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  • 1.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Division of Biological Psychology, Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear, pain and stress hormones during childbirth2005In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To investigate the course of fear, pain and stress hormones during labor, and the associations between fear, pain, stress hormones and duration of labor in nulliparous women with and without epidural analgesia (EDA).

    Method.  One day during gestation weeks 37–39, urinary and salivary samples were collected to measure catecholamines and cortisol. Hourly during labor, the participants answered the Delivery Fear Scale and a pain intensity scale, and urinary and salivary samples were collected to measure stress hormones.

    Results. The course of fear, pain and stress hormones differed throughout labor in women with and without EDA. Pain and cortisol increased throughout labor in women without EDA. Women who received EDA had more fear, but not more pain, before the administration of the EDA than women who did not receive EDA. Pain, fear and catecholamines decreased when women received EDA, but fear and pain increased again later in labor. Fear and pain correlated, as well as levels of fear in the different phases of labor. During phase one of labor epinephrine and duration of the phase were negatively correlated.

    Conclusion.  The course of fear, pain and concentrations of stress hormones differed, highly influenced by the administration of EDA. Fear and pain correlated more pronounced than stress hormones and fear, pain and duration of labor.

  • 2.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear of childbirth before, during, and after childbirth2006In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Only scanty research exists about the relationship between women's expectations during pregnancy and their experiences as reported during the actual process of labor and afterwards. The aims of the present study were: 1. to investigate the associations between fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum and fear and pain during early active labor (phase 1: cervix dilatation 3–5 cm), and 2. to explore possible differences regarding fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum between women who did or did not receive epidural analgesia during labor.

    Methods. Fear of childbirth was measured in 47 nulliparous women during gestation weeks 37–39 by means of the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ version A). During early active labor we measured women's fear (Delivery Fear Scale) and their experiences of pain (a pain intensity scale). Finally, fear after childbirth (W-DEQ version B) was measured two hours, two days, and five weeks after delivery.

    Results. A positive correlation appeared between fear of childbirth during pregnancy, postpartum, and early active labor. There were no differences in fear of childbirth during late pregnancy between women who received epidural analgesia and those who did not. Postpartum fear was higher in the women who had received epidural analgesia.

    Conclusions. Pregnant women who fear childbirth are prone to report fear during the actual labor and postpartum. The administration of epidural analgesia is not a sufficient response to women's fear during the process of labor.

  • 3.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Melin, Bo
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Catecholamine and cortisol reaction to childbirth2001In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 50-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to study the stressfulness of childbirth is to examine the output of stress hormones. In this study, urinary catecholamines and salivary cortisol from 50 primiparous women were collected for 1 day during gestational weeks 37 to 39, hourly during labor and delivery, and 2 hr and 2 days postpartum. All three stress hormones increased statistically significantly from pregnancy to labor. The increase in adrenaline and cortisol was more than 500%, and the increase in noradrenaline was about 50%. After labor, the output decreased but not statistically significantly below the levels during late pregnancy. Hormone levels during late pregnancy, during labor and delivery, and during the period postpartum mostly did not correlate systematically. However, noradrenaline and adrenaline, as well as adrenaline and cortisol, were positively correlated during labor. After administration of epidural analgesia, there was a moderate but significant decrease in noradrenaline and adrenaline, whereas cortisol did not change. In conclusion, the results of this study support the assumption that childbirth is a very stressful event and that the stress responses vary considerably among women. The substantial increase of adrenaline and cortisol compared with noradrenaline indicates that mental stress is more dominant than physical stress during labor.

  • 4.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Can women's cognitive appraisals be registered throughout childbirth?2000In: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation, ISSN 0378-7346, E-ISSN 1423-002X, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the present study were: (a) to examine whether it was possible to measure women’s cognitive appraisals hourly during the whole process of labor and delivery, and (b) to explore how the appraisals varied during labor. Measurements from 12 nulliparous women are presented. The findings indicate that it is possible to study psychological appraisals directly, in detail and continuously during the process of labor and delivery. The women’s cognitive appraisals varied throughout labor both per individual woman and between the participating women.

  • 5.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear during labor2001In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 315-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The aims of the present study were to compare primiparous and multiparous women’s experiences of fear of delivery during an early stage of active labor (cervix dilatation 3–5 centimeters) and to study whether fear of delivery, measured during the early stage of active labor, was a predictor of the amount of pain relief received during the remaining part of labor (cervix dilatation 5 cm – partus), of the duration of the remaining part of labor, and of the occurrence of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section.

    Method. Thirty-five primiparous and 39 multiparous women answered the Delivery Fear Scale (DFS) once during the early stage of labor and before they had received any pain relief.

    Results. Primiparous women reported higher levels of fear than multiparous women did. Fear during the first phase of labor predicted only the total amount of pain relief received during labor.

    Conclusion. The clinical implications of the study are that the delivery staff should consider women’s fear during labor and pay attention especially to primiparous women’s increased risk of higher levels of fear during an early stage of active labor, as compared with multiparous women’s. The challenge for staff of a delivery ward is to support the woman in labor in a way that decreases fear, which in turn might reduce the woman’s need of pain relief.

  • 6.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pre- and postpartum fear of childbirth and fear and pain during laborManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of the present study were 1) to investigate the associations between fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum and fear and pain during labor (phase 1: cervix dilatation 3-5 cm), and 2) to explore possible differences regarding fear of childbirth during pregnancy and postpartum between women who did or did not receive epidural analgesia (EDA) during labor.

    Method. During gestation weeks 37-39, in 47 nulliparous women fear of childbirth was measured by means of the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) version A. Early during labor (labor phase I = cervix dilatation 3-5cm) the women's fear (Delivery Fear Scale) and their experiences of pain (a pain intensity scale) were measured hourly. Finally, fear after childbirth (W-DEQ version B) was measured two hours, two days, and five weeks after delivery.

    Results. Fear of childbirth during pregnancy and in the three postpartum measures was positively related to fear during labor, phase I. Pain during phase 1 of labor was neither associated with fear of childbirth measured during late pregnancy, nor with postpartum fear. There were no differences in fear of childbirth during late pregnancy between those women who received EDA and those who did not. Postpartum fear was higher in those women who had received EDA.

    Conclusion. Late pregnant women who fear childbirth are prone to have a fearful delivery, as reported during the actual labor and postpartum.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Walen, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hallberg, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Paxling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlin, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Almlöv, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Källström, Reidar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umeå University, Department Psychol, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden .
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Randomized Controlled Trial of Guided Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction2011In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 2800-2809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Men with erectile dysfunction are often worried about their condition, have interpersonal difficulties, and have a reduced quality of life. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has been shown effective for a number of health problems but evidence is limited concerning the treatment of erectile dysfunction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim. The study investigated the effects of ICBT for erectile dysfunction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. Seventy-eight men were included in the study and randomized to either ICBT or to a control group, which was an online discussion group. Treatment consisted of a 7-week Web-based program with e-mail-based therapist support. Each therapist spent an average of 55 minutes per participant. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure. The International Index of Erectile Functioning five-item version was administered via the telephone at pretreatment, post-treatment, and 6 months after receiving ICBT. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. At post-treatment, the treatment group had significantly greater improvements with regard to erectile performance compared with the control group. Between-group differences at post-treatment were small (d = 0.1), but increased at the 6-month follow-up (d = 0.88). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. This study provides support for the use of ICBT as a possible treatment format for erectile dysfunction.

  • 8.
    Ayers, S.
    et al.
    City University of London, England.
    Bond, R.
    University of Sussex, England.
    Bertullies, S.
    City University of London, England.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The aetiology of post-traumatic stress following childbirth: a meta-analysis and theoretical framework2016In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1121-1134Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is evidence that 3.17% of women report post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childbirth. This meta-analysis synthesizes research on vulnerability and risk factors for birth-related PTSD and refines a diathesis-stress model of its aetiology. Systematic searches were carried out on PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science using PTSD terms crossed with childbirth terms. Studies were included if they reported primary research that examined factors associated with birth-related PTSD measured at least 1 month after birth. In all, 50 studies (n = 21 429) from 15 countries fulfilled inclusion criteria. Pre-birth vulnerability factors most strongly associated with PTSD were depression in pregnancy (r = 0.51), fear of childbirth (r = 0.41), poor health or complications in pregnancy (r = 0.38), and a history of PTSD (r = 0.39) and counselling for pregnancy or birth (r = 0.32). Risk factors in birth most strongly associated with PTSD were negative subjective birth experiences (r = 0.59), having an operative birth (assisted vaginal or caesarean, r = 0.48), lack of support (r = -0.38) and dissociation (r = 0.32). After birth, PTSD was associated with poor coping and stress (r = 0.30), and was highly co-morbid with depression (r = 0.60). Moderator analyses showed that the effect of poor health or complications in pregnancy was more apparent in high-risk samples. The results of this meta-analysis are used to update a diathesis-stress model of the aetiology of postpartum PTSD and can be used to inform screening, prevention and intervention in maternity care.

  • 9.
    Ayers, Susan
    et al.
    University of Sussex.
    Joseph, Stephen
    University of Nottingham.
    McKenzie-McHarg, Kirstie
    University of Oxford.
    Slade, Pauline
    University of Sheffield.
    Wijma , Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Post-traumatic stress disorder following childbirth: current issues and recommendations for future research2008In: Journal of psychosomatic obstetrics and gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X , Vol. 29, no 4, p. 240-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An increasing body of research shows that a proportion of women experience significant symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following childbirth.

    Aims and method: An international group of researchers, clinicians, and user-group representatives met in 2006 to discuss the research to date into PTSD following childbirth, issues and debates within the field, and recommendations for future research. This paper reports the content of four discussions on (1) prevalence and comorbidity, (2) screening and treatment, (3) diagnostic and conceptual issues, and (4) theoretical issues.

    Conclusions: Current knowledge from the perspectives of the researchers is summarized, dilemmas are articulated and recommendations for future research into PTSD following childbirth are made. In addition, methodological and conceptual issues are considered.

  • 10.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study2015In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 58, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a highly distressing and impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in appearance. Patients with BDD present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in representative samples of the general population and have demonstrated that this disorder is relatively common. Our primary objective was to assess the prevalence of BDD in the Swedish population because no data are currently available. Methods: In the current cross-sectional study, 2891 randomly selected Swedish women aged 18-60 years participated. The occurrence of BDD was assessed using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), which is a validated self-report measure derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria for BDD. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: The prevalence of BDD among Swedish women was 2.1%. The women with BDD had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than the women without BDD. Depression (HADS depression score greater than= 8) and anxiety (HADS anxiety score greater than= 8) were reported by 42% and 72% of the women with BDD, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that BDD is relatively common among Swedish women (2.1%) and that it is associated with significant morbidity.

  • 11.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire in a community sample of Swedish women2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 2, p. 647-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is characterized by a distressing and impairing preoccupation with a nonexistent or slight defect in appearance. Patients with the disorder present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in the general population and have shown that the disorder is relatively common. To date, no BDD assessment instruments have been validated in the general population. Our aim was to validate a brief self-screening instrument, the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), in a female community sample. The BDDQ was translated into Swedish and filled out by 2891 women from a randomly selected community sample. The questionnaire was validated in a subsample of 88 women, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) together with clinical assessment as the gold standard. In the validation subsample, the BDDQ showed good concurrent validity, with a sensitivity of 94%, a specificity of 90% and a likelihood ratio of 9.4. The questionnaire can therefore be of value when screening for BDD in female populations.

  • 12.
    Ekback, Maria
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benzein , Eva
    Kalmar University.
    It Is Always on My Mind: Womens Experiences of Their Bodies When Living With Hirsutism2009In: HEALTH CARE FOR WOMEN INTERNATIONAL, ISSN 0739-9332 , Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women suffer from excessive hair growth, often in combination with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). It is unclear how hirsutism influences such womens experiences of their bodies. Our aim is to describe and interpret womens experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism. Interviews were conducted with 10 women with hirsutism. We used a qualitative latent content analysis. Four closely intertwined themes were disclosed: the body was experienced as a yoke, a freak, a disgrace, and as a prison. Hirsutism deeply affects womens experiences of their bodies in a negative way.

  • 13.
    Engman, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Itch and burning pain in women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis2007In: Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, ISSN 0092-623X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 171-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty-three women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis and 27 asymptomatic women estimated sensations of burning pain and itch at 20 standardized moments during a standardized penetration situation, including vaginal muscle contractions. Forty-three women with partial vaginismus (81.1%) reported burning pain, 23 (43.4%) itch, and 22 (41.5%) both complaints, compared to 0% of the asymptomatic women. In 17 of 22 cases, burning pain preceded the appearance of itch and in four cases the two complaints coincided. The median time from the moment when burning pain started until itch appeared was 150 seconds.

  • 14.
    Engman, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Long-term coital behaviour in women treated with cognitive behaviour therapy for superficial coital pain and vaginismus2010In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 193-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate long-term coital behaviour in women treated with cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for superficial coital pain and vaginismus. Data were taken from a questionnaire concerning long-term coital behaviour sent to 59 women who presented to Linköping University Hospital because of superficial coital pain, had been diagnosed with vaginismus, and had been treated with CBT. Data were also traced from therapy records: mean follow-up time was 39 months, the women had suffered for an average of almost 4 years, and required a mean of 14 treatment sessions. Forty-four of the 59 women returned the questionnaire, for a response rate of 74.6%. At follow-up, 81% of the treated women had had intercourse. A majority (61%) rated their ability to have intercourse without pain as 6 or higher (on a scale from 0-10), and 61% rated their ability to enjoy intercourse as 6 or higher (on a scale from 0-10). The proportion of women with positive treatment outcome at follow-up ranged from 81% (able to have intercourse) to 6% (able to have pain-free intercourse). An ability to have intercourse at end of therapy was maintained at follow-up. Two-thirds of the women reported high fulfillment of individual treatment goals. At follow-up, the women estimated a significantly higher self-worth as sex partners, and as women and human beings, than before treatment. Twelve per cent of the original sample had healed after a few assessment sessions and without treatment.

  • 15.
    Engman, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Postcoital burning pain and pain at micturition: early symptoms in women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis?2008In: Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, ISSN 0092-623X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 413-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-four women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis participated in a semi-structured telephone interview concerning early signs and development of their pain symptoms during/after intercourse. At the onset of the problem, pain after intercourse was more common than pain during penetration. Pain intensity during penetration increased from the onset of the problem to when the women ceased having intercourse. Pain during penetration lasted for 1 minute, and was most often described as sharp/incisive/bursting, while pain after intercourse had a duration of 2 hours and was described as burning and/or smarting. Post-coital pain during micturition was described by 70% of the women.

  • 16.
    Fallsberg, MB
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of health and environment.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Student attitudes towards the goals of an inter-professional training ward.2000In: Medical teacher, ISSN 0142-159X, E-ISSN 1466-187X, Vol. 21, p. 576-581Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kjærgaard, Hanne
    et al.
    Juliane Marie Centre for Women, Children and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dykes, Anna-Karin
    The Unit of Caring Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fear of childbirth in obstetrically low‐risk nulliparous women in Sweden and Denmark2008In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, ISSN 0264-6838, E-ISSN 1469-672X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 340-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of troublesome fear of childbirth (FOC) in Western countries is about 20%, of which approximately 6–10% suffer from severe FOC that impacts daily life. The countries of Sweden and Denmark are quite alike as far as childbirth culture is concerned. However, to some extent they differ in the organisation of midwifery care during the antenatal and labour period, respectively, and this may influence women's FOC. The aims of this study were to compare FOC among Danish and Swedish nulliparous women and to investigate a possible difference in FOC between women who, during pregnancy, had met the midwife who they were subsequently coincidentally allocated to receive labour care from and women who had not previously met the midwife. In total 165 women participated, comprising 55 Swedes and 110 Danes, of whom 55 among the latter group had met the midwife during pregnancy. Severe FOC was found in 10%. There were no differences between the Swedish women and the Danish women who had or had not met the midwife. Fear of childbirth measured in gestational week 37 correlated positively with fear at admission to the labour ward.

  • 18.
    Kjölhede, Preben
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Borendal Wodlin, Ninnie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impact of stress coping capacity on recovery from abdominal hysterectomy in a fast-track programme: a prospective longitudinal study2012In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 119, no 8, p. 998-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To evaluate the effect of stress coping capacity in combination with mode of anaesthesia on postoperative recovery in fast-track abdominal hysterectomy. Design Prospective longitudinal study. Setting Five hospitals in the south-east of Sweden. Population A cohort of 162 women undergoing fast-track abdominal hysterectomy for benign conditions. Methods Self-administered questionnaires, the Stress Coping Inventory (SCI) and the Swedish Postoperative Symptom Questionnaire (SPSQ), and clinical information were collected prospectively. Stress coping capacity was categorised as high or low according to the summed score of the SCI. Comparisons of effect variables were adjusted using a propensity score-matching model. Main outcome measures Associations between stress coping capacity and hospital stay, sick leave, use of analgesic and self-reported postoperative symptoms. Results Women with high stress coping capacity had a significantly shorter sick leave, experienced postoperative symptoms significantly less often, and with lower intensity, than women with low stress coping capacity. With the exception of symptom intensity, these findings were related to having had the operation under spinal anaesthesia as opposed to general anaesthesia. Hospital stay, use of analgesics and abdominal pain were not related to stress coping capacity. Conclusions In patients for whom spinal anaesthesia was applied, high stress coping seems to be a quality that helps patients manage the burden of surgery. It is desirable for the individual, as well as for the healthcare system, to enhance recovery by using intervention programmes designed to improve or manage stress coping, particularly for individuals with low stress coping capacity. This recommendation merits further investigation.

  • 19.
    Klabbers, Gert A.
    et al.
    Therapy Centre Ietje Kooistraweg 25, Netherlands.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Paarlberg, K. Marieke
    Gelre Teaching Hospital Apeldoorn, Netherlands.
    Emons, Wilco H. M.
    Tilburg University, Netherlands.
    Vingerhoets, Ad J. J. M.
    Tilburg University, Netherlands.
    Treatment of severe fear of childbirth with haptotherapy: design of a multicenter randomized controlled trial2014In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 14, no 385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About six percent of pregnant women suffer from severe fear of childbirth. These women are at increased risk of obstetric labour and delivery interventions and pre- and postpartum complications, e.g., preterm delivery, emergency caesarean section, caesarean section at maternal request, severe postpartum fear of childbirth and trauma anxiety. During the last decade, there is increasing clinical evidence suggesting that haptotherapy might be an effective intervention to reduce fear of childbirth in pregnant women. The present study has been designed to evaluate the effects of such intervention. Methods/Design: Included are singleton pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth, age greater than= 18 year, randomised into three arms: (1) treatment with haptotherapy, (2) internet psycho-education or (3) care as usual. The main study outcome is fear of childbirth. Measurements are taken at baseline in gestation week 20-24, directly after the intervention is completed in gestation week 36, six weeks postpartum and six months postpartum. Secondary study outcomes are distress, general anxiety, depression, somatization, social support, mother-child bonding, pregnancy and delivery complications, traumatic anxiety symptoms, duration of delivery, birth weight, and care satisfaction. Discussion: The treatment, a standard haptotherapeutical treatment for pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth, implies teaching a combination of skills in eight one hour sessions. The internet group follows an eight-week internet course containing information about pregnancy and childbirth comparable to childbirth classes. The control group has care as usual according to the standards of the Royal Dutch Organisation of Midwives and the Dutch Organization of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

  • 20.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Applied relaxation and oral estradiol treatment of vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women2005In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 154-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate and compare the effects of applied relaxation and oral estradiol treatment on hot flushes, mood and psychological wellbeing in postmenopausal women.

    Patients and methods: In a prospective study, 30 postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms were randomized to applied relaxation or oral estradiol treatment during 12 weeks with 6 months follow-up. Number and severity of flushes were registered daily and Kupperman’s Index and a general estimate of climacteric symptoms, Mood Scale and Symptom Check List were completed at baseline, 4, 8 and 12 weeks of treatment, and 3 and 6 months after therapy.

    Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, the number of flushes/24 h decreased significantly over time in both treatment groups. In the group receiving applied relaxation, the mean number of flushes/24 h decreased from 6.0 (95% CI 4.5–7.6) to 3.0 (95% CI 2.1–3.9) after 12 weeks of treatment. The mean number of flushes/24 h was 1.7 (95% CI 0.7–2.5) at 6 months follow-up; i.e. a 72% decrease. In the estrogen group, the mean number of flushes/24 h decreased from 8.4 to 0.8; i.e a 90% decrease in the number of flushes after 12 weeks of treatment. The significant change in flushes reached after 12 weeks of treatment and remained to 6 months after end of treatment in both groups. Estrogen therapy reduced flushes significantly faster than applied relaxation. General climacteric symptoms according to the Visual Analogue Scale and the Kupperman’s Index decreased significantly over time in both groups. General mood (Mood Scale) increased significantly in the estrogen group, but not in the group receiving applied relaxation. Psychological wellbeing according to Symptom Checklist, increased significantly from baseline to 12 weeks in both groups.

    Conclusions: We suggest that applied relaxation may be used as an alternative treatment of vasomotor symptoms for postmenopausal women but should be further evaluated.

  • 21.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vasomotor symptoms decrease in women with breast cancer randomized to treatment with applied relaxation or electro-acupuncture: a preliminary study2005In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of applied  relaxation and electro-acupuncture on vasomotor symptoms in women treated for breast cancer.

    Methods: Thirty-eight postmenopausal women with  breast cancer and vasomotor symptoms were randomized to treatment with electro-acupuncture (n = 19) or applied relaxation (n = 19) during 12 weeks. The number of hot flushes was registered daily in a logbook before and during treatment and after 3 and 6 months of follow-up.

    Results: Thirty-one women completed 12 weeks of treatment and 6  months of follow-up. After 12 weeks of applied relaxation, the number of flushes/24 h had decreased from 9.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 6.6-11.9) at baseline to 4.5 (95% CI 3.2-5.8) and to 3.9 (95% CI 1.8-6.0) at 6 months follow-up (n = 14). The flushes/24 h were reduced from 8.4 (95% CI 6.6-10.2) to 4.1 (95% CI 3.0-5.2) after 12 weeks of treatment with electro-acupuncture and to 3.5 (95% CI 1.7-5.3) after 6 months follow-up (n = 17). In both groups, the mean Kupperman Index score was significantly reduced after treatment and remained unchanged 6 months after end of treatment.

    Conclusion: We suggest that applied relaxation and  electro-acupuncture should be further evaluated as possible treatments for vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women with breast cancer.

  • 22.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Psychological well-being improves in women with breast cancer after treatment with applied relaxation or electro-acupuncture for vasomotor symptom2006In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 193-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of applied relaxation and electro-acupuncture (EA) on psychological well-being in breast cancer-treated women with vasomotor symptoms. Thirty-eight breast cancer-treated postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms were included in the study. They were randomized to either treatment with electro-acupuncture (EA) (N = 19, three of them with tamoxifen) or applied relaxation (AR) (n = 19, five of them with tamoxifen) over a 12-week study period with six months follow-up. Vasomotor symptoms were registered daily. A visual analog scale was used to assess climacteric symptom, estimation of general well-being was made using the Symptom Checklist, and mood using the Mood Scale. These were applied during treatment and at follow-up. In total 31 women completed 12 weeks of treatment and six months of follow-up. Hot flushes were reduced by more than 50%. Climacteric symptoms significantly decreased during treatment and remained so six months after treatment in both groups. Psychological well-being significantly improved during therapy and at follow-up visits in both groups. Mood improved significantly in the electro-acupuncture treated group. In conclusion psychological well-being improved in women with breast cancer randomized to treatment with either AR or EA for vasomotor symptoms and we therefore suggest that further studies should be performed in order to evaluate and develop these alternative therapies. © 2006 Informa UK Ltd.

  • 23.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The relationship between stress-coping and vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women1998In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective was to assess whether menopausal women with vasomotor symptoms had a lower stress-coping than menopausal women without symptoms and if stress-coping changed when vasomotor symptoms had been effectively treated with estrogens. The objective was also to assess whether menopausal women, effectively treated for vasomotor symptoms, had a higher neuroticism score than women without such symptoms.

    Methods: Two groups of physically and mentally healthy postmenopausal women were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital of Linköping, Sweden. Sixteen women with vasomotor symptoms (target group) were treated with oral 17β-estradiol, 2 mg/day during 3 months. A comparison group was formed comprising 17 women without vasomotor symptoms. The Kupperman Index was used to cover menopausal characteristics in all women at baseline as well as at the second visit after 3 months. Stress-coping was measured by means of the Stress Coping Inventory, which is an instrument developed to measure of the individual's appraisal of having adaptive resources for handling stressful situations. At the second visit all women were also asked to complete the Eysenck Personality Inventory.

    Results: Women in the target group had a significantly lower stress-coping than women in the comparison group at baseline as well as after 3 months. Stress-coping did not change after estrogen therapy, although the vasomotor symptoms had virtually disappeared. Women in the target group successfully treated for vasomotor symptoms, had a significantly higher neuroticism score compared to the comparison group.

    Conclusions: Differences in behaviour patterns and personality are probably two reasons why some women report or seek advice due to vasomotor symptoms and some women do not. Stress-coping in women with moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms is unaffected by estrogens.

  • 24.
    Nedstrand, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychological wellbeing ameliorates in women with breast cancer randomized to treatment with applied relaxation or acupuncture for vasomotor symptomsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of applied relaxation and electro-acupuncture on psychological wellbeing in breast cancer treated women with vasomotor symptoms. Thirty-eight postmenopausal women with breast cancer and vasomotor symptoms were included in the study. They were randomized between treatment with elcctro-acupuncture (n=19, three of them with tamoxifen) or applied relaxation (n=19, five of them with tamoxifen) during 12 weeks with six months follow-up. Vasomotor symptoms were registered daily and a visual analogue scale on climacteric symptoms as well as estimates of general wellbeing using the Symptom Checklist and mood by the Mood Scale, were completed during treatment and follow-up.

    Totally 31 women completed 12 weeks of treatment and 6 months of follow-up. Hot flushes were reduced by more than 50 percent. Climacteric symptoms significantly decreased after treatment and remained so 6 months after treatment in both groups. Simultaneously with the decrease of flushes, psychological wellbeing was significantly ameliorated throughout the study period in both groups. Mood changed significantly in the acupuncture treated group.

    In conclusion psychological wellbeing ameliorates in women with breast cancer randornized to treatment with applied relaxation or acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms.

  • 25.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutetet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ryding, Elsa-Lena
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Treatment of nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth via the Internet: a feasibility study2016In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of Internet interventions among nulliparous women suffering from severe fear of childbirth (FOC) by means of an Internet-delivered therapist-supported self-help program based on cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT).

    Design: Prospective, longitudinal cohort study.Setting: A feasibility study of an ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC in pregnant women.Sample: Twenty-eight Swedish-speaking nulliparous women with severe FOC recruited via a project home page from January 2012 to December 2013.

    Methods: The main components of the ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC comprised psycho-education, breathing retraining, cognitive restructuring, imaginary exposure, in vivo exposure and relapse prevention. The study participants were anonymously self-recruited over the Internet, interviewed by telephone and then enrolled. All participants were offered 8 weeks of treatment via the Internet. Participants reported their homework weekly, submitted measurements of their fear and received feedback from a therapist via a secure online contact management system.

    Main outcome measures: Level of FOC measured with the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ A) during screening at enrollment and weekly during the treatment (W-DEQ version A), and after the delivery (W-DEQ version B).

    Results: A statistically significant (p < 0.0005) decrease of FOC [W-DEQ sum score decreased pre to post-therapy, with a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.95)].Conclusions: The results of this feasibility study suggest that ICBT has potential in the treatment of severe FOC during pregnancy in motivated nulliparous women. The results need to be confirmed by randomized controlled studies.

  • 26.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Frankenstein, Katri
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Viita, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Larsson, Kamilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Persson, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Spånberger, Loviisa
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Wretman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Silfvernagel, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Internet-provided cognitive behaviour therapy of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth—a randomized controlled trial2016In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 287-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of trauma-focused guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for relieving posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth, a problem that about 3% women encounter postpartum. Following inclusion, 56 traumatized women were randomized to either treatment or to a waiting list control group. Primary outcome measures were the Traumatic Event Scale (TES) and Impact of Event Scale—Reversed (IES-R). Secondary measures were Beck depression inventory II, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Beck Anxiety Inventory, Quality Of Life Inventory and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions. The treatment was guided by a clinician and lasted eight weeks and comprised eight modules of written text. The between-group effect size (ES) was d = .82 (p < .0001) for the IES-R. The ES for the TES was small (d = .36) and not statistically significant (p = .09). A small between-group ES (d = .20; p = .02) was found for the PHQ-9. The results from pre- to post-treatment showed large within-group ESs for PTSD symptoms in the treatment group both on the TES (d = 1.42) and the IES-R (d = 1.30), but smaller ESs in the control group from inclusion to after deferred treatment (TES, d = .80; IES-R d = .45). In both groups, the treatment had positive effects on comorbid depression and anxiety, and in the treatment group also on quality of life. The results need to be verified in larger trials. Further studies are also needed to examine long-term effects.

  • 27.
    Nieminen, Katri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Malmquist, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ryding, E-L
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nulliparous pregnant womens narratives of imminent childbirth before and after internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for severe fear of childbirth: a qualitative study2015In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 122, no 9, p. 1259-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ObjectiveTo describe the expectations concerning imminent childbirth before and after 8weeks of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) among nulliparous pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth. DesignQualitative study of nulliparous pregnant womens narratives before and after CBT. SettingThe first ICBT programme for treating severe fear of childbirth. SampleFifteen nulliparous pregnant Swedish women with severe fear of childbirth participating in an ICBT self-help programme. MethodsSemi-structured open-ended questions over the internet before and after 8weeks of ICBT. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measuresThe participants narratives pertaining to five different situations during labour and delivery before and after ICBT. ResultsAfter therapy, participants described a more realistic attitude towards imminent childbirth, more self-confidence and more active coping strategies. They perceived their partners and the staff as more supportive. They were more aware of the approaching meeting with their baby when giving birth. ConclusionsFollowing the ICBT programme, participants changed their attitude towards imminent childbirth from negative to more positive. This was manifested in positive and more realistic expectations regarding themselves, their partner and the staff that would look after them.

  • 28.
    Persson, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Kjølhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Psychological wellbeing after laparoscopic and abdominal hysterectomy--a randomised controlled multicentre study2006In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 113, no 9, p. 1023-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare laparoscopic hysterectomy and abdominal total hysterectomy regarding influence on postoperative psychological wellbeing and surgical measures. DESIGN: A prospective, open, randomised multicentre trial.

    SETTING: Five hospitals in the South East of Sweden.

    POPULATION: Hundred and twenty-five women scheduled for hysterectomy for benign conditions were enrolled in the study, and 119 women completed the study. Fifty-six women were randomised to abdominal hysterectomy and 63 to laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    METHODS: Psychometric tests measuring general wellbeing, depression and anxiety preoperatively and 5 weeks and 6 months postoperatively.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of operating method on the psychological wellbeing postoperatively. Analysis of data regarding operating time, peroperative and postoperative complications, blood loss, hospital stay and recovery time.

    RESULTS: No significant differences in the scores were observed between the two groups in any of the four psychometric tests. Both the surgical methods were associated with a significantly higher degree of psychological wellbeing 5 weeks postoperatively compared with preoperatively. The operating time was significantly longer for the laparoscopic hysterectomy group, but the duration of the stay in hospital and sick-leave were significantly shorter for laparoscopic hysterectomy group compared with the abdominal hysterectomy group.

    CONCLUSIONS: General psychological wellbeing is equal after laparoscopic and abdominal hysterectomy within 6 months after the operation. The advantages of the laparoscopic hysterectomy are the shorter stay in hospital and shorter sick-leave, but these issues must be balanced by a longer duration of the operation.

  • 29.
    Ryding, E.L.
    et al.
    Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Central Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Cental Hospital, S-251 87 Helsingborg, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Emergency cesarean section: 25 Women's experiences2000In: Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, ISSN 0264-6838, E-ISSN 1469-672X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility to categorize women's experiences of emergency cesarean section based on the patterns displayed in their narration of the event, and to describe, if possible, typical features of those categories. Twenty-five consecutive women were interviewed a few days and 1-2 months after emergency cesarean section. The narratives of the women were recorded according to a time-spatial model from disaster psychiatry. The occurrence of a traumatic delivery experience and of posttraumatic intrusive stress reactions 6 weeks postpartum in the various categories was assessed. The narratives of the 25 women can be categorized as follows: Pattern 1 - confidence whatever happens (n = 5), Pattern 2 - positive expectations turning into disappointment (n = 7), Pattern 3 - fears that come true (n = 9), and Pattern 4 - confusion and amnesia (n = 4). In the second and third groups all women had experienced the delivery as traumatic. The women in the second group had the highest prevalence of posttraumatic intrusive stress reactions 6 weeks after the emergency cesarean section.

  • 30.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swedish midwives’ views on severe fear of childbirth2011In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 153-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To describe the views of Swedish midwives on severe fear of childbirth (SFOC).

    Study design

    In this cross sectional study, a random sample of 1000 midwives, selected from the database of the Swedish Association of Midwives, received a questionnaire. The response rate was 84% (n = 834), with 726 questionnaires included in the final analysis.

    Main outcome measures

    The views of midwives on SFOC in different contexts of work: antenatal care clinic (ACC), labour ward (LW) either ACC/LW or Neither-Nor ACC/LW.

    Results

    The majority of respondents thought that the frequency of SFOC has increased during the last 10 years (67%), and that pregnant women today are more likely to discuss their fears (70%). Midwives at ACCs thought that special education in SFOC is needed (p < 0.001) and that they have more responsibility to identify women with SFOC (p < 0.001) than midwives at LWs. The majority of respondents, both at ACCs (60%) and LWs (65%), intuitively sensed when they were meeting a woman with SFOC. Opinions among midwives who alternate between working in ACCs and LWs reflected the views of the midwives working either in an ACC or an LW.

    Conclusions

    The views of midwives on SFOC are partly in concordance and partly contradictory in relation to the different workplaces as well as research data. Knowledge of the views of midwives on SFOC is a necessary pre-requisite to improve care for pregnant women.

  • 31.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gullberg, Mats T
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Self-efficacy beliefs and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women2013In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore how childbirth self-efficacy, i.e. outcome expectancy and efficacy expectancy, was associated with fear of childbirth (FOC) and how efficacy expectancy and FOC, respectively were related to socio-demographic characteristics, mental problems and preference for a caesarean section.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a consecutive sample of 1000 pregnant nulliparous women was sent the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire and Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory. Statistical analyses were performed on data from 423 women.

    Results: Outcome expectancy and efficacy expectancy correlated significantly and positively, FOC correlated significantly and negatively with both outcome expectancy and efficacy expectancy. Women with severe FOC (20.8%) had a significantly lower level of education (p = 0.001), and had more often sought help because of mental problems (p = 0.004). They were more likely to have low-efficacy expectancy (p < 0.001) and to prefer a caesarean section instead of a vaginal birth (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions: Lower efficacy expectancy was associated with higher FOC while preference for a caesarean section was not. Improvement of self-efficacy could be a part of care for women with FOC during pregnancy; however, it would not be enough for fearful women who wish to have a caesarean section.

  • 32.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swedish midwives' perceptions of fear of childbirth2010In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 327-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to describe midwives' experiences with, and perceptions of, women with fear of childbirth. DESIGN: a qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach. Data were collected by means of interviews in focus groups. SETTING: four focus groups at four types of hospital in Southern Sweden over a period of 18 months, 2004-2006. PARTICIPANTS: 21 experienced midwives. FINDINGS: four description categories emerged, i.e. appearance of fear of childbirth, origins of fear of childbirth, consequences of fear of childbirth, and fear of childbirth and midwifery care. KEY CONCLUSION: fear of childbirth is seen as a continuum from normal to irrational, severe fear. It has various origins which are more or less difficult to operationalise. Fear of childbirth influences the experience of pregnancy, the labour process and the transition to parenthood. Midwifery care of women with fear of childbirth is emotionally demanding and time consuming. Aspects of care required early identification of women with fear of childbirth, individual care, preparation for giving birth, support of a companion during labour, and postpartum follow-up.  

  • 33.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swedish midwives perceptions of fear of childbirth in JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, vol 31, issue , pp 53-532010In: JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOMATIC OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY, Informa Healthcare , 2010, Vol. 31, p. 53-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 34.
    Samelius, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lifetime history of abuse, suffering, and psychological health2010In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 227-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In a representative Swedish sample, we investigated lifetime prevalence of physical, sexual and psychological abuse of women and their current suffering. The relationship between current suffering from abuse and psychological health problems was also studied. Method: The study was cross-sectional and population-based. The Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI), measuring experiences of physical, sexual and psychological abuse and including questions on health and social situation, was sent by mail to 6000 women, randomly selected from the population register. The questionnaire was completed and returned by 4150 (70%) of 5896 eligible women. Results: 27.5% of the women reported abuse of any kind. Of those, 69.5% reported current suffering from abuse. Abused suffering women reported more anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances, and a less advantageous social situation than both non-abused and abused non-suffering women. Also, abused non-suffering women reported more depression than non-abused women. Somatization was reported more often by both abused suffering and non-suffering women than by non-abused women, with no difference between suffering and non-suffering women when adjusted for possible confounders. Conclusion: A majority of abused women, when investigating lifetime history of abuse, report current suffering thereof, which warrants considering abuse an important societal problem. Suffering could be a valuable construct, possibly useful to assess psychological health problems normally not captured by existing diagnostic instruments, although further investigations of the concept are needed.

  • 35.
    Samelius, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Post-traumatic stress and somatization in abused women2009In: Traumatology, ISSN 1534-7656, E-ISSN 1085-9373, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the relationship between posttraumatic stressdisorder (PTSD) and somatization in abused women; 213 abusedwomen were assessed for PTSD, somatization, health care contacts,and abuse-related variables. The main analyses in this exploratorystudy are based on the 91 respondents reporting either PTSDor somatization. We found no association between the occurrenceof PTSD and somatization in abused women. Women with PTSD reportedhigher total magnitude of abuse and a larger number of perpetratorsthan women with somatization. Sexually abused women with PTSDmore often described their experience as an act of abuse comparedwith sexually abused women with somatization. Results suggestthat PTSD might not be a necessary mediator between abuse andsomatization and that variables other than abuse magnitude aredecisive for the development of somatization in abused women.

  • 36.
    Samelius, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wingren, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wimja, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Somatization in abused women2007In: Journal of Women's Health, ISSN 1059-7115, E-ISSN 2168-7668, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 909-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The association between abuse and somatization has been less systematically investigated than other abuse-related outcomes. Moreover, such studies have given inconsistent results. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between somatization and lifetime exposure to physical, sexual, and psychological abuse.

    Methods: A total of 800 women, 400 reporting abuse and 400 reporting no abuse in a previous randomized, population-based study, were sent two questionnaires: SOMAT, a questionnaire on somatization, and the Abuse Inventory (AI). Of 781 eligible women, 547 participated (70% response rate).

    Results: Psychological abuse of both limited (6 months–2 years) and prolonged duration (>2 years) was associated with somatization (OR = 2.45, 95% CI 1.37-4.40 and OR = 3.09, 95% CI 1.52-6.30, respectively). Sexual abuse without penetration was associated with somatization (OR = 2.47, 95% CI 1.17-5.20), but sexual abuse with penetration was not. Physical abuse was not associated with somatization when adjustments for other kinds of abuse were made. Being abused in adulthood and in both adulthood and childhood was associated with somatization (OR = 4.20, 95% CI 2.45-7.20 and OR = 2.90, 95% CI 1.69-4.90, respectively), whereas being abused in childhood only was not.

    Conclusions: Abuse of women is associated with somatization. Other factors than severity of abuse, such as whether the abused woman herself perceives her experience as abuse, seem to be more decisive for developing somatization in abused women. Abuse should be taken into account when meeting women with somatization symptoms as patients.

  • 37.
    Sandberg, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nedstrand, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Effects of electro-acupuncture on psychological distress in postmenopausal women2002In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 161-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate effects of electro–acupuncture (EA) on general psychological distress and relate to experience of climacteric symptoms in 30 postmenopausal women.

    Design: A randomised single-blind controlled design was used to evaluate effects of EA and extremely superficial needle insertion, with the latter serving as a near-placebo control.

    Settings: The Linköping University Hospital in Sweden. Interventions: Fourteen treatments during 12 weeks with follow-ups at 3 and 6 months.

    Outcome measures: General psychological well-being, mood and experience of climacteric symptoms. Results: Mood Scale improved only in EA group and not until 12 weeks compared to baseline, from 110 to 129 (P=0.01), and to 120 at 3-month follow-up (P=0.04). Mood was significantly better than control at 8 (P=0.05) and 12 weeks (P=0.01). Visual analogue scale estimation of climacteric symptoms was decreased at 4 weeks in both groups, and lasted throughout the study period, in EA group from 5 to 2 (P=0.04) and in control group from 5 to 3 (P=0.02) at 6-month follow-up. Well-being was ameliorated from 4 weeks in EA and from 8 weeks in control group until end of study (P=0.01, P=0.03). No significant differences on climacteric symptoms or well-being existed between the groups.

    Conclusions: This study does not show that EA is better than superficial needle insertion for the amelioration of general psychological distress and experience of climacteric symptoms in women with vasomotor symptoms after menopause. However, the more pronounced effect on mood suggests that EA might have additional effects compared with superficial needle insertion.

  • 38.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Fear of Pelvic Examination Scale (F-PEXS) - measuring students fear of performing a pelvic examination2015In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Medical students of both genders often show signs of fear before they perform their first pelvic examination. This situation puts a novice in a special setting of intimacy never experienced before and where different emotions may emerge. A specially designed questionnaire, the Fear of Pelvic Examination Scale (F-PEXS) has been developed to assess fear in this context. The aim of this paper is to describe the validation of the F-PEXS. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N = 100) answered the F-PEXS one week before, prior to and after a learning session with professional patients to assess levels of anxiety towards performing the pelvic exam. The validity of the scale was examined using item analysis, reliability assessments and analysis of the construct validity in comparing the F-PEXS with the Spielberger State and Trait Anxiety Inventory and Becks Anxiety Inventory. Results: The F-PEXS has very good reliability (Cronbachs alpha 0.96) and good construct validity. The mean score on the F-PEXS did not differ between gender either before or after the learning session. Conclusions: The F-PEXS can be used to assess students fear of performing the pelvic examination, to evaluate new strategies for learning the pelvic exam and to evaluate the outcome of such interventions.

  • 39.
    Siwe, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stjernquist, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences/Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University Hospital MAS, Malmö, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Medical students learning the pelvic examination: Comparison of outcome in terms of skills between a professional patient and a clinical patient model2007In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 211-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare two models of learning the pelvic examination (PE) for medical students, with professional patients (PP) or with clinical patients (CP), by measuring perceived distress and learning outcome in terms of skills.

    Methods: Prospective longitudinal study. Assessments of self-perceived distress on four occasions at the prospect of performing a PE. Evaluation of the learning session (LS) and clinical clerkship concerning outcome of palpation skills.

    Results: During the LS, students in the PP model (PP students) received enough guidance from their coaches, were certain they had palpated the uterus and at least one ovary, and were less distressed afterwards compared with students who were instructed using the CP model (CP students). During the clinical clerkship, the PP students performed twice as many PEs as CP students did and had more often confirmed palpating the uterus and an ovary.

    Conclusion: PP students were more skilful in palpating the uterus and ovaries and performed more PEs during the clinical clerkship than did CP students.

    Practice implications: Engaging healthy and voluntary women as PPs takes time and effort. It is, however, worthwhile as it increases the confidence of students who perform PEs, makes them more competent, and ultimately improves their skills in performing the examination during their clinical clerkship.

  • 40.
    Sluijs, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Cleiren, Marc P. H. D.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Scherjon, Sicco A.
    University of Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Does fear of childbirth or family history affect whether pregnant Dutch women prefer a home- or hospital birth?2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1143-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: it is a generally accepted idea that women who give birth at home are less fearful of giving birth than women who give birth in a hospital. We explored fear of childbirth (FOC) in relation to preferred and actual place of birth. Since the Netherlands has a long history of home birthing, we also examined how the place where a pregnant womans mother or sisters gave birth related to the preferred place of birth. Design: a prospective cohort study. Setting: five midwifery practises in the region Leiden/Haarlem, the Netherlands. Participants: 104 low risk nulliparous and parous women. Method: questionnaires were completed in gestation week 30 (T1) and six weeks post partum (T2). Measurements and findings: no significant differences were found in antepartum FOC between those who preferred a home or a hospital birth. Women with a strong preference for either home or hospital had lower FOC (mean W-DEQ = 60.3) than those with a weak preference (mean W-DEQ= 71.0), t (102)= 2.60, p= 0.01. The place of birth of close family members predicted a higher chance (OR 3.8) of the same place being preferred by the pregnant woman. Pre- to postpartum FOC increased in women preferring home- but having hospital birth. Key conclusions: the idea that FOC is related to the choice of place of birth was not true for this low risk cohort. Women in both preference groups (home and hospital) made their decisions based on negative and positive motivations. Mentally adjusting to a different environment than that preferred, apart from the medical complications, can cause more FOC post partum. Implications for practice: the decreasing number of home births in the Netherlands will probably be a self-reinforcing effect, so in future, pregnant women will be less likely to feel supported by their family or society to give birth at home. Special attention should be given to the psychological condition of women who were referred to a place of birth and caregiver they did not prefer, by means of evaluation of the delivery and being alert to anxiety or other stress symptoms after childbirth. These women have higher chance of fear post partum which is related to a higher risk of psychiatric problems. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 41.
    Sluijs, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Cleiren, Marc P H D
    Leiden University, Netherlands .
    Scherjon, Sicco A
    St Lucas Andreas Hospital, Netherlands .
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    No relationship between fear of childbirth and pregnancy-/delivery-outcome in a low-risk Dutch pregnancy cohort delivering at home or in hospital2012In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the relationship of fear of childbirth (FOC), general anxiety and depression during pregnancy and postpartum with birth complications. Methods: For this prospective cohort study 105 healthy women with low-risk pregnancies (until at least 30 weeks gestation) completed the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at 30 weeks gestation and 6 weeks postpartum. These results were related with delivery characteristics. Results: FOC during pregnancy was not related to complications during labour and delivery. In a regression analysis, both multiparity and medical interventions were predictors for higher postpartum FOC. A positive correlation was found between FOC during pregnancy and FOC at six weeks postpartum, corrected for complications during childbirth (r = 0.45, p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: The birth giving process was not related to FOC during pregnancy, but the pre-partum level of FOC certainly is predictive of the level of postpartum FOC, suggesting that FOC as measured during gestation may influence the interpretation of the birth experience itself. We did find a positive relationship between both parity and medical interventions during childbirth and FOC postpartum.

  • 42.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine .
    Validation of the Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI)2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 330-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Abuse Screening Inventory (ASI) in a female sample. Method: The ASI comprises 16 items concerning four kinds of abuse: psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, and abuse in healthcare. A randomized sample of 699 women answered the ASI once. Six months later 53 of them answered the ASI again and were interviewed. To assess concurrent validity, answers in the interviews were considered as the gold standard and the ASI as the diagnostic test. Results: The ASI presented good overall test-retest reliability ranging from 81% to 96% for separate items. The ASI separated very well abused from non-abused women. No false positive answers were found. Sensitivity ranged from 72% to 82% for items concerning abuse. Conclusion: The ASI is a short abuse screening questionnaire that had acceptable validity and test-retest reliability in a random female Swedish sample.

  • 43.
    Söderquist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorbert, G.
    Central Hospital of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Risk factors in pregnancy for post-traumatic stress and depression after childbirth2009In: BJOG - An international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, ISSN 1470-0328, Vol. 116, no 5, p. 672-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  The objective of this study was to find risk factors in pregnancy for post-traumatic stress and depression 1 month after childbirth. Furthermore, the relation between post-traumatic stress and depression was explored.

    Design  A prospective longitudinal study.

    Setting  Pregnant women in Linköping and Kalmar, Sweden.

    Population  A total of 1224 women were assessed in pregnancy, week 12–20 and 32, as well as 1 month postpartum.

    Methods  Post-traumatic stress and depression after delivery were assessed 1 month postpartum. Potential risk factors were assessed in early and late pregnancy. Variables measured during pregnancy were trait anxiety, depression, fear of childbirth, childbirth-related traumatic stress, stress coping capacity, social support, parity, educational level, age, gestation week, parity, educational level, civil status, previous psychological/psychiatric counselling, and previous experience of any traumatic events. Delivery mode was assessed from the medical records.

    Main outcome measures  Prevalence of post-traumatic stress (criteria A, B, C, D, E, and F according to DSM-IV) and depression (Beck’s depression inventory).

    Results  One month postpartum, 12 (1.3%) women had post-traumatic stress (met symptom criteria B, C, and D for post-traumatic stress disorder according to Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition [DSM-IV]). The most important risk factors in pregnancy were depression in early pregnancy (OR = 16.3), severe fear of childbirth (OR = 6.2), and ‘pre’-traumatic stress (in view of the forthcoming delivery) in late pregnancy (OR = 12.5). The prevalence of depression was 5.6%. Post-traumatic stress and depression were positively related 1 month postpartum and were predicted by mainly the same factors.

    Conclusions  Risk factors for post-traumatic stress and depression after childbirth can be assessed in early pregnancy. Post-traumatic stress and depression also seem to share the same underlying vulnerability factors.

  • 44.
    Söderquist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The longitudinal course of post-traumatic stress after childbirth2006In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-traumatic stress was assessed in early and late pregnancy, and 1, 4, 7, and 11 months postpartum by means of questionnaires among 1224 women. Thirty-seven women (3%) had post-traumatic stress (meeting criteria B, C, and D for PTSD) at least once within 1–11 months postpartum. In pregnancy, depression, severe fear of childbirth, ‘pre’-traumatic stress, previous counseling related to pregnancy/childbirth, and self-reported previous psychological problems were associated with an increased risk of having post-traumatic stress within 1–11 months postpartum. Sum-scores of post-traumatic stress did not decrease over time among women who at least once had post-traumatic stress (criteria B, C, and D) within 1–11 months postpartum. Women with post-traumatic stress also showed a decrease in perceived social support over time postpartum.

  • 45.
    Söderquist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Traumatic stress after childbirth: the role of obstetric variables2002In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a sample of 1550 recently delivered women, traumatic stress after childbirth was studied in relation to obstetric variables.

    A post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom profile and traumatic stress symptoms were assessed by means of the Traumatic Event Scale (TES) Obstetric data comprised delivery mode, duration of the second stage of labor (the time from cervical dilation of 10 cm to partus) and the use of analgesia/anesthesia.

    Traumatic stress symptoms and having a PTSD symptom profile were both significantly related to the experience of an emergency cesarean section or an instrumental vaginal delivery It is of clinical importance, however that most women with a PTSD symptom profile were found in the normal vaginal delivery group (NVD) This implies that a normal vaginal delivery can be experienced as traumatic, lust as an emergency cesarian section is not necessarily traumatic Traumatic stress symptoms were neither substantially correlated to the duration of the second stage of labor, nor to the use of analgesia/anesthesia.

  • 46.
    Söderquist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Traumatic stress in late pregnancy2004In: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, ISSN 0887-6185, E-ISSN 1873-7897, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic stress has traditionally been studied in the aftermath of traumatic events. In contrast, this study aimed to explore if traumatic stress can occur before an event that is perceived as threatening or feared. Traumatic stress, as related to the forthcoming delivery, was studied in 1224 women. Background data and psychological characteristics were assessed in early pregnancy and traumatic stress and fear of childbirth in late pregnancy. Of all subjects, 2.3% met all DSM-IV criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 5.8% fulfilled criteria B, C, and D in late pregnancy. Traumatic stress and fear of childbirth correlated significantly. High trait anxiety, depressive symptomatology, psychological/psychiatric counseling related to childbirth, and self-reported psychological problems, measured in early pregnancy, were risk factors for traumatic stress and fear of childbirth in late pregnancy. Results suggest the occurrence of “pre”traumatic stress (i.e., a threatening forthcoming event provoking symptoms similar to those after a traumatic event).

  • 47.
    van de Wiel, Harry
    et al.
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Brand, Paul L P
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Schultz,, Willibrord W
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The virtual ISPOG Academy: how E-learning can enrich (our) society2010In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 111-112Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    van de Wiel, Harry
    et al.
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Brand, Paul L P
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Weijmar Schultz, Willibrord
    University Medical Centre Groningen.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The virtual ISPOG Academy: how E-learning can enrich (our) society2010In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 111-112Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Wijma, Barbo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jansson Engman, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, S.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vulvar vestibulitis syndrome and vaginismus: A case report2000In: Journal of reproductive medicine, ISSN 0024-7758, E-ISSN 1943-3565, Vol. 45, p. 219-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports have argued for a revision of the criteria used for the establishment of a diagnosis of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS). On theoretical grounds it might be hypothesized that women with VVS also suffer from vaginismus.

    CASE: A young woman presented with a history, symptoms and objective findings typical of vaginismus, yet she suffered from continuous, burning pain and itching in the vestibule. Earlier in the course of the problem she had received a diagnosis VVS. The patient was treated with behavioral therapy developed for vaginismus. Notations made during the course of therapy supported the assumption that the pain and itching were conditioned responses to penetration in the same way that a vaginal muscular reflex is.

     

    CONCLUSION: Differential diagnostic difficulties exist in the field of VVS and vaginismus. Psychophysiologic theories are needed as the basis for research to clarify the connections between different diagnostic entities associated with coital burning pain and itching in the vestibule.

  • 50.
    Wijma, Barbro
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Engman, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gender and Medicine.
    A model for critical review of literature - With vaginismus as an example2007In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present a behavioral model for the critical review of the literature within a certain research field, using vaginismus as an example. We searched the literature for the title word "vaginismus" and analyzed to what extent the articles dealt with the following seven categories: prevention, etiology, maintaining factors, consequences, object of intervention, method of intervention, and method of evaluation. In each category we scrutinized the content of the articles for biological, psychological, social, relational, and gender aspects. Quality requirements of etiological and treatment studies were then added and the results presented in a "quality-adjusted" model. There were 102 articles during 1985-2001, of which 22 were included in the review. Most of the articles deal with supposed predisposing factors of etiology and different aspects of intervention. Only a few articles discuss precipitating factors, maintaining factors, or consequences of the problem. No article had a gender analysis. Only 11 of the articles fulfilled some of the proposed quality criteria. We found the behavioral model with quality requirements useful for classifying and evaluating the literature of vaginismus. The model may also be used as a guide to design methodologically good studies. © 2007 Informa UK Ltd.

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