. A Hysitron Triboindenter TI950 and a reciprocating Tribotechnic tribometer with diamond counterparts were used in order to assess the tribological performance of the films at the micro- and macroscale, respectively. Initial Hertzian contact pressures of 2.5 GPa, 3.3 GPa and 3.9 GPa were chosen for the comparative measurements at both scales. At the macroscale, films with higher initial roughness present an increased wear. Debris creation and asperity deformation takes place causing abrasive wear. At the microscale, compression of the surface material occurs. The run-in friction shows similar trends at both scales; an initial decrease and an increase thereafter. Steady-state friction is not reached at the microscale, attributed to the absence of a graphitic tribolayer in the contact. At the macroscale, all films show abrasive wear and debris creation. Here, the changes in friction coefficients are attributed to the debris loss from the contact during the tribotests. The CN film tested at 2.5 GPa shows a continuous increase of friction, due to the continuous loss of debris from the contact. The other films reach a steady-state friction coefficient, since most of the debris is lost before the end of the tribotests. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 35.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meeuwenoord, Ralph
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    IHI Ionbond AG, Olten, Switzerland.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Tribology and Lubrication Department, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling performance of carbon nitride-coated bearing components in different lubrication regimes2017In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 114, p. 141-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of carbon nitride (CN) coated roller bearings is investigated, using a micropitting rig. The rolling performance is evaluated using Stribeck test, with a continuously varying rolling speed (0.2 - 2 m/s). Rolling contact fatigue tests with constant speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3.5 m/s) are also conducted in order to study the high-cycle performance of the rollers. The obtained Stribeck curve shows that the presence of coatings eliminates run-in, resulting in low friction coefficients (similar to 0.08). Raman spectroscopy, performed at the wear tracks, reveals that CNx maintain stable chemical state. Coatings show abrasion although the wear rate is not detrimental for the performance of the rollers, since a CNx to-steel contact is retained during the entire rolling contact fatigue test.

  • 36.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nedelcu, Ileana
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ehret, Pascal
    SKF Engn and Research Centre, Netherlands.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rolling contact fatigue of bearing components coated with carbon nitride thin films2016In: Tribology International, ISSN 0301-679X, E-ISSN 1879-2464, Vol. 98, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bearing rollers were coated with CNx films using high power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition in order to reduce their rolling-contact fatigue as investigated using a Micro-Pitting Rig tribometer under poly-alpha-olefin lubricated conditions. Coated rollers with a similar to 15 nm thick W adhesion layer to the substrate, exhibit the best performance, presenting mild wear and no fatigue after 700 kcycles. The steady-state friction coefficient was similar to 0.05 for both uncoated and coated rollers. Uncoated rollers show run-in friction in the first 50 kcycles, because of steel-to-steel contact, which is absent for coated rollers. Analytical transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the presence of a CNx coating prevents steel-to-steel contact of the counterparts, prior to the elastohydrodynamic lubrication, reducing their wear and increasing the lifetime expectancy. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 37.
    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Susann
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Greczynski, Grzegorz
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Improved adhesion of carbon nitride coatings on steel substrates using metal HiPIMS pretreatments2016In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 302, p. 454-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the effect of low-temperature metal pretreatments in order to improve the adhesion of CNx coatings on steel substrates, which is crucial for tribological applications. The substrate pretreatments were conducted using five different metal targets: Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, and W, operated in high power impulse magnetron sputtering mode, known to produce significant ionization of the sputtered material flux. The CNx adhesion, as assessed by Rockwell C tests, did not improve upon Ti and Zr pretreatments. This is primarily ascribed to the fact that no interlayer was formed owing to severe re-sputtering due to high fluxes of doubly-ionized metal species in the plasma. A slight improvement in adhesion was observed in the case an Al pretreatment was carried out, while the best results were obtained using Cr and W. Here, 30-s-long pretreatments were sufficient to clean the steel surface and form a metallic interlayer between substrate and coating. Transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that Al, Cr, and W created intermixing zones at the interlayer/substrate and the interlayer/CNx interfaces. The steel surfaces, pretreated using Cr or W, showed the highest work of adhesion with W-adh(Cr) = 1.77 J/m(2) and W-adh(W) = 1.66 J/m(2), respectively. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 38. Beckers, M.
    et al.
    Schell, N
    Martins, R. M. S.
    Mucklich, A
    Möller, W.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Nucleation and growth of Ti2 AlN thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering onto MgO(111)2007In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 102, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nucleation and growth of Ti2 AlN thin films on MgO(111) substrates during dual direct current reactive magnetron cosputtering from Ti and Al targets in an Ar N2 atmosphere at a substrate temperature of 690 °C have been investigated. Time and thickness dependent in situ specular x-ray reflectivity and x-ray diffraction in combination with cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy reveal the formation of competing phases for slight N superstoichiometry with respect to Ti2 AlN. The stoichiometry deviations initiate the layer-by-layer growth of a ∼380 Å thick epitaxial N-substoichiometric cubic (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer. N-vacancy driven diffusion of Ti and Al leads to decomposition of this metastable solid solution into nanosized cubic TiN y′ and AlN y″ domains as well as to a solid-state reaction with the MgO(111) by formation of a Mg2 (Al:Ti) O4 spinel, reducing the transformed (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer thickness down to ∼60 Å. Local AlN y″ domains serve as templates for Ti2 AlN nucleation at higher thicknesses. At the same time TiN y′ and AlN y″ serve as a sink for excess gas phase N during the subsequent polycrystalline Ti2 AlN growth with random (Ti1-x Alx) Ny renucleation as a tissue phase along Ti2 AlN grain boundaries. The individual Ti2 AlN grains with vertical sizes up to the total thickness retain local epitaxy to the substrate, with basal planes nonparallel to the substrate interface. Concurrently the (Ti1-x Alx) Ny layer is further reduced by inward Ti2 AlN grain growth along the basal planes. © 2007 American Institute of Physics.

  • 39.
    Beckers, Manfred
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lauridsen, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baehtz, C.
    Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Formation of basal plane fiber-textured Ti2AlN films on amorphous substrates2010In: PHYSICA STATUS SOLIDI-RAPID RESEARCH LETTERS, ISSN 1862-6254, Vol. 4, no 05-Jun, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of fiber-textured Ti2AlN(0001) films on SiO2 was characterized by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Ti2AlN was formed by solid-state reaction between sequentially deposited Ti and AlN layers. A deposition at 275 degrees C yields a Ti(0001) out-of-plane orientation which is maintained for the following AlN(0001)/Ti(0001) layers. Annealing to 600 degrees C yields AlN decomposition and diffusion of Al and N into Ti, with consecutive transformation into (TiAlN)-Al-3(111) and Ti2AlN(0001) plus AlN residuals. Despite preferred Ti2AlN(0001) out-of-plane orientation, the in-plane distribution is random, as expected from the self-organized pseudo-epitaxial growth.

  • 40.
    Beckers, Manfred
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Höglund, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baehtz, Carsten
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    Martins, R.M.S.
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    Persson, Per O. Å.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Möller, W.
    Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.
    The influence of substrate temperature and Al mobility on the microstructural evolution of magnetron sputtered ternary Ti-Al-N thin films2009In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 064915-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ternary Ti-Al-N films were deposited onto Al2O3 (0001) substrates by reactive co‑sputtering from elemental Ti and Al targets and analyzed by in situ and ex situ x-ray scattering, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The deposition parameters were set to values that yield Ti:Al:N ratios of 2:1:1 and 4:1:3 at room temperature. 2TiAlN depositions at 675 °C result in epitaxial Ti2AlN growth with basal planes parallel to the substrate surface. Nominal 4TiAl3N depositions at 675 °C and above, however, yield TiN and Ti2AlN domains due to Al loss to the vacuum. Depositions at a lower temperature of 600 °C yield films with correct 4:1:3 stoichiometry, but Ti4AlN3 formation is supposedly prevented by insufficient adatom mobility. Instead, an incoherent Tin+1AlNn structure with random twinned stacking sequences n is obtained, that exhibits both basal plane orientations parallel as well as nearly perpendicular to the substrate interface. X‑ray photoemission spectroscopy shows that in contrast to stoichiometric nitrides the Al is metallically bonded and hence acts as twinning plane within the Tin+1AlNn stackings. Domains with perpendicular basal plane orientation overgrowth those with parallel ones in a competitive growth mode. The resulting morphology is a combination of smooth‑surfaced parallel basal plane orientation domains interrupted by repeated facetted hillock-like features with perpendicular basal plane orientation.

  • 41.
    Ben Sedrine, Nabiha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. University of Aveiro, Portugal; University of Aveiro, Portugal.
    Zukauskaite, Agne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Fraunhofer Institute Appl Solid State Phys, Germany.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jensen, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schoeche, S.
    University of Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Schubert, M.
    University of Nebraska, NE 68588 USA.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Infrared dielectric functions and optical phonons of wurtzite YxAl1-xN (0 less than= x less than= 0.22)2015In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, ISSN 0022-3727, E-ISSN 1361-6463, Vol. 48, no 41, p. 415102-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YAlN is a new member of the group-III nitride family with potential for applications in next generation piezoelectric and light emitting devices. We report the infrared dielectric functions and optical phonons of wurtzite (0001) YxAl1-xN epitaxial films with 0 less than= x less than= 0.22. The films are grown by magnetron sputtering epitaxy on c-plane Al2O3 and their phonon properties are investigated using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The infrared-active E-1(TO) and LO, and the Raman active E-2 phonons are found to exhibit one-mode behavior, which is discussed in the framework of the MREI model. The compositional dependencies of the E-1(TO), E-2 and LO phonon frequencies, the high-frequency limit of the dielectric constant, epsilon(infinity), the static dielectric constant, epsilon(0), and the Born effective charge Z(B) are established and discussed.

  • 42.
    Ben Sedrine, Nebiha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zukauskaite, Agne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Darakchieva, Vanya
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bandgap Engineering and Optical Constants of YxAl1-xN Alloys2013In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-4922, E-ISSN 1347-4065, Vol. 52, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study wurtzite Yx Al1-xN (0 andlt;= x andlt;= 0:22) films with (0001) orientation deposited by magnetron sputtering epitaxy on Si(100) substrates and we determine the alloys band gap energies and optical constants. Room temperature spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is employed in the energy range from 1 to 6.3 eV, and data modeling based on the standard dielectric function model is used. As a result of the SE data analysis the Yx Al1-xN refractive index and extinction coefficient are determined. The band gap of Yx Al1-xN is found to decrease linearly from 6.2 eV (x=0) down to 4.5 eV (x=0:22). We further observe an increase of the refractive index with increasing Y content; from 1.93 to 2.20 (at 2 eV) for x=0 and 0.22, respectively, reflecting the increase in material density.

  • 43.
    Bentzel, Grady W.
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Naguib, Michael
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Lane, Nina J.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Vogel, Sven C.
    Los Alamos National Lab, NM 87545 USA.
    Presser, Volker
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Dubois, Sylvain
    University of Poitiers, France.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Caspi, Elad N.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA; Nucl Research Centre Negev, Israel.
    High-Temperature Neutron Diffraction, Raman Spectroscopy, and First-Principles Calculations of Ti3SnC2 and Ti2SnC2016In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 2233-2242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein, we report-for the first time-on the additive-free bulk synthesis of Ti3SnC2. A detailed experimental study of the structure of the latter together with a secondary phase, Ti2SnC, is presented through the use of X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM). A previous sample of Ti3SnC2, made using Fe as an additive and Ti2SnC as a secondary phase, was studied by high-temperature neutron diffraction (HTND) and XRD. The room-temperature crystallographic parameters of the two MAX phases in the two samples are quite similar. Based on Rietveld analysis of the HTND data, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients of Ti3SnC2 in the a and c directions were found to be 8.5 (2).10(-6) K-1 and 8.9 (1) . 10(-6) K-1, respectively. The respective values for the Ti2SnC phase are 10.1 (3) . 10(-6) K-1 and 10.8 (6) . 10(-6) K-1. Unlike other MAX phases, the atomic displacement parameters of the Sn atoms in Ti3SnC2 are comparable to those of the Ti and C atoms. When the predictions of the atomic displacement parameters obtained from density functional theory are compared to the experimental results, good quantitative agreement is found for the Sn atoms. In the case of the Ti and C atoms, the agreement is more qualitative. We also used first principles to calculate the elastic properties of both Ti2SnC and Ti3SnC2 and their Raman active modes. The latter are compared to experiment and the agreement was found to be good.

  • 44.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Furland, Andrej
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Czigany, Zs.
    Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary.
    Neidhardt, Jörg
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Spectroscopic ellipsometry characterization of amorphous carbon and amorphous,graphitic and fullerene-like carbon nitride thin films2009In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 517, no 24, p. 6652-6658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon nitride (CNx) and amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering onto silicon (001) wafers under controlled conditions to achieve amorphous, graphitic and fullerene-like microstructures. As-deposited films are analyzed by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the UV–VIS–NIR and IR spectral ranges in order to get further insight into the bonding structure of the material. Additional characterization is performed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy. Between eight and eleven resonances are observed and modeled in the ellipsometrically determined optical spectra of the films. The largest or the second largest resonance for all films is a feature associated with C–N or C–C modes. This feature is generally associated with sp3 C–N or sp3 C–C bonds, which for the nitrogen-containing films instead should be identified as a three-fold or two-fold sp2 hybridization of N, either substituted in a graphite site or in a pyridine-like configuration, respectively. The π→πlow asterisk electronic transition associated with sp2 C bonds in carbon films and with sp2 N bonds (as N bonded in pyridine-like manner) in CNx films is also present, but not as strong. Another feature present in all CNx films is a resonance associated with nitrile often observed in carbon nitrides. Additional resonances are identified and discussed and moreover, several new, unidentified resonances are observed in the ellipsometric spectra.

  • 45.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hellgren, Niklas
    Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 104 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
    Johansson, Mats P.
    Thin Film Electronics AB, A°gatan 29, S-582 22 Link¨oping, Sweden.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Microstructure, mechanical properties, and wetting behaviorof Si-C-N thin films grown by reactive magnetron sputtering2001In: Surface and Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, Vol. 141, no 2-3, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon–carbon–nitride (Si–C–N) thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering of C and Si targets in a mixed Ar/N2 discharge. Films were grown to a thickness of more than 0.5 μm on graphite and Si(001) substrates held at a negative floating potential of −35 V, and substrate temperature between 100 and 700°C. The total pressure was constant at 0.4 Pa (3 mtorr), and the nitrogen fraction in the gas mixture was varied between 0 and 100%. As-deposited films were analyzed with respect to composition, state of chemical bonding, microstructure, mechanical properties, and wetting behavior by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nanoindentation and contact angle measurements, respectively. Depending on the deposition condition, ternary SixCyNz films within the composition range 1≤x≤34 at.%, 34≤y≤81 at.%, and 16.5≤z≤42 at.% were prepared with a textured, amorphous-to-graphite-like microstructure. For Si–C–N films with low Si content, C---C, C---N and Si---C bonds were present. At higher Si content, N preferentially bonds to Si, while less C---N bonds were observed. Films containing more than 12 at.% of Si contained widely dispersed crystallites, 2–20 nm in diameter. Incorporation of a few at.% Si resulted in a dramatic reduction of the film surface energy compared to pure CN films. The measured contact angles using distilled water and glycerol liquids were for some films comparable with those on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Teflon® surface. The hardness of Si–C–N films could be varied over the range 9–28 GPa.

  • 46.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Adsorption of human serum albumin on carbon nitride films studied with in-situ ellipsometry2005In: American Vacuum Society 52 Int Symposium and Exhibition,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Bioadsorption studies on carbon nitride films using in-situ ellipsometry2005In: E-MRS spring meeting,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Poksinski, Michal
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Protein Adsorption on Carbon Nitride Films Studied with in situ Ellipsometry2007In: 4th International Conference on Spectroscopic Ellipsometry,2007, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2007, p. 246-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Berlind, Torun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Department of Biomaterials, Institute of Surgical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Protein adsorption on thin films of carbon and carbon nitride monitored with in situ ellipsometry2011In: ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, ISSN 1742-7061, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 1369-1378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amorphous carbon and amorphous, graphitic and fullerene-like carbon nitride thin filmswere deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering and optically characterized withspectroscopic ellipsometry. The films were exposed to human serum albumin and theadsorption was monitored in situ using dynamic ellipsometry. From the ellipsometric data theadsorbed amount of proteins was quantified in terms of surface mass density using de Feijter'smodel. The results indicated larger adsorption of proteins onto the amorphous films comparedto the films with a more ordered microstructure. Complementary studies with labeled HSAusing radioimmunoassay showed up to 6 times higher protein adsorption compared to theellipsometry measurement which partly might be explained by differences in surfaceroughness (from 0.3 to 13 nm) among the films. The elutability of adsorbed labeled HSAusing unlabeled HSA and sodium dodecyl sulphate was low compared to a silicon reference.In addition, the four types of films were incubated in blood plasma followed by antifibrinogen,anti-HMWK or anti-C3c revealing the materials response to complement andcontact activation. Three of the films indicated immunoactivity, whereas the amorphouscarbon showed less immunoactivity compared to a titanium reference. All films showedindications of a stronger ability to initiate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, compared tothe reference. Finally, the surfaces bone bonding ability was investigated by examination oftheir ability to form calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals in a simulated body fluid, with a-CNxdepositing most CaP after 21 days of incubation.

  • 50.
    Beshkova, M.
    et al.
    Bulgarian Academic Science, Bulgaria.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Device applications of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide2016In: Vacuum, ISSN 0042-207X, E-ISSN 1879-2715, Vol. 128, p. 186-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene has become an extremely hot topic due to its intriguing material properties allowing for ground-breaking fundamental research and applications. It is one of the fastest developing materials during the last several years. This progress is also driven by the diversity of fabrication methods for graphene of different specific properties, size, quantity and cost. Graphene grown on SiC is of particular interest due to the possibility to avoid transferring of free standing graphene to a desired substrate while having a large area SiC (semi-insulating or conducting) substrate ready for device processing. Here, we present a review of the major current explorations of graphene on SiC in electronic devices, such as field effect transistors (FET), radio frequency (RF) transistors, integrated circuits (IC), and sensors. The successful role of graphene in the metrology sector is also addressed. Typical examples of graphene on SiC implementations are illustrated and the drawbacks and promises are critically analyzed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-06-30 11:35
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