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  • 1. Abu-Elyazeed, R R
    et al.
    Heineman, T
    Dubin, G
    Fourneau, M
    Leroux-Roels, I
    Leroux-Roels, G
    Richardus, J H
    Ostergaard, L
    Diez-Domingo, J
    Poder, A
    Van Damme, P
    Romanowski, B
    Blatter, M
    Silfverdal, S A
    Berglund, J
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cunningham, A L
    Flodmark, C E
    Tragiannidis, A
    Dobson, S
    Olafsson, J
    Puig-Barbera, J
    Mendez, M
    Barton, S
    Bernstein, D
    Mares, J
    Ratner, P
    Safety and immunogenicity of a glycoprotein D genital herpes vaccine in healthy girls 10-17 years of age: results from a randomised, controlled, double-blind trial.2013In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 31, no 51, p. 6136-6043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The investigational AS04-adjuvanted herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD2) subunit prophylactic vaccine ('HSV vaccine'; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) has been shown to be well tolerated in adults, but limited data exist for pre-teen and adolescent girls, a likely target population. The primary objective of this study was to compare the occurrence of serious adverse events (SAEs) over 12 months between HSV vaccine recipients and saline recipients (placebo control group) in pre-teen and adolescent girls. The immunogenicity of the HSV vaccine was also assessed.

    METHODS: Healthy girls aged 10-17 years, stratified by age (10-15 years; 16-17 years), were randomised 2:1:1 to receive the HSV vaccine, a hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix™; HAV control) or placebo (saline) according to a 0-, 1-, 6-month schedule. Participants and study personnel not involved in the preparation or administration of vaccines were blinded to treatment. Safety and immunogenicity analyses were performed overall and by age (10-15 years; 16-17 years) and HSV serostatus.

    RESULTS: No statistically significant difference in the percentage of subjects with SAEs was observed between the HSV and saline group, or between the HSV and pooled control (HAV and saline) groups. The HSV vaccine was well tolerated, although a higher incidence of solicited local symptoms was observed in the HSV group than in the control group. Neither age nor HSV serostatus at the time of study entry had an impact on the safety profile of this vaccine. The HSV vaccine was immunogenic regardless of pre-vaccination HSV serostatus. Higher anti-gD geometric mean concentrations were observed in HSV-1 seropositive participants than in HSV-1 seronegative participants.

    CONCLUSION: The HSV vaccine had an acceptable safety profile, and was well tolerated and immunogenic when administered to girls aged 10-17 years regardless of age or HSV pre-vaccination serostatus.

  • 2.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes2012In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective was to assess parents' expectations about participating in antenatal parenthood education classes and to determine whether their expectations might be related to gender, age, and educational level. Data from 1,117 women and 1,019 partners residing in three cities in Sweden were collected with a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study. Participants believed that antenatal education classes would help them to feel more secure as parents and to be better oriented toward childbirth. Men had more positive expectations about the childbirth than the women. The participants mostly wanted help in preparing for parenthood and in learning infant care skills, followed by help in preparing for childbirth. The participants' expectations were affected by gender, age, and educational level. The expectant parents appeared to want more focus on preparation for parenthood than on childbirth.

  • 3.
    Ahldén, Ingegerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parenthood education in Swedish antenatal care: perceptions of midwives and obstetricians in charge.2008In: The Journal of perinatal education : an ASPO/Lamaze publication, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe perceptions of parenthood education among midwives and obstetricians in charge of antenatal care in Sweden. Focus group interviews of 25 obstetricians and midwives were conducted. Data were analyzed with a phenomenographic approach. Five main categories emerged: aim of the parenthood education, content and expectations, implementation, support to group leaders, and strategies for the future. There is a strong belief in parenthood education, and the overall aim was considered to be support in the transition to parenthood. Contents should focus on awareness of the expected child, confidence in the biological processes, and the changes of roles. Pedagogies training, cost effectiveness, development, and the need to reach target groups were emphasized.

  • 4.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hospitalization in Adolescence and Young Adulthood Among Twins and Singletons: A Swedish Cohort Study of Subjects Born Between 1973 and 19832013In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 707-715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children born with non-optimal birth characteristics — that is, are small for gestational age and/or preterm — have an increased risk for several long-term effects such as neurological sequelae and chronic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine whether twins exhibited a different outcome, compared with singletons, in terms of hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, and to what extent differences remain when considering the divergence in birth characteristics between singletons and twins. Persons born between 1973 and 1983 in Sweden and surviving until age 13 were included and followed until the end of 2006. Data on birth characteristics, parental socio-demographic factors, and hospitalizations were collected from national registers. Adjusting for parental socio-demographic factors, twins had a higher risk of being hospitalized than singletons (odds ratio, OR = 1.17, 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.10–1.25) and more often due to ‘Congenital anomalies’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06–1.28), ‘Infections’ (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.08–1.20), ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06–1.15), and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.10–1.26). Stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses non-optimal twins seem to do slightly better than non-optimal singletons. Thus, twins with non-optimal birth characteristics had a lower risk of hospitalization than non-optimal singletons on, for example, ‘Congenital anomalies’ and ‘Diseases of the nervous system’ (OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.77–0.96; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.97, respectively) and Total (any) hospitalization (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.83–0.92). Among those with optimal birth characteristics, twins had an increased hospitalization due to ‘External causes of illness’ (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.02–1.13) compared with optimal singletons. Twins have higher hospitalization rates than singletons. In stratifying for birth characteristics, this difference diminishes, and for some diagnoses, non-optimal twins seem to do less poorly than non-optimal singletons.

  • 5.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Intergenerational cohort study of preterm and small-for-gestational-age birth in twins and singletons2015In: Twin Research and Human Genetics, ISSN 1832-4274, E-ISSN 1839-2628, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 581-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To date several studies have investigated the intergenerational effect of preterm and small-for-gestational-age births. However, most studies excluded both twin mothers and twin offspring from the analyses. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the intergenerational effect of preterm birth and small for gestational age (SGA) among twins and singletons.

    A prospective population based register study of mother-first-born offspring pairs recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was performed. The study included 4073 twins and 264,794 singletons born in 1973-1983 and their firstborns born in 1986-2009. Preterm birth was defined as birth <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as < 2 standard deviations of the Swedish standard. Logistic regressions were performed to estimate the intergenerational effect of each birth characteristic. Adjustments were made for maternal grandmothers and mother’s socio-demographic factors in addition to maternal birth- characteristics.

    Among mothers born as singletons, being born preterm was associated with an increased risk for delivering a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.29-1.50) while being born SGA increased the likelihood of a SGA child (adjusted OR 3.04, 95% CI 2.80-3.30) as well as a preterm child (adjusted OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.20-1.40). In twin mothers, the corresponding ORs tended to be lower and the only statistically significant association was between a SGA mother and a SGA child (adjusted OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.40-3.31). A statistically significant interaction between twinning and mother’s size for gestational was identified in a multivariate linear regression analysis indicating that singleton mothers born SGA were associated with a lower birth weight compared to mothers not born SGA.

    Preterm birth and SGA appear to be transferred from one generation to the next, although not always reaching statistical significance. These effects seem to be less evident in mothers born as twins compared with those born as singletons.

  • 6.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive pattern among twins and singletons in relation to number of siblings: a Swedish cohort study of individuals born between 1973 and 19932015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Twinning has been shown to be associated with a reduced reproductive rate compared to singletons. This can partly be explained by the birth-characteristics pertaining to twinning as many twins are born preterm, with low birth weight or small for gestational age. However, the intergenerational reproductive rate may also be due to familial factors such as number of siblings.

    Methods This is a register-based study of all men and women born in Sweden between 1973 and 1993 who were living in Sweden at 13 years of age. Data on the study objects’ own births as well as their offspring, parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios for the likelihood of becoming a parent were estimated using Cox’s proportion hazard models. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic and birth characteristics.

    Results Adjusting for number of siblings, socio-demographic factors and birth characteristics, twinning was associated with a decreased likelihood of becoming a first-time parent, compared with singletons both for females (HR (95% CI)=0.90 (0.88-0.93) and males (HR (95% CI)=0.96 (0.93-0.99). Having 3 or more siblings increased the chance of becoming a first-time parent among both male twins (HR (95% CI)=1.17 (1.08-1.27)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.16 (1.15-1.18)) compared to having fewer than 3 siblings. This increased likelihood of becoming a parent was also present among female twins (HR (95% CI)=1.18 (1.10-1.26)) and singletons (HR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.21-1.24)).

