liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 178
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Clayton, Tim
    London School Hyg and Trop Med, England.
    Damman, Peter
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Fox, Keith A. A.
    Royal Infirm, Scotland.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    de Winter, Robbert J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Impact of an invasive strategy on 5 years outcome in men and women with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes2014In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 168, no 4, p. 522-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A routine invasive (RI) strategy in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) has been associated with better outcome compared with a selective invasive (SI) strategy in men, but results in women have yielded disparate results. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in long-term outcome with an SI compared with an RI strategy in NSTE ACS. Methods Individual patient data were obtained from the FRISC II trial, ICTUS trial, and RITA 3 trial for a collaborative meta-analysis. Results Men treated with an RI strategy had significantly lower rate of the primary outcome 5-year cardiovascular (CV) death/myocardial infarction (MI) compared with men treated with an SI strategy (15.6% vs 19.8%, P = .001); risk-adjusted hazards ratio (HR) 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.86). In contrast, there was little impact of an RI compared with an SI strategy on the primary outcome among women (16.5% vs 15.1%, P = .324); risk-adjusted HR 1.13 (95% CI 0.89-1.43), interaction P = .01. For the individual components of the primary outcome, a similar pattern was seen with lower rate of MI (adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.57-0.83) and CV death (adjusted HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89) in men but without obvious difference in women in MI (adjusted HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.85-1.50) or CV death (adjusted HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.68-1.39). Conclusions In this meta-analysis comparing an SI and RI strategy, benefit from an RI strategy during long-term follow-up was confirmed in men. Conversely, in women, there was no evidence of benefit.

  • 2.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Käll, Anna
    Tilander, Hanna
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sex matters-lipid goal achievement in a population admitted to a coronary care unit2008In: X Svenska Kardiovaskulära Vårmötet,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Number A13731

  • 3.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas L
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Large early variation of residual platelet reactivity in Acute Coronary Syndrome patients treated with clopidogrel: Results from Assessing Platelet Activity in Coronary Heart Disease (APACHE).2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 136, no 2, p. 335-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR), but the optimal time-point for testing is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal time-point for aggregometry testing and the risk of major adverse cardiac events associated with HRPR.

    METHOD AND RESULTS: We included 125 patients with ACS (73 with STEMI, and 71 received abciximab). The prevalence of HRPR varied substantially over time. The rate of HRPR in patients treated and not treated with abciximab were 43% vs 67% (p=0.01) before, 2% vs 23% (p=0.001) 6-8h after, 8% vs 9% (p=0.749) 3days after, and 23% vs 12% (p=0.138) 7-9 days after loading dose of clopidogrel. We found HRPR in 18% of the patients but only four ischemic events during 6months follow-up, with no significant difference between HRPR patients compared to the rest of the population. There were 3 TIMI major bleedings, all of which occurred in the low residual platelet reactivity (LRPR) group.

    CONCLUSION: There is a large variation in platelet reactivity over time, also depending on adjunctive therapy, which has a large impact on optimal time-point for assessment. We found HRPR in almost 1 in 5 patients, but very few MACE, and not significantly higher in HRPR patients. In a contemporary ACS population, with low risk for stent thrombosis, the predictive value of HRPR for ischemic events will probably be low.

  • 4.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes From the Swedish Web-System for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-Based Care in Heart Disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART)2011In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 32, no 24, p. 3128-3136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To assess gender differences in outcome with an early invasive or non-invasive strategy in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods and results We included 46 455 patients [14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)] from the SWEDEHEART register, with NSTE ACS, between 2000 and 2006, and followed them for 1 year. In the non-invasive strategy arm, the relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.94-1.11] and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders, with propensity score and discharge medication, there was a similar trend towards better outcome among women in both the early non-invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99)] and the early invasive cohort [RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06)], although it did not reach statistical significance in the early invasive cohort. Results were similar with the combined endpoint death/myocardial infarction. An early invasive treatment was associated with a marked, and similar, mortality reduction in women [RR 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55)] and men [RR 0.45 (95% CI, 0.40-0.52)], without interaction with gender. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real-life management, women and men had similar and better outcome associated with an invasive strategy.

  • 5.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender influence tretment and outcome of patients with unstable coronary artery disease.2003In: European Heart Journal,2003, 2003, p. 72-72Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Unstable coronary artery disease - a missed diagnosis.2003In: European Heart Journal,2003, 2003, p. 74-74Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sederholm-Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Although women are less likely to be admitted to coronary care units, they are treated equally to men and have better outcome: A prospective cohort study in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes2009In: Acute cardiac care, ISSN 1748-295X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in admission level of care, management and outcome in patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), initially admitted to either coronary care units (CCU) or general wards. Method: Patients admitted to CCUs were routinely registered in the RIKS-HIA registry. In addition, patients admitted to general wards with suspected ACS were also identified and registered. Multivariable regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline differences between the genders. Results: We included 570 consecutive patients with a discharge diagnosis of NSTE-ACS. Women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units (56% versus 69%, P=0.002), even after adjustment (odds ratio (OR), 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.43-0.98). After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, women were treated similarly to men. We found no significant differences in crude short-, or long-term mortality between the genders. However, adjustment for background characteristics revealed lower one-year mortality in women (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.34-0.99). Conclusion: In this study on patients with NSTE-ACS, women were less likely to be admitted to coronary care units. However, the overall treatment was as intensive for women as for men. Moreover, after adjustment, one-year mortality was lower in women.

  • 8.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender differences in level of care, management and outcome in non ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes.2008In: ESC,2008, 2008, p. 3169-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindback, J
    Wallentin, L
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Similar outcome in women and men with an invasive strategy2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Similar outcome with an invasive strategy in men and women with Non ST-Elevation Acute Coronary SyndromesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gender differences in benefit from an early invasive strategy in patients with Non ST-elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes (NSTE ACS) have been debated and results are conflicting. Some studies have even indicated harm for women associated with a routine invasive strategy.

    Method: We included 46 455 patients ( 14 819 women (32%) and 31 636 men (68%)) from The Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 2000 and 2006, and followed for 1 year. Adjustment for baseline differences between the genders was made.

    Results: In the non-invasive strategy arm relative risk (RR) of death was (women vs. men) 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.11) and in the invasive strategy arm 1.12 (95% CI, 0.96-1.29). After adjustment for baseline differences between the genders with propensity score and discharge medication there was a trend towards lower mortality among women, RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.99) in the early non-invasive group but still no difference in the early invasive cohort RR 0.90 (95% CI, 0.76-1.06). Results were similar with the combined end-point death/MI. The risk reduction with an invasive strategy was similar in women (RR 0.46 (95% CI 0.38-0.55)) and men (RR 0.45 (95% CI 0.40-0.52).

