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  • 1.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1604-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Annsofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study2006In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2). Methods. We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post. Results. There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit. Conclusions. A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Per-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage2004In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

  • 4.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chamberlain Wilmoth, Margaret
    School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Defining and Clarifying Sexual Health: A Simultaneous Concept analysis2012In: Advances in Medicine and Biology vol 28 / [ed] Leon V. Berhardt, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 177-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The concepts of health and sexuality are complex and the discussion of how to clarify them seems to be ongoing. This continuing work is essential also according to the joined concept sexual health as it is central in national and international public health programs. Hence, the aim of this paper was to clarify the concept of sexual health by making a simultaneous concept analysis of sexuality and health.

    Methods: A qualitative content analysis defined the meanings, the major concepts and the components of the superior concepts Sexuality and Health, respectively. The data for this analysis were dictionaries, definitions, reports, guidelines, books and articles. Next, a simultaneous concept analysis (SCA) was chosen in order to answer the research questions and develop a process model of sexual health.

    Findings: The definitions of the processed concepts and the developing outcome from sexual health were: Prime mover, Interconnectedness, Interdependence, Norms, Completeness, Functional physiology, Insight, Relatedness, Adaptiveness and Contentedness. These outcomes are presented in a process model.

    Conclusions: This study adds a theoretical perspective clarifying the concept sexual health. The clarifications of this study contribute with knowledge, which can be used in practise, enabling health care professionals promoting sexual health and develop sexual health issues in further research.

  • 5.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Patients' experiences of palliative care in the home. A phenomenological study of a Swedish sample.2004In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Brobäck, G
    omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    A comprehensive picture of palliative care at home from the people involved2005In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 315-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify the comprehensive picture of palliative care in the home, as experienced by the people involved. The study is a secondary analysis of three phenomenological studies including six cancer patients, six next of kin and six district nurses. Data were collected in qualitative interviews using an interview guide. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In this secondary analysis, data were analysed by hermeneutic analysis guided by Gadamer. The guiding questions during the reading were: Is there an advantage receiving palliative care at home? Is there a disadvantage receiving palliative care at home? The findings indicate that the advantages of palliative care at home is, striving for normal life, including the care in the home composed of physical care and emotional/mental care. Striving for normal life also includes emotional feelings, safety and resources and policies which regulates this activity. Disadvantages of palliative care at home are commitment, composed of adaptation and extra work, and demands, composed of frustration and uncertainty. If the people involved are to be able to manage the situation and optimize living while dying, there must be support and resources facilitating the situation. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Appelin, G
    et al.
    Avd för omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Brobäck, Gunilla
    Avd för omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palliative care in the home from the perspective of the patient, the relatives and the nursing staff.2000In: Palliative care 2000, Jerusalem., 2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Back, Christina
    et al.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Interpretativ fenomenologisk analys2015In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes och Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 148-161Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How do children overcome difficulties talking about sexual abuseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of this study was to identify and describe the obstacles that can prevent children from talking about sexual abuse in a police interview. Data consisted of 28 investigative interviews with children and 12 police interrogations with non-offending parents. The children in these situations were between 8 and 15 years of age when they were interviewed. Data interpretation and analysis were based on content analysis. The following categories were identified: not being believed/telling the truth, need of support and dependence on adults, guilt and shame, fear, and spatial- and time-oriented.

  • 10.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parental opinions of their child's experience in the legal process: an interpretative analysis2014In: Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, ISSN 1053-8712, E-ISSN 1547-0679, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 290-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate how parents of children who are victims of sexual assault experience the legal process from the children’s and parents’ perspective. Nine parents, identified in the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden, were interviewed. The parents described feelings of shame and guilt over what their children had experienced. They felt stigmatized and had difficulty fulfilling their parental role, perceived a lack of information and support from the professionals involved, and experienced a sense of withdrawal from their role as parents, though they felt the professionals who worked with their children were helpful and influential.

  • 11.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents’ opinions – view of their child´s experiences in the legal process: An interpretative analysis of parents’ opinionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate how parents of children, who are victims of sexual assault, experience the legal process, seen from the child’s, as well as the parents’ perspective. Nine parents identified in the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden, were interviewed. The parents described feelings of shame and guilt over what their children had experienced. They felt stigmatized and had difficulty fulfilling their parental role; perceived a lack of information and support from the professionals involved; experienced a sense of withdrawal from their role as parents, even though they felt the professionals who worked with their children were helpful and influential.

  • 12.
    Back, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sexually Abused Children – Prosecutors' Experiences of their Participation in the Legal Process in Sweden2013In: Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, ISSN 1321-8719, E-ISSN 1934-1687, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 273-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to interview prosecutors, based on their experiences working with children who have been sexually abused. The informants were seven prosecutors identified from the records of three public prosecution offices in three cities in Sweden. The informants' experiences were elicited via individual in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviews were carried out and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Three themes emerged: (1) difficulties with evidence of criminal conduct, (2) children's special needs, and (3) children's dependence on adults. Informants' descriptions of how they perceived the children in the legal process were associated with their experience of the difficulty of finding proof of the crime. Informants were found to experience difficulties when they encounter children in the legal process. As prosecutors they often face difficulties proving that the child has been exposed to crime.

  • 13.
    Back, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, IngBeth
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Managing the legal proceedings: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of sexually abused children's experience with the legal process2011In: International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0145-2134, E-ISSN 1873-7757, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe how sexually abused children experience the legal process, a process that includes being questioned by the police during the preliminary investigation and by lawyers and the prosecutor in the courtroom, and meeting other professionals from various agencies.

    METHOD: Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 children-9 girls and 1 boy between 9 and 15 years old-who had experienced child sexual abuse (CSA). The interviews were semi structured and carried out and analyzed by interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). The aim of IPA is to explore the participants' views of the world and to adopt as far as possible an "insider perspective." IPA draws on a tradition of phenomenology and symbolic interactionism in attempting to understand how people make sense of their experiences.

    RESULTS: Five major themes emerged through the analysis: not being believed, making CSA visible, need for support, sanctions for offenders, and lack of respect for the child's integrity. Almost all the children had a feeling of not being believed. They described feelings ranging from anxiety to dread and even terror when they had to describe the CSA they had experienced. Even though the importance of support for such children is already well understood, the children stated that the support they were given was not sufficient. The children said that they wanted support from a single professional who was well informed about both the legal process and CSA. When the children were asked to reflect on sanctions against the abusers, they said that it was important that the perpetrator got treatment/therapy but they also said that imprisonment was desirable. Financial compensation was not as important to them; the damage had been done and money could not compensate for that damage. The children also said that both the lawyers and the media had treated them with disrespect.

    CONCLUSIONS: It is valuable for children who have been exposed to CSA to learn that they can take part in the legal process as equal partners with the other participants, and it is evident that the quality of psychological care and support needs to be improved. The children want to be participants in the legal process rather than passive objects of that process.

  • 14.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. FOU, Stockholm; Sykepleievitenskap Universitetet i Nordland, Bodö, Norge.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The myth of induction in qualitative nursing research2015In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In nursing today, it remains unclear what constitutes a good foundation for qualitative scientific inquiry. There is a tendency to define qualitative research as a form of inductive inquiry; deductive practice is seldom discussed, and when it is, this usually occurs in the context of data analysis. We will look at how the terms ‘induction’ and ‘deduction’ are used in qualitative nursing science and by qualitative research theorists, and relate these uses to the traditional definitions of these terms by Popper and other philosophers of science. We will also question the assertion that qualitative research is or should be inductive. The position we defend here is that qualitative research should use deductive methods. We also see a need to understand the difference between the creative process needed to create theory and the justification of a theory. Our position is that misunderstandings regarding the philosophy of science and the role of inductive and deductive logic and science are still harming the development of nursing theory and science. The purpose of this article is to discuss and reflect upon inductive and deductive views of science as well as inductive and deductive analyses in qualitative research. We start by describing inductive and deductive methods andlogic from a philosophy of science perspective, and we examine how the concepts of induction and deduction are often described and used in qualitative methods and nursing research. Finally, we attempt to provide a theoretical perspective that reconciles the misunderstandings regarding induction and deduction. Our conclusion is that openness towards deductive thinking and testing hypotheses is needed in qualitative nursing research. We must also realize that strict induction will not create theory; to generate theory, a creative leap is needed.

  • 15.
    Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Research and Development Unit, FOU nu, SLSO, Stockholm, Sweden / Faculty of Professional Studies, Nursing Science, Nord University, Bodö, Norway.
    Berterö, Carina M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Concept analysis and the building blocks of theory: misconceptions regarding theory development.2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 10, p. 2558-2566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The purpose of this article is to discuss the attempts to justify concepts analysis as a way to construct theory - a notion often advocated in nursing.

    BACKGROUND: The notion that concepts are the building blocks or threads from which theory is constructed is often repeated. It can be found in many articles and well-known textbooks. However, this notion is seldom explained or defended. The notion of concepts as building blocks has also been questioned by several authors. However, most of these authors seem to agree to some degree that concepts are essential components from which theory is built.

    DESIGN: Discussion paper.

    DATA SOURCES: Literature was reviewed to synthesize and debate current knowledge.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Our point is that theory is not built by concepts analysis or clarification and we will show that this notion has its basis in some serious misunderstandings. We argue that concept analysis is not a part of sound scientific method and should be abandoned.

    CONCLUSION: The current methods of concept analysis in nursing have no foundation in philosophy of science or in language philosophy. The type of concept analysis performed in nursing is not a way to 'construct' theory. Rather, theories are formed by creative endeavour to propose a solution to a scientific and/or practical problem. The bottom line is that the current style and form of concept analysis in nursing should be abandoned in favour of methods in line with modern theory of science.

  • 16.
    Bergman, E.
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    You can do it if you set your mind to it: A qualitative study of patients with coronary artery disease2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 733-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims of the study. To gain increased knowledge and understanding of what it means to be afflicted with coronary artery disease (CAD) and how it affects the life/ lifestyle of the individual. Background. Research has documented that education, counselling and behavioural interventions are important elements of cardiac rehabilitation and compliance with treatment. Compliance is generally better with medical treatment than with recommended lifestyle changes. Another influencing aspect is locus of control, i.e. people's own understanding of control is the foundation for the decisions patients make more or less consciously regarding compliance with caring/nursing, treatment and lifestyle changes. Methods. Eight individuals with diagnosed coronary artery disease were interviewed about their life situation, and the opportunities and obstacles they encountered in making lifestyle changes. These interviews were transcribed and then analysed using a hermeneutic approach. Findings. The findings included three areas: (1) The causes of coronary artery disease describing different factors, such as heredity, lifestyle and demands. (2) Difficulties in the work of rehabilitation, which was explained in terms of informants' feelings of confusion, uncertainty and sadness. (3) Successful rehabilitation consisted of two factors: the personality of the individual patient and external support. Conclusions. Patients may comply well with follow-up visits but less with lifestyle changes. By identifying different 'characteristics', 'prerequisites' and 'difficulties' that describe patients' compliance, it should be possible to make treatment more individual. Nurses have a significant role in supporting these patients since they are more accessible than physicians. Nurses also have a responsibility to work together with patients to empower them, in order to make their lifestyle changes and self-care activities manageable.

  • 17.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Hjärtmottagningen Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    'Grasp life again'. A qualitative study of the motive power in myocardial infarction patients2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in Sweden today and is responsible for approximately 30% of all deaths. The aim of this study was to obtain increased knowledge and understanding of what motive power is and how it affects the individual's rehabilitation and return to a functioning daily life. Thirteen patients, six females and seven males, who had experienced a myocardial infarction, aged between 39 and 72 years and with a minimum interval from myocardial infarction diagnosis of at least 12 months, were interviewed. Grounded theory was the method used for data collection and analysis, since the method is focusing on social processes and interaction. The analysis process identified motive power as a core category: zest for life. The participants expressed a desire and a longing to continue living. The participants' experiences of their disease as well as being discharged from hospital forced them to reorientation. Autonomy, the individual's own active decision-making, plays a significant role in this zest for life. Care for was identified as the support base for zest for life. As health-care professionals we must, at a very early stage on the ward, form an idea of what kind of patient we have in front of us. ⌐ 2003 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Internmedicin, Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Malm, Dan
    Internmedicin Ryhovs länssjukhus Jönköping, Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Internmedicin, Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Does one's sense of coherence change after an acute myocardial infarction?: A two-year longitudinal study in Sweden.2011In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in the sense of coherence of patients who had suffered their first myocardial infarction. Out of 100 patients at the start of the study, these changes were evaluated in 66 men and 18 women aged 36–70 years. Generally, the sense of coherence was found to be stable among the whole group, but there were significant individual variations in its development in some of the participants over the following years. Even the individuals with an initally high sense of coherence could experience a decrease in its level. The changes that were found in the men can be explained by their marital status, level of treatment satisfaction, disease perception/quality of life, physical limitation, and alcohol intake and/or tobacco use at the baseline. An unexpected finding was that the single men with an initially high sense of coherence experienced a decreased level over time. In order to maintain or increase patients' sense of coherence, it is important for nurses to help them identify their risk factors and to provide conditions for individualized cardiac rehabilitation in order to avoid another myocardial infarction.

  • 19.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Malm, Dan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Longitudinal study of patients after myocardial infarction: Sense of coherence, quality of life, and symptoms2009In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction has pronounced effects on an individual that demand changes in lifestyle. Health is influenced by whether the individual experiences the world as comprehensible, meaningful, and manageable, that is, has a sense of coherence (SOC). High SOC scores indicate that the individual probably manages the situation by understanding the context and connections: action and effect.

    OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to identify the SOC, assess the quality of life (Short Form-12 Health Survey Questionnaire), assess the symptoms using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and create health curves from a baseline for patients with a first myocardial infarction.

    METHODS: A longitudinal and predictive Study of 100 participants in the heart care unit of a county hospital in southern Sweden was performed.

    RESULTS: Women score lower on SOC than men. Persons with high SOC scores have fewer angina attacks, are more physically active, drink more alcohol, are more satisfied with their treatments, and have better disease perception.

    CONCLUSION: By following SOC scores, a trend emerges that Suggests it may be a useful tool for identifying those who will need extra support.

  • 20.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Malm, Dan
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ljungquist, Birgit
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Meaningfulness is not the most important component for changes in sense of coherence2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 331-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sense of coherence is a theoretical construct which is used to measure the degree to which a person finds the world comprehensible, manageable and meaningful. Aim: The main aim of the present study was to assess the hypothesis of Antonovsky that meaningfulness is the most crucial component in sense of coherence. The second aim was to explore the importance of its components and factors at baseline on sense of coherence changes and if the findings can be used in cardiac rehabilitation. Methods: One hundred patients, who suffered a primary myocardial infarction were followed during two years. The instruments used were; sense of coherence questionnaire-13, 12-item short-form health survey questionnaire, the Seattle Angina Questionnaire and Health Curve. Results: Thirty-nine percent of the participants fulfilled Antonovskys hypothesis. Comprehensibility and the baseline factors of smoking, alcohol use, marital status and disease perception proved to be of importance for sense of coherence changes over time. Conclusion: The hypothesis that meaningfulness is the most crucial component in sense of coherence is rejected for patients with primary myocardial infarction. Comprehensibility is more important than meaningfulness for changes in sense of coherence. Nurses therefore have an important task to increase comprehensibility and sense of coherence by providing information and knowledge about myocardial infarction and lifestyle changes at an early stage. The information should be given in an individualized and easily understandable way from a salutogenic perspective, which means to identify and work with factors that can contribute to preserving and promoting health.

  • 21.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    A mixed methods study of lung cancer diagnosis affecting quality of life2008In: RECIIS : electronic journal of communication information & innovation in health, ISSN 1981-6286, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 38-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Affected self-respect and self-value: Breast cancer treatments impact on the QOL2000In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 151-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Affected self-respect and self-value: The impact of breast cancer treatment on self-esteem and QoL2002In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 356-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need to understand and explain the impact of breast cancer on women's self-esteem and quality of life. The purpose of the present study was to identify and describe, from the perspective of the women's lived experiences, the impact of breast cancer on women's self-esteem and elucidate its impact on their quality of life. Thirteen women diagnosed as having breast cancer were interviewed about these phenomena. The narrated interviews, tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim were analysed and interpreted using a qualitative text analysis, based on the following question: What sense of satisfaction and importance is there with respect to the women's value and preferences? The findings were interpreted as affected self-respect and self-value, which were found to be important aspects affecting the quality of life of these women, within this lies the satisfaction of desire, to be respected and loved as the women they are. Concerns related to their quality of life seemed to be heightened when treatment has been completed, i.e. when the psychological effects of the treatment experience become a reality. Health professional need to be aware of how to recognise these women, in order to provide them with support to maintain a positive self-esteem to enhance quality of life as a caring outcome. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 24.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Affected self-respect and self-value: Breast cancer treatments impact on the QOL.2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Altered sexual patterns after treatment for prostate cancer2001In: Cancer Practice, ISSN 1065-4704, E-ISSN 1523-5394, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 245-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the impact of prostate cancer and its treatment on men's sexuality and intimate relationships from the perspective of the men's lived experience. DESCRIPTION OF STUDY: Ten men diagnosed with prostate cancer were interviewed. Verbal transcripts were analyzed using an interpretive phenomenological approach based on Heidegger's philosophy RESULTS: "Altered sexual patterns" was identified as the major theme, which in turn was influenced by five minor themes: choice of consequences, age affecting sexual life, hope of improvement, acceptance of altered sexual life, and image of manliness. Choice of consequences showed that survival is paramount, as interviews often felt that they were choosing between death or sexual dysfunction. Age affecting sexual life identified sexual dysfunction as caused by natural effects of aging. Hope of improvement showed that several men hoped for improvement in sexual function, although it had been years since their treatment Acceptance of altered sexual life illustrated that the men often felt the need to accept their altered sex life, with their wives playing an important role in this acceptance. Finally, the theme image of manliness showed the men's attempts to acknowledge and cope with the changes in their self-image. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: It is important that healthcare professionals adopt a comprehensive approach in communicating information about prostate cancer treatment choices and potential side effects that includes the patient and his partner. Communication and counselling about treatment options, potentials side effects, and potential strategies to manage side effects should be offered both of the time of diagnosis and at post-treatment follow-up.

  • 26.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Breast cancer survivals; a challenge for health care professionals - widening our perspectives on survivors´quality of life.2005In: Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 4, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Developing qualitative methods - or "same old wine in a new bottle"2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, p. 27679-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of strategies  for research projects and publication in international collaboration.2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fatigue the most common problem within people afflicted with cancer; challenge for health care professionals. Widening our perspectives on existential issues.2009In: Australian-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 8, p. 195-197Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grounded theory methodology - has it become a movement?2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, p. 18571-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the nature of grounded theory, and an examination of many studies claiming to follow grounded theory indicates a wide range of approaches. In 1967 Glaser and Strauss’s ‘‘The Discovery of Grounded Theory; Strategies for Qualitative Research’’ was published and represented a breakthrough in qualitative research; it offered methodological consensus and systematic strategies for qualitative research practice. The defining characteristics of grounded theory include: simultaneous involvement in data collection and analysis, construction of analytic codes and categories from data (not from preconceived logical hypotheses), use of the constant comparative method/analysis that involves making comparisons during all steps of the analysis, developing theory during each step of data collection and analysis, memo-writing to elaborate categories, etc., theoretical sampling aiming toward theory construction (not representativeness), and conducting a literature review after performing the analysis and developing theory. When developing a theory, identification of a core category is central for the integration of other categories into a conceptual framework or theory grounded in the data. Most grounded theories are substantive theories because they address delimited problems in specific substantive areas.

  • 31.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with leukaemia: studies on quality of life, interaction and caring1996Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukaemia is one form of cancer disease, comprising both an acute or chronic form, and has a wide range of altemative therapy aids, as well as a highly unpredictable prognosis. This thesis is a study of 27 patients with acute and chronic leukaemia.

    The general aim of the present thesis was to acquire knowledge about quality of life (QOL) from the perspective of the adult individual with leukaemia. It was also to enquire how the health care system and the nursing staff can improve this individual's experienced quality of life. Data have been collected through qualitative interviews (articles I, II and III), observations, follow-up interviews and reflective conversations(articles IV and V). The data have been analysed using constant comparative analysis (articles I, II, IV and V) and narrative qualitative text analysis (article III).

    Quality of life was found to be experienced as 'a positive attitude to life' by those adults with acute leukaemia, and autonomy and interpersonal relationships were of great importance in experiencing this. Those with chronic leukaemia experienced quality of life as 'life satisfaction'. Even here interpersonal relationships played a major role, as did self-esteem, performance ability and social ability. When explaining the differentprofiles in quality of life experienced by those adults with acute and chronic leukaemia, uncertainty was the phenomenon found. Adults with acute leukaemia experienced uncertainty concerning the prognosis, recurrence, aggravations and set-backs. Those with chronic leukaemia were uncertain about adjusting their lives, changing life-styles as well as being in doubt. Both groups described this uncertainty as not feeling secure, not being in control and being undecided.

    Transition, i.e. the individual passing from one phase to another, was the core category found when studying the interaction between adults with leukaemia and their nursing staff. This transition could be described in three stages. First, being a person and trying to maintain a social status. Second, becoming a patient, accepting the disease and feeling insecure in this totally new situation. Finally, the patient becomes a leukaemia patient, isolating her/himself and becoming aware of the disease and its side-effects.

    In the study about the care supplied by the nursing staff and demanded by the leukaemia patients, the findings produced two core categories; routines and interaction. The care supplied was identified as routines, which could be seen as regular courses of procedures and a way of bringing order into daily life. Routines could also be a distancing manoeuvres to manage stress when working with seriously ill people. The care demanded by these leukaemia patients was human interaction. The leukaemia patient wants to be treated as a human being, with mutual respect, concern etc. The patients want to participate and interact while still maintaining their self-respect and individual integrity.

    This thesis points out that the QOL of those adults with leukaemia could be improved by the health care system and the nursing staff through caring for them as fellow beings, with respect and giving them autonomy and self-control. If the nurses and nursing staff are to be able to care for leukaemia/cancer patients, they have to care for themselves. If they become more aware of their own feelings and reactionS, they will also become more attentive to the patients' experiences and needs.

  • 32.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Living with Social Anguish: Shame and Guilt in Lung Cancer Patients2008In: Open area studies journal, ISSN 1874-9143, Vol. 1, p. 26-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Living with social anguish: shame and guilt in lung cancer patients.2008In: The 15th International Conference on Cancer Nursing, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Men Experiencing Life Changes After Prostate Cancer Treatment.2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Palliative care: A Scandinavian perspective.2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reflection in and on nursing practices - how nurses reflect and develop knowledge and skills during their nursing practice.2010In: International Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 1792-037X, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reflection in nursing practices - how nurses reflect and develop knowledge and skills during their nursing practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Self as female?: Women´s experiences following treatment for breast cancer or uterus cancer2005In: Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 4, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Socialt stöd och självkänsla hos patienter med en behandlad cancersjukdom.2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strategies for definition of research priorities in nursing on woman's and child's health - The Scandinavian experience2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The advisor's role in research projects development and interstutitional cooperation.2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The contribution of nursing research for the woman's and child's health: the reality of Sweden.2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    What do women think about menopause? A qualitative study of women's expectations, apprehensions and knowledge about the climacteric period2003In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify and describe expectations, apprehensions and knowledge about the menopausal period and climacteric symptoms. Method: Data were collected by semi-structured interviews/discussions with a convenience sample of 39 women, all 47 years of age. Data interpretation and analysis were based on content analysis, but influenced by a qualitative approach. Findings: These included women's expectations and feelings of freedom. Apprehensions were described as different climacteric symptoms, which were well known to the women through their own or other's experiences. The women were, to some extent, aware of the physical and psychological changes that follow the menopause. However, the women lacked knowledge about these changes or self-care activities that could prevent problems or mitigate symptoms. Key conclusions and implications for practice: Discussions on health with premenopausal women can increase their knowledge about a natural phase of life, the climacteric period. The study showed that nurses/midwives who have regular contact with some women during their life have an important role to play in providing information, as well as in the treatment of climacteric symptoms.

  • 44.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Young women with breast cancer-using the healing tool: writing blogs2017In: Nursing & Palliative Care, ISSN 2397-9623, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This qualitative study aims to interpret and describe how young women diagnosed with a breast cancer uses blogs to manage daily life.

    Methods: 14 blogs written by women diagnosed with breast cancer aged between 25 and 38 years. These blogs were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis.

    Results: Four themes were identified in the data body illustrating what the women were writing about in their blogs: Experiencing frustration, The fear is bigger than death, Preparing for physical changes, Body and mind are in disharmony. These four themes ended up in a concluding theme: The healing effect of writing a blog.

    Conclusion: The young women used writing blogs as a healing activity. The writing was a channel for emotions and thoughts, but was also a way of sharing experiences and supporting each other. Their narratives revealed the impact of breast cancer experiences on their personal, familial and social lives. Reading blogs is an activity that could allow healthcare professionals to better understand these women’s life situation and needs.

    Implications for practice: Blogs could become a useful tool for healthcare professionals, relatives, patients and the people around them. By reading blogs, not necessarily commenting on or writing them, there will be a better and deeper understanding about the effects of a cancer diagnosis. Using blogs could facilitate the provision of requested and needed health care activities.

  • 45.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson-Svärd, S
    n/a.
    Att som kvinna leva med stomi; dess inverkan på livssituationen2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a one-year follow up: An interview study2010In: Journal of Vascular Nursing, ISSN 1062-0303, E-ISSN 1532-6578, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 97-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and the finding of an enlarged aorta cause worries and affect the living situations of men with aneurysms or of their families within a 12-month follow-up period. Men invited to ultrasound screening and having an enlarged aorta (>/=30 mm) were invited for an interview. In total, 10 men were interviewed. The semi-structured interview was conducted by using an interview guide. Data was analyzed by using an interpretative phenomenological method. Three themes were identified: (i) feeling secure being under superintendence; (ii) living as usual, but repressing thoughts; and (iii) feeling disillusionment due to negative outcome. Being given the message that an enlarged aorta was discovered at the screening was manageable; hence, continuing growth of the aorta led to some unpleasant feelings. The men were living as usual; however, they all had some reflections about having an AAA and that something could happen when they least expected it. They reported thoughts about the consequences of the enlarged aorta itself and the surgery. In a one-year retrospective interview, men who have had an aneurysm detected in a screening program for AAA reported feeling secure being under superintendence. The one finding in our study concerning worries and effects on life situation could be interpreted as disillusionment due to negative outcomes. Decisions to introduce screening for AAA in Sweden and other countries with ongoing programs should be considered to include guidelines for how to handle disillusionment.

  • 47.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundgren, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    The Lived Experience of 65-year-old Men Being Screened for Abdominal Aortic aneurysm; a Short-Term Perspective2009In: PRO-Newsletter, no 41, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to investigate whether screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm and the finding of an enlarged aorta in those men causes worries and affects the life-situation. Men at the age of 65 years were invited to ultrasound screening and they who had an enlarged aorta (≥30 mm), were invited for a qualitative interview analyzed by interpretive phenomenological method. Totally 11 men were interviewed. Three themes were identified: be under superintendence; affected, but live as usual; and hereditariness leading to fatalism. Although not unaffected by the screening result the men carry on with their life as usual. However, the need for a long term study to confirm the results is now in accomplishment.

  • 48.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Chamberlain, Wilmoth M.
    Chamberlain Wilmoth, M., School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, UNC Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, United States.
    Breast cancer diagnosis and its treatment affecting the self: A meta-synthesis2007In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 194-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a great deal of qualitative research conducted that has examined the impact of breast cancer on the Self, however, there has been little effort to analyze these findings from a meta-perspective. This study sought to fill this gap by conducting a meta-synthesis of the qualitative research on breast cancer and its treatments affecting the Self. Meta-method and meta-synthesis techniques were used to integrate findings across 30 qualitative research reports conducted between 1990 and 2003 with a total of 795 women, from several different countries.The fusions identified from this meta-synthesis revealed 4 aspects of the Self affected by the diagnosis of breast cancer and its treatment: awareness of their own mortality, living with an uncertain certainty, attachment validation, and redefinition of Self. These findings were validated through use of a comparison study. The women adapt to being a breast cancer patient, redefining their lives and their self. This study highlights the existential process that women of many cultures move through as they incorporate the meaning of breast cancer into their lives. Nurses who are aware of these processes are better able to link women with resources to help them in their adaptation to living with breast cancer. © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 49.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    The double-edged experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis: a qualitative study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe the experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis.

    Background

    Endometriosis is a “hidden” chronic gynaecological disease appearing in every 10th woman of fertile age. Different manifestations of pain are the main symptoms, often leading to impaired physical and mental health, and lower quality of life. Previous research on healthcare experiences among women with endometriosis has focused on diagnostic delay and experiences of encountering general practitioners.

    Design

    A qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological approach was used.

    Methods

    We interviewed nine women aged 23–55, with a laparoscopy-confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed following the steps of the interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Results

    Two themes were identified in the interview transcripts: being treated with ignorance and being acknowledged. The essence: “the double-edged experience of healthcare encounters” emerged from the themes. The women's experience was double-edged as it involved contradictory feelings: the encounters were experienced as both destructive or constructive. On the one hand, the destructive side was characterised by ignorance, exposure and disbelief. On the other hand, the constructive side made the women feel acknowledged and confirmed, boosting their self-esteem.

    Conclusions

    The new and important aspects of the findings are that the experience of healthcare encounters is for the first time expressed as double-edged: both destructive and constructive. The experience was of specific importance as it affected the women's perceptions of themselves and of their bodies.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The information about the constructive side of the experience is of clinical valuable for all healthcare professionals (nurses, midwives and doctors) encountering these women, as it provides a new level of understanding of the experiences. The findings demonstrate both psychological and practical aspects that can help professionals to improve the encounters.

  • 50.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Institutionen för hälso och vårdvetenskap, Linnéuniversitetet Växjö, Växjö, Sverige.
    Social support as described by foreign-born persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and living in Sweden.2010In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe the meaning of support and its impact on the life situation of foreign-born persons diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and living in Sweden in relation to gender, age, and the duration of the disease. Mixed methods were used on a purposive sample of 34 foreign-born adults who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interviews and quantitative data were collected by the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ). The meaning of “support” was described by the participants as medical support, information support, and aiding support to learn to manage diabetes. Support influenced the participants' entire life and their need for it was related to the severity of the diabetes and differences regarding age and gender. The participants scored low on the NSSQ regarding total emotional support, total aid, and total function and 42% had lost an important relationship during the last year. Their marital status had no impact on emotional support but aid was significant. Medical support, with regular follow-up and information, is important in obtaining affirmation and aids in learning to manage diabetes mellitus.

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