    Conclusions Twins have a decreased likelihood of becoming a parent compared to singletons even when adjusting for number of siblings.

  • 7.
    Bladh, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive patterns among twins: a Swedish register study of men and women born 1973-19832013In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the last decades there has been a steady increase of twin births. A combination of improved medical treatment of preterm and small-for-gestational age children has contributed to a higher number of surviving twins. Prematurity is known to affect reproduction in a negative way. Few studies have focused on the potential effect twinning may have on future reproduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of being born a twin compared to being born a singleton have on future reproduction.

    Methods

    In a national population-based register study, all individuals born between 1973–1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 1 016 908) constituted the sample. Data on each study subject’s own birth as well as the birth of their first offspring, and parental socio-demographic factors were collected from Swedish population based registers. Hazard ratios and corresponding 95% CI was calculated using Cox proportional hazards model.

    Results

    Twins, both men and women, had a reduced likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86-0.93; men: HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97). This difference in birth rates can only partly be explained by diverging birth characteristics. Amongst men and women born very preterm, twins had an increased likelihood of reproducing compared to singletons (women: HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.02-1.62; men: HR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.01-1.78).

    Conclusions

    Twins have lower reproduction rates compared to singletons, which only to a certain degree can be explained by diverging birth characteristics.

  • 8.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekholm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The importance of maternal BMI on infants birth weight in four BMI groups for the period 1978-20012009In: ACTA OBSTETRICIA ET GYNECOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 391-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To study whether increased maternal weight and other factors of importance is associated with higher birth weights of the children over a period of almost 25 years. Design. Retrospective cohort study. Setting. Delivery wards in southeast Sweden. Sample. A total of 4,330 delivered women and their children from the years 1978, 1986, 1992, 1997, and 2001. Methods. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the importance of the mothers body mass index (BMI) on the childrens birth weights during the study years and smoking, parity, employment, gestational age, and the age of the mothers were adjusted for. Main outcome measures. Weight of the offspring in relation to maternal BMI and possible confounders such as smoking, parity, employment, gestational age, and the age of the mother. Results. Between 1978 and 1992, there was an increase in birth weight in each of the four BMI categories (i.e. BMI20, 20-24.9, 25-29.9 and 30, respectively) even after adjustments were made for relevant background characteristics (p0.001). However, between 1992 and 2001, the birth weight for children whose mothers had a BMI of less than 20 or between 20 and 24.9 decreased (p0.001). For almost every study year, the mothers BMI was of significant influence on the childrens birth weights. However, the proportion of variance explained by the models (i.e. the adjusted R2) was not substantially altered when the mothers BMI was excluded from the models. Conclusion. Maternal BMI is of significance to explain trends in infants birth weight over time, but not of sole importance.

  • 9.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Leptin and adiponectin in cord blood from children of normal weight, overweight and obese mothers2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 6, p. 620-624Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To study cord blood concentrations of adiponectin and leptin in children born by normal weight, overweight and obese mothers and to study these parameters in relation to a weight gain intervention programme for obese mothers. Methods Ten millilitre cord blood was collected and analysed for leptin and adiponectin concentrations in children with gestational age andgt;37weeks born by 60 normal weight, 45 overweight and 145 obese mothers. 82 obese mothers took part in a weight gain intervention programme. Results Concentrations of leptin and adiponectin were higher in cord blood from children of overweight and obese mothers compared with children of normal weight mothers (leptin: Md 13.2, 30, 3 and 90.2ng/mL respectively, pandlt;0.001; adiponectin 35.9, 205.4, 213.8ng/L pandlt;0.001). No differences were found between overweight and obese mothers. The weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women had significant effects on the weight gain during pregnancy but had no effects on cord blood serum concentrations of leptin and adiponectin. Conclusion Cord blood leptin and adiponectin concentrations were higher in children born by overweight or obese women compared with children of normal weight mothers. A weight gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women did not affect these results. Intrauterine exposition to high concentrations of leptin and adiponectin may play a role in weight development later in life.

  • 10.
    Cedergren, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hyperemesis gravidarum that requires hospitalization and the use of antiemetic drugs in relation to maternal body composition2008In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 198, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess whether maternal prepregnancy body mass index was associated with the use of antiemetic drugs in early pregnancy and/or with the occurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective, population-based, cohort study. Women who delivered singleton infants (n = 749,435) from 19952003 were evaluated concerning the use of antiemetic drugs in early pregnancy (data available from 1995). Women who delivered singleton infants (n = 942,894) from 1992-2001 were evaluated concerning hospitalization because of hyperemesis gravidarum (data available until 2001). Adjusted odds ratios were determined by Mantel- Haenszel technique and were used as estimates of relative risk (RR). RESULTS: Underweight pregnant women were more likely to use antiemetic drugs (RR, 1.19, 95% CI, 1.14-1.24) and to become hospitalized for hyperemesis gravidarum (RR, 1.43, 95% CI, 1.33-1.54) compared with ideal weight women. Obese women were less likely to use antiemetic drugs (RR, 0.93, 95% CI, 0.89-0.97) and less likely to require hospitalization because of hyperemesis (RR, 0.90, 95% CI, 0.85-0.95) compared with women with an ideal body mass index. CONCLUSION: The use of antiemetic drugs and the occurrence of hyperemesis gravidarum are related to maternal body composition.

  • 11.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate.2009In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 88, no 10, p. 1158-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether pregnancy, delivery, and neonatal outcome among obese pregnant women who took part in an intervention study for weight restriction differed from a group of obese pregnant women attending regular antenatal care. The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women and 193 obese pregnant women who formed a control group. We found that a weight gain restriction of less than 7 kg during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and the neonate.

  • 12.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate women's attitudes and satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme during pregnancy.

    Design: exploratory, descriptive study. Data were collected via interviews.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Participants: 56 obese pregnant women who attended antenatal care at the University Hospital of Linköping's obstetrical department and took part in an intervention programme aimed at reducing weight gain during pregnancy, between November 2003 and August 2004.

    Findings: the interviews comprised several questions concerning attitudes and opinions of the programme. Most of the women expressed positive experiences with the treatment and would attend the programme if they became pregnant again. Most of the women stated that they had changed their eating and exercise habits during pregnancy, and almost all of them had continued with these new habits. Even though the weight gain goal of a maximum 6.9 kg was reached by less than half of the participants, most of the women were satisfied with their weight gain. A total of 71.4% of the women participated in aqua aerobics classes. They stated that they were most satisfied with this form of exercise, and that it also was a good social experience.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice: a pregnant woman herself must be actively involved in setting her own goals to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. Considerable effort and support must be placed on discussing strategies, pitfalls and risks. In order for the woman to maintain the change in attitude and habits, she must probably be given continuous feedback and reinforcement over the long term.

  • 13.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study.2010In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 766-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although studies have shown an association between anxiety and depression and obesity, psychological health among obese women during and after pregnancy has not been carefully studied. The aim of this study was to investigate psychological well-being using symptoms of depression and/or anxiety among obese pregnant women attending a weight gain restriction program and to then compare this group with a control group receiving traditional antenatal care.

    METHODS: 151 obese pregnant women in an intervention group and 188 obese pregnant women in a control group answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Group differences between the two groups were estimated by using the χ2 - test on categorical variables. The Student's t-test on continuous, normally distributed variables measuring changes in mean score on BAI and EPDS over time was used. To make a more comprehensive assessment of group differences, between as well as within the two groups, logistic regressions were performed with the BAI and EPDS as dependent variables, measured at gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks postnatal. The grouping variable has been adjusted for socio-demographic variables and complications.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy varied between 24% and 25% in the intervention group and 22% and 23% in the control group. The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety postnatally was 9% in the intervention group and 11% in the control group. Five percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% of the women in the control group showed symptoms of anxiety during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. The prevalence of symptoms of depression during pregnancy varied between 19% and 22% in the intervention group but was constant at 18% in the control group. Postnatal prevalence was 11% in both groups. Six percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% in the control group showed symptoms of depression during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. We found no differences between the two groups as concerns demographic characteristics, weight gain in kg, or the distribution of scores on anxiety and depressive symptoms nor did we find differences in the fluctuation of anxiety and depressive symptoms over time between the women in the intervention group and in the control group.

    CONCLUSION: Obese pregnant women attending an intervention program seem to have the same risk of experiencing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms as do obese pregnant and postnatal women in general.

  • 14.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight six years after childbirth: a follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction programmme2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to compare weight development in an intervention group and a control group, six years after participation in a gestational weight-gain restriction programme.

    DESIGN: follow-up of a prospective intervention study.

    SETTINGS: antenatal care clinics.

    PARTICIPANTS: a total of 129 women (88.4%) from the original intervention group and 166 women (88.8%) from the original control group.

    MEASUREMENTS: the women answered a study specific questionnaire, covering socio-demographic data and health- and weight status.

    FINDINGS: after adjusting for socio-demographic factors, the mean weight was lower (4.1kg) among the women in the intervention group, compared to the controls (p=0.028). Furthermore, the mean weight change, e.g. the weight at the six year assessment compared with the weight at the start of the intervention at the first antenatal care visit, was greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The women in the intervention group had a larger mean weight change (-5.2kg), e.g. weighed less than the women in the control group (-1.9kg) (p=0.046). Mean weight change expressed in 5kg classes also showed a significant difference between the two groups (p=0.030).

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: the results indicate that attending a gestational weight-gain-restriction programme can have a positive effect on weight up to six years after the intervention.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTISE: a restrictive gestational weight gain can result in a positive weight development during the first years after childbirth. It might provide both short- and long term medical health benefits for the mother as well as the child.

  • 15.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Klein, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Physical activity and psychological well-being in obese pregnant and postpartum women attending a weight-gain restriction programme2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    the objective of the study was to compare the differences in psychological well-being and quality of life during pregnancy and post partum of obese physically active women and obese physically inactive women enroled in a weight gain restriction programme. We also wanted to explore whether physical activity influences weight change or health status during pregnancy.

    Design

    a prospective intervention study.

    Setting

    antenatal care clinic.

    Participants

    a total of 74 obese pregnant women in a physically active group and 79 obese women in a physically inactive group.

    Measurements

    the women kept diaries of their physical activity during pregnancy and answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Medical Study Short-Form Health Survey in gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks post partum. Physical activity was measured in metabolic equivalents.

    Findings

    the physically active women experienced fewer depressive symptoms and estimated an improved quality of life during their pregnancies as measured by physical functioning, bodily pain, social functioning, role limitations due to emotional problems and general mental health as compared with the physically inactive women. There were no differences between the groups in gestational weight gain or weight change from early pregnancy to post partum or in prevalence of complications.

    Key conclusions

    physical activity among obese pregnant women provides better psychological well-being and improved quality of life, but does not prevent weight change.

    Implications for practice

    staff at Antenatal Care Clinics that face obese pregnant women, should encourage and emphasise the benefits of being physically active throughout pregnancy.

  • 16.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight after childbirth: A 2-year follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction program2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a weight gain restriction program on weight development or weight maintenance two years after childbirth.

    Methods: The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women who participated in a weight gain restriction program with weekly support duringpregnancy. The control group consisted of 193 obese pregnant women. Follow-up weight measurements were done at 12 and 24 months postpartum.

    Results: The mean value of weight change in the intervention group was -2.2 kg compared to + 0.4 kg in the control group from early pregnancy to the follow-up 12 months after childbirth (p = .046). A greater percentage of women in the intervention group showed a weight loss 24 months after delivery than did women in the control group at that same time (p = .034). Women in the intervention group who gained less than 7 kg during pregnancy had a significantly lower weight than the controls at the 24 months follow-up (p = .018).

    Conclusion: An intervention program with weekly motivational support visits during pregnancy and every 6 months after childbirth seems to have an impact on weight gain up to 24 months after childbirth for those women in the intervention group who succeeded in restricting their gestational weight gain to less than 7 kg.

  • 17.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women: A case-control intervention study2008In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To minimise obese women's total weight gain during pregnancy to less than 7 kg and to investigate the delivery and neonatal outcome. Design: A prospective case-control intervention study. Setting: Antenatal care clinics in the southeast region of Sweden. Population: One hundred fifty-five pregnant women in an index group and one hundred ninety-three women in a control group. Methods: An intervention programme with weekly motivational talks and aqua aerobic classes for obese pregnant women. Main outcome measures: Weight gain in kilograms, delivery and neonatal outcome. Results: The index group had a significantly lower weight gain during pregnancy compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The women in the index group weighed less at the postnatal check-up compared with the weight registered in early pregnancy (P < 0.001). The percentage of women in the index group who gained less than 7 kg was greater than that of women in the control group who gained less than 7 kg (P = 0.003). The percentage of nulliparous women in this group was greater than that in the control group (P = 0.018). In addition, the women in the index group had a significantly lower body mass index at the postnatal check-up, compared with the control group (P < 0.001). There were no differences between the index group and the control group regarding birthweight, gestational age and mode of delivery. Conclusion: The intervention programme was effective in controlling weight gain during pregnancy and did not affect delivery or neonatal outcome.

  • 18.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Oldin, Carin
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effects of a Gestational Weight Gain Restriction Program for Obese Pregnant Women: Childrens Weight Development during the First Five Years of Life2016In: CHILDHOOD OBESITY, ISSN 2153-2168, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 162-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Maternal prepregnancy obesity (BMI 30kg/m(2)) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) have shown a strong positive association with a higher BMI and risk of obesity in the offspring. The aim of this study is to estimate the effect of a GWG restriction program for obese pregnant women on the childrens BMI at 5 years of age and weight-for-length/height (WL/H) development from 2 months of age until 5 years of age. Methods: This was a follow-up study of 302 children (137 children in an intervention group and 165 children in a control group) whose mothers participated in a weight gain restriction program during pregnancy. Results: BMI at five years of age did not differ between girls and boys in the intervention and control group. The degree of maternal GWG, amp;lt;7kg or 7kg, did not affect the offsprings WL/H. Compared with Swedish reference data, just over half of the children in both the intervention and control group had a BMI within the average range, whereas slightly more than one-third of the children had a higher BMI. Conclusion: Despite a comprehensive gestational intervention program for obese women containing individual weekly visits and opportunity to participate in aqua aerobic classes, there were no differences between BMI or weight development among the offspring at 5 years of age in the intervention and control group.

  • 19.
    DeKeyser, Nicholas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Premature birth and low birthweight are associated with a lower rate of reproduction in adulthood: a Swedish population-based registry study2012In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 1170-1178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate if individuals born with sub-optimal birth characteristics have reduced probability of reproducing in adulthood. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanUsing population-based registries, the authors included 522 216 males and 494 692 females born between 1973 and 1983 and examined their reproductive status as of 2006. Outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) of reproducing. Adjustments were made for socio-economic factors. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMales and females born very premature displayed a reduced probability of reproducing [HR 0.78, 95 confidence interval (CI): 0.700.86 for males; HR 0.81, CI: 0.750.88 for females]. Likewise for very low birthweight (HR 0.83, CI: 0.710.95 for males; HR 0.80, 95 CI: 0.720.89 for females). Individuals born large for gestational age (LGA) displayed no significant changes. Males born small for gestational age (SGA) had a 9 lower reproductive rate (CI: 0.890.94) and that reduction increased as the individuals aged. Women born SGA tended to start reproducing at an earlier age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe results suggest that being born with low birthweight, premature or SGA (for males) is associated with a reduced probability of reproducing as an adult. LGA shows no statistically significant relationship with future reproduction.

  • 20.
    DeKeyser, Nicholas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Monfils-Gustavsson, Wiktor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Total cost comparison of standard antenatal care with a weight gain restriction programme for obese pregnant women2011In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 125, no 5, p. 311-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To perform a cost comparison of a weight gain restriction programme for obese pregnant women with standard antenatal care, and to identify if there were differences in healthcare costs within the intervention group related to degree of gestational weight gain or degree of obesity at programme entry. Study design: A comparison of mean healthcare costs for participants of an intervention study at antenatal care clinics with controls in south-east Sweden. Methods: In total, 155 women in an intervention group attempted to restrict their gestational weight gain to less than7 kg. The control group comprised 193 women. Mean costs during pregnancy, delivery and the neonatal period were compared with the costs of standard care. Costs were converted from Swedish Kronor to Euros ((sic)). Results: Healthcare costs during pregnancy were lower in the intervention group. There was no significant difference in total healthcare costs (i.e. sum of costs during pregnancy, delivery and the neonatal period) between the intervention group and the control group. Within the intervention group, the subgroup that gained 4.5-9.5 kg had the lowest costs. The total cost, including intervention costs, was (sic)1283 more per woman/ infant in the intervention group compared with the control group (P = 0.025). The degree of obesity at programme entry had no bearing on the outcome. Conclusions: The weight gain restriction programme for obese pregnant women was effective in restricting gestational weight gain to less than7 kg, but had a higher total cost compared with standard antenatal care.