    Conclusion: In this large cohort of patients with NSTE ACS, reflecting real life management, women and men had similar outcome and similar benefit with an early invasive strategy.

  • 11.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sex-based differences in management and outcome in unstable coronary artery disease2005In: Second International Conference on Women, Heart disease and Stroke,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, Lars
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Gender differences in management and outcome in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome2007In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1357-1362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study gender differences in management and outcome in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome. Design, setting and patients: Cohort study of 53 781 consecutive patients (37% women) from the Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), with a diagnosis of either unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. All patients were admitted to intensive coronary care units in Sweden, between 1998 and 2002, and followed for 1 year. Main outcome measures: Treatment intensity and in-hospital, 30-day and 1 -year mortality. Results: Women were older (73 vs 69 years, p<0.001) and more likely to have a history of hypertension and diabetes, but less likely to have a history of myocardial infarction or revascularisation. After adjustment, there were no major differences in acute pharmacological treatment or prophylactic medication at discharge. Revascularisation was, however, even after adjustment, performed more often in men (OR 1.15, 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.21). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in in-hospital (OR 1.03, 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.13) or 30-days (OR 1.07, 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.15) mortality, but at 1 year being male was associated with higher mortality (OR 1.12, 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.19). Conclusion: Although women are somewhat less intensively treated, especially regarding invasive procedures, after adjustment for differences in background characteristics, they have better long-term outcomes than men.

  • 13.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Management of acute coronary syndromes from a gender perspective2010In: FUNDAMENTAL and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY, ISSN 0767-3981, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 719-728Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute Coronary Syndromes are the most frequent manifestations of coronary heart disease (CHD). Gender differences in treatment intensity, including differences in level of care, have been reported. Also differences in benefit from certain treatments, especially invasive treatment, have been discussed. Finally, differences in outcome between men and women have been proposed. Results have been inconsistent, partly depending on if and how adjustment for differences in background characteristics has been made.

  • 14.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin M
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Individual long-term variation of platelet reactivity in patients with dual antiplatelet therapy after myocardial infarction.2018In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large inter-individual variation in response to clopidogrel treatment, and previous studies have indicated higher risk of thrombotic events in those with high residual platelet reactivity (HPR). Less is known about individual variation over time. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to investigate intra-individual variation in platelet reactivity. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was assessed in 77 patients, at 3 days, 8 days and 6 months after admission for acute myocardial infarction and loading dose of clopidogrel. All patients were treated with aspirin and clopidogrel through 6-month follow-up. We found a significant increase in median ADP-stimulated aggregation from third to eighth day (195 vs. 250 AU*min, p-value = 0.001) but not from day 8 to 6 months (250 vs. 223 AU*min, p-value = 0.666). There was no significant change in the overall rate of HPR (15.6% vs 20.8%, p-value 0.503) or low platelet reactivity (LPR) (37.7% vs 33.8%, p-value = 0.609) from day 8 to 6-month follow-up. In contrast, more than one in four changed HPR status, 15.6% from non-HPR to HPR and 10.4% HPR to non-HPR. A shift in LPR status appeared even more frequent, occurring in about one of three patients. In spite of similar median aggregation and rate of HPR during 6-month follow-up, about one in four of the patients changed HPR status and one in three changed LPR status. This may be important information for a concept of risk stratification based on a single aggregation value early after an acute coronary syndromes.

  • 15.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    ST-segment depression and elevated biochemical cardiac markers are highly predictive of worse outcome in both women and men.2004In: XXVI Congress of the European Soceity of Cardiology,2004, 2004, p. 1762-1762Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Beygui, Farzin
    et al.
    Caen University Hospital, France.
    Castren, Maaret
    Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Finland; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brunetti, Natale Daniele
    University of Foggia, Italy.
    Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando
    Empresa Pública de Emergencias Sanitarias de Andalucía, Spain.
    Christ, Michael
    Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg, Germany.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum der Stadt Ludwigshafen am Rhein gGmbH, Germany.
    Huber, Kurt
    Cardiology and Emergency Medicine, Wilhelminenhospital, Vienna, Austria.
    Folke, Fredrik
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark.
    Svensson, Leif
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Bueno, Hector
    Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain.
    Van't Hof, Arnoud
    Interventional Cardiology, Zwolle, The Netherlands.
    Nikolaou, Nikolaos
    Konstantopouleio General Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Nibbe, Lutz
    Medizinische Klinik m.S. Intensivmedizin und Nephrologie, Berlin, Germany.
    Charpentier, Sandrine
    University Hospital of Rangueil, Toulouse, France.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Tubaro, Marco
    San Filippo Neri Hospital, Rome, Italy.
    Goldstein, Patrick
    Lille University Hospital, France.
    Gestione pre-ospedaliera dei pazienti con dolore toracico e/o dispnea di origine cardiaca[Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin]2017In: Recenti progressi in medicina, ISSN 2038-1840, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 27-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care.

  • 17. Bjorklund, E
    et al.
    Dellborg, M
    Lindahl, B
    Pehrsson, K
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Van de Werf, F
    Wallentin, L
    Outcome of myocardial infarction in the unselected population is vastly different from samples of eligible patients in large-scale clinical trials2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, p. 625-625Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18. Bjorklund, E
    et al.
    Lindahl, B
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Dellborg, M
    Pehrsson, K
    Van De Werf, F
    Wallentin, L
    Outcome of ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis in the unselected population is vastly different from samples of eligible patients in a large-scale clinical trial2004In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 148, no 4, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Patients in clinical trials of fibrinolytic agents have been shown to be younger, less often female, and to have lower risk characteristics and a better outcome compared with unselected patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. However, a direct comparison of patients treated with fibrinolytic agents and not enrolled versus those enrolled in a trial, including a large number of patients, has not been performed. Methods Prospective data from the Swedish Register of Cardiac Intensive Care on patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction treated with thrombolytic agents in 60 Swedish hospitals were linked to data on trial participants in the ASsessment of Safety and Efficacy of a New Thrombolytic (ASSENT)-2 trial of fibrinolytic agents. Baseline characteristics, treatments, and long-term outcome were evaluated in 729 trial participants (A2), 2048 nonparticipants at trial hospitals (non-A2), and 964 nonparticipants at other hospitals (non-A2-Hosp). Results Nontrial patients compared with A2 patients were older and had higher risk characteristics and more early complications, although the treatments were similar. Patients at highest risk of death were the least likely to be enrolled in the trial. The 1-year mortality rate was 8.8% versus 20.3% and 19.0% (P < .001 for both) among A2 compared with non-A2 and non-A2-Hosp patients, respectively. After adjustment for a number of risk factors, the 1-year mortality rate was still twice as high in nontrial compared with A2 patients. Conclusions The adjusted 1-year mortality rate was twice as high in patients treated with fibrinolytic agents and not enrolled in a clinical trial compared with those enrolled. One major reason for the difference in outcome appeared to be the selection of less critically ill patients to the trial.

  • 19. Björkelund, Cecilia
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Calle
    Göteborg.
    Schenk-Gustafsson, Karin
    Kard klin KS Stockholm.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Hantering av hjärt-kärlsjukdom präglas av manligt perspektiv.2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, p. 3314-3318Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jököping, Sweden.
    Maret, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ohlsson, Jan
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Scheike, Morten
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Säfström, Kåge
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pulsed tissue Doppler imaging for the detection of myocardial ischaemia, a comparison with myocardial perfusion SPECT2004In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 289-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to compare the diagnostic ability of pulsed tissue Doppler and myocardial perfusion Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in patients with a history of unstable coronary artery disease, CAD, 26 patients, 22 men and four women, age 47-76 years, were investigated in a prospective study, 5-10 day after an episode of unstable angina. Tissue Doppler and two-dimensional echocardiography were performed during dobutamine stress testing and myocardial scintigraphy after bicycle exercise and at rest. Patients with a normal SPECT had higher peak systolic velocity during dobutamine infusion, 18.9 +/- 4.1 cm s(-1), than patients with ischaemia, 12.2 +/- 3.8 cm s(-1) (P<0.001) or scar, 8.8 +/- 3.0 cm s(-1) (P<0.01). In a territorial analysis the difference in peak systolic velocity between areas with a normal and abnormal SPECT was less apparent. Failure to achieve >/=13 cm s(-1) in mean-peak systolic velocity was the most accurate criterion for detection of significant CAD on SPECT. We conclude that pulsed tissue Doppler can be used for objective quantification of left ventricular wall motion during dobutamine stress testing and for identification of patients with CAD on SPECT but not for identification of regional ischaemia.

  • 21.
    Cannon, Christopher P.
    et al.
    Baim Institute for Clinical Research, USA; Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Heart and Vascular Center, USA; Harvard Medical School, USA.
    Bhatt, Deepak L.
    Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Heart and Vascular Center, USA; Harvard Medical School, USA.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala Clinical Research Center and Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lip, Gregory Y. H.
    Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Ellis, Stephen G.
    Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, USA.
    Kimura, Takeshi
    Kyoto University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.
    Maeng, Michael
    Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Merkely, Bela
    University Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest, Hungary.
    Zeymer, Uwe
    Klinikum der Stadt Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Medizinische Klinik B, Ludwigshafen, Germany.
    Gropper, Savion
    Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany.
    Nordaby, Matias
    Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany.
    Kleine, Eva
    Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany.
    Harper, Ruth
    Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK.
    Manassie, Jenny
    Boehringer Ingelheim, Bracknell, UK.
    Januzzi, James L.
    Baim Institute for Clinical Research, USA; Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA; Harvard Medical School, USA.
    Ten Berg, Jurrien M.
    St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein, Netherlands.
    Steg, P. Gabriel
    Imperial College, London, London, UK.
    Hohnloser, Stefan H.
    Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
    Dual Antithrombotic Therapy with Dabigatran after PCI in Atrial Fibrillation.2017In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 16, p. 1513-1524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Triple antithrombotic therapy with warfarin plus two antiplatelet agents is the standard of care after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for patients with atrial fibrillation, but this therapy is associated with a high risk of bleeding.

    METHODS: inhibitor (clopidogrel or ticagrelor) and no aspirin (110-mg and 150-mg dual-therapy groups). Outside the United States, elderly patients (≥80 years of age; ≥70 years of age in Japan) were randomly assigned to the 110-mg dual-therapy group or the triple-therapy group. The primary end point was a major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding event during follow-up (mean follow-up, 14 months). The trial also tested for the noninferiority of dual therapy with dabigatran (both doses combined) to triple therapy with warfarin with respect to the incidence of a composite efficacy end point of thromboembolic events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or systemic embolism), death, or unplanned revascularization.

    RESULTS: The incidence of the primary end point was 15.4% in the 110-mg dual-therapy group as compared with 26.9% in the triple-therapy group (hazard ratio, 0.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42 to 0.63; P<0.001 for noninferiority; P<0.001 for superiority) and 20.2% in the 150-mg dual-therapy group as compared with 25.7% in the corresponding triple-therapy group, which did not include elderly patients outside the United States (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.88; P<0.001 for noninferiority). The incidence of the composite efficacy end point was 13.7% in the two dual-therapy groups combined as compared with 13.4% in the triple-therapy group (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.29; P=0.005 for noninferiority). The rate of serious adverse events did not differ significantly among the groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: inhibitor, and aspirin. Dual therapy was noninferior to triple therapy with respect to the risk of thromboembolic events. (Funded by Boehringer Ingelheim; RE-DUAL PCI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02164864)

  • 22.
    Damman, P.
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Clayton, T.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, United Kingdom.
    Wallentin, L.
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, B.
    Department of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fox, K.A.A.
    Cardiovascular Research, Department of Medical and Radiological Sciences, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Hirsch, A.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Windhausen, F.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pocock, S.J.
    London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, United Kingdom.
    Tijssen, J.G.P.
    Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    de Winter, R.J.
    De Winter, R.J., Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Effects of age on long-term outcomes after a routine invasive or selective invasive strategy in patients presenting with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: A collaborative analysis of individual data from the FRISC II - ICTUS - RITA-3 (FIR) trials2012In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To perform a patient-pooled analysis of a routine invasive versus a selective invasive strategy in elderly patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Methods: A meta-analysis was performed of patientpooled data from the FRISC IIeICTUSeRITA-3 (FIR) studies. (Un)adjusted HRs were calculated by Cox regression, with adjustments for variables associated with age and outcomes. The main outcome was 5-year cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction (MI) following routine invasive versus selective invasive management. Results: Regarding the 5-year composite of cardiovascular death or MI, the routine invasive strategy was associated with a lower hazard in patients aged 65-74 years (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.90) and those aged ≥75 years (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.91), but not in those aged less than65 years (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.38), p=0.001 for interaction between treatment strategy and age. The interaction was driven by an excess of early MIs in patients less than65 years of age; there was no heterogeneity between age groups concerning cardiovascular death. The benefits were smaller for women than for men (p=0.009 for interaction). After adjustment for other clinical risk factors the HRs remained similar. Conclusion: The current analysis of the FIR dataset shows that the long-term benefit of the routine invasive strategy over the selective invasive strategy is attenuated in younger patients aged less than65 years and in women by the increased risk of early events which seem to have no consequences for long-term cardiovascular mortality. No other clinical risk factors were able to identify patients with differential responses to a routine invasive strategy. Trial registration: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN82153174 (ICTUS), http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN07752711 (RITA-3).

  • 23.
    Damman, Peter
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam.
    Clayton, Tim
    London School Hyg and Trop Med.
    Wallentin, Lars
    University of Amsterdam.
    Lagerqvist, Bo
    UCR, Uppsala.
    Fox, Keith A
    Royal Infirm, Edinburgh.
    Hirsch, Alexander
    University of Amsterdam.
    Windhausen, Fons
    University of Amsterdam.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pocock, Stuart J
    London School Hyg and Trop Med.
    Tijssen, Jan G
    University of Amsterdam.
    de Winter, Robbert J
    University of Amsterdam.
    Age and 5-Year Outcomes After a Routine or Selective Invasive Strategy for Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes in JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, vol 58, issue 20, pp B110-B1102011In: JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 58, no 20, p. B110-B110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 24.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Regestein, Quentin
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Hyperarousal, depression and quality of life - Validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Hyperarousal Scale2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Research focusing on hyperarousability in association with general sensitivity to stress has increased. This study aimed to: (i) describe values for self-reported hyperarousal behaviour traits, depression, sleeplessness behaviour and health-related quality of life [The Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36)] in a gender-stratified random sample from the Swedish population, and (ii) test the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Hyperarousal Behavioural Trait Scale (H-scale). Methods: In this study, 402 women and 391 men from Sweden were included. A test-retest study was performed on 297 subjects. Results: The total mean score on the H-scale was 29.5 (SD 10.0, 95% CI 28.8-30.2). Compared to men, women scored higher on the H-scale (total score, sub-scales and many items), whereas no evidence of an age trend was seen. The H-scale has proven to be a valid and reliable scale. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed similar magnitude and direction between the H-scale and the Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale, as between the H-scale and the Vicious Cycle of Sleeplessness Behaviour Scale, Vitality, Mental Health and the Mental Component Summary index on the SF-36 respectively. The Cronbach's alpha for the H-scale was 0.84 and estimated stability test-retest point of time varies between 0.73 and 0.80. Conclusions: This study indicates gender differences in response style in association with altered health-related quality of life. The H-scale is a valid and reliable self-reported scale for measuring hyperarousal behavioural trait research outcome in clinical practice. © 2006 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  • 25.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A gender perspective on sleeplessness behavior, effects of sleep loss, and coping resources in patients with stable coronary artery disease2006In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 75-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to systematically compare perceived sleep quality, sleeplessness behavior, sense of mastery, self-esteem, depression, subjective health, and effects of sleep loss in men and women with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Further aims were to determine possible predictors of poor sleep quality and sense of mastery, as well as the consequences of too little sleep. METHODS: Comparative-correlation and predictive design were used. Patients with a history of stable angina pectoris scheduled to undergo coronary angiography at Linköping University Hospital in Sweden were included. There were 47 women and 88 men (mean age 62.4 years) with CAD. Structured interviews using validated questionnaires covered sleep quality and sleep habits, effects of sleep loss, psychologic resources, and depression. RESULTS: Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that sleeplessness behavior, depressed mood, female gender, and pharmacologic treatments with inflammation inhibitors significantly (P < .0001) accounted for the variance of poorer sleep quality. The analysis also showed that the following factors in descending order significantly accounted (P < .0001) for the outcome of sleep quality: inability to feel refreshed by sleep, difficulty in maintaining sleep, gastrointestinal problems, too little sleep, final morning awakening time, sleep onset latency, lying down because of daytime tiredness, and daytime physical tiredness. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with men, women with stable CAD may be especially at risk of experiencing poor sleep quality, even when sleeplessness behavior and pharmacologic treatments with inflammation inhibitors are controlled. It is also possible that they may be more at risk of depressed mood. Copyright © 2006 by Mosby, Inc.

  • 26.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Psychological behavioural symptoms and sleep quality in patients with stable coronary artery disease2004In: Congress of the European Sleep Research Society,2004, 2004, p. 207-207Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Clinical Neurophysiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Hyperarousal behavioural trait, sufficient sleep index and health related qualtiy of life insomnia associated professional sleep societies (APSS)2005In: Associated Professional Sleep Societies APSS,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Edell-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep-activity profile and quality of life in patients with stable coronary disease2003In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 26, no Abstract supplement, p. A357-A357Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Previous studies have examined the relationship between initiation sleep difficulties and quality of life. However, when reviewing the literature in this area we found no reports of a relationship between evening physical activity and health related quality of life in patients with coronary disease. This study was designed to investigate assumed sleep, circadian rhythm, evening physical activity and health related quality of life.

    Methods: Twenty-six men and 21 women, mean age 64.0 (SD 8.9) years and 63 (SD 9.3) years, respectively, with stable angina pectoris were included. For assessment of health related quality of life the patients completed the SF36 questionnaire. The data were compared with those for men and women in the general Swedish population. Physical activity was continuously recorded at home, using actigraphy with an integral light recorder (Model AW-L, Cambridge Neurotechnology Ltd, UK) in 1-minute epochs during one week. The data were downloaded by Actiwatch Reader and imported to the Actiwatch software for Windows 98.

    Results: Average time of going to bed was 22.37, sleep latency 27 minutes, assumed sleep duration 7.59 hr, time in bed 8.56 hr and sleep efficiency 79.2%. No differences were found during the seven nights. Nonparametric analysis of the circadian rhythm showed that 39 of 47 patients had the lowest 5-hour count activity onset at 00.00 p.m. and 41of 47 patients had the maximal 10 hr count onset 08.00 a.m. or later. Sleep analysis indicated reduced activity in the evening (p.m. 06.00-09.00). Some actigraphic parameters of the evening activity associated significantly with circadian rhythm parameters. Compared to the general Swedish population, the patients ́ health related quality of life waspoor. Linear stepwise regression analysis showed that reduced activity 3 evenings/week significantly explained health related quality of life in32.3% of role function outcome, due to physical causes (p=0.0001) and in 24.7% (p<0.01) of social function, whereas reduced activity 2 evenings/week explained 20% (p<0.01) of body pain.

    Conclusions: These data indicate that sleep-activity profile is associated with health related quality of life in patients with stable angina pectoris.

  • 29.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, U
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, E
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ejdeback, J
    Svanborg, E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tygesen, H
    Johansson, A
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyperarousal, insomnia and health-related quality of life in patients with previous history of myocardial infarction2007In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms, ISSN 1446-9235, E-ISSN 1479-8425, Vol. 5, p. A154-A154Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Eggers, Kai M
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Department of Emergency and Cardiovascular Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnston, Nina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Oldegren, Jonas
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Venge, Per
    Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital and Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Myeloperoxidase is not useful for the early assessment of patients with chest pain.2010In: Clinical Biochemistry, ISSN 0009-9120, E-ISSN 1873-2933, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 240-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) has been listed as a potentially useful risk marker in acute coronary syndrome. However, its clinical utility in patients with acute chest pain is not yet defined.

    Design and methods

    MPO (Architect, Abbott Diagnostics) was measured in 120 healthy controls and 303 chest pain patients who had been admitted to the coronary care units of three Swedish hospitals.

    Results

    Chest pain patents had significantly higher median MPO levels compared to healthy controls (120.6 vs. 78. 9 pmol/L; p < 0.001). However, MPO was not useful for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (c-statistics 0.61 [95% CI 0.54–0.67]), and Cox regression analysis revealed no independent association between MPO and mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3 [95% CI 0.8–2.0]) or the composite endpoint (adjusted hazard ratio 1.1 [95% CI 0.8–1.5]) after a median follow-up of 4.9 years.

    Conclusions

    MPO provided no clinically relevant information in the present population of chest pain patients.

  • 31.
    Eggers, Kai M
    et al.
    Uppsala.
    Ellenius, Johan
    KI, Stockholm.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Göteborg.
    Groth, Torgny
    Uppsala.
    Oldgren, Jonas
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala.
    Artificial neural network algorithms for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction and prediction of infarct size in chest pain patients2007In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 366-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To prospectively validate artificial neural network (ANN)-algorithms for early diagnosis of myocardial infarction (AMI) and prediction of 'major infarct' size in patients with chest pain and without ECG changes diagnostic for AMI. Methods: Results of early and frequent Stratus CS measurements of troponin I (TnI) and myoglobin in 310 patients were used to validate four prespecified ANN-algorithms with use of cross-validation techniques. Two separate biochemical criteria for diagnosis of AMI were applied: TnI ≥ 0.1 μg/L within 24 h ('TnI 0.1 AMI') and TnI ≥ 0.4 μg/L within 24 h ('TnI 0.4 AMI'). To be considered clinically useful, the ANN-indications of AMI had to achieve a predefined positive predictive value (PPV) ≥ 78% and a negative predictive value (NPV) ≥ 94% at 2 h after admission. 'Major infarct' size was defined by peak levels of CK-MB within 24 h. Results: For the best performing ANN-algorithms, the PPV and NPV for the indication of 'TnI 0.1 AMI' were 87% (p = 0.009) and 99% (p = 0.0001) at 2 h, respectively. For the indication of 'TnI 0.4 AMI', the PPV and NPV were 90% (p = 0.006) and 99% (p = 0.0004), respectively. Another ANN-algorithm predicted 'major AMI' at 2 h with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 78%. Corresponding PPV and NPV were 73% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions: Specially designed ANN-algorithms allow diagnosis of AMI within 2 h of monitoring. These algorithms also allow early prediction of 'major AMI' size and could thus, be used as a valuable instrument for rapid assessment of chest pain patients. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 32. Eggers, KM
    et al.
    Dellborg, M
    Oldgren, J
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Venge, P
    Lindahl, B
    Risk prediction in chest pain patients by biochemical markers including estimates of renal function2008In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 128, no 2, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Early risk stratification of patients with chest pain may be improved by combining cardiac Troponin I (cTnI) results and ECG findings with markers of left-ventricular dysfunction, inflammation or renal function. Methods: Serial measurements of cTnI were prospectively performed in 452 chest pain patients with a non-diagnostic ECG for AMI and admitted to the coronary care unit. NT-pro BNP, CRP, cystatin C and creatinine-clearance were retrospectively analyzed in admission samples. The prognostic value of these markers alone and in different combinations together with ECG findings was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression models. Results: During follow-up, 14 deaths and 21 myocardial (re)-infarctions occurred. Independent predictors for the combined endpoint of death or (re)-infarction were peak cTnI ≥ 0.1 μg/L within 24 h (OR 3.9, 95% confidence interval [CI]1.5-10.4), cystatin C ≥ 1.28 mg/L (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.9-16.3) and NT-pro BNP ≥ 550 ng/L (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.0-7.3). At 2 h from admission, a combination of cTnI ≥ 0.1 μg/L, an abnormal ECG and NT-pro BNP or cystatin C as a third variable resulted in a similar stratification of patients to different risk groups. Conclusion: cTnI, NT-pro BNP and cystatin C are strong risk predictors in patients with chest pain. For pragmatic reasons, a combination of cTnI ≥ 0.1 μg/L, ECG findings and a marker of renal function, preferably cystatin C, appears to be most appropriate for early risk stratification of these patients. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 33.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden .
    Andersson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with 1-year mortality for elderly patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction2014In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1216-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For the large population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is crucial to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is denoting decreased physiological reserves and increased vulnerability. We analysed the manner in which the variable frailty is associated with 1-year outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centres, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By Cox regression analyses, frailty was found to be independently associated with 1-year mortality after adjusting for cardiovascular risk and comorbid conditions (hazard ratio 4.3, 95% CI 2.4-7.8). The time to the first event was significantly shorter for frail patients than for nonfrail (34 days, 95% CI 10-58, p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with 1-year mortality. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an important risk prediction concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 34.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Stockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty as a Predictor of Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients with non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background – For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiologic reserves. We analyzed how the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly NSTEMI patients.

    Methods and Results – Patients, aged 75 years or older, with diagnosed NSTEMI were included at three centers, and clinical data including judgement of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS). Of 307 patients, 150 (48.5%) were considered frail. Frail patients were slightly older and presented with a greater burden of comorbidity. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be a strong independent risk factor for inhospital mortality, one-month mortality (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.3 to 10.8) and the primary composite outcome (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 3.7). Particularly frail patients with a high comorbidity burden manifested a markedly increased risk for the primary composite outcome. By multiple linear regression, frailty was identified as a strong independent predictor for prolonged hospital care (frail 13.4 bed days, non-frail 7.5 bed days; P<0.0001).

    Conclusions - Frailty is a strong independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, one-month mortality, prolonged hospital care and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediction concept regarding cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 35.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty is independently associated with short-term outcomes for elderly patients with non-st-segment elevation myocardial infarction2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ekerstad, Niklas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Löfmark, Rurik
    Department of Medical Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet.
    Lindenberger, Marcus
    Department of Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital Jönköping.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frailty Is Independently Associated With Short-Term Outcomes for Elderly Patients With Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction2011In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 124, no 22, p. 2397-2404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: For the large and growing population of elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, it is important to identify clinically relevant measures of biological age and their contribution to risk. Frailty is an emerging concept in medicine denoting increased vulnerability and decreased physiological reserves. We analyzed the manner in which the variable frailty predicts short-term outcomes for elderly non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients.

    Methods and results: Patients aged ≥ 75 years, with diagnosed non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were included at 3 centers, and clinical data including judgment of frailty were collected prospectively. Frailty was defined according to the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. The impact of the comorbid conditions on risk was quantified by the coronary artery disease-specific index. Of 307 patients, 149 (48.5%) were considered frail. By multiple logistic regression, frailty was found to be strongly and independently associated with risk for the primary composite outcome (death from any cause, myocardial reinfarction, revascularization due to ischemia, hospitalization for any cause, major bleeding, stroke/transient ischemic attack, and need for dialysis up to 1 month after inclusion) (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7) in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-16.8), and 1-month mortality (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-13.0).

    Conclusions: Frailty is strongly and independently associated with in-hospital mortality, 1-month mortality, prolonged hospital care, and the primary composite outcome. The combined use of frailty and comorbidity may constitute an ultimate risk prediciton concept in regard to cardiovascular patients with complex needs.

  • 37. Eriksson, M
    et al.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Hellström-Ängerud, K
    Eriksson, M
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Differences in symptom presentation in STEMI patients, with or without a previous history of hypertension; a survey report from the SymTime study group.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Erlinge, D.
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Omerovic, E.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Frobert, O.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Linder, R.
    Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Danielewicz, M.
    Karlstad Hospital, Sweden.
    Hamid, M.
    Mälarsjukhuset, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Henareh, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wagner, H.
    Helsingborg Lasarett, Sweden.
    Hardhammar, P.
    Halmstad County Hospital, Sweden.
    Sjogren, I.
    Falun Central Hospital, Sweden.
    Stewart, J.
    Skaraborgs Hospital, Sweden.
    Grimfjard, P.
    Västmanlands Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Jensen, J.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Aasa, M.
    Södersjukhuset AB, Sweden.
    Robertsson, L.
    Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Lindroos, P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Haupt, J.
    Sunderby Sjukhus, Sweden.
    Wikstrom, H.
    Kristianstad Hospital, Sweden.
    Ulvenstam, A.
    Östersund Hospital, Sweden.
    Bhiladvala, P.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindvall, B.
    Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundin, A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Todt, T.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ioanes, D.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ramunddal, T.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Kellerth, T.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Zagozdzon, L.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gotberg, M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Andersson, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Angeras, O.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ostlund, O.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lagerqvist, B.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Held, C.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Wallentin, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Schersten, F.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Koul, S.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    James, S.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Bivalirudin versus Heparin Monotherapy in Myocardial Infarction2017In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 377, no 12, p. 1132-1142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND The comparative efficacy of various anticoagulation strategies has not been clearly established in patients with acute myocardial infarction who are undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) according to current practice, which includes the use of radial-artery access for PCI and administration of potent P2Y 12 inhibitors without the planned use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. METHODS In this multicenter, randomized, registry-based, open-label clinical trial, we enrolled patients with either ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-STEMI (NSTEMI) who were undergoing PCI and receiving treatment with a potent P2Y(12) inhibitor (ticagrelor, prasugrel, or cangrelor) without the planned use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. The patients were randomly assigned to receive bivalirudin or heparin during PCI, which was performed predominantly with the use of radial-artery access. The primary end point was a composite of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, or major bleeding during 180 days of follow-up. RESULTS A total of 6006 patients (3005 with STEMI and 3001 with NSTEMI) were enrolled in the trial. At 180 days, a primary end-point event had occurred in 12.3% of the patients (369 of 3004) in the bivalirudin group and in 12.8% (383 of 3002) in the heparin group (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 1.10; P = 0.54). The results were consistent between patients with STEMI and those with NSTEMI and across other major subgroups. Myocardial infarction occurred in 2.0% of the patients in the bivalirudin group and in 2.4% in the heparin group (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.19; P = 0.33), major bleeding in 8.6% and 8.6%, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.19; P = 0.98), definite stent thrombosis in 0.4% and 0.7%, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.10; P = 0.09), and death in 2.9% and 2.8%, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.41; P = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS Among patients undergoing PCI for myocardial infarction, the rate of the composite of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, or major bleeding was not lower among those who received bivalirudin than among those who received heparin monotherapy. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others;

  • 39. Frostfeldt, G
    et al.
    Ahlberg, G
    Gustafsson, G
    Helmius, G
    Lindahl, B
    Nygren, A
    Siegbahn, A
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Venge, P
    Wallentin, L
    Low molecular weight Heparin as adjusted treatment to thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction - a pilot study: biochemic markers in acute coronary syndroms.1999In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 33, p. 627-633Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Fålun, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
    Moons, Philip
    Center for Health Services and Nursing Research, University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Fitzsimons, Donna
    Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University and Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, UK.
    Kirchhof, Paulus
    Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals National Health Service Trust, UK.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tubaro, Marco
    San Filippo Neri Hospital, Italy..
    Norekvål, Tone M
    Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway.
    Practical challenges regarding in-hospital telemetry monitoring require the development of European practice standards2016In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Institutionen för omvårdnad, Umeå Universitet.
    Ericsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Isaksson, R-M
    Norrbotten County Council, Department of Research, Luleå.
    Sederholm Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Differences in symptoms in relation to myocardial infarction.2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In myocardial infarction (MI) rapid diagnosis and treatment is crucial for the prognosis. Previous research has found that symptom presentation influence pre hospital delay times but studies about differences in MI symptoms between patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. To enhance the understanding of symptom presentation in regard to MI type, we aimed to describe symptoms in relation to MI type and to find predictors of STEMI versus NSTEMI in patients with MI.

    Methods: Patients with MI (n=694) from the SymTime study were included. SymTime was a multicentre cross-sectional study of symptoms and actions in the prehospital phase of MI and data were collected using a previously validated questionnaire administered to MI patients within 24 h of admission to hospital.

    Results: Patients with STEMI were younger, more often men and smokers. Patients with NSTEMI were more likely to have a history of hypertension, MI and stroke. Chest pain was the most common symptom in both groups. Pain, discomfort, or pressure located in the jaw or teeth, vertigo/pre-syncope, cold sweat and nausea/vomiting were significantly more frequent in patients with STEMI (Table 1). In a multivariate logistic regression model patients with STEMI were more likely to present with cold sweat (OR 4.13, 95% CI 2.71–6.29) jaw pain (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.02–4.50), and nausea (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.20–3.33), and less likely to have a history of stroke (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.15–0.84), fluctuating symptoms (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.36–0.83) and anxiety (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32–0.92) compared to patients with NSTEMI.

    Conclusion: Patients with STEMI differed significantly from those with NSTEMI regarding symptom presentation. This knowledge is important for health care personnel to recognize symptoms alarming for STEMI when evaluating patients with MI symptoms.

  • 42. Hellström-Ängerud, K
    et al.
    Eriksson, M
    Isaksson, R-M
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Logander, Elisabeth
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Symptoms in MI in patients wit and without diabetes: a survey report from the SymTime study group.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Henriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Nordlund, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, National Centre for Work and Rehabilitation.
    Janzon, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    A comparison of EQ-5D and SF-6D utilities2003In: iHEA 2003, San Francisco. Muntlig posterpresentation,2003, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Zolfagharian, Shima
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Bleeding complications after myocardial infarction in a real world population - An observational retrospective study with a sex perspective2018In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 167, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of the current study was to assess bleeding events, including severity, localisation and prognostic impact, in a real world population of men and women with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results: In total 850 consecutive patients were included during 2010 and followed for one year. Bleeding complications were identified by searching of each patients medical records and characterised according to the TIMI criteria. For this analysis, only the first event was calculated. The total incidence of bleeding events was 24.4% (81 women and 126 men, p=ns). The incidence of all inhospital bleeding events was 13.2%, with no sex difference. Women had significantly more minor non-surgery related bleeding events than men (5% vs 2.2%, p=0.02). During follow-up, 13.5% had a bleeding, with more non-surgery related bleeding events among women, 14.7% vs 9.7% (p=0.03). The most common bleeding localisation was the gastrointestinal tract, more in women than men (12.1% vs 7.6%, p=0.03). Women had also more access site bleeding complications (4% vs 1.7%, p=0.04), while men had more surgery related bleeding complications (6.4% vs 0.9%, p=0.001). Increased mortality was found only in men with non-surgery related bleeding events (p=0.008). Conclusions: Almost one in four patients experienced a bleeding complication through 12 months follow-up after a myocardial infarction. Women experienced more non-surgery related minor/minimal bleeding complications than men, predominantly GI bleeding events and access site bleeding events, with no apparent impact on outcome. In contrast men with non-surgery related bleeding complications had higher mortality. Improved bleeding prevention strategies are warranted for both men and women.

  • 45.
    Holm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sederholm-Lawesson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alfredsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Gender difference in prognostic impact of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction - data from the SWEDEHEART registry.2016In: European heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care, ISSN 2048-8734, Vol. 6, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding complications increase mortality in myocardial infarction patients. Potential gender difference in bleeding regarding prevalence and prognostic impact is still controversial.

    OBJECTIVES: Gender comparison regarding incidence and prognostic impact of bleeding in patients hospitalised with myocardial infarction during 2006-2008.

    METHODS: Observational study from the SWEDEHEART register. Outcomes were in-hospital bleedings, in-hospital mortality and one-year mortality in hospital survivors.

    RESULTS: A total number of 50,399 myocardial infarction patients were included, 36.6% women. In-hospital bleedings were more common in women (1.9% vs. 3.1%, p<0.001) even after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.37). The increased risk for women was found in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.10-1.94) and in those who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.45-2.24). In contrast the risk was lower in medically treated women (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62-1.00). After adjustment, in-hospital bleeding was associated with higher risk of one-year mortality in men (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.04-1.74), whereas this was not the case in women (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72-1.31).

    CONCLUSIONS: Female gender is an independent risk factor of in-hospital bleeding after myocardial infarction. A higher bleeding risk in women appeared to be restricted to invasively treated patients and ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Even though women have higher short- and long-term mortality, there was no difference between the genders among bleeders. After multivariable adjustment the prognostic impact of bleeding complications was higher in men.

  • 46.
    Husted, S E
    et al.
    Dep. of medicine and cardioloy Aarhus, Danmark.
    Wallentin, L
    Uppsala.
    Lagerqvist, B
    Uppsala.
    Kontny, F
    Ullevål, Norge.
    Ståhle, E
    Uppsala.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Benefits of extended treatment with dalteparin in patients with unstable coronary artery disease eligible for revascularization2002In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 23, no 15, p. 1213-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims The FRISC II trial demonstrated that, for patients with unstable coronary artery disease, an early invasive strategy following acute treatment with dalteparin and aspirin, was superior to a more conservative approach. We evaluated whether it is beneficial to extend treatment with dalteparin to patients eligible for revascularization but for whom these procedures are performed after the initial hospital stay. Methods and Results As a subanalysis of FRISC II, the efficacy and clinical safety of extended dalteparin treatment (5000 or 7500 IU. 12 h-1 to day 90) compared with placebo was assessed in 1601 patients randomized to a non-invasive group who underwent revascularization only when necessary because of recurring symptoms, (re)infarction, or severe ischaemia. By day 90, 440 patients had undergone revascularization: 267 of these procedures occurred during the double-blind period. All patients initially received acute treatment (5-7 days from day 1) with dalteparin (120 IU / kg-1 12 h-1). The incidence of death and/or myocardial infarction was monitored until revascularization or day 45 and until revascularization or day 90. There was a significant difference in the estimated probability of death and/or myocardial infarction until revascularization or day 90 in favour of dalteparin (log-rank test, P=0╖0415) and there was a significant reduction in death and/or myocardial infarction in favour of extended dalteparin treatment at day 45, with a 57% relative risk reduction (P=0╖0004). At day 90 the relative risk reduction was 29%. The safety profile of extended dalteparin treatment was similar to that of acute usage. Conclusion Extended dalteparin treatment for up to 45 days is effective and safe as a bridging therapy for patients with unstable coronary artery disease awaiting revascularization. ⌐ 2002 The European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Jacobsen, M.D.
    et al.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark, Department of Medicine B, Hilleroed Hospital, DK-3400 Hilleroed, Denmark.
    Wagner, G.S.
    Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC, United States.
    Holmvang, L.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kontny, F.
    Heart and Lung Center, Ulleval University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Wallentin, L.
    Department of Cardiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Husted, S.
    Dept. of Medicine and Cardiology A, Århus University Hospital, Århus, Denmark.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Stahle, E.
    Ståhle, E., Dept. Thorac. and Cardiovasc. Surg., University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Steffensen, R.
    Department of Medicine B, Hilleroed Hospital, DK-3400 Hilleroed, Denmark.
    Clemmensen, P.
    Department of Medicine B, H:S Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Quantitative T-wave analysis predicts 1 year prognosis and benefit from early invasive treatment in the FRISC II study population2005In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the prognostic value of T-wave abnormalities in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS), and whether such ECG changes may predict benefit from an early coronary angiography. Although ST-segment changes are considered the most important ECG feature in NSTE-ACS, T-wave abnormalities are the most common ECG finding. We hypothesize that a new quantitative approach to T-wave analysis could improve the prognostic value of this ECG abnormality. Methods and results: Quantitative T-wave analysis was performed on the admission ECG in 1609 patients with NSTE-ACS. Nine different categories of T-wave abnormality were analysed for their prognostic value concerning clinical outcome in patients not randomized to early coronary angiography. Also, the presence of one category (i.e. T-wave abnormality in >6 leads) was analysed for its predictive value concerning benefit from early coronary angiography. The combined study endpoint was death or myocardial infarction at 1 year follow-up. Patients with >6 leads with abnormal T-waves and concomitant ST-segment depression had a higher risk when not receiving early coronary angiography (24 vs. 12%, respectively, P = 0.003), but could be brought to the same level of risk as the remaining patients with this treatment. For non-invasively treated patients five different categories of T-wave abnormality were significantly associated with an adverse outcome. Conclusion: New quantitative T-wave analysis of the admission ECG gives additional predictive information concerning clinical outcome and identifies patients who benefit from early coronary angiography.

  • 48. Jacobsson, F
    et al.
    Dellborg, M
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Univ Hosp, Linkoping, Sweden Akad Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Univ Hosp, Linkoping, Sweden Akad Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tolerance and safety of cangrelor, a novel purin receptor antagonist, used as a platelet aggregation inhibitor in the acute coronary syndrome2000In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 343A-343AConference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Jacobsson, F.
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden, Clinical Experimental Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, 416 85 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Wallentin, L.
    Akademiska Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dellborg, M.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Safety profile and tolerability of intravenous AR-C69931MX, a new antiplatelet drug, in unstable angina pectoris and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction2002In: Clinical Therapeutics, ISSN 0149-2918, E-ISSN 1879-114X, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 752-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in the disrupted atherosclerotic plaque are the major reasons for thrombus formation associated with acute coronary events. AR-C69931MX is a new agent that inhibits adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation by antagonism of the P2T purinoceptor. Objective: This study assessed the safety profile, tolerability, and plasma concentrations at steady state of intravenous AR-C69931MX in patients with unstable angina pectoris or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: This was a Phase II, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave MI were randomized to a 72-hour infusion of AR-C69931MX or placebo as adjunctive therapy to aspirin and low-molecular-weight heparin. Other treatment was at the discretion of the local investigator. Outcomes were assessed at 30 days. Results: Ninety-four patients were randomized and 91 received treatment (45 AR-C69931MX, 46 placebo). Plasma concentrations of AR-C69931MX were within the expected range, there were no signs of accumulation, and interindividual variability in clearance was low. Four patients receiving AR-C69931MX discontinued treatment due to minor bleeding events, and 5 patients receiving placebo discontinued treatment due to other adverse events or deterioration in their condition. No serious bleeding events were seen during treatment. The incidence of =1 episode of minor bleeding was slightly higher in patients receiving AR-C69931MX compared with those receiving placebo (38% vs 26%, respectively). The drug was well tolerated hemodynamically, and there were no significant changes in other laboratory values between groups. Conclusions: As adjunctive therapy to aspirin and low-molecular-weight heparin in patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave MI, intravenous AR-C69931MX was well tolerated, with no difference in the incidence of serious adverse events compared with placebo.

  • 50.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Ekberg, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Areskog, M.
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Kalmar Regional Hospital.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Quantitative digital evaluation of myocardial exercise thallium-201 single-photon emission tomography in post-menopausal women1998In: Clinical Physiology, ISSN 0144-5979, E-ISSN 1365-2281, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 169-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative computerized analysis of data from myocardial thallium-201 (201Tl) single-photon emission tomography (SPET) may improve the diagnostic accuracy of coronary heart disease. The reference ranges for post-menopausal women are, however, limited and obtained mainly from patients. To compare reference values from healthy post-menopausal women and to improve the quantitative analysis, 20 women (10 patients with coronary heart disease and previous infarction and 10 age-matched healthy volunteers) were examined immediately post exercise and after a delay. A nine-segment 'bull's-eye' model was used for analysis. At visual evaluation, reproducibility was high (93%), no false-positive results were obtained and in 70% of the patients the SPET was interpreted as abnormal. Using reported reference values for quantitative analysis, all the healthy women had an abnormal result. New reference values based on three different methods of 'normalization' were calculated: the relative activity of segment 3 set to 100%, the segment with the highest activity set to 100% and a least-squares method. They all differed significantly from those that had previously been reported. The frequencies of agreement between visual and quantitative analysis were 84-92% and were highest when segment 3 was used as a reference, but in this case only 40% of the patients with coronary heart disease had an abnormal SPET. Using the least-squares method for handling digital information, the SD of the normal values decreased and 90% of the patients with coronary heart disease were accurately diagnosed. These results provide quantitative digital reference values for healthy post-menopausal women. They verify that quantitative analysis is in diagnostic agreement with visual evaluation, stress the need for local verification of reference ranges and suggest a least-square normalization method for the analysis.

1234 1 - 50 of 178
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf