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  • 1.
    Alstrand, N
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hyllienmark, L
    Karolinska Institute.
    Wahlberg, J
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptomatic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes is preceded by subclinical electrophysiological abnormalities - a prospective study in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 53, issue , pp2010In: DIABETOLOGIA, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Andersson, C
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Vaziri-Sani, F
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Delli, A J.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lindblad, B
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital, Sweden .
    Carlsson, A
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Forsander, G
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ivarsson, S A.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lernmark, A
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Elding Larsson, H
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Triple specificity of ZnT8 autoantibodies in relation to HLA and other islet autoantibodies in childhood and adolescent type 1 diabetes2013In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Andersson C, Vaziri-Sani F, Delli AJ, Lindblad B, Carlsson A, Forsander G, Ludvigsson J, Marcus C, Samuelsson U, Ivarsson SA, Lernmark A, Elding Larsson H, the BDD Study group. Triple specificity of ZnT8 autoantibodies in relation to HLA and other islet autoantibodies in childhood and adolescent type 1 diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes 2013: 14: 97-105. Objective To establish the diagnostic sensitivity of and the relationships between autoantibodies to all three Zinc transporter 8 (Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody to either one, two, or all three amino acid variants at position 325, ZnT8A) variants to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ and to autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA-2A), and insulin (IAA). Methods We analyzed 3165 patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Better Diabetes Diagnosis study for HLA-DQ genotypes and all six autoantibodies (ZnT8RA, arginine 325 Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody; ZnT8WA, tryptophan 325 Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody; ZnT8QA, glutamine 325 Zinc transporter 8 autoantibody; GADA, IA-2A, and IAA). Results ZnT8A was found in 65% of the patients and as many as 108 of 3165 (3.4%) had 13 ZnT8A alone. None had ZnT8QA alone. Together with GADA (56%), IA-2A (73%), and IAA (33%), 93% of the T1D patients were autoantibody positive. All three ZnT8A were less frequent in children below 2 yr of age (pandlt;0.0001). All three ZnT8A were associated with DQA1-B1*X-0604 (DQ6.4) and DQA1-B1*03-0302 (DQ8). ZnT8WA and ZnT8QA were negatively associated with DQA1-B1*05-02 (DQ2). Conclusions Analysis of ZnT8A increased the diagnostic sensitivity of islet autoantibodies for T1D as only 7% remained islet autoantibody negative. The association between DQ6.4 and all three ZnT8A may be related to ZnT8 antigen presentation by the DQ6.4 heterodimer.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Kolmodin, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Sten-Anders
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Department of Pediatrics, Lund University, Sweden.
    Forsander, Gun
    Department of Pediatrics, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindblad, Bengt
    Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marcus, Claude
    Division of Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Elding Larsson, Helena
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Törn, Carina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Islet cell antibodies (ICA) identify autoimmunity in children with new onset diabetes mellitus negative for other islet cell antibodies2014In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 336-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to explore whether islet cell antibodies (ICA) could be identified in children with newly onset diabetes mellitus but negative for autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), islet antigen-2 (IA-2A), insulin (IAA), or any of the three variants with arginine (R), tryptophan (W), or glutamine (Q) at position 325 of the zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8A).

    METHODS: A population-based analysis of autoantibodies was performed from 1 May 2005 to 2 September 2010 in Swedish children newly diagnosed with diabetes. ICA was analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and if positive, reanalyzed in the classical ICA immunofluorescence assay, in 341 samples among 3545 children who had been tested negative for all of GADA, IA-2A, IAA, or ZnT8A (R, W, Q).

    RESULTS: An isolated positivity for ICA was identified in 5.0% (17/341) of the newly diagnosed children. The levels of ICA in positive subjects ranged from 3 to 183 JDF-U (median 30). This finding increased the diagnostic sensitivity of islet autoimmunity as 3204/3545 patients (90.4%) were islet autoantibody positive without the ICA analyses and 3221 patients (90.9%) were positive with the inclusion of ICA.

    CONCLUSIONS: The finding of an isolated positivity for ICA despite negativity for GADA, IA-2A, IAA, and ZnT8A (R, W, Q) suggests that still another yet unidentified autoantigen(s) may contribute to the ICA immunofluorescence. Hence, ICA is important to analyze in type 1 diabetes children and adolescents that would otherwise be islet autoantibody negative.

  • 4.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Domeij, Erica
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    A follow-up of medical graduates of a problem-based learning curriculum2003In: Medical Education, ISSN 0308-0110, E-ISSN 1365-2923, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 155-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: There is little information available on the effects of problem-based undergraduate curricula on doctors and their performances after graduation. Therefore, we conducted a questionnaire study of all graduates of the new medical programme at the Faculty of Health Sciences, Link÷ping University. Methods: All 446 medical students who had graduated from the new programme were asked to fill in a questionnaire about selected activities during their studies and their careers after graduation. They were also asked to evaluate the quality of their undergraduate education retrospectively. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive, multivariate and bivariate approaches. Results: A total of 77% of the graduates responded. They showed a high degree of overall contentment with their undergraduate education and felt well prepared for professional life during their preregistration period and specialist education (mean = 4.0 on a 6-point Likert scale ranging from 0 to 5). They felt especially well prepared in terms of skills for communication with patients, collaboration with other health professionals and development of critical thinking/scientific attitudes. The students' age at the beginning of their studies correlated positively with their contentment as graduates, especially in terms of preparation for patient communication and collaboration with other health professionals. No differences between students originally admitted via a local admission procedure and those admitted via a national procedure were detected concerning retrospective evaluation of undergraduate medical education. Conclusion: Graduates of the new curriculum showed a high degree of satisfaction with their undergraduate education and its preparation of them for medical practice. Specifically, they were very content with the particular emphases of the new curriculum.

  • 5.
    Asad, Samina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nikamo, Pernilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gyllenberg, Alexandra
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Bennet, Hedvig
    Lund University, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Hansson, Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Wierup, Nils
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Carlsson, Annelie
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Forsander, Gun
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, Sten-Anders
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Larsson, Helena
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lernmark, Ake
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lindblad, Bengt
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ronningen, Kjersti S.
    University of Oslo, Norway .
    Nerup, Jan
    Steno Diabet Centre, Denmark .
    Pociot, Flemming
    Lund University, Sweden University Hospital Glostrup, Denmark .
    Luthman, Holger
    Lund University, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Fex, Malin
    Lund University, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    HTR1A a Novel Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Gene on Chromosome 5p13-q132012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have previously performed a genome-wide linkage study in Scandinavian Type 1 diabetes (T1D) families. In the Swedish families, we detected suggestive linkage (LOD less than= 2.2) to the chromosome 5p13-q13 region. The aim of our study was to investigate the linked region in search for possible T1D susceptibility genes. Methodology/Principal Findings: Microsatellites were genotyped in the Scandinavian families to fine-map the previously linked region. Further, SNPs were genotyped in Swedish and Danish families as well as Swedish sporadic cases. In the Swedish families we detected genome-wide significant linkage to the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (HTR1A) gene (LOD 3.98, pless than9.8x10(-6)). Markers tagging two separate genes; the ring finger protein 180 (RNF180) and HTR1A showed association to T1D in the Swedish and Danish families (pless than0.002, pless than0.001 respectively). The association was not confirmed in sporadic cases. Conditional analysis indicates that the primary association was to HTR1A. Quantitative PCR show that transcripts of both HTR1A and RNF180 are present in human islets of Langerhans. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the presence of the 5-HTR1A protein in isolated human islets of Langerhans as well as in sections of human pancreas. Conclusions: We have identified and confirmed the association of both HTR1A and RFN180, two genes in high linkage disequilibrium (LD) to T1D in two separate family materials. As both HTR1A and RFN180 were expressed at the mRNA level and HTR1A as protein in human islets of Langerhans, we suggest that HTR1A may affect T1D susceptibility by modulating the initial autoimmune attack or either islet regeneration, insulin release, or both.

  • 6.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cheramy, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cellular and Humoral Immune responses in Type 1 Diabetic patients participating in a Phase III GAD-alum Intervention Trial2013In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 3418-3424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVEGAD formulated in aluminum hydroxide (GAD-alum) has previously been shown to induce preservation of residual insulin secretion in recent-onset type 1 diabetes, but recent phase II and III GAD-alum trials failed to reach primary outcomes. The European phase III study was therefore closed after 15 months, and only a minority of patients completed the 30 months of follow-up.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSThis study aimed to characterize cellular and humoral responses in the Swedish patients (n = 148) participating in the phase III trial, receiving four (4D) or two (2D) GAD-alum doses or placebo. Serum GAD(65) antibody (GADA) levels, GADA IgG1-4 subclass distribution, cytokine secretion, and proliferative responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were analyzed.RESULTSThe GAD(65)-induced cytokine profile tended to switch toward a predominant Th2-associated profile over time both in the 2D and 4D group. The groups also displayed increased GADA levels and PBMC proliferation compared with placebo, whereas GADA IgG subclass distribution changed in 4D patients.CONCLUSIONSBoth 2D and 4D patients displayed GAD(65)-specifc cellular and humoral effects after GAD-alum treatment, but at different time points and magnitudes. No specific immune markers could be associated with treatment efficacy.

  • 7.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Martinuzzi, Emanuela
    St Vincent de Paul Hospital.
    Mallone, Roberto
    St Vincent de Paul Hospital.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Long-Lasting Immune Responses 4 Years after GAD-Alum Treatment in Children with Type 1 Diabetes2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A phase II clinical trial with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 formulated with aluminium hydroxide (GAD-alum) has shown efficacy in preserving residual insulin secretion in children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have performed a 4-year follow-up study of 59 of the original 70 patients to investigate long-term cellular and humoral immune responses after GAD-alum-treatment. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65). Frequencies of naive, central and effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were measured, together with cytokine secretion, proliferation, gene expression and serum GAD(65) autoantibody (GADA) levels. We here show that GAD-alum-treated patients display increased memory T-cell frequencies and prompt T-cell activation upon in vitro stimulation with GAD(65), but not with control antigens, compared with placebo subjects. GAD(65)-induced T-cell activation was accompanied by secretion of T helper (Th) 1, Th2 and T regulatory cytokines and by induction of T-cell inhibitory pathways. Moreover, post-treatment serum GADA titres remained persistently increased in the GAD-alum arm, but did not inhibit GAD(65) enzymatic activity. In conclusion, memory T- and B-cell responses persist 4 years after GAD-alum-treatment. In parallel to a GAD(65)-induced T-cell activation, our results show induction of T-cell inhibitory pathways important for regulating the GAD(65) immunity.

  • 8.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Preserved C-peptide 30 months after GAD-alum treatment of children and adolescents with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, and its relation to immune markersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa isoform (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although alum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) induced preservation of residual insulin secretion in a previous clinical Phase II trial, recent Phase II and Phase III trials failed to reach their primary end-points. The European Phase III trial was therefore closed after 15 months, and the 30 months follow-up period was completed only for a minority of the patients. This study aimed to assess whether GAD-alum preserved β-cell function in those recent-onset T1D patients who completed their 30 months visit in the European Phase III trial, and to characterize their GAD65-induced cytokine secretion and proliferation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated at baseline and after 1, 3, 9, 15 and 21 months from the 148 Swedish subjects included in the Phase III GAD-alum trial, and also at 30 months from 45 patients who had reached the final visit before the trial was closed. Patients had been randomly assigned into three arms: 4 doses of GAD-alum (4D), 2 doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo (2D), or 4 doses of placebo. Cytokine secretion was detected in cell culture supernatants by Luminex, after 7 days of in vitro culture. Cell proliferation was determined by 3H thymidine incorporation assay. Fasting and stimulated C-peptide was analysed in serum.

    Patients treated with 2 doses of GAD-alum had less decline of both fasting (p=0.040) and stimulated C-peptide (p=0.012) after 30 months, and a larger proportion of these patients preserved >25% of their initial stimulated C-peptide AUC compared to placebo (p=0.012). Both 2D and 4D patients showed increased PBMC proliferation to GAD65 and a cytokine profile that tended to switch towards a more predominant Th2 associated profile over time.

    The results support the concept of GAD-alum treatment, but no specific immune markers have been identified.

  • 9.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Faresjö, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Hedman, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells are suitable for the assessment of immunological markers in type 1 diabetic children2008In: Cryobiology, ISSN 0011-2240, E-ISSN 1090-2392, Vol. 57, no 3, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are commonly used when assessing immune responses in clinical trials, both for practical reasons and to minimize interassay variation, as samples are often collected and studied over time. This study investigated the effect of cryopreservation on cytokine and chemokine secretion, and on expression of regulatory T-cell associated markers, in samples from children with type 1 diabetes. PBMC were cultured before and after cryopreservation either with GAD(65) or PHA. Secretion of cytokines (IL-5, -6, -10, -12, -13 -17, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha) and chemokines (IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1 alpha, MIP-1 beta and RANTES) was analysed in cell supernatants using multiplex fluorochrome technique (Luminex). Expression of FOXP3 and TGF-beta mRNA was detected by multiplex real-time RT-PCR. Increased spontaneous secretion of IL-6, -10, -12, -13, IFN-gamma and MCP-1, and mRNA expression of FOXP3 and TGF-beta, was detected after cryopreservation. Stimulation with GAD65 induced higher levels of IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, whereas lower secretion was found for IL-10 and IL-13 in cryopreserved PBMC. Stimulation with PHA induced lower secretion of IP-10, MCPA and RANTES and FOXP3 mRNA expression after cryopreservation. Thus, cryopreserved PBMC were suitable to assess the immunological markers included in this study, even though their expression could differ from freshly handled cells.

  • 10.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Akerman, L
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Treatment with alum-formulated GAD65 in type 1 diabetic children results in early induction of Th2 responses2009In: in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 52, 2009, Vol. 52, p. S193-S193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 11.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Decreased GAD(65) -specific Th1/Tc1 phenotype in children with Type 1 diabetes treated with GAD-alum.2012In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1272-1278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  The balance between T helper cell subsets is an important regulator of the immune system and is often examined after immune therapies. We aimed to study the immunomodulatory effect of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 formulated with aluminium hydroxide (GAD-alum) in children with Type 1 diabetes, focusing on chemokines and their receptors. Methods  Blood samples were collected from 70 children with Type 1 diabetes included in a phase II clinical trial with GAD-alum. Expression of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and CCR4 was analysed on CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes after in vitro stimulation with GAD(65) using flow cytometry, and secretion of the chemokines CCL2, CCL3 and CCL4 was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cell supernatants with Luminex. Results  Expression of Th1-associated CCR5 was down-regulated following antigen challenge, together with an increased CCR4/CCR5 ratio and CCL2 secretion in GAD-alum-treated patients, but not in the placebo group. Conclusion  Our results suggest that GAD-alum treatment has induced a favourable immune modulation associated with decreased Th1/Tc1 phenotypes upon antigen re-challenge, which may be of importance for regulating GAD(65) immunity. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  • 12.
    Axelsson, Stina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Early induction of GAD(65)-reactive Th2 response in type 1 diabetic children treated with alum-formulated GAD(65)2010In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 559-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g alum-formulated glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD(65)) (GAD-alum; Diamyd (R)) in children with recent-onset type 1 diabetes lead to preservation of residual insulin secretion. In vitro cytokine production at the 15 months follow-up indicated immunomodulation. In the present study, we took advantage of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, cryopreserved during early follow-ups, to investigate whether the immunomodulatory effect of GAD-alum was apparent earlier after treatment, preceding the changes previously reported at 15 months.<p>Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 70 type 1 diabetic children, randomly assigned GAD-alum (n = 35) or placebo (n = 35), that had been frozen at baseline (n = 27) and after 1 (n = 58), 3 (n = 67) and 9 (n = 66) months, were stimulated in vitro with GAD(65), tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 peptide, insulin peptide, GAD-alum, alum formulation or phytohaemagglutinin. Interleukin (IL)-5, -6, -10, -12, -13, -17, tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma were measured in cell supernatants and serum samples using Luminex. Expression of FOXP3 and transforming growth factor-beta was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.</p><p>Results Already 1 month after the first injection, GAD(65)-induced IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 were enhanced in GAD-alum-treated patients compared to those with placebo. The in vitro response at 3 and 9 months was characterized by a broader range of cytokines in the treated group. Notably, only the T-helper 2-associated cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 together with FOXP3 increased continuously over time.</p><p>Conclusions Treatment with GAD-alum in type 1 diabetic children induced an early T-helper 2 immune enhanced response to GAD(65), followed by a wider spectrum of cytokines at 3 and 9 months. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley &amp; Sons, Ltd.</p>

  • 13.
    Barker, A.
    et al.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Lauria, A.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy .
    Schloot, N.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Hosszufalusi, N.
    Semmelweis University, Hungary .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mathieu, C.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Mauricio, D.
    Hospital Arnau Vilanova, Spain .
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Van der Schueren, B.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium .
    Mandrup-Poulsen, T.
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Scherbaum, W .A.
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Weets, I.
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Belgian Diabet Registry BDR, Belgium .
    Gorus, F. K.
    Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Vrije University of Brussel, Belgium Belgian Diabet Registry BDR, Belgium .
    Wareham, N.
    Cambridge Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Leslie, R. D.
    Queen Mary University of London, England .
    Pozzilli, P.
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy Queen Mary University of London, England .
    Age-dependent decline of beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes after diagnosis: a multi-centre longitudinal study2014In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 262-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsC-peptide secretion is currently the only available clinical biomarker to measure residual -cell function in type 1 diabetes. However, the natural history of C-peptide decline after diagnosis can vary considerably dependent upon several variables. We investigated the shape of C-peptide decline over time from type 1 diabetes onset in relation to age at diagnosis, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and insulin dose. MethodsWe analysed data from 3929 type 1 diabetes patients recruited from seven European centres representing all age groups at disease onset (childhood, adolescence and adulthood). The influence of the age at onset on -cell function was investigated in a longitudinal analysis at diagnosis and up to 5-years follow-up. ResultsFasting C-peptide (FCP) data at diagnosis were available in 3668 patients stratified according to age at diagnosis in four groups (less than5years, n=344; greater than5yearsless than10years, n=668; greater than10yearsless than18years, n=991; greater than18years, n=1655). FCP levels were positively correlated with age (pless than0.001); the subsequent decline in FCP over time was log-linear with a greater decline rate in younger age groups (pless than0.0001). ConclusionsThis study reveals a positive correlation between age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and FCP with a more rapid decline of -cell function in the very young patients. These data can inform the design of clinical trials using C-peptide values as an end-point for the effect of a given treatment.

  • 14.
    Berzina, L.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Saduaskaite-Kühne, Vaiva
    Laboratory of Pediatric Endocrinology, Kaunas University of Medicine, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Shtauvere-Brameus, A.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sanjeevi, C. B.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    DR3 is associated with type 1 diabetes and blood group ABO incompatibility2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 958, p. 345-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 diabetes is associated with autoimmunity against pancreatic β cells. ABO incompatibility is associated with ABO immunization during pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with certain HLA DR and DQ haplotypes. The mechanism by which blood group incompatibility is associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes is not known. We propose that certain HLA alleles contribute to the development of both type 1 diabetes and ABO blood group incompatibility. We studied 57 children with ABO blood group incompatibility, 118 children with type 1 diabetes, and 98 age- and sex-matched unrelated healthy controls from Linköping. Typing of HLA DQA1, DQB1, and DRB1 was done on DNA extracted from peripheral blood, by PCR amplification, manual dot-blotting onto nylon membranes, synthetic sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probe 3′ end-labeling with 32P-dCTP, and hybridization followed by stringency washes and autoradiography. We observed that DR3 allele was more frequent in patients with ABO incompatibility when compared to healthy controls (OR = 2.7, Pc < 0.05). Patients with type 1 diabetes had significantly higher frequency of DR3, DQ2, DR4, and DQ8 alleles when compared to healthy controls. No significant difference was observed in frequency of DR3 between ABO blood group incompatibility and type 1 diabetes patients. We conclude that DR3 is associated with both the development of type 1 diabetes and ABO incompatibility.

  • 15. Berzina, L
    et al.
    Shtauvere-Brameus, S
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Sanjeevi, CB
    Newborn screening for high-risk human leukocyte antigen markers associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: The ABIS study2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 958, p. 312-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus is associated with specific high-risk HLA DQ and DR haplotypes and islet cell antibodies. IDDM susceptibility in Caucasians is more strongly associated with DQ2/DQ8 (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201/DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302) and DQ6 (B1*0604) than with DRB1*03/DRB1*04, while a single copy of DQ6 (B1*0602) gives sufficient protection against type 1 diabetes. As a part of the ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden) study we have done typing of DQA1, DQB1, and DRB1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the second exon of the genes, manually dot-blotting onto nylon membranes synthetic sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes, 3' end-labeling with 32P-dCTP, and hybridization followed by stringency washes and autoradiography using the SSO probe. Among 3756 newborns born in southeast Sweden we have found the high-risk genotype DQ2/DR3-DO8/DR4 to be present in 1%, haplotype DQ8/DR4 in 7.8%, and haplotype DQ2/DR3 in 9.6%. DQ2/DR3 or DQ8/DR4 was carried by 16.4% of newborns, the low-risk DQ6 molecule was carried by newborns as follows: DQ2/DR3-DQ6/DR15, 1.3%, DQ8/DR4-DQ6/DR15, 1.3%, and DQ6/DR15, 9.4%. We conclude from our results that the high incidence of IDDM in Sweden is at least in part due to increased prevalence of high-risk HLA haplotypes compared to protective haplotypes (20% vs. 13%) in the general population.

  • 16.
    Besser, Rachel E J
    et al.
    University of Exeter.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jones, Angus G
    University of Exeter.
    McDonald, Timothy J
    University of Exeter.
    Shields, Beverley M
    University of Exeter.
    Knight, Bridget A
    University of Exeter.
    Hattersley, Andrew T
    University of Exeter.
    Urine C-Peptide Creatinine Ratio Is a Noninvasive Alternative to the Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test in Children and Adults With Type 1 Diabetes2011In: DIABETES CARE, ISSN 0149-5992, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 607-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-Stimulated serum C-peptide (sCP) during a mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) is the gold standard measure of endogenous insulin secretion, but practical issues limit its use. We assessed urine C-peptide creatinine ratio (UCPCR) as an alternative. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Seventy-two type 1 diabetic patients (age of diagnosis median 14 years [interquartile range 10-22]; diabetes duration 6.5[2.3-32.7]) had an MMTT. sCP was collected at 90 min. Urine for UCPCR was collected at 120 min and following a home evening meal. RESULTS-MMTT 120-min UCPCR was highly correlated to 90-min sCP (r = 0.97; P andlt; 0.0001). UCPCR andgt;= 0.53 nmol/mmol had 94% sensitivity/100% specificity for significant endogenous insulin secretion (90-min sCP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L). The 120-min postprandial evening meal UCPCR was highly correlated to 90-min sCP (r = 0.91; P andlt; 0.0001). UCPCR andgt;= 0.37 nmol/mmol had 84% sensitivity/97% specificity for sCP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L. CONCLUSIONS-UCPCR testing is a sensitive and specific method for detecting insulin secretion. UCPCR may be a practical alternative to serum C-peptide testing, avoiding the need for inpatient investigation.

  • 17.
    Besser, Rachel E J
    et al.
    University of Exeter, England .
    Shields, Beverley M
    University of Exeter, England .
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hattersley, Andrew T.
    University of Exeter, England .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Lessons From the Mixed-Meal Tolerance Test Use of 90-minute and fasting C-peptide in pediatric diabetes2013In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 195-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-Mixed-meal tolerance test (MMTT) area under the curve C-peptide (AUC CP) is the gold-standard measure of endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetes but is intensive and invasive to perform. The 90-minMMTT-stimulated CP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L (90CP) is related to improved clinical outcomes, and CP andgt;= 0.1 nmol/L is the equivalent fasting measure (FCP). We assessed whether 90CP or FCP are alternatives to a full MMTT. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-CP was measured during 1,334 MMTTs in 421 type 1 diabetes patients aged, 18 years at 3, 9, 18, 48, and 72 months duration. We assessed: 1) correlation between mean AUC CP and 90CP or FCP; 2) sensitivity and specificity of 90CP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L and FCP andgt;= 0.1 nmol/L to detect peak CP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L and the equivalent AUC CP; and 3) how the time taken to reach the CP peak varied with age of diagnosis and diabetes duration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS-AUC CP was highly correlated to 90CP (r(s) = 0.96; P andlt; 0.0001) and strongly correlated to FCP (r(s) = 0.84; P andlt; 0.0001). AUC CP andgt;= 23 nmol/L/150 min was the equivalent cutoff for peak CP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L (98% sensitivity/97% specificity). A 90CP andgt;= 0.2 nmol/L correctly classified 96% patients using AUC or peak CP, whereas FCP andgt;= 0.1 nmol/L classified 83 and 85% patients, respectively. There was only a small difference seen between peak and 90CP (median 0.02 nmol/L). The CP peak occurred earlier in patients with longer diabetes duration (6.1 min each 1-year increase in duration) and younger age (2.5 min each 1-year increase). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS-90CP is a highly sensitive and specific measure of AUC and peak CP in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and offers a practical alternative to a full MMTT. Diabetes Care 36:195-201, 2013

  • 18. Bojestig, M
    et al.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Karlberg, Bengt E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: endomed.
    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is suppressed in adults with Type 1 diabetes2000In: jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, ISSN 1470-3203, E-ISSN 1752-8976, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 353-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor glycaemic control and high blood pressure are two important risk factors for the development of retinopathy and nephropathy in Type 1 diabetes. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may be involved in this process, since treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors postpones the development of these complications. We investigated whether plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) differed in Type 1 diabetic patients compared with healthy controls. We recruited 80 patients with Type 1 diabetes of more than 10 years' duration and 75 age-matched controls. We found that PRA and Ang II concentrations were significantly lower in patients than in the controls. The levels of ANP, on the other hand, were higher in patients than in controls. PRA correlated negatively to the mean value of HbA1c during the previous five years. PRA and Ang II were significantly lower in patients with mean HbA1c. >8.4% compared with those with mean HbA1c 7.2%. In summary, we found patients with Type 1 diabetes to have RAAS suppression and increased ANP levels, suggesting a state of fluid retention.

  • 19.
    Brekke, Hilde K
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Daily vegetable intake during pregnancy negatively associated to islet autoimmunity in the offspring-The ABIS study2010In: PEDIATRIC DIABETES, ISSN 1399-543X, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 244-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate if maternal diet during pregnancy is associated with occurrence of islet autoimmunity (IA) in the offspring. Methods: Of 21 700 infants invited to the All Babies in South-east Sweden (ABIS) study, 16 004 screening questionnaires, including a 22-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) regarding the mothers diet during pregnancy, were completed after delivery. Follow-up of the children (questionnaires and blood sampling) was performed at 1, 2.5 and 5 yr of age. IA was defined as being positive (above the 95th percentile for healthy children) in two or more measurements of autoantibodies [glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA); tyrosine phosphatase (IA-2A), insulin autoantibodies (IAA)] analysed at the three time points or being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during the 5-yr follow-up period. The 5 724 children in whom we carried out two to three possible blood samplings were included in the study. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify variables predicting IA. Results: Of 5 724 children,191 (3.3%) were considered positive for IA. In a univariate analysis, less than daily consumption of vegetables (3-5 times/week) in the mothers diet was associated with increased risk of IA (OR 1.71, 95% CI:1.24-2.35, p = 0.001) compared to daily consumption (p for trend = 0.004). The association was strengthened when adjusting for known IA-risk factors (p for trend andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: Daily consumption of vegetables in the mothers diet during pregnancy was associated with a decreased risk of IA in the offspring.

  • 20. Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Vitamin D supplementation and diabetes-related autoimmunity in the ABIS study2007In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 11-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supplementation with vitamin D during infancy, as well as intake of vitamin D during pregnancy, has been associated with decreased risk of type 1 diabetes or diabetes-related autoantibodies in children. The primary aim of this report was to investigate whether vitamin D supplementation during infancy is associated with diabetes-related autoimmunity at 1 and 2.5 yr in the children. Second, we examined whether consumption of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy is related to risk of autoimmunity in the offspring. Screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery, including a food-frequency questionnaire regarding the mother's use of dietary supplements during pregnancy. Parents of 11 081 and 8805 infants completed a follow-up questionnaire regarding the use of vitamin supplementation at 1 and 2.5 yr, respectively. Autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen-2 (IA-2) were analyzed in whole blood from 8694 children at 1 yr and 7766 children at 2.5 yr. Supplementation with AD-drops was not associated with autoantibodies at 1 or 2.5 yr. Use of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy was associated with reduced diabetes-related autoimmunity at 1 yr (adjusted odds ratio: 0.707, confidence interval: 0.520-0.962, p = 0.028) but not at 2.5 yr. In conclusion, no association was found between an intermediate dose of vitamin D supplementation during infancy and development of diabetes-related autoantibodies at 1 and 2.5 yr. Use of vitamin-D-containing supplements during pregnancy was associated with reduced development.

  • 21.
    Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Avd för klin nutrition, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas
    Barnkliniken, Örebro.
    van Odijk, J
    Avd för klin nutrition Sahlgrenska sjukhuset.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Breastfeeding and introduction of solid foods in Swedish infants; the All Babies in Southeast Sweden study2005In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 377-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this report is to describe breastfeeding duration and introduction of foods in Swedish infants born 1997-9, in relation to current recommendations. A secondary aim is to examine breastfeeding duration and introduction of certain allergenic foods in allergy-risk families (for whom allergy-preventive advice has been issued). Out of 21 700 invited infants, screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery. Parents to 11 081 infants completed a follow-up questionnaire regarding breastfeeding and introduction of foods and 9849 handed in detailed food diaries at 1 year of age. The percentages of infants who were exclusively breast-fed at 3, 6 and =9 months of age were 78.4, 10.1 and 3.9, respectively. The corresponding percentages for partial breastfeeding were 87.8, 68.9 and 43.6. Gluten-containing foods were introduced to 66 % of infants between 4 and 6 months, as recommended at the time of the study, and one-quarter had stopped breastfeeding when gluten was introduced. More than 90 % of parents introduced the first sample of solid food during months 4-6, as recommended. Fish and eggs had been introduced during the first year in 43 % and 29 %, respectively, of infants with atopic heredity. Exclusive breastfeeding duration and time of introduction of solid foods, including gluten, seemed to have been in line with Swedish recommendations at the time, although gluten was often introduced late, and not during ongoing breastfeeding as recommended. The adherence to allergy-preventive advice was less than optimal in infants with atopic heredity.

  • 22.
    Brekke, Hilde
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    van Odijk, Jenny
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Predictors and dietary consequences of frequent intake of high-sugar, low-nutrient foods in 1-year-old children participating in the ABIS study2007In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 176-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foods rich in sugar have been suggested to contribute to the increasing prevalence of obesity in children. The aim of this report is to investigate the dietary pattern in 1-year-old children who frequently receive foods rich in sugar but low in nutrients and to study associated demographic and parental factors. During 1977-9, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in this prospective, population-based, longitudinal cohort study. Screening questionnaires were completed for 16 070 infants after delivery. Follow-up questionnaires from 10 762 children at 1 year of age are included in the analysis. It was found that 24% of the children received sweets/pastries more often than one or two times per week. They had a higher intake of French fries, potato crisps and cream as well as a lower intake of fruit and vegetables. A frequent intake of sugar-rich, low-nutrient foods was significantly associated with several maternal factors (high intake of sweets/pastries during pregnancy, young age, mother living alone) as well as presence of older siblings. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and maternal overweight were of borderline significance. Parental education level was inversely associated with the frequency of intake of sweets/pastries in the child. Children who frequently receive sweets/pastries also have an otherwise unfavourable dietary pattern. Several parental and demographic factors were associated with this feeding pattern, especially high intake of sweets/pastries during pregnancy. Screening of pregnant women for risk predictors like consumption of sweets/pastries, young age and smoking could be possible ways of identifying children at future risk for low dietary quality.

  • 23.
    Cardwell, C R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, L C
    Norwegian Institute Public Health.
    Joner, G
    Oslo University Hospital.
    Davis, E A
    University Western Australia.
    Cinek, O
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, J
    University Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Castell, C
    Advisory Comm Diabet Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain .
    Svensson, J
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, M J
    University of Oxford.
    Waldhoer, T
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Polanska, J
    Silesian Technical University.
    Gimeno, S G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, L-M
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Parslow, R C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, E J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, A
    University Lancaster.
    Pozzilli, P
    University Campus Biomed, Rome, Italy .
    Brigis, G
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, B
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Sipetic, S
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, E
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, C
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Nutr and Metab Disease Clin, Bucharest, Romania .
    de Beaufort, C E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, D
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Buschard, K
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen.
    Patterson, C C
    Queens University Belfast.
    Birthweight and the risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes: a meta-analysis of observational studies using individual patient data2010In: DIABETOLOGIA, ISSN 0012-186X, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 641-651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated whether children who are heavier at birth have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. Relevant studies published before February 2009 were identified from literature searches using MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of all studies containing relevant data were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct pre-specified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by category of birthweight were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were then used to derive combined ORs and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Data were available for 29 predominantly European studies (five cohort, 24 case-control studies), including 12,807 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, studies consistently demonstrated that children with birthweight from 3.5 to 4 kg had an increased risk of diabetes of 6% (OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.11]; p = 0.02) and children with birthweight over 4 kg had an increased risk of 10% (OR 1.10 [95% CI 1.04-1.19]; p = 0.003), compared with children weighing 3.0 to 3.5 kg at birth. This corresponded to a linear increase in diabetes risk of 3% per 500 g increase in birthweight (OR 1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]; p = 0.03). Adjustments for potential confounders such as gestational age, maternal age, birth order, Caesarean section, breastfeeding and maternal diabetes had little effect on these findings. Children who are heavier at birth have a significant and consistent, but relatively small increase in risk of type 1 diabetes.

  • 24.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute for Public Health .
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo.
    Bulsara, Max K
    University of Notre Dame.
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jane, Mireia
    Department of Health, Public Health Div, Barcelona, Spain .
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University Oxford.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa
    Medical University of Silesia.
    Gimeno, Suely G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster.
    Pozzilli, Paolo
    University Campus Biomed, Rome, Italy .
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, Denka
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Buschard, Karsten
    Rigshosp, Bartholin Institute, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Patterson, Chris C
    Queens University Belfast.
    Maternal Age at Birth and Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis of 30 Observational Studies2010In: DIABETES, ISSN 0012-1797, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 486-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-The aim if the study was to investigate whether children born to older mothers have an increased risk of type 1 diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies using individual patient data to adjust for recognized confounders. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Relevant studies published before June 2009 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of studies were contacted and asked to provide individual patient data or conduct prespecified analyses. Risk estimates of type 1 diabetes by maternal age were calculated for each study, before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios and to investigate heterogeneity among studies. RESULTS-Data were available for 5 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 14,724 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was, on average, a 5% (95% CI 2-9) increase in childhood type 1 diabetes odds per 5-year increase in maternal age (P = 0.006), but there was heterogeneity among studies (heterogeneity I-2 = 70%). In studies with a low risk of bias, there was a more marked increase in diabetes odds of 10% per 5-year increase in maternal age. Adjustments for potential confounders little altered these estimates. CONCLUSIONS-There was evidence of a weak but significant linear increase in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes across the range of maternal ages, but the magnitude of association varied between studies. A very small percentage of the increase in the incidence of childhood type 1 diabetes in recent years could be explained by increases in maternal age.

  • 25.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University Belfast.
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute Public Health.
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo.
    Bulsara, Max K
    University of Western Australia.
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University Prague.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University of Oxford.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa
    Medical University of Silesia.
    Gimeno, Suely G A
    University Fed Sao Paulo.
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital.
    Roberts, Christine L
    University of Sydney.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster.
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University Medical.
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Nutr and Metab Disease Clin.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Pediat Clin, Luxembourg.
    Stoyanov, Denka
    Childrens Diabet Centre, Sofia.
    Buschard, Karsten
    Rigshosp, Copenhagen.
    Radon, Katja
    Hospital LMU Munich.
    Glatthaar, Christopher
    Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital.
    Patterson, Chris C
    Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK.
    Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies2011In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, ISSN 0300-5771, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 363-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies. Methods Relevant studies published before January 2010 were identified from MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. Authors of studies provided individual patient data or conducted pre-specified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to derive combined odds ratios (ORs), before and after adjustment for confounders, and investigate heterogeneity. Results Data were available for 6 cohort and 25 case-control studies, including 11 955 cases of type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was no evidence of an association prior to adjustment for confounders. After adjustment for maternal age at birth and other confounders, a reduction in the risk of diabetes in second- or later born children became apparent [fully adjusted OR = 0.90 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.83-0.98; P = 0.02] but this association varied markedly between studies (I-2 = 67%). An a priori subgroup analysis showed that the association was stronger and more consistent in children andlt; 5 years of age (n = 25 studies, maternal age adjusted OR = 0.84 95% CI 0.75, 0.93; I-2 = 23%). Conclusion Although the association varied between studies, there was some evidence of a lower risk of childhood onset type 1 diabetes with increasing birth order, particularly in children aged andlt; 5 years. This finding could reflect increased exposure to infections in early life in later born children.

  • 26.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland .
    Stene, Lars C
    Norwegian Institute Public Heatlh, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Rosenbauer, Joachim
    University of Dusseldorf, Germany .
    Cinek, Ondrej
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic University Hospital Motol, Czech Republic .
    Svensson, Jannet
    Herlev University Hospital, Denmark .
    Perez-Bravo, Francisco
    University of Chile, Chile .
    Memon, Anjum
    Brighton and Sussex Medical School and NHS Brighton and Hove, England .
    Gimeno, Suely G
    University of Federal Sao Paulo, Brazil .
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University, Wales .
    Strotmeyer, Elsa S
    University of Pittsburgh, PA USA .
    Goldacre, Michael J
    University of Oxford, England .
    Radon, Katja
    Hospital Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany .
    Chuang, Lee-Ming
    National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan .
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds, England .
    Chetwynd, Amanda
    University of Lancaster, England .
    Karavanaki, Kyriaki
    University of Athens, Greece .
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University, Latvia .
    Pozzilli, Paolo
    University of Campus Biomed, Italy .
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Lithuanian University of Health Science, Lithuania .
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna, Austria .
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Salento, Italy .
    Sipetic, Sandra
    University of Belgrade, Serbia .
    Joner, Geir
    University of Oslo, Norway Oslo University Hospital, Norway .
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet, Romania .
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Clin Pediat Luxembourg, Luxembourg .
    Harrild, Kirsten
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland .
    Benson, Victoria
    University of Oxford, England .
    Savilahti, Erkki
    University of Helsinki, Finland .
    Ponsonby, Anne-Louise
    Royal Childrens Hospital, Australia .
    Salem, Mona
    Ain Shams University, Egypt .
    Rabiei, Samira
    Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science and Health Serv, Iran .
    C Patterson, Chris
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland .
    Breast-Feeding and Childhood-Onset Type 1 Diabetes A pooled analysis of individual participant data from 43 observational studies2012In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 35, no 11, p. 2215-2225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Relevant studies were identified from literature searches using MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE. Authors of relevant studies were asked to provide individual participant data or conduct prespecified analyses. Meta-analysis techniques were used to combine odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS-Data were available from 43 studies including 9,874 patients with type 1 diabetes. Overall, there was a reduction in the risk of diabetes after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks (20 studies; OR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.64-0.88), the association after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;3 months was weaker (30 studies; OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.00), and no association was observed after (nonexclusive) breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks (28 studies; OR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.81-1.07) or andgt;3 months (29 studies; OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.00). These associations were all subject to marked heterogeneity (I-2 = 58, 76, 54, and 68%, respectively). In studies with lower risk of bias, the reduced risk after exclusive breast-feeding for andgt;2 weeks remained (12 studies; OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.99), and heterogeneity was reduced (I-2 = 0%). Adjustments for potential confounders altered these estimates very little. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS-The pooled analysis suggests weak protective associations between exclusive breast-feeding and type 1 diabetes risk. However, these findings are difficult to interpret because of the marked variation in effect and possible biases (particularly recall bias) inherent in the included studies.

  • 27.
    Cardwell, Chris R
    et al.
    Queens University of Belfast.
    Svensson, Jannet
    Glostrup University Hospital.
    Waldhoer, Thomas
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Sadauskaite-Kuehne, Vaiva
    Lithuanian University of Health Science.
    Roberts, Christine L
    University of Sydney.
    Parslow, Roger C
    University of Leeds.
    Wadsworth, Emma J K
    Cardiff University.
    Brigis, Girts
    Riga Stradins University.
    Urbonaite, Brone
    Kaunas University of Medicine.
    Schober, Edith
    Medical University of Vienna.
    Devoti, Gabriele
    University of Lecce.
    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin
    N Paulescu Institute Diabet.
    de Beaufort, Carine E
    Clin Pediat Luxembourg.
    Soltesz, Gyula
    University of Pecs.
    C Patterson, Chris
    Queens University of Belfast.
    Interbirth Interval Is Associated With Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Risk2012In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 702-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short interbirth interval has been associated with maternal complications and childhood autism and leukemia, possibly due to deficiencies in maternal micronutrients at conception or increased exposure to sibling infections. A possible association between interbirth interval and subsequent risk of childhood type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. A secondary analysis of 14 published observational studies of perinatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes was conducted. Risk estimates of diabetes by category of interbirth interval were calculated for each study. Random effects models were used to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Overall, 2,787 children with type 1 diabetes were included. There was a reduction in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals andlt;3 years compared with longer interbirth intervals (OR 0.82 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). Adjustments for various potential confounders little altered this estimate. In conclusion, there was evidence of a 20% reduction in the risk of childhood diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals andlt;3 years.

  • 28.
    Carlsson, A
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital SUS.
    Kockum, I
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindblad, B
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Engleson, L
    Skåne University Hospital SUS.
    Nilsson, A
    Lund University.
    Forsander, G
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Karlsson, A-K
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Kernell, A
    Sachs Childrens Hospital.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska Institute.
    Zachrisson, I
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ivarsson, S-A
    Lund University.
    Lernmak, A
    Lund University.
    Low risk HLA-DQ and increased body mass index in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes children in the Better Diabetes Diagnosis study in Sweden2012In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 718-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Type 1 diabetes and obesity has increased in childhood. We therefore tested the hypothesis that type 1 diabetes human leukocyte antigen DQ (HLA-DQ) risk genotypes may be associated with increased body mass index (BMI). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: The type 1 diabetes high-risk HLA-DQ A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*03:01-B1*03:02 genotype along with lower risk DQ genotypes were determined at the time of clinical onset by PCR and hybridization with allele-specific probes. BMI was determined after diabetes was stabilized. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSubjects: A total of 2403 incident type 1 diabetes children below 18 years of age were ascertained in the Swedish national Better Diabetes Diagnosis (BDD) study between May 2005 to September 2009. All children classified with type 1 diabetes, including positivity for at least one islet autoantibody, were investigated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Overall, type 1 diabetes HLA-DQ risk was negatively associated with BMI (Pandlt;0.0008). The proportion of the highest risk A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*03:01-B1*03:02 genotype decreased with increasing BMI (Pandlt;0.0004). However, lower risk type 1 diabetes DQ genotypes were associated with an increased proportion of patients who were overweight or obese (Pandlt;0.0001). Indeed, the proportion of patients with the low-risk A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype increased with increasing BMI (Pandlt;0.003). The magnitude of association on the multiplicative scale between the A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype and increased BMI was significant (Pandlt;0.006). The odds ratio in patients with this genotype of being obese was 1.80 (95% confidence interval 1.21-2.61; Pandlt;0.006). The increased proportion of overweight type 1 diabetes children with the A1*05:01-B1*02:01 haplotype was most pronounced in children diagnosed between 5 and 9 years of age. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Susceptibility for childhood type 1 diabetes was unexpectedly found to be associated with the A1*05:01-B1*02:01/A1*05:01-B1*02:01 genotype and an increased BMI. These results support the hypothesis that overweight may contribute to the risk of type 1 diabetes in children positive for HLA-DQ A1*05:01-B1*02:01.

  • 29.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Forsander, Gun
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Larsen, Sara
    Novo Nordisk Scandinavia AB, Sweden .
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    A multicenter observational safety study in Swedish children and adolescents using insulin detemir for the treatment of type 1 diabetes2013In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This 26-wk observational study in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Sweden investigated the safety and efficacy of insulin detemir (IDet) in newly diagnosed (ND) patients and those with established diabetes (ED) switching to IDet. A total of 159 patients initiated IDet as part of basal-bolus therapy, 59 in the ND stratum (mean age 9.7yr) and 97 in the ED stratum (mean age 12.5 yr). The primary outcome measure was the incidence of severe adverse drug reactions; just one major hypoglycemic event occurred in a patient in the ND stratum during the study and one patient was withdrawn due to injection-site reactions. All other events were classified as mild. In the ED stratum, there was a reduction in hypoglycemic events in the 4wk prior to study end from baseline (mean reduction of 2.46 events, not significant) and a significant reduction in nocturnal hypoglycemia (mean reduction of 2.24 events, p=0.0078). Glycemic control improved in the ND stratum as expected and, in the ED stratum, there was no significant change in HbA1c from baseline (mean reduction of -0.45%). At study end, mean daily IDet doses were 0.39U/kg (ND) and 0.54U/kg (ED). Weight increased by 5.7 and 2.0kg in the ND and ED strata, respectively, and was within the normal limits for growing children. IDet provided good glycemic control and was well tolerated, with a reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia in a heterogeneous cohort of children and adolescents with T1D.

  • 30.
    Carlsson, E
    et al.
    1The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Huus, K
    CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Faresjö, M
    The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

  • 31.
    Carlsson, Emma
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Frostell, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Faresjo, Maria
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, Jonköping University, Jönköping, Sweden, Division of Medical Diagnostics, Ryhov County Hospital, Jonköping, Sweden.
    Psychological stress in children may alter the immune response2014In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 192, no 5, p. 2071-2081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological stress is a public health issue even in children and has been associated with a number of immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological stress and immune response in healthy children, with special focus on autoimmunity. In this study, psychological stress was based on a composite measure of stress in the family across the domains: 1) serious life events, 2) parenting stress, 3) lack of social support, and 4) parental worries. PBMCs, collected from 5-y-old high-stressed children (n = 26) and from 5-y-old children without high stress within the family (n = 52), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden cohort, were stimulated with Ags (tetanus toxoid and b-lactoglobulin) and diabetes-related autoantigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insulin, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), clinical parameters (C-peptide, proinsulin, glucose), and cortisol, as an indicator of stress, were analyzed. Children from families with high psychological stress showed a low spontaneous immune activity (IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.01) but an increased immune response to tetanus toxoid, b-lactoglobulin, and the autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, heat shock protein 60, and tyrosine phosphatase (IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IFN-g, TNF-A, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10; p less than 0.05). Children within the high-stress group showed high level of cortisol, but low level of C-peptide, compared with the control group (p less than 0.05). This supports the hypothesis that psychological stress may contribute to an imbalance in the immune response but also to a pathological effect on the insulin-producing b cells.Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists.

  • 32.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winquist, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detection of global glycosylation changes of serum proteins in type 1 diabetes using a lectin panel and multivariate data analysis2008In: Talanta: The International Journal of Pure and Applied Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0039-9140, E-ISSN 1873-3573, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 333-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global glycosylation changes of serum proteins in type 1 diabetic patients have in this paper been investigated based on the interaction of the saccharide moiety of serum proteins with different lectins. Lectins are proteins, which bind carbohydrates specifically and reversibly. Panels with lectins of various carbohydrate specificities were immobilized on gold surfaces. Sera from healthy individuals, newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients and type 1 diabetes patients having had the disease for 4–6 years, respectively, were applied to the lectin panel. The biorecognition was evaluated with null ellipsometry. Data obtained were related to an internal standard of lactoferrin. Multivariate data analysis (MVDA) techniques were used to analyze data.

    Principal component analysis showed that the lectin panel enabled discrimination between sera from the three different above-mentioned groups. Using an artificial neuronal net (ANN), it was possible to correctly categorize unknown serum samples into one of the three groups.

     

  • 33.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An indirect competitive immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies based on surface plasmon resonance2008In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 876-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a sensitive and specific method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detection of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in serum samples from individuals at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). When measuring trace molecules in undiluted sera with label-free techniques like SPR, non-specific adsorption of matrix proteins to the sensor surface is often a problem, since it causes a signal that masks the analyte response. The developed method is an indirect competitive immunoassay designed to overcome these problems. Today, IAA is mainly measured in radio immunoassays (RIAs), which are time consuming and require radioactively labeled antigen. With our SPR-based immunoassay the overall assay time is reduced by a factor of >100 (4 days to 50 min), while sensitivity is maintained at a level comparable to that offered by RIA.

  • 34.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Determination of insulin autoantibodies using surface plasmon resonance: A screening study of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients2008Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the screening potential of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based indirectcompetitive immunoassay for quantification of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in sera from childrennewly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) as reference technique.The two methods agreed well with respect to sample classification of 54 sera from newly diagnosedT1D children and 32 reference sera from non-diabetic children. Interestingly, five samples from newlydiagnosed T1D patients classified as IAA-negative according to RIA were IAA-positive with the SPRbasedassay, suggesting that the SPR-based assay might provide a higher sensitivity than the referenceRIA. However, 14 percent of the analyzed samples (five samples from non-diabetics and seven fromnewly diagnosed T1D patients) gave rise to anomalously high and easily distinguishable responses withthe SPR-based method, precluding IAA-quantification. A considerable part of the paper is devoted to adiscussion of possible causes of these anomalous responses. They were not due to temporary changesin the status of the patients, such as infections at the time of sampling, and also not related tocomplement activation. It is speculated whether a plausible explanation should instead be sought in theexistence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to IAA.

  • 35.
    Casas, Rosaura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelsson, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Specific immunomodulatory effect of GAD(65) in type 1 diabetics2009In: in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 52, 2009, Vol. 52, p. S194-S194Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Cattaneo, A
    et al.
    Institute Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo.
    Monasta, L
    Institute Maternal and Child Health IRCCS Burlo Garofolo.
    Stamatakis, E
    UCL.
    Lioret, S
    French Food Safety Agency.
    Castetbon, K
    University of Paris 13.
    Frenken, F
    Stat Netherlands.
    Manios, Y
    Harokopio University.
    Moschonis, G
    Harokopio University.
    Savva, S
    Research and Education Institute for Child Health.
    Zaborskis, A
    University of Medicine, Kaunas.
    Rito, A I
    NIH, Portugal .
    Nanu, M
    Alfred Rusescu Institute Mother and Child Care.
    Vignerova, J
    National Institute for Public Health, Czech Republic .
    Caroli, M
    Azienda Sanit Locale, Italy .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Koch, Felix-Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Serra-Majem, L
    University Las Palmas Gran Canaria.
    Szponar, L
    National Food and Nutrion Institute, Poland .
    van Lenthe, F
    Erasmus MC.
    Brug, J
    Vrije University Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Overweight and obesity in infants and pre-school children in the European Union a review of existing data2010In: OBESITY REVIEWS, ISSN 1467-7881, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandgt;The objective of this study was to synthesize available information on prevalence and time trends of overweight and obesity in pre-school children in the European Union. Retrieval and analysis or re-analysis of existing data were carried out. Data sources include WHO databases, Medline and Google, contact with authors of published and unpublished documents. Data were analysed using the International Obesity Task Force reference and cut-offs, and the WHO standard. Data were available from 18/27 countries. Comparisons were problematic because of different definitions and methods of data collection and analysis. The reported prevalence of overweight plus obesity at 4 years ranges from 11.8% in Romania (2004) to 32.3% in Spain (1998-2000). Countries in the Mediterranean region and the British islands report higher rates than those in middle, northern and eastern Europe. Rates are generally higher in girls than in boys. With the possible exception of England, there was no obvious trend towards increasing prevalence in the past 20-30 years in the five countries with data. The use of the WHO standard with cut-offs at 1, 2 and 3 standard deviations yields lower rates and removes gender differences. Data on overweight and obesity in pre-school children are scarce; their interpretation is difficult. Standard methods of surveillance, and research and policies on prevention and treatment, are urgently needed.

  • 37.
    Ceriello, Antonio
    et al.
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Barkai, Laszlo
    University of Miskolc, Hungary .
    Sandahl Christiansen, Jens
    Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark .
    Czupryniak, Leszek
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland .
    Gomis, Ramon
    Hospital Clin Barcelona, Spain.
    Harno, Kari
    LKT Dosentti FHIMSS, Finland .
    Kulzer, Bernhard
    Diabet Clin, Germany .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nemethyova, Zuzana
    Poliklin Bratislava, Slovakia .
    Owens, David
    University Hospital Llandough, Wales .
    Schnell, Oliver
    Helmholtz Centre, Germany .
    Tankova, Tsvetalina
    Medical University of Sofia, Bulgaria .
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland .
    Verges, Bruno
    Hop Bocage, France .
    Weitgasser, Raimund
    Diakonissen Hospital Salzburg, Austria .
    Wens, Johan
    University of Antwerp, Belgium .
    Diabetes as a case study of chronic disease management with a personalized approach: The role of a structured feedback loop2012In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 5-10Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As non-communicable or chronic diseases are a growing threat to human health and economic growth, political stakeholders are aiming to identify options for improved response to the challenges of prevention and management of non-communicable diseases. This paper is intended to contribute ideas on personalized chronic disease management which are based on experience with one major chronic disease, namely diabetes mellitus. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDiabetes provides a pertinent case of chronic disease management with a particular focus on patient self-management. Despite advances in diabetes therapy, many people with diabetes still fail to achieve treatment targets thus remaining at risk of complications. Personalizing the management of diabetes according to the patients individual profile can help in improving therapy adherence and treatment outcomes. This paper suggests using a six-step cycle for personalized diabetes (self-)management and collaborative use of structured blood glucose data. E-health solutions can be used to improve process efficiencies and allow remote access. Decision support tools and algorithms can help doctors in making therapeutic decisions based on individual patient profiles. Available evidence about the effectiveness of the cycles constituting elements justifies expectations that the diabetes management cycle as a whole can generate medical and economic benefit.

  • 38.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Axelsson, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerman, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pihl, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    GAD65 autoantibody (GADA) responses in Type 1 diabetes patients participating in a phase III GAD-alum intervention trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa isoform (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although aluminum-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) induced preservation of residual insulin secretion in a previous clinical phase II trial, recent phase II and III trials failed to reach their primary end-points. The European phase III trial was therefore closed after 15 months, and the entire study period was completed only for a minority of the patients. This study aimed to characterize GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA) and Tyrosine phosphatase IA-2 autoantibody (IA-2A) levels, GADA IgG1-4 subclass distribution, B-cell frequencies/phenotypes and cytokine secretion. We also assessed whether GAD-alum preserved β-cell function in the small subgroup of Swedish patients who completed the 30 months visit. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected at baseline and after 1, 3, 9, 15 and 21 months from the 148 Swedish subjects included in the trial, and also at 30 months from the 45 patients who reached the final visit. Patients were randomly assigned to; i) 4 doses of GAD-alum (4D), ii) 2 doses of GAD-alum followed by two doses of placebo (2D), or iii) 4 doses of placebo.

    GADA titers were induced both in the 4D and 2D group compared to placebo, and 4D patients also displayed a higher GADA fold-change after receiving the  two additional injections compared to the 2D group. The 4D group switched to a higher frequency of GADA IgG4, associated to a Th2 type response at 9 months, whereas an association between GADA fold-change and GAD65-induced in vitro cytokine secretion was observed in the 2D group. These findings suggest that the humoral response, induced by the 2D treatment,  seems to be associated with a GAD65-specific cellular response, while 4D induces a distinct humoral response. Even though GADA titers were elevated, no changes in B-cell frequencies or phenotype were observed in any group. IA-2A levels declined at a similar rate in all groups during the trial.The subgroup of patients who completed the 30 month visit receiving 2 doses of GAD-alum had less decline of both fasting and stimulated C-peptide after 30 months compared to placebo. These results support the concept of GAD-alum treatment, but no specific immune markers have been identified.

  • 39.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hampe, Christiane S.
    Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characteristics of in-vitro phenotypes of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies in high-titre individuals2013In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 171, no 3, p. 247-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have indicated phenotypical differences in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA) found in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients, individuals at risk of developing T1D and stiff-person syndrome (SPS) patients. In a Phase II trial using aluminium-formulated GAD65 (GAD-alum) as an immunomodulator in T1D, several patients responded with high GADA titres after treatment, raising concerns as to whether GAD-alum could induce GADA with SPS-associated phenotypes. This study aimed to analyse GADA levels, immunoglobulin (Ig)G1–4 subclass frequencies, b78- and b96·11-defined epitope distribution and GAD65 enzyme activity in sera from four cohorts with very high GADA titres: T1D patients (n = 7), GAD-alum-treated T1D patients (n = 9), T1D high-risk individuals (n = 6) and SPS patients (n = 12). SPS patients showed significantly higher GADA levels and inhibited the in-vitro GAD65 enzyme activity more strongly compared to the other groups. A higher binding frequency to the b78-defined epitope was found in the SPS group compared to T1D and GAD-alum individuals, whereas no differences were detected for the b96·11-defined epitope. GADA IgG1–4 subclass levels did not differ between the groups, but SPS patients had higher IgG2 and lower IgG4 distribution more frequently. In conclusion, the in-vitro GADA phenotypes from SPS patients differed from the T1D- and high-risk groups, and GAD-alum treatment did not induce SPS-associated phenotypes. However, occasional overlap between the groups exists, and caution is indicated when drawing conclusions to health or disease status.

  • 40.
    Chéramy, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hampe, Christiane S
    University of Washington.
    Casas, Rosaura
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    GAD-alum treatment in patients with type 1 diabetes and the subsequent effect on GADA IgG subclass distribution, GAD(65) enzyme activity and humoral response2010In: Clinical Immunology, ISSN 1521-6616, E-ISSN 1521-7035, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 31-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously shown that two injections of 20 mu g GAD-alum to recent onset type 1 diabetic children induced GADA levels in parallel to preservation of insulin secretion. Here we investigated if boosted GADA induced changes in IgG1, 2, 3 and 4 subclass distributions or affected GAD(65) enzyme activity. We further studied the specific effect of GAD-alum through analyses of IA-2A, tetanus toxoid and total IgE antibodies. Serum from children receiving GAD alum or placebo was collected pre-treatment and after 3, 9, 15 and 21 months. At 3 months a reduced percentage of IgG1 and increased IgG3/IgG4 were detected in GAD-alum treated. Further, IA-2A, IgE and tetanus toxoid antibodies, as well as GAD(65) enzyme activity, were unaffected confirming the specific effect of treatment. In the GAD-alum group, higher pretreatment GADA were associated to more pronounced C-peptide preservation. The induced IgG3/IgG4 and reduced IgG1 suggest a Th2 deviation of the immune response.

  • 41.
    Couper, Jennifer J.
    et al.
    Womens and Childrens Hospital, Australia; University of Adelaide, Australia; University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Haller, Michael J.
    University of Florida, FL USA.
    Ziegler, Annette-G
    Technical University of Munich, Germany; Technical University of Munich, Germany.
    Knip, Mikael
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Craig, Maria E.
    Childrens Hospital Westmead, Australia; University of Sydney, Australia; University of New S Wales, Australia .
    Phases of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents2014In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 15, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 42. Dahlqvist, G
    et al.
    Mustonen, L
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Barn.
    Analysis of 20 years of prospective registration of childhood onset diabetes - time trends and birth cohort effects.2000In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 89, p. 1231-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Danne, Thomas
    et al.
    Battelino, T
    Jarosz-Chobot, P
    Kordonouri, O
    Pankowska, E
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    al, et
    Establishing glycaemic control with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Experience of the PedPump Study in 17 countries2008In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 1594-1601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: To assess the use of paediatric continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSII) under real-life conditions by analysing data recorded for up to 90 days and relating them to outcome. Methods: Pump programming data from patients aged 0-18 years treated with CSII in 30 centres from 16 European countries and Israel were recorded during routine clinical visits. HbA 1c was measured centrally. Results: A total of 1,041 patients (age: 11.8±4.2 years, diabetes duration: 6.0±3.6 years, average CSII duration: 2.0±1.3 years, HbA1c: 8.0±1.3% [means±SD]) participated. Glycaemic control was better in preschool (n=142, 7.5±0.9%) and pre-adolescent (6-11 years, n=321, 7.7±1.0%) children than in adolescent patients (12-18 years, n=578, 8.3±1.4%). There was a significant negative correlation between HbA1c and daily bolus number, but not between HbA1c and total daily insulin dose. The use of <6.7 daily boluses was a significant predictor of an HbA1c level >7.5%. The incidence of severe hypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis was 6.63 and 6.26 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. Conclusions/ interpretation: This large paediatric survey of CSII shows that glycaemic targets can be frequently achieved, particularly in young children, and the incidence of acute complications is low. Adequate substitution of basal and prandial insulin is associated with a better HbA1c. © 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  • 44.
    Danne, Thomas
    et al.
    Hannover, Tyskland .
    Battelino, Tadej
    Ljubljana, Slovenien .
    Kordonouri, Olga
    Berlin, Tyskland .
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Barnklin, Uddevalla .
    Klinkert, Christof
    Bad Oeynhausen, Tyskland .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Barrio, Raquel
    Madrid, Spanien.
    Aebi, Christine
    Wildermeth, Schweiz .
    Gschwend, Sylvia
    Biel, Schweiz .
    Mullis, Primus-E
    Zug, Schweiz .
    Schumacher, Urs
    Munsterlingen, Schweiz .
    Zumsteg, Urs
    Basel, Schweiz .
    Morandi, Anita
    Verona, Italy .
    Rabbone, Ivana
    Turin, Italien .
    Cherubini, Valentino
    Marche, Italien .
    Toni, Sonia
    Florence, Italien .
    de Beauforte, Carine
    Luxemburg .
    Hindmarsh, Peter
    London, UK .
    Sumner, Alex
    Peterborough, UK.
    van Waarde, Willie M
    Groningen, Holland .
    van den Berg, Norbert
    Almere, Holland .
    Phillip, Moshe
    Petah Tikva Israel.
    A cross-sectional international survey of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in 377 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 10 countries2005In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical data from children and adolescents in different pediatric diabetes centers from Europe and Israel. Methods: Data of patients (1-18 yr) treated with CSII in 23 centers from nine European countries and Israel were recorded with the ENCAPTURE software (PEC International, Frankfurt, Germany). The number of patients who participated was 377 (48% female, mean diabetes duration ± SD: 6.8 ± 3.7 yr, age: 12.9 ± 3.8 yr, preschool n = 33, prepubertal n = 95, adolescent n = 249, CSII duration: 1.6 ± 1.2 yr, local HbA1c: 8.1 ± 1.2%). Results: The total insulin dose was lower than previously reported for injection therapy (0.79 ± 0.20 U/kg/d). Covariance coefficient of daily total insulin was high in all age groups (adolescents 19 ± 9%, prepubertal 18 ± 8 and preschool 17 ± 8). The distribution of basal insulin infusion rates over 24 hr (48 ± 12% of total dose) varied significantly between centers and age groups. The number of boluses per day (7 ± 3) was not significantly different between the age groups (average daily bolus amount: 0.42 ± 0.16 U /kg). The rate of severe hypoglycemia (coma/convulsions) was 12.4 episodes per 100 patient-years and the number of diabetes-related hospital days was 124 per 100 patient-years. Discussion: Pediatric CSII patients show a high variability in their insulin therapy. This relates both to age-dependent differences in the distribution of basal insulin as to the age-independent day-to-day variation in prandial insulin. © Blackwell Munksgaard, 2005.

  • 45.
    Delli, A J
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Vaziri-Sani, F
    Lund University.
    Carlsson, A
    Lund University Hospital.
    Forsander, G
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Ivarsson, S A
    Lund University.
    Lindblad, B
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Marcus, C
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lernmark, A
    Lund University.
    Clinical and genetical characterisation of a series of patients with type 1 diabetes induced by interferon therapy in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 53, issue , pp S119-S1202010In: DIABETOLOGIA, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 53, p. S119-S120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Delli, Ahmed J.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Lindblad, Bengt
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Carlsson, Annelie
    University Lund Hospital.
    Forsander, Gun
    Queen Silvia Childrens Hospital.
    Ivarsson, Sten-A
    Lund University.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lernmark, Ake
    Lund University.
    Type 1 diabetes patients born to immigrants to Sweden increase their native diabetes risk and differ from Swedish patients in HLA types and islet autoantibodies2010In: Pediatric Diabetes, ISSN 1399-543X, E-ISSN 1399-5448, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 513-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To determine whether type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients, having parents who immigrated to Sweden, have increased T1DM risk before 18 yr compared with countries of origin. We also determined whether they have different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genetic markers and islet autoantibodies at diagnosis compared with Swedish patients. Methods: A total of 1988 (53% males) newly diagnosed and confirmed T1DM patients less than 18 yr registered within the Better Diabetes Diagnosis (BDD) study (May 2005 to September 2008) were included. Participants were classified into three groups: Swedish, non-Swedish, and Mixed-origin patients according to country of origin of two generations (parents and grandparents). These groups were compared with respect to T1DM HLA markers and islet autoantibodies [glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GAD65Ab), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), and islet antigen-2 autoantibodies (IA-2Ab)]. Results: Only 30 (1.5%) patients were born outside Sweden. Swedish patients constituted 66%, non-Swedish patients 8%, Mixed origins 17%, and 9% were of uncertain origin. Confirmed T1DM in patients within the study was 22 (95% CI: 21-23) patients/105/yr rate for Swedish patients compared with 14 (95% CI: 13-15) among non-Swedish patients. The HLA-DQ8 haplotype (p less than 0.0001) and DQ2/8 genotype (p less than 0.02) predominated among Swedish compared with non-Swedish patients. In contrast, DQ2 was the most frequent haplotype among non-Swedish patients [OR = 1.5 (95% CI: 1.0-2.0), p less than 0.04]. Multiple (greater than= 2) autoantibodies (p less than 0.04) and specifically IA-2Ab (p less than 0.001) were most prevalent among the Swedish patients. Multiple autoantibodies were associated with DQ8 among the Swedish patients only (p less than 0.001). Conclusion: Patients born to parents who had immigrated to the high T1DM incidence environment of Sweden have, compared with Swedish patients, more frequent HLA-DQ2 genetic markers and are diagnosed more often with GAD65Ab.

  • 47.
    Delli, Ahmed J
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Vaziri-Sani, Fariba
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Lindblad, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Elding-Larsson, Helena
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Carlsson, Annelle
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Forsander, Gun
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, Sten A
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Marcus, Claude
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ortqvist, Eva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Groop, Leif
    Lund University, Sweden .
    P Bondinas, George
    Epirus Institute Technology, Greece .
    Papadopoulos, George K
    Epirus Institute Technology, Greece .
    Lernmark, Ake
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Zinc Transporter 8 Autoantibodies and Their Association With SLC30A8 and HLA-DQ Genes Differ Between Immigrant and Swedish Patients With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes in the Better Diabetes Diagnosis Study2012In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 2556-2564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined whether zinc transporter 8 autoantibodies (ZnT8A; arginine ZnT8-RA, tryptophan ZnT8-WA, and glutamine ZnT8-QA variants) differed between immigrant and Swedish patients due to different polymorphisms of SLC30A8, HLA-DQ, or both. Newly diagnosed autoimmune (andgt;= 1 islet autoantibody) type 1 diabetic patients (n = 2,964, andlt;18 years, 55% male) were ascertained in the Better Diabetes Diagnosis study. Two subgroups were identified: Swedes (n = 2,160, 73%) and immigrants (non-Swedes; n = 212, 7%). Non-Swedes had less frequent ZnT8-WA (38%) than Swedes (50%), consistent with a lower frequency in the non-Swedes (37%) of SLC30A8 CT+TT (RW+WW) genotypes than in the Swedes (54%). ZnT8-RA (57 and 58%, respectively) did not differ despite a higher frequency of CC (RR) genotypes in non-Swedes (63%) than Swedes (46%). We tested whether this inconsistency was due to HLA-DQ as 2/X (2/2; 2/y; y is anything but 2 or 8), which was a major genotype in non-Swedes (40%) compared with Swedes (14%). In the non-Swedes only, 2/X (2/2; 2/y) was negatively associated with ZnT8-WA and ZnT8-QA but not ZnT8-RA. Molecular simulation showed nonbinding of the relevant ZnT8-R peptide to DQ2, explaining in part a possible lack of tolerance to ZnT8-R. At diagnosis in non-Swedes, the presence of ZnT8-RA rather than ZnT8-WA was likely due to effects of HLA-DQ2 and the SLC30A8 CC (RR) genotypes.

  • 48.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Leni
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordfeldt, Sam
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Web 2.0 Systems Supporting Childhood Chronic Disease Management: Design Guidelines Based on Information Behaviour and Social Learning Theories2010In: JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SYSTEMS, ISSN 0148-5598, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-directed learning denotes that the individual is in command of what should be learned and why it is important. In this study, guidelines for the design of Web 2.0 systems for supporting diabetic adolescents every day learning needs are examined in light of theories about information behaviour and social learning. A Web 2.0 system was developed to support a community of practice and social learning structures were created to support building of relations between members on several levels in the community. The features of the system included access to participation in the culture of diabetes management practice, entry to information about the community and about what needs to be learned to be a full practitioner or respected member in the community, and free sharing of information, narratives and experience-based knowledge. After integration with the key elements derived from theories of information behaviour, a preliminary design guideline document was formulated.

  • 49.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Effect of photopheresis on lymphocyte population in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes2004In: Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, ISSN 1071-412X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 856-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years photopheresis has been claimed to be an effective form of immunomodulation. It has also been shown to have an effect on the disease process at the onset of type 1 diabetes. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study, we analyzed if the effect of photopheresis in children with newly diagnosed diabetes is related to changes in the balance of lymhocyte populations. We also analyzed if lymphocyte subsets were related to recent infection, mild or aggressive disease manifestations, heredity, or gender. Nineteen children received active treatment with photopheresis, while 21 children received sham pheresis (placebo group). No influence of a history of previous infection, heredity, or certain clinical parameters on lymphocyte subsets was found. At the onset of type 1 diabetes, girls showed a higher proportion and a larger number of T cells (CD3+) and T-helper cells (CD4+) and a higher proportion of naïve CD4 +CD45RA+ cells. In the placebo group, an increase in the number of subsets with the activated phenotype in both the CD4 (CD29 +) and the CD8 (CD11a+) compartments was noted during the course of the study. These changes did not occur in the photopheresis group. No relation between lymphocyte subsets and clinical outcome was found 1 year after the treatment with photopheresis. In conclusion, we found no major effect of photopheresis on lymphocyte populations in a group of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. However, in the placebo group the proportions of activated CD4 and CD8 cells increased over time. Since these changes did not occur in the actively treated group, our findings suggest that photopheresis may have some suppressive effects.

  • 50.
    Fagrell, Tobias G.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Ullbro, Christer
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Lundin, Sven-Ake
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Koch, Goran
    Postgrad Dent Educ Centre, Örebro.
    Aetiology of severe demarcated enamel opacities - an evaluation based on prospective medical and social data from 17,000 children2011In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 57-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 1970s dentists reported an increasing prevalence of a "new" type of enamel disturbance. The disturbance was very specific, with areas of demarcated hypomineralised enamel, and was mostly found in permanent first molars and incisors. Several studies have tried to reveal the aetiology behind the enamel disturbance but so far no clear factors correlated have been found. The aim of the present study was to evaluate aetiological factors to severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first permanent molars in a large cohort of children enrolled in the "All Babies in Southeast Sweden" (ABIS) project. ABIS is a prospective study of all children in five Swedish counties born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, in all about 17,000 children. They have been followed from birth with recording of a large number of factors on nutrition, diseases, medication, infections, social situation etc. With help from 89 Public Dental Service clinics in the same area preliminary examinations of the children, born between Oct 1,1997 and Oct 1,1999, reported 595 children with severe demarcated opacities (SDO) in first molars. These children and a randomly selected age matched group of 1,200 children were further invited to be examined by specialists in paediatric dentistry. At these examinations 224 severe cases were identified as well as 253 children completely without enamel disturbances among children registered in ABIS. These two groups were analysed according to any correlation between SDO and variables in the ABIS databank. The analyses showed no association between SDO and pre-, peri-, and neonatal data. However, we found a positive association between SDO and breastfeeding for more than 6 months (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.2), late introduction of gruel (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.9), and late introduction of infant formula (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9). A combination of these three variables increased the risk to develop SDO by more than five times (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.6-15.7). No significant associations were found to other environmental, developmental, or medical factors. We conclude that nutritional conditions during first 6 months of life may influence the risk to develop severe demarcated opacities in first permanent molars.

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