  • 21.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hospitalization in adolescence affects the likelihood of giving birth: a Swedish population-based register study.2009In: Acta paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 561-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To examine the effect of hospitalization during adolescence on the likelihood of giving birth.

    Methods: 142 998 women born in 1973-75 were followed with the help of the Swedish Medical Birth Register (MBR) and the Swedish Total Population Register (TPR) up until the end of 2000 with respect to their likelihood of giving birth. All analyses were adjusted for parental socio-economic characteristics and factors related to the studied women's own birth.

    Results: The likelihood of giving birth between 20 and 27 years of age was positively affected by hospitalization at least once during adolescence according to the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register (HDR); adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.32, 95% confidence interval: 1.29-1.35. Women hospitalized due to genitourinary diseases, respiratory diseases, abdominal problems and abuse of alcohol and drugs were more likely to have given birth during the study period, while hospitalizations according to cerebral palsy and congenital malformations tended to decrease childbearing. Women hospitalized due to psychiatric diseases had an increase likelihood of given birth at 20-24 years but a reduced thereafter.

    Conclusion: A majority of the causes of hospitalization during adolescence increased the likelihood of giving birth between ages 20 to 27.

  • 22.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finnström, Orvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hospitalizations in adolescence and early adulthood among Swedish men and women born preterm or small for gestational age2008In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preterm birth and reduced intrauterine growth appear to be related to morbidity in childhood and later adulthood. We studied whether the risk of all-cause hospitalization in adolescence and early adulthood differed between individuals who were born preterm or small for gestational age (SGA) compared with those bom at term and appropriate for gestational age.

    Methods: Using Swedish registries, we followed 304,275 men and women born in 1973-1975 for any hospitalizations occurring in 1987-1996. Preterm birth was defined as <37 weeks of gestation and SGA as babies smaller than 2 standard deviations below the mean weight for gestational length, according to Swedish standards. We created 3 mutually exclusive categories: "preterm" (<37 weeks and not SGA), "SGA" (SGA and not preterm), and "both preterm and SGA." The comparison group was all term births not SGA. Childhood socioeconomic characteristics were accounted for in the analyses.

    Results: The overall risk of hospitalization was higher for men and women bom SGA (adjusted odds ratio = 1.16; 95% confidence interval = 1.12-1.21), for those born preterm (1.06; 1.02-1.10), and for those born both preterm and SGA (1.42; 1.26-1.59). In addition to higher risks for previously reported adverse health outcomes, such as neurodevelopment sequelae and congenital anomalies, men and women born SGA or preterm were more likely to be hospitalized due to unspecified symptoms. SGA also appeared to be associated with genitourinary diseases and drug use.

    Conclusions: Men and women born SGA or preterm were at higher risk for hospitalization during adolescence and early adulthood, with men and women born SGA more at risk than those bom preterm.

  • 23.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Attitudes towards mode of birth among Swedish midwives2010In: MIDWIFERY, ISSN 0266-6138, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 38-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate midwives attitudes and opinions on mode of birth. Design: exploratory descriptive study. Data were collected via study-specific questionnaires during 2006. Setting: southeastern Sweden. Participants: all midwives working in two counties. Findings: regardless of age, experience and working field, the midwives considered a reasonable caesarean rate to be around 11.5 per cent. None of the participants thought that the caesarean rate was too low. Midwives younger than 50 years tended to consider the current caesarean rate to be too high (p = 0.059). Midwives working on labour wards stated that they thought the current caesarean rate was too high compared with midwives working at antenatal care clinics (ACCs)(pandlt;0.001). Midwives working at ACCs agreed with the statements one should agree to a womans right to have an elective caesarean (pandlt;0.001) and elective caesarean is the best choice for a woman with fear of birth (p = 0.046) more often than midwives working on labour wards, regardless of age or working experience. Key conclusions and implications for practice: midwives working at ACCs are more willing to accept caesarean section at the womans request and for women with fear of birth. It is of importance that ACC caregivers and professionals on labour wards increase their collaboration and have continuous discussions with one another in an attempt to reach consensus about the appropriate caesarean rates on evidence-based grounds.

  • 24.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekholm, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology .
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Attitudes towards cesarean section in a nationwide sample of obstetricians and gynecologists2008In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The Swedish cesarean section (CS) rate has increased dramatically over the last decades, but remains relatively low compared to several other countries in the Western world. The reasons for this continuous increase are multifactorial and difficult to investigate. That pregnant women are demanding CS more frequently does not appear to be the major explanatory factor for the increasing CS rate. Since Swedish CS rates are relatively low, it is important to study attitudes to CS in a nationwide population of Swedish obstetricians and gynecologists in order to determine the possible concerns of this group. Methods. In 2006, a study-specific questionnaire was created and posted to Swedish obstetricians and gynecologists. In total, 1,280 obstetricians and gynecologists received a questionnaire and replied with a response rate of 66%. Results. In general, older and longer work experience physicians had a more positive attitude towards providing CS on maternal request or elective CS for women who fear vaginal delivery. In addition, these colleagues were more positive in expressing their belief that elective CS is as safe as vaginal delivery for the mother and her child. The main difference between female and male physicians was that males were more positive toward providing CS on maternal request (p<0.001). Conclusion. We have shown that female physicians differ from their male colleagues in their attitudes toward providing CS on maternal request. Female physicians were more reluctant than males to provide CS on maternal request. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  • 25.
    Gutke, Annelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pelvic girdle pain and lumbar pain in relation to postpartum depressive symptoms2007In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 32, no 13, p. 1430-1436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the possible association of lumbopelvic pain and postpartum depression and differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms among women without lumbopelvic pain and women classified as having pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and/or lumbar pain.

    Summary of background data: Lumbopelvic pain and depression are common pregnancy complications, but their comorbidity has rarely been evaluated and has not been studied in relation to subgroups of lumbopelvic pain.

    Methods: In a cohort of consecutively enrolled pregnant women, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to evaluate depressive symptoms at 3 months postpartum, applying a primary screening cutoff of >=10 and a cutoff of >=13 for probable depression. Women were classified into lumbopelvic pain subgroups by means of mechanical assessment of the lumbar spine, standard history, pelvic pain provocation tests, a pain drawing, and the active straight leg raising test.

    Results: The postpartum cohort (n = 267) comprised 180 (67%) women without lumbopelvic pain, 44 (16%) with PGP, 29 (11%) with lumbar pain, and 14 (5%) with combined PGP and lumbar pain. Applying a cutoff of >=10, postpartum depressive symptoms were more prevalent in women with lumbopelvic pain (27 of 87, 31%; 95% confidence interval, 26%–36%) than in women without lumbopelvic pain (17 of 180, 9%; 95% confidence interval, 5%–13%; P < 0.001). The comorbidity of lumbopelvic pain and depressive symptoms was 10%. Depressive symptoms were more prevalent in women with lumbar pain versus women without lumbopelvic pain when applying cutoffs of >=10 or >=13 (P <= 0.002); whereas for women with PGP, this comparison was significant only at the screening level of >=10 (P = 0.01).

    Conclusions: Postpartum depressive symptoms were 3 times more prevalent in women having lumbopelvic pain than in those without. This comorbidity highlights the need to consider both symptoms in treatment strategies.

  • 26.
    Hildebrand, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Källén, Bengt
    Tornblad Institute, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gottvall, Tomas
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Maternal obesity and risk of Down syndrome in the offspring2014In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 310-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to determine if maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of Down syndrome in the offspring and whether the risk estimates for trisomy 21 based on combined screening is affected by maternal body mass index (BMI).

    METHODS: Study group I consisted of a nationwide cohort of 168 604 women giving birth; outcome was infants born with Down syndrome. Adjustment was made for maternal age. Study group II consisted of 10 224 women undergoing 1st trimester combined screening. Outcome was risk assessment for Down syndrome. All women were divided into six BMI groups, and outcomes were evaluated over the BMI strata with BMI 18.5 to 24.9 as reference and correcting for maternal age.

    RESULTS: Obese women had an increased risk for giving birth to an infant with Down syndrome compared with normal-weight women, BMI 30 to 34.9 odds ratio (OR) 1.31 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-1.55], BMI 35 to 39.9 OR 1.12 (95% CI 0.82-1.53), BMI ≥ 40 OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.00-2.43). The observed and the expected numbers of women with a risk of Down syndrome >1/300 based on 1st trimester combined screen and maternal age were similar in each BMI group.

    CONCLUSION: Maternal obesity seems to increase the risk for Down syndrome births. The risk estimate for Down syndrome with 1st trimester combined screening is unaffected by BMI. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 27.
    Johansson, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping. Department Orthopaed, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Incidence of Perthes disease in children born between 1973 and 1993: A Swedish nationwide cohort study of 2.1 million individuals2017In: Acta Orthopaedica, ISSN 1745-3674, E-ISSN 1745-3682, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 96-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose - The incidence of Perthes disease as reported in the literature varies widely between and within countries. The etiology of the disease is still unknown. Both environmental and genetic factors have been suggested to play a part in either causing the disease or increasing the susceptibility of an individual. We determined the incidence of Perthes disease in Sweden and investigated possible relationships to parental socioeconomic status, ethnicity, marital status, mothers age when giving birth, parity, number of siblings, and smoking habits. Patients and methods - Six Swedish population-based registers were used, together covering all children born in Sweden from 1973 through 1993. Results - The incidence of Perthes disease in Sweden was 9.3 per 100,000 subjects. The ratio between boys and girls was 3.1:1. The educational level of the father and the mother of a child with Perthes disease was lower than in the controls. The incidence was lower when the fathers were in the highest income bracket (above the 90(th) percentile). A higher proportion of parents of Nordic lineage had children with Perthes disease than parental pairs with one or both who were not of such lineage. Interpretation - This study confirms that there is an association between the incidence of Perthes disease and the socioeconomic status of the parents.

  • 28.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Author response to: Weight gain restriction for obese pregnant women2008In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 796Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 29.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postpartum Depression: Epidemiological and Biological Aspects2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Postpartum depression is by definition a major depression with an onset during the first weeks after delivery. In practice, however, the term, postpartum depression is used to characterize all kinds of depressive symptoms after childbirth. The aims of this thesis were to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms during late pregnancy, in the puerperium and four years after delivery, and to analyze the mothers’ estimation of personal health and their children’s behavior at the age of four. Additional goals were to test the predictive power of potential associated factors of postpartum depression during pregnancy and the puerperium and finally, to elucidate possible genetic or neuropeptidergic explanatory variables behind the development of postpartum depression.

    A population-based sample of 1489 women was screened with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the prevalence of depressive symptoms was 17% in late pregnancy and 13% postpartum. Antenatal depressed mood was related to postpartum depression. In a cross-sectional study we later found that postpartum depression was associated with subsequent depressive symptoms and current health problems four years after childbirth. Four-year-old boys of postpartum depressed mothers and children of mothers with a subsequent depressive status had more behavior problems than children of non-symptomatic mothers did, according to the mothers’ opinion.

    The strongest associated factors for postpartum depression, in a case-control study, were sick leave during pregnancy mainly due to pregnancy complications, e.g. hyperemesis and premature contractions and a high number of visits to the antenatal care clinic. There was no association between delivery complications or complications in the perinatal period and postpartum depression. The theory that depressive symptoms in late pregnancy or postpartum are connected with CYP2D6 genotype could not be confirmed.

    In a rat model, we found that pregnancy and parturition influence the concentrations of neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, substance P and galanin in the rat brain. This result supports the hypothesis that neuropeptidergic systems in the brain influence the mood changes around childbirth. In conclusion, postpartum depression is a common feature with influence on both maternal and child well being.

    List of papers
    1. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum
    2001 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 251-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postnatal depression refers to a non-psychotic depressive episode that begins in or extends into the postpartum period. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a pregnant and later postnatal population, to determine the natural course of these symptoms and whether there is an association between antenatal and postnatal depressive symptomatology.

    METHODS: A longitudinal study with a total population of 1,558 consecutively registered pregnant women in the southeast region of Sweden. Presence of depressive symptoms was measured with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale on four occasions namely in gestational week 35-36, in the maternity ward, 6-8 weeks and 6 months postpartum.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive symptoms during late pregnancy was 17%; in the maternity ward 18%; 6-8 weeks postnatally 13%; and 6 months postnatally, 13%. A correlation between antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms was found (r=0.50, p<0.0001).

    CONCLUSION: Detection of women at risk for developing postnatal depressive symptoms can be done during late pregnancy. Antenatal care clinics constitute a natural and useful environment for recognition of women with depressive symptoms.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13667 (URN)10.1034/j.1600-0412.2001.080003251.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-04-30 Created: 2003-04-30 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    2. Obstetric, somatic, and demographic risk factors for postpartum depressive symptoms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obstetric, somatic, and demographic risk factors for postpartum depressive symptoms
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Obstetrics and gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and test the predictive power of potential independent risk factors of postpartum depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the perinatal period.

    METHODS: We conducted a case-control study where 132 women with postpartum depressive symptoms were selected as an index group and 264 women without depressive symptoms as a control group. Data related to sociodemographic status, medical, gynecologic, and obstetric history, pregnancy, and perinatal events were collected from standardized medical records.

    RESULTS: The strongest risk factors for postpartum depressive symptoms were sick leave during pregnancy and a high number of visits to the antenatal care clinic. Complications during pregnancy, such as hyperemesis, premature contractions, and psychiatric disorder were more common in the postpartum depressed group of women. No association was found between parity, sociodemographic data, or mode of delivery and postpartum depressive symptoms.

    CONCLUSION: Women at risk for postpartum depression can be identified during pregnancy. The strongest risk factors, sick leave during pregnancy and many visits to the antenatal care clinic, are not etiologic and might be of either behavioral or biologic origin. The possibilities of genetic vulnerability and hormonal changes warrant further investigation to reach a more thorough understanding.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13668 (URN)10.1016/S0029-7844(01)01722-7 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-04-30 Created: 2003-04-30 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    3. A follow-up study of postnatal depressed women: Recurrent maternal depressive symptoms and child behaviour after four years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A follow-up study of postnatal depressed women: Recurrent maternal depressive symptoms and child behaviour after four years
    2007 (English)In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and self reported health of women who have shown previous postpartum depressive symptoms. To examine the behavior of four-year-old children born to mothers affected by postpartum depression.

    Methods: Longitudinal study. The index group (n = 251) constituted of all women with postpartum depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), in a population-based study made in the late 1990s. The control group (n = 502) consisted of women without postpartum depressive symptoms on the EPDS at the same occasion. Approximately four years after delivery these women were asked to answer a short questionnaire on general health, the EPDS, and also to assess their child’s behavior with the Richman Pre-School Behaviour Checklist. Results: Women with a history of postpartum depressive symptoms were approximately 6 times more likely to have recurrent depressive symptoms (OR = 5.82, 95% CI: 3.79–8.93), compared to those without postpartum depressive symptoms, and they were also more likely to experience physical and mental illness. Although postpartum depressive symptoms in the mothers were involved in explaining the likelihood of behavioral problems in their four-year-old children, mothers with current depressive symptoms were the most likely to have a child with behavioral problems (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.88–11.78). Conclusion: Postpartum depressive illness constitutes a risk for future illness as well as maternal perceived behavioral problems in offspring. In order to diminish long-term adverse consequences for the mother and the child there is a great need to recognize and treat women with postpartum depressive symptoms as early as possible.

    Keywords
    Postpartum depression, maternal depression, child behavior, follow-up study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13669 (URN)10.1007/s00737-007-0185-9 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-04-30 Created: 2003-04-30 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    4. CYP2D6 genotypes and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and postpartum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>CYP2D6 genotypes and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and postpartum
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    2004 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 61-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this exploratory was to investigate the theory of a relation between cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) genotype and depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and/or postpartum. We studied 145 women with depressive symptoms. CYP2D6 genotype was analysed in leukocyte DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences in CYP2D6 genotypes between the groups of women being depressed during and/or after pregnancy. The frequencies of CYP2D6 genotypes did not differ from other European studies. This study cannot confirm that depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum are connected with CYP2D6 genotype. It is, however, noteworthy that the frequency of ultrarapid metabolizers was higher than in a general Caucasian population. This warrants further exploration in a greater study sample, but should also be investigated in a general population with major depression.

    Keywords
    CYP2D6, Depression, Pregnancy, Postpartum
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13670 (URN)10.1080/08039480310000815 (DOI)
    Available from: 2003-04-30 Created: 2003-04-30 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    5. Pregnancy and parturition influence neuropeptide concentrations in the rat brain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnancy and parturition influence neuropeptide concentrations in the rat brain
    Show others...
    Manuscript (Other academic)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13671 (URN)
    Available from: 2003-04-30 Created: 2003-04-30 Last updated: 2010-01-13
  • 30.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Angelsiöö, L.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ekström, CM.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Obstetric, somatic, and demographic risk factors for postpartum depressive symptoms2002In: Obstetrics and gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and test the predictive power of potential independent risk factors of postpartum depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the perinatal period.

    METHODS: We conducted a case-control study where 132 women with postpartum depressive symptoms were selected as an index group and 264 women without depressive symptoms as a control group. Data related to sociodemographic status, medical, gynecologic, and obstetric history, pregnancy, and perinatal events were collected from standardized medical records.

    RESULTS: The strongest risk factors for postpartum depressive symptoms were sick leave during pregnancy and a high number of visits to the antenatal care clinic. Complications during pregnancy, such as hyperemesis, premature contractions, and psychiatric disorder were more common in the postpartum depressed group of women. No association was found between parity, sociodemographic data, or mode of delivery and postpartum depressive symptoms.

    CONCLUSION: Women at risk for postpartum depression can be identified during pregnancy. The strongest risk factors, sick leave during pregnancy and many visits to the antenatal care clinic, are not etiologic and might be of either behavioral or biologic origin. The possibilities of genetic vulnerability and hormonal changes warrant further investigation to reach a more thorough understanding.

  • 31.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prevalence of depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum2001In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 251-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Postnatal depression refers to a non-psychotic depressive episode that begins in or extends into the postpartum period. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a pregnant and later postnatal population, to determine the natural course of these symptoms and whether there is an association between antenatal and postnatal depressive symptomatology.

    METHODS: A longitudinal study with a total population of 1,558 consecutively registered pregnant women in the southeast region of Sweden. Presence of depressive symptoms was measured with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale on four occasions namely in gestational week 35-36, in the maternity ward, 6-8 weeks and 6 months postpartum.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive symptoms during late pregnancy was 17%; in the maternity ward 18%; 6-8 weeks postnatally 13%; and 6 months postnatally, 13%. A correlation between antenatal and postnatal depressive symptoms was found (r=0.50, p<0.0001).

    CONCLUSION: Detection of women at risk for developing postnatal depressive symptoms can be done during late pregnancy. Antenatal care clinics constitute a natural and useful environment for recognition of women with depressive symptoms.

  • 32.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wirehn, A-B
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk for congenital malformations in offspring of women who have undergone bariatric surgery. A national cohort2013In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 1477-1482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To study the risk for congenital anomalies in the first child of women after bariatric surgery compared with all other women giving birth to their first child and divided by maternal body mass index (BMI) groups.

    Design

    Prospective, population-based register study.

    Setting

    Sweden.

    Sample

    All firstborn children to women born 1973–83 were studied to determine if they had a congenital anomaly and a mother who had undergone bariatric surgery before pregnancy.

    Methods

    A total of 270 805 firstborns; of which 341 had mothers who had had bariatric surgery before delivery. We retrieved information on the women's marital or cohabitation status, smoking, BMI, diabetes and hypertension during pregnancy.

    Main outcome measures

    Congenital malformations.

    Results

    Of the firstborn children to mothers who had had bariatric surgery before pregnancy, 4.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.2–6.0) were malformed compared with 3.4% (95% CI 3.3–3.5) of those whose mothers had not undergone bariatric surgery. The risk for congenital malformation in firstborn children increased with increasing maternal BMI. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for congenital malformation among children whose mothers' BMI ranged between 25 and 29 kg/m2 was 1.09 (95% CI 1.03–1.15), whose mothers' BMI ranged between 30 and 34 kg/m2 was 1.14 (1.05–1.24) and whose mothers' BMI was ≥35 kg/m2 was 1.30 (95% CI 1.16–1.45) compared with those whose mothers had a normal BMI. Bariatric surgery before pregnancy did not have any effect on the odds ratio for having congenital malformation (OR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.63–1.91).

    Conclusions

    Preconception bariatric surgery does not seem to affect the risk for congenital malformations but a high to very high BMI does appear to increase the risk.

  • 33.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Frederiksen, Sven G
    Lund University Hospital, Lund.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bariatric surgery in a national cohort of women: sociodemographics and obstetric outcomes2011In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0002-9378, E-ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 205, no 3, p. 25-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In a large, prospective Swedish national cohort, we investigated individual birth characteristics for women who had undergone bariatric surgery and their obstetric outcome and made comparisons with all other women during the same period. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSTUDY DESIGN: The cohort consisted of 494,692 women born 19731983 of which 681 women who had undergone bariatric surgery constituted the index group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The index women more often have parents with lower sociodemographic status and are more often born large for gestational age. The women surgically treated before their first child had a shorter gestational length, their children had lower birthweight, and were more often born small for gestational age compared with the children born to the reference mothers. Women whose child was born before their bariatric surgery more often had a cesarean section, and their children were more often large for gestational age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION: Preconception bariatric surgery in obese women may be associated with improved obstetric outcomes.

  • 34.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Gunnervik, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A Comparison Between Swedish Midwives and Obstetricians and Gynecologists Opinions on Cesarean Section2011In: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, ISSN 1092-7875, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 555-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare Swedish obstetricians/gynecologists and midwives attitudes and opinions on different aspects of cesarean section (CS). In total 330 midwives from the south east of Sweden and 1280 Swedish obstetricians/gynecologists were asked to answer a study-specific questionnaire anonymously about their opinions on different issues concerning CS. The majority of obstetricians/gynecologists and midwives had more than 10 years of experience in their professions (75.2% vs. 73.6%). The midwives thought that a reasonable CS rate would be 11.5% whereas the corresponding figures for the obstetricians/gynecologists was 13.8% (P andlt; 0.001). There are differences in opinions and attitudes concerning both CS rates and other aspects in connection with CS. There are evident differences in attitudes towards CS and mode of delivery between midwives and obstetricians/gynecologists. These need to be explored and discussed in relation to state-of-the-art knowledge and should become a part of the curriculum for both groups of professionals both in training as well as on a regular clinical basis.

  • 35.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kernell, K
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive Pattern and Pregnancy Outcome in Women with Congenital Heart Disease: A Swedish Population-Based Study in JOURNAL OF WOMENS HEALTH, vol 19, issue 3, pp 619-6192010In: JOURNAL OF WOMENS HEALTH, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. , 2010, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 619-619Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kernell, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Reproductive patterns and pregnancy outcomes in women with congenital heart disease - a Swedish population-based study2011In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 90, no 6, p. 659-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To study women diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD) with respect to characteristics related to their own births, their subsequent likelihood of giving birth and the obstetric and neonatal outcomes of their pregnancies. Design. Population-based register study. Population. All women born in 1973-1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n=500 245). Methods. Women diagnosed with CHD (n=2 216) were compared with women without CHD (n=492 476). A total of 188 867 mother-firstborn-offspring pairs were identified and available for analysis. Results. Mothers of women with CHD were more often older and single/unmarried. Women with CHD were more often born preterm or small-for-gestational age (SGA) than women without CHD, more likely to have been born with a cesarean section, to have given birth during the study period, and to be younger at the time of their first pregnancy. Women with CHD were also more prone to give birth to children preterm or SGA and their babies were more often delivered by cesarean section with a higher frequency of congenital abnormality. Conclusions. Women with CHD were more likely to have been born preterm or SGA and these outcomes were repeated in the next generation. Women with CHD should not be discouraged from pregnancy. Prenatal diagnostics should be discussed and offered to these women, as there is an increased risk for congenital abnormalities.

  • 37.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Larsson, Caroline
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nylander, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Psychiatry.
    Temperament and character in women with postpartum depression2007In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether women with postpartum depression differ in personality traits from healthy postpartum women, healthy controls from the normal Swedish population and non-postpartum women with major depression. Methods: Forty-five women with postpartum depression were compared with 62 healthy postpartum women, 62 age-matched, healthy, non-postpartum women from a normal sample and 74 non-postpartum women with major depression from a clinical sample. The edinburgh postnatal depression scale was used in order to screen for postpartum depression. A clinical diagnostic interview was done including a rating with the Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale. Personality i.e. temperament and character was measured by the temperament and character inventory. Results: Harm avoidance (HA) was higher (p < 0.001) and self-directedness (SD) scored lower (p < 0.001) in women with postpartum depression compared to healthy postpartum women. These differences were the most important differences between these two groups. Women with postpartum depression scored lower (p = 0.001) in cooperativeness (CO) and higher (p = 0.019) in self-transcendence (ST) compared to healthy postpartum women. Women with postpartum depression scored overall similar to women with major depression. Conclusion: High HA and low SD can be seen as vulnerability factors for developing a depression and especially in a stressful situation as childbirth. © 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  • 38.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    A follow-up study of postnatal depressed women: Recurrent maternal depressive symptoms and child behaviour after four years2007In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and self reported health of women who have shown previous postpartum depressive symptoms. To examine the behavior of four-year-old children born to mothers affected by postpartum depression.

    Methods: Longitudinal study. The index group (n = 251) constituted of all women with postpartum depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), in a population-based study made in the late 1990s. The control group (n = 502) consisted of women without postpartum depressive symptoms on the EPDS at the same occasion. Approximately four years after delivery these women were asked to answer a short questionnaire on general health, the EPDS, and also to assess their child’s behavior with the Richman Pre-School Behaviour Checklist. Results: Women with a history of postpartum depressive symptoms were approximately 6 times more likely to have recurrent depressive symptoms (OR = 5.82, 95% CI: 3.79–8.93), compared to those without postpartum depressive symptoms, and they were also more likely to experience physical and mental illness. Although postpartum depressive symptoms in the mothers were involved in explaining the likelihood of behavioral problems in their four-year-old children, mothers with current depressive symptoms were the most likely to have a child with behavioral problems (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.88–11.78). Conclusion: Postpartum depressive illness constitutes a risk for future illness as well as maternal perceived behavioral problems in offspring. In order to diminish long-term adverse consequences for the mother and the child there is a great need to recognize and treat women with postpartum depressive symptoms as early as possible.

  • 39.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Dahl, Marja-Liisa
    Wadelius, Mia
    Nordin, Conny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    CYP2D6 genotypes and depressive symptoms during late pregnancy and postpartum2004In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 61-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this exploratory was to investigate the theory of a relation between cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) genotype and depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and/or postpartum. We studied 145 women with depressive symptoms. CYP2D6 genotype was analysed in leukocyte DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences in CYP2D6 genotypes between the groups of women being depressed during and/or after pregnancy. The frequencies of CYP2D6 genotypes did not differ from other European studies. This study cannot confirm that depressive symptoms in late pregnancy and postpartum are connected with CYP2D6 genotype. It is, however, noteworthy that the frequency of ultrarapid metabolizers was higher than in a general Caucasian population. This warrants further exploration in a greater study sample, but should also be investigated in a general population with major depression.

  • 40.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hilke, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Complex Biphasic Changes of Neuropeptide Concentrations in the Rat Limbic System During Pregnancy and Parturition2010In: The Open Neuroendocrinology Journal, ISSN 1876-5289, Vol. 3, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sex hormones including estrogens affect brain areas involved in mood and cognition in addition to directly controlling reproduction and reproductive behavior. We studied the effect of pregnancy and puerperium on the concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP) and galanin in tissue extracts from the rat striatum, frontal cortex and the hippocampal formation by means of radioimmunoassay. The most profound effects were found in the frontal cortex. Thus, cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity (CCK-LI) was increased by 40 % during late pregnancy (p < 0.01) compared to estrous whereas SP-LI and galanin-LI decreased 25 % and 10 %, respectively. Postpartum, CCKLI decreased by 26% compared to pregnancy (p < 0.05) whereas SP-LI and galanin-LI were increased to a level above estrous (SP, P < 0.01; galanin, P < 0.05). No significant effect was observed in NPY-LI in this area. In the striatum during late pregnancy the concentrations of cholecystokinin-LI increased by 29 % (p < 0.05), NPY-LI by 22% (p < 0.05) whereas SP-LI slightly increased (not significant). Postpartum, cholecystokinin-LI decreased by 25 % (p < 0.01) compared to pregnancy and NPY by 16 % (p < 0.01). SP continued to increase postpartum by 33 % (p < 0.05) whereas no effect was observed on galanin-LI concentration. Surprisingly, we did not observe any changes in any peptide or groups measured in the hippocampal formation. The complex hormonal adjustments occurring during pregnancy and in the puerperium induce profound changes in the concentrations of several neuropeptides in regions of the rat brain involved in the control of mood and motor control.

  • 41.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Continuation rates of oral hormonal contraceptives in a cohort of first-time users: a population-based registry study, Sweden 2005-20102013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate if continuation rates in first-time users of oral hormonal contraceptives differed between different formulations and to measure if the rates were related to the prescribing categories, that is, physicians and midwives.                                

    Design A longitudinal national population-based registry study.                                

    Setting The Swedish prescribed drug register.                                

    Participants All women born between 1977 and 1994 defined as first-time users of hormonal contraceptives from 2007 to 2009 (n=226 211).                                

    Main outcome measures A tendency to switch the type of hormonal contraceptive within 6 months use and repeated dispensation identical to the first were estimated as percentages and relative risks (RRs). Physicians’ and midwives’ prescription patterns concerning the women's                                    continuation rates of oral hormonal contraceptive type.                                

    Results In Sweden, there were 782 375 women born between 1977 and 1994 at the time of the study. Of these, 226 211 women were identified as first-time users of hormonal contraceptives. Ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel, desogestrel-only and ethinylestradiol+drospirenone were the hormonal contraceptives most commonly dispensed to first-time users at rates of 43.3%, 24.4% and 11.1%, respectively. The overall rate of switching contraceptive types in the first 6 months was 11.3%, which was highest for desogestrel-only (14.3%) and lowest for ethinylestradiol+drospirenone (6.6%). The switching rate for all three products was highest in the 16-year to 19-year age group. Having a repeated dispensation identical to the initial dispensation was highest for users of ethinylestradiol either combined with levonorgestrel or drospirenone, 81.4% and 81.2%, respectively, whereas this rate for the initial desogestrel-only users was 71.5%. The RR of switching of contraceptive type within the first 6 months was 1.35 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.39) for desogestrel-only and 0.63 (0.59 to 0.66) for ethinylestradiol+drospirenone compared with ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel as the reference category. There were no differences in the women's continuation rates depending on the prescriber categories.                                

    Conclusions Desogestrel-only users conferred the highest switcher rate to another hormonal contraceptive within a 6-month period. Users of ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel were more prone to switch to another product within 6 months than women using ethinylestradiol+drospirenone. These findings may be of clinical importance when tailoring hormonal contraceptives on an individual basis.

  • 42.
    Kernell, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Bladh, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nielsen, Niels-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Congenital heart disease in men - birth characteristics and reproduction: a national cohort study.2014In: BMC pregnancy and childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, p. 187-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Women with congenital heart disease (CHD) are more often born preterm or small-for-gestational age and with a caesarean section. This pattern together with an increased risk of congenital anomalies seems to be repeated in the next generation. Information on the effect of paternal CHD on their offspring is sparse. In this study we investigated if men with CHD differ from those who do not have CHD with respect to characteristics related to their own births, their reproductive patterns and the neonatal outcomes of their children.

    METHODS: In this national cohort study data were derived from Swedish population-based registries. The population consists of all men born in 1973-1983 who were alive and living in Sweden at 13 years of age (n = 522 216). The index group is men with CHD (n = 2689). Men diagnosed with CHD were compared with men without CHD. The CHD were also divided into two groups, complex and simple CHD and comparisons between the groups were made.

    RESULTS: Men with CHD are more likely to have been born preterm (p < 0.001), small-for gestational-age (p < 0.001) or large-for-gestational-age (p < 0.001) than men without CHD. They are also more likely to have been the result of a twin pregnancy (p < 0.001) and to have been delivered by caesarean section (p < 0.001). Men with CHD have a decreased likelihood to become fathers compared to non-CHD men and in this study their offspring do not have a higher incidence of CHD than offspring to non-CHD fathers. The neonatal outcomes of children of men with CHD do not differ from the outcomes of children of non-CHD men.

    CONCLUSIONS: Men with CHD were more often born with non-optimal characteristics compared to men without the condition. However, the increased risk does not repeat itself in the next generation. This knowledge can lead to improved preconception counselling for couples in which the father has a CHD.

  • 43. Larsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Health, sociodemographic data, and pregnancy outcome in women with antepartum depressive symptoms2004In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 459-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether women with antepartum depression have an increased risk for adverse perinatal outcome. METHODS: From a sample of 1,489 women, an index group (n = 259) of all women with depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in gestational week 35-36 was selected. Two hundred fifty-nine women with no depressive symptoms on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale antepartum or postpartum were randomly chosen as the reference group. Medical, gynecologic, and obstetric history, sodoeconomic status, pregnancy, and perinatal data were collected from standardized medical records for all women. RESULTS: Women with antepartum depressive symptoms were more often multiparas with a history of earlier obstetric complications. Complications during the present pregnancy were more frequent in the antepartum-depressed group of women. There were no differences concerning outcome of delivery, puerperium, and neonatal health between the index and reference groups. Forty-six percent of the women with antepartum depressive symptoms had depressive symptoms at 6-8 weeks or 6 months postpartum or both. CONCLUSION: Women depressed during pregnancy constitute a group without an increased risk for adverse obstetric or neonatal outcome but with a high risk for postpartum depressive symptoms.

  • 44.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prevalence of blood and injection phobia among pregnant women2008In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 87, no 12, p. 1276-1279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of blood and injection phobia in an unselected pregnant population, in order to estimate the need for curative intervention programmes.

    Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting. Antenatal care clinics in the southeast region of Sweden.

    Sample: In total, 1,606 consecutively registered pregnant women attending their first visit with a midwife.

    Methods: The women were asked to complete the Injection Phobia-Anxiety scale, measuring phobic symptoms. Women who scored 20 on the questionnaire were telephone-interviewed and then diagnosed or dismissed according to the DSM-IV criteria for blood and injection phobia. Main outcome measures. Prevalence of blood and injection phobia according to the DSM-IV.

    Results: Of 1,529 women who chose to participate (92.5%), 110 women or 7.2% fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for blood and injection phobia. The mean age of the women was 29.1 years.

    Conclusions: Blood and injection phobia is hitherto unreported in the literature, but seems to be relatively common and needs to be recognized during pregnancy as it causes a great deal of discomfort and fear among pregnant women. The Injection Phobia-Anxiety scale is suitable as a screening tool in an antenatal care clinic setting.

  • 45.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    An open trial with cognitive behavioral therapy for blood- and injection phobia in pregnant women-a group intervention program2010In: ARCHIVES OF WOMENS MENTAL HEALTH, ISSN 1434-1816, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 7% of pregnant women suffer from blood- and injection phobia. The aim was to investigate if cognitive behavior group therapy (CBT) is effective in treating pregnant womens blood- and injection phobia. Thirty pregnant women with blood- and injection phobia according to DSM-IV took part in an open treatment intervention. A two-session cognitive behavior group therapy was conducted. As controls, 46 pregnant women with untreated blood- and injection phobia and 70 healthy pregnant women were used. Repeated measures ANOVA were performed. The scores for the CBT treatment group on the "Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety" were reduced both after each treatment session and postpartum (p andlt; 0.001). Anxiety and depressive symptoms were also reduced (p andlt; 0.001). Cognitive-behavior group therapy for pregnant women with blood- and injection phobia is effective and stable up to at least 3 months postpartum. It seems also to reduce anxiety and depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

  • 46.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Laren, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effect of maternal stress during pregnancy on the risk for preterm birth2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Preterm birth defined as birth prior to 37 weeks of gestation is caused by different risk factors and implies an increased risk for disease and early death for the child. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of maternal stress during pregnancy on the risk of preterm birth. Methods: A case-control study that included 340 women; 168 women who gave birth preterm and 172 women who gave birth at term. Data were manually extracted from standardized medical records. If the medical record contained a psychiatric diagnosis or a self-reported stressor e.g., depression or anxiety the woman was considered to have been exposed to stress during pregnancy. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) was used to calculate the attributable risk (AR) of maternal stress during pregnancy on preterm birth, both for the women exposed to stress during pregnancy (AR1 = (AOR-1)/AOR) and for the whole study population (AR2 = AR1*case fraction). Results: Maternal stress during pregnancy was more common among women who gave birth preterm compared to women who gave birth at term (p &lt;0.000, AOR 2.15 (CI = 1.18-3.92)). Among the women who experienced stress during pregnancy 54 % gave birth preterm with stress as an attributable risk factor. Among all of the women the percentage was 23 %. Conclusions: Stress seems to increase the risk of preterm birth. It is of great importance to identify and possibly alleviate the exposure to stress during pregnancy and by doing so try to decrease the preterm birth rate.

  • 47.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Obstetric and perinatal outcomes among women with blood- and injection phobia during pregnancy2011In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 129, no 1-3, p. 289-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Backgroun: Little is known about how anxiety disorders affect pregnancy outcomes. Therefore we investigated the impact of one anxiety disorder, blood- and injection phobia, on obstetric and neonatal outcomes.

    Method: From a population-based prospectively collected cohort we compared an index group of 110 women with blood- and injection phobia with a control group of 220 women. Standardized medical records were used to collect data. Obstetric and neonatal outcomes e.g. elective cesarean, prematurity, and small for gestational age were used as the main outcome measures.

    Result: Women with blood- and injection phobia stated more often a fear of childbirth (p < 0.001) and were more frequently delivered by elective cesarean section (p = 0.032). The incidence of premature delivery (p = 0.028), neonatal morbidity (p = 0.001) and the risk of having a baby born small for gestational age (p = 0.009) was higher among women with blood- and injection phobia.

    Limitation: The medical records, from which all information is drawn, despite standardization, sometimes may lack some information. However, this dilemma exists in both groups.

    Conclusions: Women with an anxiety disorder such as blood- and injection phobia are at increased risk for adverse obstetric outcomes, premature delivery and for having a baby born with higher neonatal morbidity. It therefore seems important to identify and treat women with anxiety disorders without delay early during pregnancy in an effort to minimize risks of complications for the woman herself and the child.

  • 48.
    Lilliecreutz, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Salivary cortisol in pregnant women suffering from blood-and injection phobia2011In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, ISSN 1434-1816, E-ISSN 1435-1102, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Stress and/or anxiety during pregnancy affect maternal and fetal wellbeing and can cause premature delivery and postnatal pathology in the child. Women suffering from phobias related to blood and injections are prone to high levels of stress including anxiety and sometimes panic attacks during pregnancy. Cortisol is amongst the mediators through which the neurohormonal expressions of maternal psychological factors may be transduced to the fetus. The aim was to investigate if pregnant women suffering from blood- and injection phobia have raised cortisol levels or are characterized by unusual diurnal salivary cortisol profiles compared to healthy controls.

    Methods: The sample consisted of 110 pregnant women with blood- and injection phobia and 110 pregnant healthy controls. Both groups provided morning and evening saliva samples in week 25 and 36 for the assay of cortisol. In gestational week 25 when blood was drawn for the mandatory blood testing extra blood was taken to analyze corticotrophin releasing  factor (CRF), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in serum.

    Results: The expected diurnal decline in salivary cortisol was observed as well as increased cortisol levels during pregnancy. Pregnant women suffering from blood- and injection phobia had higher output of cortisol compared to women without the phobia (F=6.25 df=1 p=0.014) but no marked difference in the diurnal cortisol rhythm was found between the groups.

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that untreated blood- and injection phobia during pregnancy increases cortisol concentrations. Blood- and injection phobia is treatable and cognitive behavioral therapy can be used.

  • 49.
    Lindberg, Malou
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Differences in prescription rates and odds ratios of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual hormonal contraceptives: A nationwide population-based study with age-specific analyses2012In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 106-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To examine, among young women, the association of individual hormonal contraceptives, within two broad groupings, with antidepressant therapy. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods In a nationwide register-based study, we examined the prescription rates of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual combined hormonal and progestin-only contraceptives among Swedish women aged 16-31 years (N = 917,993). Drug data were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register for the period 1 July 2005-30 June 2008. Data on the total population of women aged 16-31 in 2008 were obtained from the Total Population Register of Statistics Sweden. The proportion of women using both hormonal contraception and antidepressants, and odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressant use for hormonal contraceptive users versus non-users, were calculated, the latter by logistic regression, for each formulation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The highest antidepressant OR in all age groups, particularly in the 16-19 years age group, related to medroxyprogesterone-only, followed by etonogestrel-only, levonorgestrel-only and ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin formulations. Oral contraceptives containing ethinylestradiol combined with lynestrenol or drospirenone had considerably higher ORs than other pills. ORs significantly lower than 1 were observed when ethinylestradiol was combined with norethisterone, levonorgestrel or desogestrel. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion The association between use of hormonal contraceptives and antidepressant drugs varies considerably within both the combined hormonal contraceptive and the progestin-only groups.

  • 50.
    Lindberg, Malou
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Differences in prescription rates of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual hormonal contraceptives: a nationwide population-based study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
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