liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 119
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bernstein, Joshua G
    et al.
    National Military Audiology and Speech Pathology Center Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids2014In: Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiogram predicts less than a third of the variance in speech reception thresholds (SRTs) for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners properly fit with individualized frequency-dependent gain. The remaining variance is often attributed to a combination of su-prathreshold distortion in the auditory pathway and non-auditory factors such as cogni-tive processing. Distinguishing between these factors requires a measure of suprathresh-old auditory processing to account for the non-cognitive contributions. Preliminary re-sults in 12 HI listeners identified a correlation between spectrotemporal modulation (STM) sensitivity and speech intelligibility in noise presented over headphones. The cur-IHCON 2014 27 August 13-17, 2014rent study assessed the effectiveness of STM sensitivity as a measure of suprathreshold auditory function to predict free-field SRTs in noise for a larger group of 47 HI listeners with hearing aids.SRTs were measured for Hagerman sentences presented at 65 dB SPL in stationary speech-weighted noise or four-talker babble. Pre-recorded speech and masker stimuli were played through a small anechoic chamber equipped with a master hearing aid pro-grammed with individualized gain. The output from an IEC711 Ear Simulator was played binaurally through insert earphones. Three processing algorithms were examined: linear gain, linear gain plus noise reduction, or fast-acting compressive gain.STM stimuli consist of spectrally-rippled noise with spectral-peak frequencies that shift over time. STM with a 2-cycle/octave spectral-ripple density and a 4-Hz modulation rate was applied to a 2-kHz lowpass-filtered pink-noise carrier. Stimuli were presented over headphones at 80 dB SPL (±5-dB roving). The threshold modulation depth was estimated adaptively in a two-alternative forced-choice task.STM sensitivity was strongly correlated (R2=0.48) with the global SRT (i.e., the SRTs averaged across masker and processing conditions). The high-frequency pure-tone aver-age (3-8 kHz) and age together accounted for 23% of the variance in global SRT. STM sensitivity accounted for an additional 28% of the variance in global SRT (total R2=0.51) when combined with these two other metrics in a multiple-regression analysis. Correla-tions between STM sensitivity and SRTs for individual conditions were weaker for noise reduction than for the other algorithms, and marginally stronger for babble than for sta-tionary noise.The results are discussed in the context of previous work suggesting that STM sensitivity for low rates and low carrier frequencies is impaired by a reduced ability to use temporal fine-structure information to detect slowly shifting spectral peaks. STM detection is a fast, simple test of suprathreshold auditory function that accounts for a substantial pro-portion of variability in hearing-aid outcomes for speech perception in noise.

  • 2.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Charactering the individual ear by the "Auditory Profile".2008In: "Auditory Profile". In: ACOUSTICS2008. Paris., 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Charactering the individual ear by the "Auditory Profile"2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN “AUDITORY PROFILE” FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF HEARING IMPAIRMENTS.2009In: In: 9th EFAS Congress. Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. 2009., 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN “AUDITORY PROFILE” FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF HEARING IMPAIRMENTS2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    SUPRATHRESHOLD PROCESSING DEFICITS IN HEARING-IMPAIRED LISTENERS AS REVEALED IN THE “AUDITORY PROFILE”.2009In: In: 9th EFAS Congress. Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. 2009., 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    SUPRATHRESHOLD PROCESSING DEFICITS IN HEARING-IMPAIRED LISTENERS AS REVEALED IN THE “AUDITORY PROFILE”.2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    The "Auditory Profile". Proposal from the European HEARCOM project.2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK-Southampton.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam .
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    Kollmeier, B
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, D- Oldenburg.
    The"Auditory Profile". Proposal from the European HEARCOM project.2007In: In: International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research, ISSAAR 2007. Marienlyst, Helsingör, Danmark:, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    AMC, Clinical and Experimental Audiology, Amsterdam, Netherland.
    van Esch, T
    AMC, Clinical and Experimental Audiology, Amsterdam, Netherland.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Lyzenga, Johannes
    Vrije Universiteit Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vorman, M
    Hoerzentrum Oldenburg, Hoerzentrum Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Kollmeier, B
    Universität Oldenburg, Medizinische Physik, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Charactering the individual ear by the "Auditory Profile2008In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 123, no 5, article id 3714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new approach to auditory diagnostics, which is one of the central themes of the EU-project HEARCOM. For this purpose we defined a so-called "Auditory Profile" that can be assessed for each individual listener using a standardized battery of audiological tests that - in addition to the pure-tone audiogram - focus on loudness perception, frequency resolution, temporal acuity, speech perception, binaural functioning, listening effort, subjective hearing abilities, and cognition. For the sake of testing time only summary tests are included from each of these areas, but the broad approach of characterizing auditory communication problems by means of standardized test is expected to have an added value above traditional testing in understanding the reasons for poor speech reception. The Auditory profile may also be relevant in the field of auditory rehabilitation and for design of acoustical environments. The results of an international 5-center study (in 4 countries and in 4 languages) will be presented and the relevance of a broad but well-standardized approach will be discussed.

  • 11.
    Dreschler, W. A.,
    et al.
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    van Esch, T
    Academic Medical Center, NL-Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Lyzenga, J
    VU Medical Center, NL- Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Vorman, M
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, Germany.
    Wagener, K. C.
    Hörzentrum Oldenburg GmbH, Germany.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Lutman, Mark
    University of Southampton, UK.
    Athalye, Sheetal
    University of Southampton, UK.
    D-2-6: Report about the results of the multicentre evaluation of the Auditory Profile. Public report2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-eight partners participated in the FP6 EU-funded project HearCom, with the goal to improve hearing in our communication society. One of the main achievements has been the provision of advanced hearing screening tests by telephone and Internet. For hearing diagnostics it was aimed at the harmonization of hearing diagnostic tests within Europe. For this the concept of the Auditory Profile has been developed with several tests for various languages. Hearing problems are also a result of adverse acoustical circumstances for which the effects have been studied, modelled and evaluated for hearing impaired. For hearing rehabilitation a large scale comparison study was performed on signal enhancement techniques (algorithms) for hearing devices. Modern technology may assist on hearing and communication by the use of wireless technology and automatic speech transcription. On this it is shown that improvements for auditory communication can be obtained, but that technology should develop further. An overview is given on the HearCom portal with sections for screening diagnostics, hearing information for the public and professionals, and a new service called HearCompanion that provides step-by-step support for the hearing rehabilitation process.

  • 12.
    Edberg, P.O.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Wahlquist, U.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Allvarlig kombination av hörsel- och synnedsättning hos personer över 65 år2008Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Edberg, P.O.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Wahlquist, U.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Allvarlig kombination avhörsel- och synnedsättning hos personer över 65 år.2008Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of central auditory functions: methods and applications2001Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central auditory processing is complex and can not be completely evaluated by a single method. This thesis focuses on assessment of some aspects of central auditory functions by the use of dichotic speech tests, cognitive tests that tax functions important for speech processing and electrophysiological tests.

    Paper A deals with the cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly hearing impaired subjects. Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 hearing impaired subjects ranging in age from 42 to 84 years. The dichotic test material consisted of digits, short sentences and consonant-vowel-syllables. The cognitive test material comprised tests for short-term memory, verbal information processing and phonological processing. Effects of age in dichotic speech tests in elderly were verified. The degree of effect was dependent upon focusing condition and test material. The different listening tasks in the dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability, shown by a varying degree of correlation between cognitive functions and dichotic test parameters. Age-related cognitive decline in the elderly was strongly connected with problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    Paper B presents a new cognitive test battery, performed in text, auditory and audiovisual modalities. The tests are sensitive for functions important for speech processing and understanding. The test battery was evaluated in four groups, differing in age and hearing status. Each group comprised twelve subjects. The effect of low-level noise on cognitive functions was investigated. The only significant result in the text modality was an age effect in speed of performance, which was also seen in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interaction between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and speed of performance, shows that hearing-impaired subjects benefit more from visual cues. In noise generally poorer results were obtained, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. The test battery has proven to be useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input-modalities and the effect of age, hearing-impairment and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    Paper C describes the development of a system for recording of auditory evoked potentials. The system is built around a personal computer with a data-acquisition board with analogue input and output channels. Acoustic stimuli are presented to the test subject and responses to the acoustic stimuli are recorded in an EEG-recording system. The program is written in the graphical programming environment LabView (National Instruments). With the system it is possible to perform all clinical standard measurements. In addition, test-procedures not available in commercial auditory evoked potential systems have been developed. For the assessment of auditory discrimination a toolkit for evaluation of the mismatch negativity potential was developed and evaluated in six normal-hearing subjects.

    List of papers
    1. Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    2001 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of chronologic age on central auditory functions using dichotic speech tests and to study whether and how the age effect in dichotic listening is related to cognitive ability.

    DESIGN: Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 bilaterally hearing-impaired subjects, with a pure-tone average better than 50 dB HL. They were between 42 and 84 yr of age and were divided into an older and a younger group comprising 15 subjects each. The dichotic test material were digits, low-redundancy sentences and consonant-vowel syllables. The subjects reported stimuli heard in both ears (free report) or in one ear (directed report to left or right ear). The cognitive test battery comprised tests focusing on short-term memory, verbal information-processing speed and phonologic processing.

    RESULTS: A decreased overall performance in all dichotic speech tests was observed in the older group. In the syllable test the older subjects showed poorer results when focusing on the stimuli heard in the left ear, as compared with when focusing on stimuli heard in the right ear, whereas the younger group showed almost equal results for left- and right ear-focusing conditions. An age effect was also seen in reaction times recorded in the cognitive tests and in the scores of the reading span test. These cognitive parameters correlate with the results of the dichotic test when focusing to the left, but not when focusing to the right in the directed report condition. In the free report condition the overall performance showed a high correlation with cognitive test parameters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of chronologic age in dichotic speech tests in the elderly have been verified. The degree of effect is dependent on test material, way of reporting and focusing condition. The different listening tasks in dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability shown by a varying degree of correlations between cognitive function and dichotic test parameters. Also, the results indicate a strong connection between age-related cognitive decline in the elderly and problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13584 (URN)10.1097/00003446-200104000-00005 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2016-03-14
    2. Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    2001 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive test battery sensitive to processes important for speech understanding was developed and investigated. Test stimuli are presented as text or in an auditory or audiovisual modality. The tests investigate phonologic processing and verbal information processing. Four subject groups, young/elderly with normal-hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment, each including 12 subjects, participated in the study. The only significant effect in the text modality was an age effect in the speed of performance, seen also in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities, the effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interactions between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and in reaction times, show that hearing-impaired subjects have difficulties without visual cues. Performing the test battery in noise made the tasks more difficult, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. Test-retest measurements showed learning effects and a modality-dependent variability. The test battery has proven useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input signals and the effects of age, hearing impairment, and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13585 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2013-11-13
    3. A system for recording of auditory evoked responses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A system for recording of auditory evoked responses
    2000 (English)In: Technology and Health Care, ISSN 0928-7329, E-ISSN 1878-7401, Vol. 8, p. 315-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A system for recording of evoked potentials from auditory stimulation was developed. The system consists of a PC equipped with an audio bandwidth board with analog input and output channels. The sound stimulus signal is generated in the computer, D/A converted, and via audio amplifier fed to earphones on the test subject. Auditory evoked potentials in response to sound stimuli are recorded via electrodes, amplified and filtered in an EEG recording system and fed to an A/D converter. The signal is analysed in the PC. The modular design of the program makes it a flexible system where stimulus and recording parameters can easily be modified and new applications can be added to standard clinical measurements.

    Three applications that are not possible with commercially available systems were developed and evaluated. a) A diagnostic procedure to verify hydrops in patients with Meniere's disease. b) Intraoperative recordings of auditory evoked potentials during neurootological surgery. c) Recording of mismatch negativity (MMN) potentials in evaluation of central auditory functions.

    Keywords
    evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials, evoked potentials
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27612 (URN)11258578 (PubMedID)12342 (Local ID)12342 (Archive number)12342 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 15.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Att förstå tal - mer än bara hörsel2005In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing and cognition in speech comprehension. Methods and applications2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central auditory processing is complex and can not be evaluated by a single method. This thesis focuses on assessment of some aspects of central auditory functions by the use of dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests that tax functions important for speech processing.

    Paper A deals with the cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly hearing-impaired subjects. It was found that different listening tasks in the dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability, shown by a varying degree of correlation between cognitive functions and dichotic test parameters. Age-related cognitive decline was strongly connected with problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    Paper B presents a new cognitive test battery sensitive for functions important for speech processing and understanding, performed in text, auditory and audiovisual modalities. The test battery was evaluated in four groups, differing in age and hearing status, and has proven to be useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input-modalities and the effect of age, hearingimpairment and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    In Paper C the test battery developed in Paper B was used to study listening situations with different kinds of background noise. Interfering noise at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio has significant negative effects on performance in speech processing tasks and on the effort perceived. Hearing-impaired subjects showed poorer results in noise with temporal variations, and elderly subjects were more distracted by noise with temporal variations, especially by noise with meaningful content. In noise, all subjects, particularly those with impaired hearing, were more dependent upon visual cues than in the quiet condition.

    Hearing aid benefit in speech processing with and without background noise was studied in Paper D. The test battery developed in Paper B was used together with a standard measure of speech recognition. With hearing aids, speech recognition was improved in the background condition without noise and in the background condition of ordinary speech. Significantly less effort was perceived in the cognitive tests when hearing aids were used, although only minor benefits of hearing aid amplification were seen. This underlines the importance of considering perceived effort as a dimension when evaluating hearing aid benefit, in further research as well as in clinical practice.

    The results from the studies contribute to the knowledge about speech processing but also to the search for more specific evaluation of speech understanding, incorporating both sensory and cognitive factors.

    List of papers
    1. Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons
    2001 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of chronologic age on central auditory functions using dichotic speech tests and to study whether and how the age effect in dichotic listening is related to cognitive ability.

    DESIGN: Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 bilaterally hearing-impaired subjects, with a pure-tone average better than 50 dB HL. They were between 42 and 84 yr of age and were divided into an older and a younger group comprising 15 subjects each. The dichotic test material were digits, low-redundancy sentences and consonant-vowel syllables. The subjects reported stimuli heard in both ears (free report) or in one ear (directed report to left or right ear). The cognitive test battery comprised tests focusing on short-term memory, verbal information-processing speed and phonologic processing.

    RESULTS: A decreased overall performance in all dichotic speech tests was observed in the older group. In the syllable test the older subjects showed poorer results when focusing on the stimuli heard in the left ear, as compared with when focusing on stimuli heard in the right ear, whereas the younger group showed almost equal results for left- and right ear-focusing conditions. An age effect was also seen in reaction times recorded in the cognitive tests and in the scores of the reading span test. These cognitive parameters correlate with the results of the dichotic test when focusing to the left, but not when focusing to the right in the directed report condition. In the free report condition the overall performance showed a high correlation with cognitive test parameters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of chronologic age in dichotic speech tests in the elderly have been verified. The degree of effect is dependent on test material, way of reporting and focusing condition. The different listening tasks in dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability shown by a varying degree of correlations between cognitive function and dichotic test parameters. Also, the results indicate a strong connection between age-related cognitive decline in the elderly and problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13584 (URN)10.1097/00003446-200104000-00005 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2016-03-14
    2. Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons
    2001 (English)In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive test battery sensitive to processes important for speech understanding was developed and investigated. Test stimuli are presented as text or in an auditory or audiovisual modality. The tests investigate phonologic processing and verbal information processing. Four subject groups, young/elderly with normal-hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment, each including 12 subjects, participated in the study. The only significant effect in the text modality was an age effect in the speed of performance, seen also in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities, the effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interactions between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and in reaction times, show that hearing-impaired subjects have difficulties without visual cues. Performing the test battery in noise made the tasks more difficult, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. Test-retest measurements showed learning effects and a modality-dependent variability. The test battery has proven useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input signals and the effects of age, hearing impairment, and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13585 (URN)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2013-11-13
    3. Cognitive performance and perceived effort in speech processing tasks: effects of different noise backgrounds in normals and in hearing-impaired subjects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive performance and perceived effort in speech processing tasks: effects of different noise backgrounds in normals and in hearing-impaired subjects
    2005 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 131-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive tests of speech understanding were administered (presented as text, or in auditory or audiovisual modality) and perceived effort was rated. This was done in four background conditions: in silence, and in three types of noise (S/N=+10 dB) varying in temporal structure and meaningfulness. Four groups of 12 subjects each (young/elderly with normal hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment) participated. The presence of noise had a negative effect on accuracy and speed of performance in the speech processing tasks, and resulted in higher scores of perceived effort, even when the stimuli were presented as text. Differences in performance between noise conditions existed. In the subjective scores, the noise with temporal variations, but without meaningful content, was the most disruptive of the three noise conditions. In the objective scores, the hearing-impaired subjects showed poorer results in noise with temporal variations. The elderly subjects were more distracted by noise with temporal variations, and especially by noise with meaningful content. In noise, all subjects, particularly those with impaired hearing, were more dependent upon visual cues than in the quiet condition.

    Keywords
    Speech processing; Cognitive tests; Perceived effort; Hearing; Age; Noise; Audio-visual contribution
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13586 (URN)10.1080/14992020500057244 (DOI)
    Available from: 2005-05-28 Created: 2005-05-28 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids
    2005 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Speech recognition and cognitive functions important for speech understanding were evaluated by objective measures and by scores of perceived effort, with and without hearing aids. The tests were performed in silence, and with background conditions of speech spectrum random noise and ordinary speech. One young and one elderly group of twelve hearing-impaired subjects each participated. Hearing aid use improved speech recognition in silence (7 dB) and in the condition with speech as background (2.5 dB S/N), but did not change the perceived effort scores. In the cognitive tests no hearing aid benefit was seen in objective measures, while there was an effect of hearing aid use in scores of perceived effort, subjects reported less effort. There were no age effects on hearing aid benefit. In conclusion, hearing aid use may result in reduced effort in listening tasks that is not associated with improvement in objective scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29202 (URN)10.1080/14992020500190011 (DOI)14477 (Local ID)14477 (Archive number)14477 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
  • 17.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    HINT Hearing in Noise Test, nu på svenska2006In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 3, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dikotiska Taltest.1998In: Läkaresällskapets riksstämma 1998., 1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dikotiska Taltest.1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Johansson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Dichotic speech tests1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no Suppl. 49, p. 35-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Diagnostiska verktyg för att bestämma auditiv profil. Rapport från EU-projektet HEARCOM.2007In: Svensk teknisk audiologisk förening (STAF), Visby, 2007., 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    EU-HearCom: Diagnostiska verktyg för att bestämma auditiv profil2007In: STAF,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing aid benefit in noise.2003In: In: EFAS, editor. European Federation of Audiology Congress, Kreta, 28 maj-1 juni, 2003; Kreta, Greece., 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing aid benefit in noise.2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing and cognition in speech recognition in noise2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening via Internet och telefon.2009In: In: Tema Hörsel. Jönköping, Sweden. 2009, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hörselscreening via Internet och telefon2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kognitionen påvirker taleforståelsen.2008In: NYT-VIDENCENTRET FOR DÖVBLINDBLIVNE, no 4, p. 38-39Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Speech processing in the elderly.2004In: In: NAS, editor. Hearing in the Elderly, 1st Internationell Congress on Geriatric/Gerontologic Audiology, Stockholm Sweden, June 6-9 2004;, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Översikt av EU-projektet HearCom.2008In: In: Nordisk Audiologisk Sällskaps 20. kongress, 4-7 juni 2008, pp. 49. Reykjavik, Island: NAS., 2008, p. 49-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Översikt av EU-projektet HearCom2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A Swedish version of the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT) for measurement of speech recognition2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish Hearing In Noise Test (HINT), consisting of everyday sentences to be used in an adaptive procedure to estimate the speech recognition thresholds in noise and quiet, has been developed. The material consists of 250 sentences, with a length of five to nine syllables, normalized for naturalness, difficulty and reliability. The sentences were recorded with a female speaker. From the sentences, 25 phonemically balanced lists were created. All lists fluctuate less than 1 dB of the overall mean. The standard deviation of the test-retest difference is 0.94 dB when testing with one list, and decreases to 0.68 dB and 0.56 dB for two and three lists, respectively. The average speech recognition thresholds in noise for the Swedish sentences were -3.0 dB signal/noise ratio (SD = 1.1 dB). The present study has resulted in a well-defined and internationally comparable set of sentences, which can be used in Swedish audiological rehabilitation and research to measure speech recognition in noise and quiet. © 2006 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 33.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hearing in noise test (HINT) på svenska med kvinnlig och manlig röst.2006In: In: TEMA HÖRSEL, . Göteborg, SWEDEN, Abstract, p22, 2006, p. 22-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Hearing in noise test (HINT) på svenska, med kvinnlig och manlig röst2006In: Tema Hörsel,2006, 2006, p. 22-22Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 35.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    A cognitive test-battery based on text, auditory and audio-visual stimuli. Evaluation in young and elderly, normal hearing and hearing-impaired subjects2003In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive effects in dichotic speech testing in elderly persons2001In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 120-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of chronologic age on central auditory functions using dichotic speech tests and to study whether and how the age effect in dichotic listening is related to cognitive ability.

    DESIGN: Dichotic speech tests and cognitive tests were performed on 30 bilaterally hearing-impaired subjects, with a pure-tone average better than 50 dB HL. They were between 42 and 84 yr of age and were divided into an older and a younger group comprising 15 subjects each. The dichotic test material were digits, low-redundancy sentences and consonant-vowel syllables. The subjects reported stimuli heard in both ears (free report) or in one ear (directed report to left or right ear). The cognitive test battery comprised tests focusing on short-term memory, verbal information-processing speed and phonologic processing.

    RESULTS: A decreased overall performance in all dichotic speech tests was observed in the older group. In the syllable test the older subjects showed poorer results when focusing on the stimuli heard in the left ear, as compared with when focusing on stimuli heard in the right ear, whereas the younger group showed almost equal results for left- and right ear-focusing conditions. An age effect was also seen in reaction times recorded in the cognitive tests and in the scores of the reading span test. These cognitive parameters correlate with the results of the dichotic test when focusing to the left, but not when focusing to the right in the directed report condition. In the free report condition the overall performance showed a high correlation with cognitive test parameters.

    CONCLUSIONS: Effects of chronologic age in dichotic speech tests in the elderly have been verified. The degree of effect is dependent on test material, way of reporting and focusing condition. The different listening tasks in dichotic tests put different demands on cognitive ability shown by a varying degree of correlations between cognitive function and dichotic test parameters. Also, the results indicate a strong connection between age-related cognitive decline in the elderly and problems to perceive stimuli presented to the left ear.

  • 37.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of a cognitive test battery in young and elderly normal-hearing and hearing-impaired persons2001In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 357-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cognitive test battery sensitive to processes important for speech understanding was developed and investigated. Test stimuli are presented as text or in an auditory or audiovisual modality. The tests investigate phonologic processing and verbal information processing. Four subject groups, young/elderly with normal-hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment, each including 12 subjects, participated in the study. The only significant effect in the text modality was an age effect in the speed of performance, seen also in the auditory and audiovisual modalities. In the auditory and audiovisual modalities, the effects of hearing status and modality were seen in accuracy parameters. Interactions between hearing status and modality, both in accuracy and in reaction times, show that hearing-impaired subjects have difficulties without visual cues. Performing the test battery in noise made the tasks more difficult, especially in the auditory modality and for the elderly, affecting both accuracy and speed. Test-retest measurements showed learning effects and a modality-dependent variability. The test battery has proven useful in assessing the relative contribution of different input signals and the effects of age, hearing impairment, and visual contribution on functions important for speech processing.

  • 38.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech Processing in the Elderly2004In: 1st International Congress on Geriatric/Gerontologic Audiology,2004, 2004, p. 73-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 39.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Speech understanding in quiet and noise, with and without hearing aids2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 574-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech recognition and cognitive functions important for speech understanding were evaluated by objective measures and by scores of perceived effort, with and without hearing aids. The tests were performed in silence, and with background conditions of speech spectrum random noise and ordinary speech. One young and one elderly group of twelve hearing-impaired subjects each participated. Hearing aid use improved speech recognition in silence (7 dB) and in the condition with speech as background (2.5 dB S/N), but did not change the perceived effort scores. In the cognitive tests no hearing aid benefit was seen in objective measures, while there was an effect of hearing aid use in scores of perceived effort, subjects reported less effort. There were no age effects on hearing aid benefit. In conclusion, hearing aid use may result in reduced effort in listening tasks that is not associated with improvement in objective scores. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Department of Psychology , Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Department of Psychology , Uppsala University , Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience , Psychiatry Section , Karolinska Institutet , Stockholm, Sweden.
    Implicit memory bias for eating- and body appearance-related sentences in eating disorders: An application of Jacoby's white noise task2008In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 135-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jacoby's white noise task and an explicit recognition task were used to investigate whether individuals with eating disorders demonstrate implicit memory bias and explicit memory bias, respectively, for information related to eating and body appearance. Included were 33 women with eating disorders (seven with anorexia nervosa and 26 with bulimia nervosa), 29 with nonclinical eating disorder‐related concerns, and 36 healthy controls. Results showed partial support for implicit memory bias but no support for explicit memory bias. These findings suggest that eating disorders may be characterized by relative initial automatic bias for eating disorder‐relevant information but not by bias at later stages of information processing. However, previous studies have demonstrated explicit memory bias in eating disorders, which is inconsistent with this interpretation. Future research is required to clarify the precise cognitive biases associated with eating disorders.

  • 41.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. ENT/Audiology and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate how well normal-hearing adults recalled Swedish (native) and English (non-native) fictional stories masked by speech in Swedish and English. Each story was 15 min long and divided into three parts of 5 min each. One part was masked by Swedish speech, one by English speech and one was presented unmasked as a baseline. Audibility was rated immediately after listening to each fragment. Episodic long-term memory was assessed using 24 multiple choice questions (4AFC). Every 8 questions corresponded to 5 min of recorded story and included 4 simple and 4 complex questions. Participants also performed complex span test of working memory capacity and proficiency tests in Swedish and English. The main result was that the stories in quiet were significantly better recalled than the stories masked by Swedish. Although the stimuli were correctly identified at the perceptual level, challenging listening

  • 42.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana A.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. ENT/Audiology and EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to address how 43 normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners subjectively experienced the disturbance generated by four masker conditions (i.e., stationary noise, fluctuating noise, Swedish two-talker babble and English two-talker babble) while listening to speech in two target languages, i.e., Swedish (native) or English (non-native). The participants were asked to evaluate their noise-disturbance experience on a continuous scale from 0 to 10 immediately after having performed each listening condition. The data demonstrated a three-way interaction effect between target language, masker condition, and group (HI versus NH). The HI listeners experienced the Swedish-babble masker as significantly more disturbing for the native target language (Swedish) than for the non-native language (English). Additionally, this masker was significantly more disturbing than each of the other masker types during the perception of Swedish target speech. The NH listeners, on the other hand, indicated that the Swedish speech-masker was more disturbing than the stationary and the fluctuating noise-maskers for the perception of English target speech. The NH listeners perceived more disturbance from the speech maskers than the noise maskers. The HI listeners did not perceive the speech maskers as generally more disturbing than the noise maskers. However, they had particular difficulty with the perception of native speech masked by native babble, a common condition in daily-life listening conditions. These results suggest that the characteristics of the different maskers applied in the current study seem to affect the perceived disturbance differently in HI and NH listeners. There was no general difference in the perceived disturbance across conditions between the HI listeners and the NH listeners.

  • 43.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vrije University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers2015In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 19, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated how hearing-impaired listeners perceive native (Swedish) and nonnative (English) speech in the presence of noise- and speech maskers. Speech reception thresholds were measured for four different masker types for each target language. The maskers consisted of stationary and fluctuating noise and two-talker babble in Swedish and English. Twenty-three hearing-impaired native Swedish listeners participated, aged between 28 and 65 years. The participants also performed cognitive tests of working memory capacity in Swedish and English, nonverbal reasoning, and an English proficiency test. Results indicated that the speech maskers were more interfering than the noise maskers in both target languages. The larger need for phonetic and semantic cues in a nonnative language makes a stationary masker relatively more challenging than a fluctuating-noise masker. Better hearing acuity (pure tone average) was associated with better perception of the target speech in Swedish, and better English proficiency was associated with better speech perception in English. Larger working memory and better pure tone averages were related to the better perception of speech masked with fluctuating noise in the nonnative language. This suggests that both are relevant in highly taxing conditions. A large variance in performance between the listeners was observed, especially for speech perception in the nonnative language.

  • 44.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. ENT/audiology, VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The effects of native and non-native target and distractor language on speech perception are modulated by non-native proficiency2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying speech in noisy conditions requires both native and non-native listeners to cope with decreased intelligibility and thereby an increased cognitive load. The current study examined in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions how energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers interfered with target speech in Swedish (native language) and English (non-native language). The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, nonverbal reasoning and working memory capacity; the latter in both Swedish and English. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, 13 females and 10 males, age-range between 28 and 64 years.The main result was that the target language, masker type and English proficiency all affected speech perception. The SRT’s were better when the target language was Swedish. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native language. High English proficiency was beneficial in three out of four conditions when the target language was English. The findings suggest that English proficiency is essential regarding automaticity in perceiving this non-native language

  • 45.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    The influence of non-native language proficiency on speech perception perfomance2014In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, no 651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions, including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating noise) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. Our approach with focus on proficiency and the assessment of external as well as internal, listener-related factors allowed us to examine which variables explained intra- and interindividual differences in native and non-native speech perception performance. The main result was that in the non-native target, the level of English proficiency is a decisive factor for speech intelligibility in noise. High English proficiency improved performance in all four conditions when the target language was English. The informational maskers were interfering more with perception than energetic maskers, specifically in the non-native target. The study also confirmed that the SRTs were better when target language was native compared to non-native.

  • 46.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    As clear as crystal or all Greek...? The combined effect of hearing impairment and L2 on speech perception in noise.2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Kilman, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    As clear as crystal or all Greek...? The combined effects of hearing impairment and language on speech perception in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cognitive performance and perceived effort in speech processing tasks: effects of different noise backgrounds in normals and in hearing-impaired subjects2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 131-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive tests of speech understanding were administered (presented as text, or in auditory or audiovisual modality) and perceived effort was rated. This was done in four background conditions: in silence, and in three types of noise (S/N=+10 dB) varying in temporal structure and meaningfulness. Four groups of 12 subjects each (young/elderly with normal hearing and young/elderly with hearing impairment) participated. The presence of noise had a negative effect on accuracy and speed of performance in the speech processing tasks, and resulted in higher scores of perceived effort, even when the stimuli were presented as text. Differences in performance between noise conditions existed. In the subjective scores, the noise with temporal variations, but without meaningful content, was the most disruptive of the three noise conditions. In the objective scores, the hearing-impaired subjects showed poorer results in noise with temporal variations. The elderly subjects were more distracted by noise with temporal variations, and especially by noise with meaningful content. In noise, all subjects, particularly those with impaired hearing, were more dependent upon visual cues than in the quiet condition.

  • 49.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    A. EU-HEARCOM: Översikt över pågående EU-Hörselprojekt.2007In: Svensk teknisk audiologisk förening (STAF), Visby, 2007., 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology.
    Arbetsminne och lexikal snabbhet vid taluppfattningsmätning i brus. TeMA Hörsel2012In: TeMA Hörsel 2012, 28-30 mars, Program- och abstractbok, 2012, p. 44-Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 119
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf