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  • 1.
    Andersson-Engels, Stefan
    et al.
    Inst för fysik Lunds Tekniska Högskola.
    Pålsson, S
    Backlund, Erik Olof
    IMT LiU.
    Sturnegk, Patrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Medical Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Svanberg, K
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    ALA-PpIX Fluorescence and spectroscopy in connection with stereotactic biopsy of human glioblastomas2005In: European Conference on Biomedical Optics,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Antonsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements for tissue type discrimination during deep brain stimulation2008In: Journal of neural engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 185-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a method for improving intracerebral guidance during functional neurosurgery has been investigated. An optical probe was developed for measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery in man. The aim of the study was to investigate the spectral differences between white and grey matter and between white matter and functional targets. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements in ten patients were recorded at incremental steps towards and in three different functional targets (STN, GPi and Zi). The recorded spectra along the trajectory were sorted into white or grey matter, based on preoperative MRI images or the recorded spectral shape and intensity. The difference between tissue types was calculated as a quotient. Significant intensity differences between white and grey matter were found to be at least 14% (p < 0.05) and 20% (p < 0.0001) for MRI and spectral-sorted data respectively. The reflectance difference between white matter and the functional targets of GPi was higher than for STN and Zi. The results indicate that diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has a potential to be developed to a suitable complement to other intracerebral guidance methods.

  • 3.
    Antonsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Optical measurements during experimental stereotactic radiofrequency lesioning2006In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 84, no 2-3, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo a laser Doppler measurement system in porcine brain tissue during thermal lesioning. A 2-mm monopolar radiofrequency lesioning electrode was equipped with optical fibers in order to monitor the lesioning procedure. Laser Doppler and backscattered light intensity signals were measured along the electrode trajectory and during bilateral lesioning in the central gray (70, 80 and 90°C, n = 14). The time course of the coagulation process could be followed by optical recordings. Two separate groups of tissue were identified from the intensity signals. The changes in the perfusion levels in both groups displayed significant changes (p < 0.05, n = 48) at all temperature settings, while backscattered light intensity was significant for only one group at the different temperatures (p < 0.05, n = 39). These results indicate that optical measurements correlate with lesion development in vivo. The study also indicates that it is possible to follow the lesioning process intra-operatively.

  • 4.
    Antonsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    In-vivo reflection spectroscopy measurements in pig brain during stereotactic surgery2003In: Biophotonics West: Biomedical Optics, 2003, Vol. 4958, p. 242-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency (RF) lesioning in the human brain is a commonsurgical therapy for relieving severe pain as well as formovement disorders such as Parkinsonia. During the procedure a smallelectrode is introduced by stereotactic means towards a target arealocalized by CT or MRI. An RF-current is applied throughthe electrode tip when positioned in the target area. Thetissue in the proximity of the tip is heated bythe current and finally coagulated.The overall aim of this studywas to improve the RF-technique and its ability to estimatelesion size by means of optical methods. Therefore, the opticaldifferences between white and gray matter, as well as lesionedand unlesioned tissue were investigated. Reflection spectroscopy measurements in therange of 450-800 nm were conducted on fully anesthetized pigsduring stereotactic RF-lesioning (n=6). Light from a tungsten lamp wasguided to the electrode tip through optical fibers, inserted alonga 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF-electrode. Measurements were performedin steps of 0-10 mm from the target in eachhemisphere towards the entry point of the skull. In thecentral gray of the porcine brain measurements were performed bothbefore and after the creation of a lesion. A totalof 55 spectra were collected during this study. Correlation totissue type was done using post-operative MR-images. The spectral signaturefor white and gray matter differs significantly for the entirespectral range of 450-800 nm. Pre- and post-lesioning reflection spectroscopyshowed the largest differences below 600 and above 620 nm,which implies that lasers within this wavelength range may beuseful for in-vivo measurements of tissue optical changes during RF-lesioning.

  • 5.
    Antonsson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Radio frequency electrode system for optical lesion size estimation in functional neurosurgery2005In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency(RF) lesioning in the human brain is one possible surgicaltherapy for severe pain as well as movement disorders. Oneobstacle for a safer lesioning procedure is the lack ofsize monitoring. The aim of this study was to investigateif changes in laser Doppler or intensity signals could beused as markers for size estimation during experimental RF lesioning.A 2 mm in diameter monopolar RF electrode was equippedwith optical fibers and connected to a digital laser Dopplersystem. The optical RF electrode's performance was equal to astandard RF electrode with the same dimensions. An albumin solutionwith scatterers was used to evaluate the intensity and laserDoppler signal changes during lesioning at 70, 80, and 90 °C.Significant signal changes were found for these three different clotsizes, represented by the temperatures (p<0.05,  n=10). The volume, width, andlength of the created coagulations were correlated to the intensitysignal changes (r=0.88, n=30, p<0.0001) and to the perfusion signalchanges (r=0.81, n=30, p<0.0001). Both static and Doppler-shifted light canbe used to follow the lesioning procedure as well asbeing used for lesion size estimation during experimental RF lesioning.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Characterisation and modelling of radio-frequency lesioning in functional neurosurgery2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the characterisation and modelling of the radio frequency (RF) lesioning with emphasis on size estimation in functional neurosurgery. A computer-assisted video system has been set up for standardised test and documentation of protein clots generated by RF-lesioning electrodes in an albumin solution. A standardised test is essential in comparing assessed results of the size and shape of protein clots generated using different parameters. This is beneficial to both the manufacturer oflesioning electrodes as well as the surgeon.

    In an animal study, performed analogously to thalamotomy in man, the correlation in size between in vitro protein clots and in vivo lesions has been investigated. The result shows a high correlation between protein clots and lesions observed on MR images; and lesions observed on MR images and corresponding coagulated tissue in histological sectionings. This actualises the value of presurgical electrode tests to validate the electrode function and lesion size in vitro.

    A finite element model has been set-up in order to facilitate studies of the growth and the temperature distribution during the lesioning process. Of the utmost importance is the finding of a difference in temperature between maximum temperature, located outside the electrode, compared to the intra-electrode (thermocouple) temperature.

    A method for real time monitoring of lesion growth and estimation of lesion size utilising static and/or Doppler broadened laser light is proposed. Implemented in a surgical-assist system, this could give valuable guidance to the surgeon as to whether the desired lesion size is obtained or not and keep the destruction precise, but to a minimum.

    List of papers
    1. In vitro evaluation of brain lesioning electrodes (Leksell) using a computer-assisted video system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro evaluation of brain lesioning electrodes (Leksell) using a computer-assisted video system
    Show others...
    1999 (English)In: Neurological Research, ISSN 0161-6412, E-ISSN 1743-1328, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency (RF) generated thermal brain lesions are widely used in functional neurosurgery. The size, shape and development of the lesions depends on system parameter settings and the electrode configuration. Difficulties in studying the effect of these factors in vivo stimulated us to develop an in vitro system for standardized comparison between different electrodes and physical parameters. A computer-assisted video system was set-up allowing continuous video recording of RF-generated coagulations in either a standard albumin solution or in the fresh white of a hen's egg as transparent test substrates. Ten lesions were made with each test electrode (two bipolar and three monopolar) in each of the two substrates at 70 degrees, 80 degrees and 90 degrees C (t = 60 sec). Due to the better homogeneity the lesions in the albumin solution were much more regular and reproducible. This made it possible to calculate the size (width 2.2 +/- 0.1 to 5.3 +/- 0.1 mm and length 3.0 +/- 0.1 to 8.7 +/- 0.3 mm) as well as the volume (8.5 +/- 1.4 mm3 to 133.5 +/- 26.8 mm3). It is concluded that this in vitro system offers a reproducible way to study and document the effect of different electrode configurations and RF-generator settings on the formation of a heat lesion. Even if the results are not directly applicable to the living human brain they give an estimate of the form and size of a coagulation lesion and can be of value for standardized comparisons between different electrodes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30203 (URN)10048063 (PubMedID)15697 (Local ID)15697 (Archive number)15697 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. In-vitro size estimation of protein clots generated by brain electrodes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-vitro size estimation of protein clots generated by brain electrodes
    1998 (English)In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1998 / [ed] H. K. Chang, Y. T. Zhang, Hong Kong: IEEE , 1998, p. 1783-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for in-vitro size estimation of protein clots generated by brain electrodes is presented. Radiofrequency generated thermal brain lesions are widely used in functional neurosurgery and in-vitro tests are used to confirm the electrodes' ability to generate lesions. To be able to estimate the size of protein clots generated in-vitro by brain electrodes, a computer-assisted video system was set up. The size estimation is carried out by software using two captured images of the protein clot. The “true” length and width (9.5 mm) of a sphere as measured with a slide-caliper differed at the most 0.5 mm (5%) and 0.3 mm (3%) respectively, all random errors fall within 2s.d

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Hong Kong: IEEE, 1998
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31111 (URN)10.1109/IEMBS.1998.746933 (DOI)16842 (Local ID)16842 (Archive number)16842 (OAI)
    Conference
    The 20th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, October 29 - November 1 1998, Hong Kong SAR, China
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2016-05-04
    3. Experimental radiofrequency brain lesions: a volumetric study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental radiofrequency brain lesions: a volumetric study
    Show others...
    2002 (English)In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE : This study describes the production, under strictly standardized and controlled conditions, of radiofrequency lesions with identical neurogenerator settings: in vitro in two different albumin solutions (nongelatinous and gelatinous) and in vivo in the thalamus of the pig.

    METHODS : The radiofrequency lesions were investigated in vitro by the use of a specially designed video system and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, the size of the in vivo lesions was estimated with the use of histological sectioning. The statistical analysis included the calculation of a correlation coefficient for the length, width, and volume for each lesion estimation.

    RESULTS : A high correlation (R = 0.96, P < 0.005; n = 14) was found between clot sizes in the two albumin solutions. Albumin clots generated in gelatinous albumin showed systematically larger volumes. In the pig, two concentric zones were seen in all magnetic resonance images and all histological preparations. The width correlation of the completely coagulated brain tissue (inner zones) was R = 0.94, P < 0.005, and n = 7. The corresponding correlation between magnetic resonance images and gelatinous albumin was R = 0.93, P < 0.005, and n = 7. As a rule, the in vitro clots were smaller than the outer zone but larger than the inner zone of the magnetic resonance imaging-recorded lesions for all of the electrode and temperature combinations tested. In vivo lesions generated with the same electrode and parameter settings showed high reproducibility.

    CONCLUSION : The value of presurgical electrode tests to validate the electrode function and lesion size in vitro has become evident in this study, which shows a high correlation between the in vitro albumin clots and the in vivo lesions observed on magnetic resonance images.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29944 (URN)10.1097/00006123-200209000-00030 (DOI)15370 (Local ID)15370 (Archive number)15370 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. A comparison between in vitro studies of protein lesions generated by brain electrodes and finite element model simulations
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison between in vitro studies of protein lesions generated by brain electrodes and finite element model simulations
    1999 (English)In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 737-741Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a finite element model for simulation of the thermal characteristics of brain electrodes and to compare its performances with an in vitro experimental albumin model. Ten lesions were created in albumin using a monopolar electrode connected to a Leksell Neuro Generator and a computer-assisted video system was used to determine the size of the generated lesions. A finite element model was set up of the in vitro experiments using the same thermal properties. With a very simple heat source applied to the finite element model in the proximity of the upper part of the tip, a good agreement (no deviations in width and distance from tip but a deviation in length of −1.6 mm) with the in vitro experiments (width 4.6±0.1 mm and length 7.4±0.1 mm) was achieved when comparing the outline of the lesion. In addition, a gelatinous albumin-model was set up and compared to computer simulations resulting in deviations in width of −0.4 mm, length of −2.2 mm and distance from the tip of −0.1 mm. Hence, the utilisation of finite element model simulations may be a useful complement to in-vitro experiments.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-30204 (URN)10.1007/BF02513376 (DOI)15698 (Local ID)15698 (Archive number)15698 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Analysis of temperature measurement for monitoring radio-frequency brain lesioning
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of temperature measurement for monitoring radio-frequency brain lesioning
    2001 (English)In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    During ablative neurosurgery of movement disorders, for instance therapy of Parkinson's disease, temperature monitoring is crucial. This study aims at a quantitative comparison of measurement deviations between the maximum temperature located outside the lesioning electrode and two possible thermocouple locations inside the electrode. In order to obtain the detailed temperature field necessary for the analysis, four finite element models associated with different surroundings and with different power supplies are studied. The results from the simulations show that both the power level and the power density as well as the surrounding medium affect the temperature measurement and the temperature field in general. Since the maximum temperature is located outside the electrode there will always be a deviation in time and level between the measured and the maximum temperature. The deviation is usually 2–7 s and 3–12°C, depending on, for example, the thermocouple location and surrounding medium. Therefore, not only the measured temperature but also the relation between measured and maximum temperature must be accounted for during therapy and device design.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29926 (URN)10.1007/BF02344810 (DOI)15351 (Local ID)15351 (Archive number)15351 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    6. Optical changes as a marker for lesion size estimation during radio frequency ablation: a model study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical changes as a marker for lesion size estimation during radio frequency ablation: a model study
    2001 (English)In: SPIE Proceedings | Volume 4254 | Guidance, Surgical-Assist and Treatment Systems / [ed] Warren S. Grundfest; David A. Benaron; Tuan Vo-Dinh, 2001, Vol. 4254, p. 164-171Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereotactic radiofrequency (RF)-lesioning in the central part of the brain is performed on patients that, for instance, have severe movement or psychiatric disorders. The size of the generated lesion can to some extent be controlled by RF-generator settings such as temperature and time as well as the electrode configuration. Today, MR- imaging and CT are the essential diagnostic methods to confirm the lesion size in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to use changes in the reflected light intensity and laser Doppler flowmetry as a marker for size estimation during RF-lesioning.

    Keywords
    Brain electrodes, Laser doppler flowmetry, Reflection spectroscopy, RF-lesioning
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47497 (URN)10.1117/12.427930 (DOI)
    Conference
    Biomedical Diagnostic, Guidance, and Surgical-Assist Systems III, San Jose, CA, January 20, 2001
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2016-05-04
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Characterisation of brain electrodes for ablative neurosurgery1999Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereotactic ablative neurosurgery with radio frequency current is regularly performed on patients with movement disorders, for instance Parkinson's disease. Even though the technique has been used for ablation in the brain for almost 50 years, nobody has suggested a standardised way of testing the electrodes used for ablative surgery.

    Within the framework of this thesis a computer-assisted video system has been developed for a proposed standardised method for in vitro estimation of protein clots generated by radio frequency lesioning electrodes. The system can be used for documentation of lesion growth by video recording, as well as lesion shape and size Oength, width and volume) calculations by use of two perpendicularly captured images of the protein clot. The system has been used for this purpose in a comparative study including two different test solutions (albumin and hen's egg white), three different temperature settings (70, 80 or 90°C) and five different brain electrode configurations, three monopolar (2mm diameter and 4mm tip, 1mm diameter and 2 or 4mm tip) and two bipolar (1 or 2mm diameter). Electrode configurations and parameter settings of the radio frequency generator greatly affect the size and shape of the coagulated lesion. Larger electrodes and higher temperature settings produce larger lesions, while the shape of the lesion is more dependent on the choice between monopolar or bipolar electrodes and the length of the active uninsulated electrode tip. The experiments performed in the albumin solution showed more regular, reproducible and homogeneous shapes and sizes compared to the experiments performed in hen's egg white. Protein clots generated by the electrodes in the albumin solution ranged in width from 2.2±0.1 to 5.3±0.lmm, length from 3.0±0.1 to 8.7±0.3mm and volume from 8.5±1.4 to 133.5±26.8mm3 , (m±s.d.,n=10). By using different test patterns, the video system has been  proven to be accurate and precise (random error 2%), giving repeatable and reproducible results.

    A method for simulation of the thermal characteristics of brain lesioning electrodes using the finite element method has also been developed. Finite element simulations of thein vitro experiment give valuable information of the lesion growth and final size when using different thermal properties and conditions. No deviation in width and distance from tip was seen when comparing finite element simulations of a power distribution at the distal part of the tip to in vitro experiments. However, the length is somewhat underestimated.

    In conclusion, the developed computer-assisted video system can be used as a standard system for evaluation of radio frequency electrodes used in stereotactic ablative neurosurgery. The proposed albumin solution is superior to egg white and should be used as a test substrate. An FEM simulation offers a good approximation for assessment of the size of the in vitro lesion.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Backlund, Erik Olof
    Lindstam, Håkan
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Lindström, Sivert
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of cell biology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Stereotactic RF-lesioning - A study in the pig brain2000In: Scandinavian Neurosurgical Society Meeting,2000, 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Backlund, Erik-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurosurgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindstam, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Sivert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Experimental radiofrequency brain lesions: a volumetric study2002In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 781-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE : This study describes the production, under strictly standardized and controlled conditions, of radiofrequency lesions with identical neurogenerator settings: in vitro in two different albumin solutions (nongelatinous and gelatinous) and in vivo in the thalamus of the pig.

    METHODS : The radiofrequency lesions were investigated in vitro by the use of a specially designed video system and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, the size of the in vivo lesions was estimated with the use of histological sectioning. The statistical analysis included the calculation of a correlation coefficient for the length, width, and volume for each lesion estimation.

    RESULTS : A high correlation (R = 0.96, P < 0.005; n = 14) was found between clot sizes in the two albumin solutions. Albumin clots generated in gelatinous albumin showed systematically larger volumes. In the pig, two concentric zones were seen in all magnetic resonance images and all histological preparations. The width correlation of the completely coagulated brain tissue (inner zones) was R = 0.94, P < 0.005, and n = 7. The corresponding correlation between magnetic resonance images and gelatinous albumin was R = 0.93, P < 0.005, and n = 7. As a rule, the in vitro clots were smaller than the outer zone but larger than the inner zone of the magnetic resonance imaging-recorded lesions for all of the electrode and temperature combinations tested. In vivo lesions generated with the same electrode and parameter settings showed high reproducibility.

    CONCLUSION : The value of presurgical electrode tests to validate the electrode function and lesion size in vitro has become evident in this study, which shows a high correlation between the in vitro albumin clots and the in vivo lesions observed on magnetic resonance images.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluid and Mechanical Engineering Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluid and Mechanical Engineering Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A comparison between in vitro studies of protein lesions generated by brain electrodes and finite element model simulations1999In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 737-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to develop a finite element model for simulation of the thermal characteristics of brain electrodes and to compare its performances with an in vitro experimental albumin model. Ten lesions were created in albumin using a monopolar electrode connected to a Leksell Neuro Generator and a computer-assisted video system was used to determine the size of the generated lesions. A finite element model was set up of the in vitro experiments using the same thermal properties. With a very simple heat source applied to the finite element model in the proximity of the upper part of the tip, a good agreement (no deviations in width and distance from tip but a deviation in length of −1.6 mm) with the in vitro experiments (width 4.6±0.1 mm and length 7.4±0.1 mm) was achieved when comparing the outline of the lesion. In addition, a gelatinous albumin-model was set up and compared to computer simulations resulting in deviations in width of −0.4 mm, length of −2.2 mm and distance from the tip of −0.1 mm. Hence, the utilisation of finite element model simulations may be a useful complement to in-vitro experiments.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    In-vitro size estimation of protein clots generated by brain electrodes1998In: Proceedings of the 20th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 1998 / [ed] H. K. Chang, Y. T. Zhang, Hong Kong: IEEE , 1998, p. 1783-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for in-vitro size estimation of protein clots generated by brain electrodes is presented. Radiofrequency generated thermal brain lesions are widely used in functional neurosurgery and in-vitro tests are used to confirm the electrodes' ability to generate lesions. To be able to estimate the size of protein clots generated in-vitro by brain electrodes, a computer-assisted video system was set up. The size estimation is carried out by software using two captured images of the protein clot. The “true” length and width (9.5 mm) of a sphere as measured with a slide-caliper differed at the most 0.5 mm (5%) and 0.3 mm (3%) respectively, all random errors fall within 2s.d

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Optical changes as a marker for lesion size estimation during radio frequency ablation: a model study2001In: SPIE Proceedings | Volume 4254 | Guidance, Surgical-Assist and Treatment Systems / [ed] Warren S. Grundfest; David A. Benaron; Tuan Vo-Dinh, 2001, Vol. 4254, p. 164-171Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stereotactic radiofrequency (RF)-lesioning in the central part of the brain is performed on patients that, for instance, have severe movement or psychiatric disorders. The size of the generated lesion can to some extent be controlled by RF-generator settings such as temperature and time as well as the electrode configuration. Today, MR- imaging and CT are the essential diagnostic methods to confirm the lesion size in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to use changes in the reflected light intensity and laser Doppler flowmetry as a marker for size estimation during RF-lesioning.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson-Bylund, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kullberg, Gunvor
    Department of Neurosurgery, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Rehncrona, Stig
    Department of Neurosurgery, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    In vitro evaluation of brain lesioning electrodes (Leksell) using a computer-assisted video system1999In: Neurological Research, ISSN 0161-6412, E-ISSN 1743-1328, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiofrequency (RF) generated thermal brain lesions are widely used in functional neurosurgery. The size, shape and development of the lesions depends on system parameter settings and the electrode configuration. Difficulties in studying the effect of these factors in vivo stimulated us to develop an in vitro system for standardized comparison between different electrodes and physical parameters. A computer-assisted video system was set-up allowing continuous video recording of RF-generated coagulations in either a standard albumin solution or in the fresh white of a hen's egg as transparent test substrates. Ten lesions were made with each test electrode (two bipolar and three monopolar) in each of the two substrates at 70 degrees, 80 degrees and 90 degrees C (t = 60 sec). Due to the better homogeneity the lesions in the albumin solution were much more regular and reproducible. This made it possible to calculate the size (width 2.2 +/- 0.1 to 5.3 +/- 0.1 mm and length 3.0 +/- 0.1 to 8.7 +/- 0.3 mm) as well as the volume (8.5 +/- 1.4 mm3 to 133.5 +/- 26.8 mm3). It is concluded that this in vitro system offers a reproducible way to study and document the effect of different electrode configurations and RF-generator settings on the formation of a heat lesion. Even if the results are not directly applicable to the living human brain they give an estimate of the form and size of a coagulation lesion and can be of value for standardized comparisons between different electrodes.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Kullberg, G
    Rehncrona, S
    Invitro evaluation of brain lesioning electrodes (Leksell) using a computer-based video system1997In: XIIth Meeting World Society Stereotactic Functional Neurosurgery,1997, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Ola
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    A finite element model for brain electrodes and its comparison with in-vitro albumin lesions1999In: Congress of the International Society for Neurosurgical Technology and Instrument Invention ISNTII,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Blomstedt, P.
    Department of Neurosurgery University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Bergenheim, A. T.
    Department of Neurosurgery University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hariz, M. I.
    Department of Neurosurgery University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Combined electric impedance and optical diffuse reflectance measurements for navigation aid in deep brain surgery2008In: XVIII Congress of the European Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Neurokirurgiska kliniken Norrlands universitetssjukhus.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Institute of Neurology University College, London, UK.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Neurokirurgiska kliniken Norrlands universitetssjukhus.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Simultan jämförande mätning av elektrisk impedans och reflekterat ljus för guidning vid stereotakisk neurokirurgi2007In: Medicinteknikdagarna,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Johansson, Johannes D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Department of Neurosurgery, Norrland´s University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Haj-Hosseini, Neda
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Department of Neurosurgery, Norrland´s University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Combined diffuse light reflectance and electric impedance measurements for navigation aid in deep brain surgery2009In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 105-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate reflected light intensity combined with impedance for navigation aid during stereotactic neurosurgery.

    Methods: During creation of 21 trajectories for stereotactic implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes in the globus pallidus internus or subthalamus (zona incerta or subthalamic nucleus), impedance at 512 kHz and reflected light intensity at 780 nm were measured continuously and simultaneously with a radio frequency electrode containing optical fibres. The signals were compared with anatomy determined from pre- and postoperative MRI and CT. The measurements were performed within minutes and signal analysis was done post-operatively.

    Results: Reflected light intensity was low from cortex, lateral ventricle, caudate nucleus and putamen. It was intermediate from globus pallidus and thalamus while it was high from subcortical white matter, internal capsule and the subthalamus. The electric impedance was less consistent but generally low in the cortex, intermediate in subcortical white matter, the putamen, the globus pallidus and the thalamus and high in the internal capsule and the subthalamus.

    Conclusion: Reflected light intensity and electric impedance give complementary information about passed tissue and the combination seems promising for navigation aid during stereotactic neurosurgery.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Johannes D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comparison between a detailed and a simplified finite element model of radio-frequency lesioning in the brain2004In: 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, San Fransisco, USA, 2004, Vol. 4, p. 2510-2513Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A detailed and a simplified model of a lesioning electrode was made using the finite element method. 15 simulations of the lesioning procedure were performed for each model and the resulting lesion volumes were compared in order to investigate if the simplified model is adequate. The simplified model resulted in a very slight overestimation of the volume compared to the detailed model. It was thus concluded that the simplified model is adequate for simulations.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Johannes D
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Radio-frequency lesioning in brain tissue with coagulation-dependent thermal conductivity: modelling, simulation and analysis of parameter influence and interaction2006In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 44, no 9, p. 757-766Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio-frequency brain lesioning is a method for reducing e.g. symptoms of movement disorders. A small electrode is used to thermally coagulate malfunctioning tissue. Influence on lesion size from thermal and electric conductivity of the tissue, microvascular perfusion and preset electrode temperature was investigated using a finite-element model. Perfusion was modelled as an increased thermal conductivity in non-coagulated tissue. The parameters were analysed using a 24-factorial design (n = 16) and quadratic regression analysis (n = 47). Increased thermal conductivity of the tissue increased lesion volume, while increased perfusion decreased it since coagulation creates a thermally insulating layer due to the cessation of blood perfusion. These effects were strengthened with increased preset temperature. The electric conductivity had negligible effect. Simulations were found realistic compared to in vivo experimental lesions.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Johannes D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simulations of radio-frequency lesions with varying brain electrode dimensions2005In: 13th Nordic Baltic conference biomedical engineering and medical physics, Umeå, Sweden, 2005, Vol. 9, p. 62-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio-frequency (RF) lesioning in the

    brain was simulated using the finite element method

    (FEM). Heating for 60 s with temperature control in

    order to keep the tip at 80 °C was simulated. Length,

    L, (2 – 4 mm) and diameter, D, (0.5 – 2.5 mm) of the

    electrode tip were varied and the resulting lesion

    volumes were used to calculate a regression model:

    Lesion Volume = – 13.1D + 15.7LD + 13.1D2 mm3.

    The results can be useful for electrode design and

    prediction of lesion size.

  • 22.
    Johansson, Johannes D.
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Simulation of reflected light intensity changes during navigation and radio frequency lesioning in the brain2009In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, ISSN 1083-3668, E-ISSN 1560-2281, Vol. 14, no 044040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electrode with adjacent optical fibers for measurements during navigation and radio frequency lesioning in the brain was modeled for Monte Carlo simulations of light transport in brain tissue. Relative reflected light intensity at 780 nm, I780, from this electrode and probes with identical fiber configuration were simulated using the intensity from native white matter as reference. Models were made of homogeneousnative and coagulated gray, thalamus, and white matter as well as blood. Dual layermodels, including models with a layer of cerebrospinal fluid between the fibers andthe brain tissue, were also made. Simulated I780 was 0.16 for gray matter, 0.67 forcoagulate gray matter, 0.36 for thalamus, 0.39 for coagulated thalamus, unity forwhite matter, 0.70 for coagulated white matter and 0.24 for blood. Thalamic matterhas also been found to reflect more light than gray matter and less than white matterin clinical studies. In conclusion the reflected light intensity can be used todifferentiate between gray and white matter during navigation. Furthermore,coagulation of light gray tissue, such as the thalamus, might be difficult to detectusing I780, but coagulation in darker gray tissue should result in a rapid increase of I780.

  • 23.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    FEM-modell för termisk koagulering i hjärnvävnad2003In: Svenska lakaresallskapets riksstamma,2003, 2003, p. 242-242Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Simulering av ljusreflektion i hjärnan under navigation och radiofrekvensablation2008In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2008,2008, 2008, p. 70-70Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Investigation of brain RF-lesion size by finite element simulations2004In: European Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery ESSFN,2004, Wien: Springer Verlag , 2004, p. 932-932Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Johannes
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Konvektiva flöden och deras termiska inverkan vid Radiofrekvenslesionering i hjärna2006In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2006,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 27.
    Wren, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of temperature measurement for monitoring radio-frequency brain lesioning2001In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, E-ISSN 1741-0444, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During ablative neurosurgery of movement disorders, for instance therapy of Parkinson's disease, temperature monitoring is crucial. This study aims at a quantitative comparison of measurement deviations between the maximum temperature located outside the lesioning electrode and two possible thermocouple locations inside the electrode. In order to obtain the detailed temperature field necessary for the analysis, four finite element models associated with different surroundings and with different power supplies are studied. The results from the simulations show that both the power level and the power density as well as the surrounding medium affect the temperature measurement and the temperature field in general. Since the maximum temperature is located outside the electrode there will always be a deviation in time and level between the measured and the maximum temperature. The deviation is usually 2–7 s and 3–12°C, depending on, for example, the thermocouple location and surrounding medium. Therefore, not only the measured temperature but also the relation between measured and maximum temperature must be accounted for during therapy and device design.

  • 28.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Optical markers for guidance during stereotactic neurosurgery2004In: European Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery ESSFN,2004, Wien: Springer Verlag , 2004, p. 881-881Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Optical measurements during experimental stereotactic neurosurgery2004In: Medicon and Health Telematics,2004, Naples, Italy: AIIMB IFMBE , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Blomstedt, P.
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Richter, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurosurgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurosurgery UHL.
    Bergenheim, A.T.
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hariz, M.I.
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Intracerebral microvascular measurements during deep brain stimulation implantation using laser doppler perfusion monitoring2007In: Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, ISSN 1011-6125, E-ISSN 1423-0372, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 279-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate if laser Doppler perfusion monitoring (LDPM) can be used in order to differentiate between gray and white matter and to what extent microvascular perfusion can be recorded in the deep brain structures during stereotactic neurosurgery. An optical probe constructed to fit in the Leksell® Stereotactic System was used for measurements along the trajectory and in the targets (globus pallidus internus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, thalamus) during the implantation of deep brain stimulation leads (n = 22). The total backscattered light intensity (TLI) reflecting the grayness of the tissue, and the microvascular perfusion were captured at 128 sites. Heartbeat-synchronized pulsations were found at all perfusion recordings. In 6 sites the perfusion was more than 6 times higher than the closest neighbor indicating a possible small vessel structure. TLI was significantly higher (p < 0.005) and the perfusion significantly lower (p < 0.005) in positions identified as white matter in the respective MRI batch. The measurements imply that LDPM has the potential to be used as an intracerebral guidance tool.

  • 31.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Neurokirurgen Universitetssjukhuset i Umeå.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Richter, Johan
    Neurokirurgen Universitetssjukhuset i Umeå.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Institute of Neurology Queen square, London, UK.
    Intracerebral measurements during DBS-implatation using optical methods2006In: Congress of the European Society for Stereotactic and Funktional Neurosurgery,2006, New York: Springer , 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 32.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Blomstedt, Patric
    Inst. för Neurovetenskap, avd för neurokirurgi Umeå Universitetssjukhus.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Richter, Johan
    Inst. för Nervsystem och rörelseorgan, avd för Neurokirurgi Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Inst. för Nervsystem och rörelseorgan, avd för Neurokirurgi Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Inst. för Neurovetenskap, avd för neurokirurgi Umeå Universitetssjukhus samt Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK.
    Optiska mätningar under stereotaktisk neurokirurgi2006In: Medicinteknikdagarna 2006,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 33.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    A computer-based video system for in vitro evaluation of brain microelectrodes1997In: ISNII - International Society for Neurosurgical and Instrument Invention,1997, 1997Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    ECG-triggering of the laser Doppler perfusion imaging signal1998In: Int Conf of the IEEE Engineering in Medicien an Biology Society,1998, Hong Kong: IEEE , 1998, p. 1879-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Influence from the heart synchronous wave pattern on the LDPI-signal1999In: Congress of the International Society for Skin Imaging,1999, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Backlund, Erik-Olof
    Neurokir Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    In-vitro and in-vivo RF-lesions - a correlation study2001In: ISNTII Congress International Society for Neurosurgerical Technology and Instrument Invention,2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Wårdell, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fors, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Antonsson, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A laser Doppler system for intracerebral measurements during stereotactic neurosurgery2007In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2007. EMBS 2007, IEEE , 2007, p. 4083-4086Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A laser Doppler system for intracerebral measurements during stereotactic and functional neurosurgery is presented. The system comprises a laser Doppler perfusion monitor, an optical probe adapted for the Leksellreg stereotactic system and a personal computer with software for acquisition, data analysis and presentation. The software makes it possible to present both the perfusion and the total backscattered light intensity (TLI) in real-time. During intracerebral measurements, the perfusion signal records the tissue's microcirculation whereas the TLI signal may be used to distinguish between grey and white matter. Evaluation of the system has been done during stereotactic neurosurgery in relation to implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. Measurements were made along trajectories towards targets in the deep brain structure as well as in pre-calculated target areas. The measurements show that the system has a potential to be used for intracerebral guidance but further evaluation of the technique is needed.

  • 38.
    Åström, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Johansson, Johannes
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Hariz, Marwan
    Institute of Neurology London.
    Eriksson, Ola
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    The effect of cystic cavities on deep brain stimulation in the basal ganglia: A simulation-based study2006In: Journal of Neural Engineering, ISSN 1741-2560, E-ISSN 1741-2552, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) is well recognized, a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms responsible is still not known. In this study finite element method (FEM) modelling and simulation was used in order to study relative changes of the electrical field extension surrounding a monopolar DBS electrode positioned in grey matter. Due to the frequently appearing cystic cavities in the DBS-target globus pallidus internus, a nucleus of grey matter with and without a cerebrospinal fluid filled cystic cavity was modelled. The position, size and shape of the cyst were altered in relation to the electrode. The simulations demonstrated an electrical field around the active element with decreasing values in the radial direction. A stepwise change was present at the edge between grey and white matters. The cyst increased the radial extension and changed the shape of the electrical field substantially. The position, size and shape of the cyst were the main influencing factors. We suggest that cystic cavities in the DBS-target may result in closely related unexpected structures or neural fibre bundles being stimulated and could be one of the reasons for suboptimal clinical effects or stimulation-induced side effects. © 2006 IOP Publishing Ltd.

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