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  • 1.
    Abelius, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, L J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immunological interactions between mother and child: a characterisation of Th1-and Th2-like chemokines during pregnancy, postpartum and childhood in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 170-1712011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 170-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    High cord blood levels of the T-helper 2-associated chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 precede allergy development during the first 6 years of life2011In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 70, no 5, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to a strong T-helper 2 (Th2)-like environment during fetal development may promote allergy development. Increased cord blood (CB) levels of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 were associated with allergy development during the first 2 y of life. The aim of the present study was to determine whether CB Th1- and Th2-associated chemokine levels are associated with allergy development during the first 6 y of life, allowing assessment of respiratory allergic symptoms usually developing in this period. The CB levels of cytokines, chemokines, and total IgE were determined in 56 children of 20 women with allergic symptoms and 36 women without allergic symptoms. Total IgE and allergen-specific IgE antibody levels were quantified at 6, 12, 24 mo, and 6 y of age. Increased CB CCL22 levels were associated with development of allergic sensitization and asthma and increased CCL17 levels with development of allergic symptoms, including asthma. Sensitized children with allergic symptoms showed higher CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels and higher ratios between these Th2-associated chemokines and the Th1-associated chemokine CXCL10 than nonsensitized children without allergic symptoms. A pronounced Th2 deviation at birth, reflected by increased CB CCL17 and CCL22 levels, and increased CCL22/CXCL10 and CCL17/CXCL10 ratios might promote allergy development later in life.

  • 3.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Placental Immune Milieu is Characterized by a Th2- and Anti-Inflammatory Transcription Profile, Regardless of Maternal Allergy, and Associates with Neonatal Immunity2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 73, no 5, p. 445-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: How maternal allergy affects the systemic and local immunological environment during pregnancy and the immune development of the offspring is unclear.

    METHOD OF STUDY: Expression of 40 genes was quantified by PCR arrays in placenta, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring.

    RESULTS: Placental gene expression was dominated by a Th2-/anti-inflammatory profile, irrespectively of maternal allergy, as compared to gene expression in PBMC. p35 expression in placenta correlated with fetal Tbx21 (ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001) and IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal galectin1 (ρ = 0.91, P < 0.001). Increased expression of Th2-associated CCL22 in CBMC preceded allergy development.

    CONCLUSIONS: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy was partly associated with the offspring's gene expression, possibly indicating that the immunological milieu is important for fetal immune development. Maternal allergy was not associated with an enhanced Th2 immunity in placenta or PBMC, while a marked prenatal Th2 skewing, shown as increased CCL22 mRNA expression, might contribute to postnatal allergy development.

  • 4.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gene expression in placenta, peripheral and cord blood mononuclear cells from allergic and non-allergic women2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of maternal allergy on the development of immune responses and allergy in the offspring is not understood.

    Objective: To investigate (i) if maternal allergy influences the gene expression locally in placenta, systemically in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and fetally in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC), (ii) if the gene expression in the placenta and PBMC influences the gene expression in CBMC and (iii) how the gene expression at birth relates to allergy development during  childhood.

    Methods: A real-time PCR array was used to quantify forty immune regulatory genes in placenta, PBMC (gestational week 39) and in CBMC from 7 allergic and 12 non-allergic women and their offspring. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of Tbx21, GATA-3, Foxp3, RORC and CCL22 in CBMC, selected based on present PCR array results and previous protein findings in cord blood, in 13 children who developed and 11 children who did not develop allergy during childhood.

    Results: The gene expression profile in the placenta revealed a T-helper (Th) 2-/anti-inflammatory environment as compared with gene expression systemically, in PBMC. Maternal allergy was associated with increased expression of p35 in PBMC and CBMC and p40 in placenta. Placental p35 expression correlated with fetal Tbx21 expression (Rho=-0.88, p<0.001) and maternal IL-5 expression in PBMC with fetal Galectin-1 (Rho=0.91, p<0.001) expression. Allergy development in the children was preceded by high mRNA expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth.

    Conclusion and clinical relevance: Gene expression locally and systemically during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s gene expression at birth, indicating an interplay between maternal and fetal immunity. Children developing allergy during childhood had an increased expression of the Th2-associated chemokine CCL22 at birth, indicating a Th2 skewing before disease onset. Maternal allergy was not associated with a Th2-dominance in placenta, PBMC or CBMC.

  • 5.
    Abelius, Martina S
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lempinen, Esma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Th2-like chemokine levels are increased in allergic children and influenced by maternal immunity during pregnancy2014In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 387-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The influence of the intra-uterine environment on the immunity and allergy development in the offspring is unclear. We aimed to investigate (i) whether the pregnancy magnifies the Th2 immunity in allergic and non-allergic women, (ii) whether the maternal chemokine levels during pregnancy influenced the offspring’s chemokine levels during childhood and (iii) the relationship between circulating Th1/Th2-associated chemokines and allergy in mothers and children.

    Methods: The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and the Th2- associated chemokines CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 were quantified by Luminex and ELISA in 20 women with and 36 women without allergic symptoms at gestational week (gw) 10–12, 15–16, 25, 35, 39 and 2 and 12 months post-partum and in their children at birth, 6, 12, 24 months and 6 yr of age. Total IgE levels were measured using ImmunoCAP Technology.

    Results: The levels of the Th2-like chemokines were not magnified by pregnancy. Instead decreased levels were shown during pregnancy (irrespectively of maternal allergy status) as compared to post-partum. In the whole group, the Th1-like chemokine levels were higher at gw 39 than during the first and second trimester and post-partum. Maternal CXCL11, CCL18 and CCL22 levels during and after pregnancy correlated with the corresponding chemokines in the offspring during childhood. Increased CCL22 and decreased CXCL10 levels in the children were associated with sensitisation and increased CCL17 levels with allergic symptoms during childhood. Maternal chemokine levels were not associated with maternal allergic disease.

    Conclusions: Allergic symptoms and sensitisation were associated with decreased Th1-and increased Th2-associated chemokine levels during childhood, indicating a Th2 shift in the allergic children, possibly influenced by the maternal immunity during pregnancy.

  • 6.
    Aniansson Zdolsek, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holt, Patrick G.
    TVW Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Perth, Australia.
    Nilsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of the T–cell markers CD3, CD4 and CD8 in healthy and atopic Children during the first 18 months of life1999In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1018-2438, E-ISSN 1423-0097, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 6-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is little information available about the development of T–cell immunity in healthy and atopic children. We have studied prospectively the mean fluorescence intensity of the T–cell receptor complex–associated CD3, CD4 and CD8 in relation to atopic family history (AFH) and the development of atopic disease.

    Methods: Children with a defined AFH (n = 172) were followed from birth to 18 months and the cumulative history of atopic disease was recorded. Blood samples were obtained at birth and at 18 months, and in a subgroup of 78 children also at 3, 6 and 12 months. Multicolour flow cytometry was used to analyse pan T–cells (CD3+CD45+CD14–), T–helper–(CD3+CD4+) and T–cytotoxic–(CD3+CD8+) cells.

    Results: At 18 months, 31 children were atopic and 118 non–atopic. Children who developed atopic disease had a higher CD4 expression (mean fluorescence intensity, MFI) on CD4+CD3+ lymphocytes at birth and at 3 months, particularly as compared with non–atopic children without AFH. Furthermore, the CD3 expression on CD3+CD45+CD14– lymphocytes increased more slowly with age in children with double atopic heredity, as compared with children with no or only one atopic family member.

    Conclusions: The higher expression of the CD4 receptor in early infancy in children who developed atopic disease compared with non–atopics suggests a delayed expression in T–helper cells. Children with a strong AFH had a slower increase in the expression of CD3, indicating a delayed T–cell maturation.

  • 7.
    Backteman, K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ledent, E
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A rapid and reliable flow cytometric routine method for counting leucocytes in leucocyte-depleted platelet concentrates2002In: Vox Sanguinis, ISSN 0042-9007, E-ISSN 1423-0410, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: To ensure a proper quality control it is important to use a reliable method to count low numbers of leucocytes in leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates (PCs). Materials and Methods: A modified flow cytometric method for counting low numbers of leucocytes, based on a reference population contained in tubes with an exact number of fluorescent beads and staining with propidium iodide was used. To increase the number of events, the original sample volume was increased. Results: There was a good correlation in the number of leucocytes (r = 0.99) between the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy of samples from unfiltered and expected numbers from serially diluted PCs. Samples from leucocyte-reduced PCs obtained by apheresis or filtered buffy coats showed no correlation between results from the modified flow cytometric method and microscopy (Nageotte). Conclusion: Counting by microscopy gave a lower number of leucocytes than the modified flow cytometric method when counting a low number of cells. However, analysis of the serially diluted PCs proved that the modified flow cytometric method was reliable and rapid, making it suitable for clinical routine use.

  • 8.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Lymph Nodes and Peripheral Blood: A Comparison between Patients with Stable Angina and Acute Coronary Syndrome2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammatory response involving activated T cells and impairment of natural killer (NK) cells. An increased T cell activity has been associated with plaque instability and risk of acute cardiac events. Lymphocyte analyses in blood are widely used to evaluate the immune status. However, peripheral blood contains only a minor proportion of lymphocytes. In this study, we hypothesized that thoracic lymph nodes from patients with stable angina (SA) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) might add information to peripheral blood analyses. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Peripheral blood and lymph nodes were collected during coronary by-pass surgery in 13 patients with SA and 13 patients with ACS. Lymphocyte subpopulations were assessed by flow cytometry using antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD16/56, CD25, Foxp3, CD69, HLA-DR, IL-18 receptor (R) and CCR4. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Lymph nodes revealed a lymphocyte subpopulation profile substantially differing from that in blood including a higher proportion of B cells, lower proportions of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells and a 2-fold higher CD4/CD8 ratio. CD4(+)CD69(+) cells as well as Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells were markedly enriched in lymph nodes (p andlt; 0.001) while T helper 1-like (CD4(+)IL-18R(+)) cells were more frequent in blood (p andlt; 0.001). The only significant differences between ACS and SA patients involved NK cells that were reduced in the ACS group. However, despite being reduced, the NK cell fraction in ACS patients contained a significantly higher proportion of IL-18R(+) cells compared with SA patients (p andlt; 0.05). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: There were several differences in lymphocyte subpopulations between blood and lymph nodes. However, the lymphocyte perturbations in peripheral blood of ACS patients compared with SA patients were not mirrored in lymph nodes. The findings indicate that lymph node analyses in multivessel coronary artery disease may not reveal any major changes in the immune response that are not detectable in blood.

  • 9.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte subsets in blood of human adults2007In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 322, no 1-2, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although lymphocyte populations are often monitored over time, information about the biological variation over time is limited. Three-colour-flow cytometry was used to investigate the biological and methodological variation of lymphocyte populations in blood. Fifteen healthy individuals (11 females and 4 males) were longitudinally monitored for 2-8 years. Blood samples were drawn monthly when possible. In total, 493 observations were included. Absolute counts and proportions were determined for T-cells (CD3+), T-helper cells (CD3+ CD4+), cytolytic T-cells (CD3+ CD8+), B-cells (CD3- CD19+) and NK-cells (CD3- CD16+/56+). As to variation over the year, ANOVA testing showed only a minor monthly variation for absolute counts of the CD8+ population (p < 0.05) for October compared with June and July, whereas no significant differences were found for the other populations or in the proportions of lymphocyte subsets. Although lower than the longitudinal variation, the methodological variation, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV %), was in a similar range as the variation over time, indicating that the normal biological variation should not be overestimated, while the methodological inter-assay should be taken into consideration in longitudinal studies or monitoring of patients. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 10.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Cytomegalovirus seropositivity is a major determinant of CD28null T cell expansion in patients with coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Accumulation of CD4+28null cells, with a proinflammatory and senescent phenotype, has been associated with unstable conditions of coronary artery disease (CAD). Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is known to exert profound effects on T cells, including loss of CD28. Here, we longitudinally assessed the proportions of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ cells in CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of patients with CAD and related the findings to HCMV seropositivity.

    Methods: HCMV antibody levels and expression of CD28 and CD57 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were analysed in 31 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. Samples were taken prior to 34 coronary angiography and after 3 and 12 months. In a subsample, HCMV-specific IFN-γ and  TNF production was assessed ex vivo.

    Results: Increased proportions of CD4+CD28null, but not CD8+CD28null cells, were significantly associated with presence of CAD. Significant increases in CD28null 37 and CD28nullCD57+ cells occurred within CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in both ACS and SA patients during 12-month follow-up. HCMV was the major determinant of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cell levels in both patients and controls (p <0.001). There were no obvious signs of CMV reactivation in patients.

    Conclusion: HCMV was a major determinant of the presence of CD28null and CD28nullCD57+ T cells in patients with CAD, independent of clinical stage. Findings also indicate that HCMV might have a large impact on the T cell aging process that occurred in patients after a cardiac event.

  • 11.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS IN LYMPH NODES AND PERIPHERAL BLOOD. A COMPARISON BETWEEN PATIENTS WITH STABLE ANGINA AND ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME in INFLAMMATION RESEARCH, vol 60, issue , pp 215-2162011In: INFLAMMATION RESEARCH, Springer Science Business Media , 2011, Vol. 60, p. 215-216Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Backteman, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Natural killer (NK) cell deficit in coronary artery disease: no aberrations in phenotype but sustained reduction of NK cells is associated with low-grade inflammation2014In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 175, no 1, p. 104-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although reduced natural killer (NK) cell levels have been reported consistently in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the clinical significance and persistence of this immune perturbation is not clarified. In this study we characterized the NK cell deficit further by determining (i) differentiation surface markers and cytokine profile of NK cell subsets and (ii) ability to reconstitute NK cell levels over time. Flow cytometry was used to analyse NK cell subsets and the intracellular cytokine profile in 31 patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI), 34 patients with stable angina (SA) and 37 healthy controls. In blood collected prior to coronary angiography, the proportions of NK cells were reduced significantly in non-STEMI and SA patients compared with controls, whereas NK cell subset analyses or cytokine profile measurements did not reveal any differences across groups. During a 12-month follow-up, the proportions of NK cells increased, although not in all patients. Failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with several components of metabolic syndrome. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-6 levels remained high in patients with sustained NK cell deficit, whereas a decline in IL-6 (P < 0·001) was seen in patients with a pronounced increase in NK cells. In conclusion, we found no evidence that reduction of NK cells in CAD patients was associated with aberrations in NK cell phenotype at any clinical stage of the disease. Conversely, failure to reconstitute NK cell levels was associated with a persistent low-grade inflammation, suggesting a protective role of NK cells in CAD.

  • 13.
    Bengner, Malin
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Beziat, Vivien
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nilsson, Bengt-Olof
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Lofgren, Sture
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden .
    Wikby, Anders
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Johan Malmberg, Karl
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden Oslo University Hospital, Norway University of Oslo, Norway .
    Strindhall, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Independent skewing of the T cell and NK cell compartments associated with cytomegalovirus infection suggests division of labor between innate and adaptive immunity2014In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 571-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection induces profound changes in different subsets of the cellular immune system. We have previously identified an immune risk profile (IRP) where CMV-associated changes in the T cell compartment, defined as a CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1, are associated with increased mortality in elderly people. Since natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in the defense against viral infections, we examined whether the expansion of CD8 + T cells seen in individuals with CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1 is coupled to a parallel skewing of the NK cell compartment. A number of 151 subjects were examined with CMV serology and a flow cytometry panel for assessment of T cell and NK cell subsets. CMV-seropositive individuals had higher frequencies of CD57 + and NKG2C + NK cells and lower frequencies of NKG2A + NK cells, in line with a more differentiated NK cell compartment. Intriguingly, however, there was no correlation between CD4/CD8 ratio and NK cell repertoires among CMV-seropositive donors, despite the profound skewing of the T cell compartment in the group with CD4/CD8 ratio less than 1. Conversely, donors with profound expansion of NK cells, defined as NKG2C + NK cells with high expression of CD57 and ILT-2, did not display more common changes in their T cell repertoire, suggesting that NK cell expansion is independent of the T cell-defined IRP. Altogether, these results indicate that the effect of CMV on CD8 T cells and NK cells is largely nonoverlapping and independent.

  • 14.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lindgren, R
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cytokine changes in postmenopausal women treated with estrogens: A placebo-controlled study2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem: Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is being increasingly used in postmenopausal women. Sex steroids are known to affect the immune system in several ways, although this is mainly based on clinical observations and experimental studies. Method of study: We studied the in vivo effects of transdermal estrogens (50 ╡g 17 ▀-Estradiol/24 hr) on cytokine production in postmenopausal women. A total of 17 women were randomized to either placebo (n = 7) or active estrogen therapy (n = 10) for 14 weeks, with addition of oral medoxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily during the last 2 weeks in both groups. Secretion of the cytokines IFN-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-6 in blood mononuclear cells was determined, spontaneously and after stimulation with common vaccination antigens and mitogen, using the cell ELISA technique. Results: IL-6 production after stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD) decreased in the estrogen treated group (P < 0.01). Mitogen-induced IL-6 production was reduced in the estrogen treated group in contrast to an increase in the placebo group, leading to a significant difference (P < 0.01) between the groups after 12 weeks of treatment. This difference was eliminated after an addition of progestagens for 2 weeks. No significant changes were noted for IFN-?, IL-4 or IL-10 in relation to estrogen or placebo treatment. Conclusions: In the present controlled study, the main in vivo effect of estrogens was a decrease in IL-6 production, indicating a possible beneficial effect of estrogen therapy.

  • 15.
    Berg, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Special Issue: Marcus Wallenberg International Symposium in Comparative Reproductive Immunology, "Immunology at the fetal maternal interface: Basic science and clinical applications", July 7-8th, 2011, Linkoping University, Sweden2011In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 66, no Issue supplement 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    ACCUMULATION OF CD56+CD8+T CELLS IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: HIGH PRODUCTION OF IFN-GAMMA BUT DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF ANNEXIN 1 in INFLAMMATION RESEARCH, vol 60, issue , pp 223-2232011In: INFLAMMATION RESEARCH, Springer Science Business Media , 2011, Vol. 60, p. 223-223Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Persistent accumulation of interferon-gamma-producing CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells in blood from patients with coronary artery disease2012In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 224, no 2, p. 515-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There is emerging evidence for CD8(+) T cell alterations in blood from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We examined whether the distribution and phenotype of CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells differed according to the clinical manifestation of CAD. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, n = 30), stable angina (SA, n = 34) and controls (n = 36) were included. Blood was collected before and up to 12 months after referral for coronary investigation. CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells were assessed by flow cytometry for expression of surface markers, apoptosis, and intracellular expression of cytokines. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The proportions of CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells were significantly higher in both ACS and SA patients compared with controls, and remained so after 3 and 12 months. This was independent of age, sex, systemic inflammation and cytomegalovirus seropositivity. CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells differed from CD8(+)CD56(-) T cells in terms of lower CD28 expression and fewer apoptotic cells. Both CD8(+) T cell subsets were positive for interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor, although IFN-gamma was significantly more confined to the CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The persistent accumulation of CD8(+)CD56(+) T cells in ACS and SA patients share several features with immunological aging. It also contributes to a larger IFN-gamma(+) pool in blood, and may thereby hypothetically drive the atherosclerotic process in a less favorable direction.

  • 18.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, and iRiSC - Inflammatory 18 Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Annexin A1 expression in blood mononuclear cells: a potential marker of glucocorticoid activity in patients with coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory actions is believed to drive progression of atherosclerosis. Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a key player in resolution of inflammation and a mediator of anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids. Here, we investigated whether expression of AnxA1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was altered in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and also related findings to glucocorticoid sensitivity ex vivo.

    We included 57 patients 6-12 months after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 10 patients with ACS, and healthy controls. AnxA1 mRNA was measured in PBMCs and AnxA1 protein was assessed in monocytes and lymphocyte subsets by flow cytometry. In post-ACS patients and controls, glucocorticoid sensitivity was determined by measuring inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on LPS46 induced cytokine secretion.

    AnxA1 mRNA levels in PBMCs were higher in patients compared with controls, although most pronounced in ACS patients. AnxA1 protein was most abundant in the monocyte fraction. ACS patients exhibited the highest levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1 protein while levels in post-ACS patients and controls were similar. Ex vivo assays showed that PBMCs from post-ACS patients were more prone to release IL-6. Glucocorticoid sensitivity correlated with cell surface-associated AnxA1 protein in peripheral monocytes. Dexamethasone also induced upregulation of AnxA1 mRNA.

    AnxA1 expression in PBMCs is closely associated with glucocorticoid actions and cell surface associated AnxA1 appears to be a marker of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Although still speculative, a “normal” expression of cell surface-associated AnxA1 in post-ACS patients may suggest that glucocorticoid actions in vivo are insufficient to provide adequate anti-inflammatory effects in these patients.

  • 19.
    Bergström, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reutelingsperger, Chris
    Department of Biochemistry, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Särndahl, Eva
    Department of Clinical Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, and iRiSC - Inflammatory 18 Response and Infection Susceptibility Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Higher expression of annexin A1 in 1 CD56+ than in CD56-T cells: Potential implications for coronary artery disease2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased proportions of circulating proinflammatory CD56+ T cells have been reported in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Yet, little is known about regulation of these cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression and potential role of the glucocorticoid-mediated protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) in CD56+ and CD56-T cell subsets, with focus on CAD.

    Methods and Results: We included totally 52 healthy individuals, 28 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 57 patients with a history of ACS. AnxA1 mRNA expression was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. AnxA1 protein expression (total and cell surface-associated) was measured by whole blood flow cytometry in circulating CD56+ and CD56- T cell subsets. Furthermore, inhibitory effects of dexamethasone and/or recombinant AnxA1 on cytokine secretion by CD56+ and CD56- T cells were explored in vitro. We found that CD56+ T cells (the majority CD8+), expressed higher levels of AnxA1 mRNA and protein than did CD56- T cells. When comparing CAD patients with healthy controls, significantly higher levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1 expression were seen in patients, most pronounced in ACS patients. In vitro, dexamethasone reduced cytokine secretion by CD56+ T cells, whereas AnxA1 alone had no effect, and AnxA1 combined with dexamethasone abolished the dexamethasone-induced suppressive effects.

    Conclusion: AnxA1 was expressed more abundantly in proinflammatory CD56+ T cells. Patients with ACS exhibited increased levels of cell surface-associated AnxA1, thus indicating increased activation of the AnxA1 pathway. Our data further suggested that AnxA1 might counteract glucocorticoid mediated anti-inflammatory effects in T cells.

  • 20.
    Bhai Mehta, Ratnesh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mirrasekhian, E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Freland, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sharma, S
    Brown University.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Trophoblast cells in immune regulation: modulation of macrophage polarization and production of IL-35 in JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, vol 90, issue 2, pp 165-1652011In: JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, Elsevier , 2011, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 165-165Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A possible link between loading, inflammation and healing: Immune cell populations during tendon healing in the rat2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 29824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loading influences tendon healing, and so does inflammation. We hypothesized that the two are connected. 48 rats underwent Achilles tendon transection. Half of the rats received Botox injections into calf muscles to reduce mechanical loading. Cells from the regenerating tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. In the loaded group, the regenerating tissue contained 83% leukocytes (CD45(+)) day 1, and 23% day 10. The M1/M2 macrophage ratio (CCR7/CD206) peaked at day 3, while T helper (CD3(+)CD4(+)) and T-reg cells (CD25(+) Foxp3(+)) increased over time. With Botox, markers associated with down-regulation of inflammation were more common day 5 (CD163, CD206, CD25, Foxp3), and M1 or M2 macrophages and T-reg cells were virtually absent day 10, while still present with full loading. The primary variable, CCR7/CD206 ratio day 5, was higher with full loading (p = 0.001) and the T-reg cell fraction was lower (p amp;lt; 0.001). Free cage activity loading is known to increase size and strength of the tendon in this model compared to Botox. Loading now appeared to delay the switch to an M2 type of inflammation with more T-reg cells. It seems a prolonged M1 phase due to loading might make the tendon regenerate bigger.

  • 22.
    Blomgran, Parmis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomgran, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Cox-2 inhibition and the composition of inflammatory cell populations during early and mid-time tendon healing2017In: Muscles, ligaments and Tendons journal, ISSN 2240-4554, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During early tendon healing, the cells within the regenerating tissue are, to a large part, inflammatory leukocytes (CD45+). In a rat Achilles tendon healing model, the inflammation resolves between 5 and 10 days. In the same model, Cox inhibitors (NSAIDs) impair healing when given during the first 5 days, but have a positive effect if given later. We tested the hypothesis that a Cox inhibitor would exert these effects by influencing inflammation, and thereby the composition of the inflammatory cell subpopulations.Methods: Achilles tendon transection was performed in 44 animals. Animals were randomized to either parecoxib or saline injections. Healing was evaluated by mechanical testing day 7 after surgery and by flow cytometry day 3 and 10.Results: Cross-sectional area, peak force and stiffness were reduced by parecoxib 31, 33, and 25% respectively (p=0.005, p=0.002, and p=0.005). By flow cytometry, there was a strong effect of time (p<0.001) on virtually all inflammatory cell subpopulations (CD45, CD11b, CD68, CCR7, CD163, CD206, CD3, CD4), but no significant effect of parecoxib at any time point.Conclusion: The results suggest that the negative effects of Cox inhibitors on tendon healing might be exerted mainly via mechanisms not directly related to inflammatory cells.

  • 23.
    Blystad, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Håkansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tisell, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Quantitative MRI for Analysis of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions without Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent2016In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 94-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions are important markers of active inflammation in the diagnostic work-up of MS and in disease monitoring with MR imaging. Because intravenous contrast agents involve an expense and a potential risk of adverse events, it would be desirable to identify active lesions without using a contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-contrast injection tissue-relaxation rates and proton density of MS lesions, by using a new quantitative MR imaging sequence, can identify active lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of MS were studied. MR imaging with a standard clinical MS protocol and a quantitative MR imaging sequence was performed at inclusion (baseline) and after 1 year. ROIs were placed in MS lesions, classified as nonenhancing or enhancing. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, as well as proton density were obtained from the quantitative MR imaging sequence. Statistical analyses of ROI values were performed by using a mixed linear model, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Enhancing lesions had a significantly (P &lt; .001) higher mean longitudinal relaxation rate (1.22 0.36 versus 0.89 +/- 0.24), a higher mean transverse relaxation rate (9.8 +/- 2.6 versus 7.4 +/- 1.9), and a lower mean proton density (77 +/- 11.2 versus 90 +/- 8.4) than nonenhancing lesions. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.832 was obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Contrast-enhancing MS lesions often have proton density and relaxation times that differ from those in nonenhancing lesions, with lower proton density and shorter relaxation times in enhancing lesions compared with nonenhancing lesions.

  • 24.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Mjosberg, Jenny
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Svensson Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hjorth, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia2015In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

  • 25.
    Boij, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson-Ekdahl, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Sweden Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linneaus University, Sweden .
    Lindahl, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Palonek, Elzbieta
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Garle, Mats
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden Doping Control Lab, Sweden .
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Biomarkers of Coagulation, Inflammation, and Angiogenesis are Independently Associated with Preeclampsia2012In: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF REPRODUCTIVE IMMUNOLOGY, ISSN 1046-7408, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 258-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Although preeclampsia has been associated with inflammation, coagulation, and angiogenesis, their correlation and relative contribution are unknown. Method of Study About 114 women with preeclampsia, 31 with early onset (EOP) and 83 with late onset preeclampsia (LOP), and 100 normal pregnant controls were included. A broad panel of 32 biomarkers reflecting coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis was analyzed. Results Preeclampsia was associated with decreased antithrombin, IL-4 and placental growth factor levels and with increased C3a, pentraxin-3, and sFlt-1 levels, with more marked differences in the EOP group. The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 were significantly higher in the preeclampsia and EOP group than in controls, respectively. No correlations between the biomarkers were found in preeclampsia. Multivariate logistic regression tests confirmed the results. Conclusions Cytokines, chemokines and complement activation seem to be part of a Th1-like inflammatory reaction in preeclampsia, most pronounced in EOP, where chemokines may be more useful than cytokines as biomarkers. Biomarkers were not correlated suggesting partly independent or in time separated mechanisms.

  • 26.
    Buse, Eberhard
    et al.
    Covance Laboratories, Münster, Germany.
    Häeger, Jan-Dirk
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Markert, Udo R
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics, University Hospital, Jena, Germany.
    Faas, Marijke M
    University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dixon, Darlene
    NIEHS, NTP, Molecular Pathogenesis, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Cline, J Mark
    Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
    Pfarrer, Christiane
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany.
    The placenta in toxicology. Part I: Animal models in toxicology2014In: Toxicologic pathology (Print), ISSN 0192-6233, E-ISSN 1533-1601, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 314-326Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immune system represents a key defense mechanism against potential pathogens and adverse non-self materials. During pregnancy, the placenta is the point of contact between the maternal organism and non-self proteins of the fetal allograft and hence undoubtedly fulfils immune functions. In the placenta bacteria, foreign (non-self) proteins and proteins that might be introduced in toxicological studies or by medication are barred from reaching the progeny, and the maternal immune system is primed for acceptance of non-maternal fetal protein. Both immunologic protection of the fetus and acceptance of the fetus by the mother require effective mechanisms to prevent an immunologic fetomaternal conflict and to keep both organisms in balance. This is why the placenta requires toxicological consideration in view of its immune organ function. The following articles deal with placenta immune-, control-, and tolerance mechanisms in view of both fetal and maternal aspects. Furthermore, models for experimental access to placental immune function are addressed and the pathological evaluation is elucidated. "The Placenta as an Immune Organ and Its Relevance in Toxicological Studies" was subject of a continuing education course at the 2012 Society of Toxicologic Pathology meeting held in Boston, MA.

  • 27.
    Cline, J Mark
    et al.
    Department of Pathology/Section on Comparative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA.
    Dixon, Darlene
    National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program (NTP), Molecular Pathogenesis, NTP Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Faas, Marijke M
    Immunoendocrinology, Division of Medical Biology, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Göhner, Claudia
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics. University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Häger, Jan-Dirk
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany .
    Markert, Udo R
    Placenta-Labor, Department of Obstetrics. University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
    Pfarrer, Christiane
    Department of Anatomy, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany .
    Svensson-Arvelund, Judit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Buse, Eberhard
    Covance Laboratories GmbH, Muenster, Germany .
    The placenta in toxicology. Part III: Pathologic assessment of the placenta2014In: Toxicologic pathology (Print), ISSN 0192-6233, E-ISSN 1533-1601, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 339-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short review is derived from the peer-reviewed literature and the experience and case materials of the authors. Brief illustrated summaries are presented on the gross and histologic normal anatomy of rodent and macaque placentas, including typical organ weights, with comments on differences from the human placenta. Common incidental findings, background lesions, and induced toxic lesions are addressed, and a recommended strategy for pathologic evaluation of placentas is provided.

  • 28.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Margareta
    Department of Neurology, County Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology.
    T helper type 2 like cytokine responses to peptides from P0 and P2 myelin proteins during the recovery phase of Guillain-Barré syndrome1997In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T-lymphocytes are probably involved in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). T-helper-1 (Th1) cytokines activate macrophages and induce a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) inflammatory response, consistent with the morphology of the demyelination in GBS. Th2 cytokines encourage antibody production and downregulate Th1 responses. To study the Th1/Th2 cytokines in relation to the clinical course of GBS an ELISPOT method for determination of single cells secreting interferon-γ, IFN-γ (Th1) or interleukin-4, IL-4 (Th2) was used. We serially investigated antigen-induced cytokine secretion from circulating T-cells stimulated with human peptides from the P0 and P2 proteins in seven patients and compared to results from seven serially investigated healthy controls. Most patients (five of seven) showed IL-4 responses during the plateau- or recovery-phase as compared to controls. One patient with a prolonged disease course, on the other hand, had an IFN-γ dominated reactivity. We suggest that the IL-4 responses are beneficial in GBS, and may have a role in terminating the disease process in this self-limiting inflammatory disease.

  • 29.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Margareta
    Neurology Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elevated number of cells secreting transforming growth factor β in Guillain-Barré syndrome2003In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 111, no 12, p. 1095-1104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used ELISPOT and cell ELISA to study secretion of IL-4, IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-6, and TNF-α by circulating mononuclear cells during the course of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Compared to healthy controls, patients with GBS had higher numbers of TGF-β-secreting cells and the number of individuals with myelin-peptide-induced IL-4 and TGF-β secretion was higher in the GBS group. No significant differences were seen concerning the predominantly pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-6 or TNF-α. Our findings indicate a down-regulatory role for TGF-β and IL-4 in GBS.

  • 30.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    T lymphocyte subset abnormalities in peripheral blood from patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome1994In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T lymphocytes are probably of pathogenic importance in many autoimmune diseases. Recently, deviations of circulating T-helper (CD4+) subpopulations have been noticed. Blood samples from 12 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) were studied with flow cytometry during their disease to define circulating T cell populations. The proportion of T-helper cells (CD4+) was decreased (mean value 41±15%, P = 0.01) and the proportion of T cytotoxic/suppressor cells (CD8+) was increased (35±18%, P = 0.0006) as compared to the control group of healthy blood donors (47±8% and 26±7% respectively). The CD4+ population is divided into the helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) and suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subsets. which normally are equally distributed (mean values in our control group were 45±15% and 44±15%, respectively). In patients with GBS, the helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) subset was increased (54±10%, P = 0.05) and the suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subset was decreased (31±9, P = 0.005) compared to the controls. The proportion of activated HLA-DR-expressing T cells was increased (7±8%, P = 0.005) as compared to control (3±3%). The total proportions of T cells (CD2+), B cells (CD19+) and natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+) were similar in pateints and controls. The CD4+ and CD8+ populations, as well as the activated HLA-DR+ T cells, normalized during the disease course. The derivations within the CD4+ population also tended to normalize, but even at follow up after 6–33 (mean 23) months, some abnormalities remained. In conclusion, we confirm previous reports of T cell activation in peripheral blood from patients with GBS. A new finding is the derivation of T helper subpopulations with an increased helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) subset and a decreased suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subset, which indicates a possible autoimmune character of GBS.

  • 31.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 32.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gati, Istvan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, B
    University Hospital, Neurol Clin, Orebro.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    CLASSIFICATION AND VALUE OF EXTENDED PATHOLOGICAL WORK UP OF 99 CONSECUTIVE PATIENTS WITH MORPHOLOGICAL FINDINGS OF INFLAMMATORY MYOPATHY in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, vol 18, issue SI, pp 49-492011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, Vol. 18, no SI, p. 49-49Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Bjorn
    University Hospital Örebro, Sweden .
    Gati, Istvan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Classification and Diagnostic Investigation in Inflammatory Myopathies: A Study of 99 Patients2013In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 1173-1182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies have led to new diagnostic methods. The aims of our study were (1) to evaluate the consequences of using the classification of Amato/European Neuromuscular Centre Workshop (ENMC), compared to that of Bohan and Peter; and (2) to evaluate any diagnostic benefit in using an extended pathological investigation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. From a consecutive retrospective database, we evaluated 99 patients for classification. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) were classified according to Griggs, et al. In addition to routine stainings and immunohistochemistry, a multilevel serial sectioning procedure was performed on paraffin-embedded material, to identify scarce pathological findings. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. Classification according to Bohan and Peter could be performed for 83 of the 99 patients, whereas only 60 patients met the Amato/ENMC criteria, the latter resulting in the following diagnostic groups: IBM (n = 18), nonspecific myositis (n = 14), polymyositis (n = 12), dermatomyositis (n = 10), dermatomyositis sine dermatitis (n = 5), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (n = 1). Most of the Amato/ENMC diagnostic groups harbored patients from several of the Bohan and Peter groups, which included a substantial group lacking proximal muscle weakness. The serial sectioning procedure was essential for classification of 9 patients (15%), and led to a more specific diagnosis for 13 patients (22%) according to Amato/ENMC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. The classification of Amato/ENMC was more restrictive, forming groups based on clinical criteria and specified myopathological findings, which clearly differed from the groups of the Bohan and Peter classification. An extended pathological investigation increased the diagnostic yield of a muscle biopsy and highlights the quantity and specificity of certain pathological findings.

  • 34.
    Danielsson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindvall, Bjorn
    University Hospital Örebro.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Expression of apoptosis related proteins in normal and diseased muscle: A possible role for Bcl-2 in protection of striated muscle2009In: NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS, ISSN 0960-8966, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 412-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unique absence of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (MHC-I) expression in normal muscle is one possible mechanism protecting striated muscle. In order to define their possible involvement in protection of normal muscle. we investigated the expression of molecules involved in muscle fibre death and survival mechanisms (Bcl-2, Fas, Fas-ligand and TRAIL), focusing on disorders with possible involvement of cytotoxic T cells. We studied muscle biopsies from 20 healthy volunteers, from 10 patients affected by polymyositis and 10 by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. By using immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time PCR we detected a constitutional expression of Bcl-2 in healthy muscle, whereas the expression was weaker in disease processes. Fas-L and TRAIL were not detected in muscle fibres, and Fas only in muscle affected by disease. Our findings indicate that the major apoptotic protein Bcl-2 might have a hitherto unrecognized role in the protection of normal muscle.

  • 35.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Press, Rayomand
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th1/Th2/Th17 and Treg related transcription factors and cytokines in multiple sclerosis2008In: JOURNAL OF NEUROIMMUNOLOGY, 2008, Vol. 203, no 2, p. 131-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 37.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Press, R
    Huddinge University Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood2011In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas Th2 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependant on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    Objective:The aim of this study was to assess the balance of CD4+T cell populations in relapsing-remitting MS.

    Methods:Blood mRNA expression of TBX21, GATA3, RORC, FOXP3 and EBI3 was assessed in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to assess T lymphocyte numbers.

    Results:In relapsing-remitting MS, diminished expression of FOXP3 (Treg) was found (p < 0.05), despite normal numbers of CD4+CD25hiTreg. Immunoregulatory EBI3 and Th2-associated GATA3 ([a-z]+) was also decreased in MS (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Expression of TBX21 (Th1) and RORC (Th17) did not differ between patients and controls. Similar changes were observed when analysing beta-interferon treated (n = 12) or untreated (n = 21) patients. Analysis of transcription factor ratios, comparing TBX21/GATA3 and RORC/FOXP3, revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 ratio in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (p < 0.005).

    Conclusion:Our findings indicate systemic defects at the mRNA level, involving downregulation of beneficial CD4+phenotypes. This might play a role in disease development by permitting activation of harmful T cell populations.

  • 38.
    Edvardsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Rättsmedicinalverket, Linköping, Sweden.
    Clinical use of conventional reference intervals in the frail elderly2015In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aims and objectives

    Reference intervals provided by the laboratory are commonly established by measuring samples from apparently healthy subjects in the ages 18–65 years, excluding elderly individuals with chronic diseases and medication. The aim of our study was to establish whether current reference intervals for immune parameters and chemical biomarkers are valid for older individuals including those with chronic diseases, so-called frail elderly.

    Methods

    Data from our cohort of 138 non-infected nursing home residents (NHR), mean age 86.8 years, range 80–98, were compared with raw data, as basis for the development of reference intervals, obtained from reference populations, like blood donors (IgA, IgG, IgM, C3 and C4) and from the Nordic Reference Interval Project (NORIP) (alanine aminotransferase, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase, lactate dehydrogenase, phosphate, sodium and urea). Immune parameters were measured by nephelometry and in NORIP the measurements were performed by means of different routine methods, in more than 100 laboratories.

    Results

    Only nine individuals (7%) of NHR were found to be free from chronic disease. C3, C4 (P < 0.001) and IgG levels (P < 0.05) were higher, while IgM levels (P < 0.001) were lower in NHR compared with reference blood donors. Levels of alanine aminotransferase, phosphate (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.05) and sodium (P < 0.01) were lower while creatinine and urea levels were higher (P < 0.001) in NHR compared with NORIP subjects.

    Conclusion

    Comparing laboratory results from elderly people with conventional reference intervals can be misleading or even dangerous, as normal conditions may appear pathological, or vice versa and thus lead to unnecessary or even harmful treatment.

  • 39.
    Ekdahl, Kristina N
    et al.
    Kalmar University.
    Blomberg, Carolina
    Kalmar University.
    Henningsson, Anna J
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hakansson, Irene
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology .
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Kalmar University.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Systemic and intrathecal complement activation in multiple sclerosis and Guillan-Barre syndrome2009In: in MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY, vol 46., issue 14, 2009, Vol. 46, no 14, p. 2848-2848Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 40.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Weissert, R.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Neuroimmunology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, T.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Neuroimmunology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Transfer of myelin-specific cells deviated in vitro towards IL-4 production ameliorates ongoing experimental allergic neuritis2001In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A causal role of IL-4 (Th2) production for recovery in experimental allergic neuritis (EAN) was indicated by experiments where Th1-like autoreactive cell populations, taken from the induction phase of the disease, were deviated to extensive secretion of IL-4 in a selective fashion, by ex vivo stimulation with autoantigen in the presence of IL-4. The deviated cells were adoptively transferred to EAN rats at a time just prior to the onset of clinical signs. This treatment ameliorated EAN compared with sham treatment. This therapeutic approach, with generation of autoreactive IL-4-secreting cells ex vivo followed by subsequent adoptive transfer, may become a new selective treatment of organ-specific autoimmune diseases since, in contrast to previous attempts, it is done in a physiological and technically easy way.

  • 41.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Jönsson, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ärlehag, L
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lyme borreliosis in Sweden - Diagnostic performance of five commercial Borrelia serology kits using sera from well-defined patient groups2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 74-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five commercial Borrelia serology kits available in Sweden were evaluated and compared for their diagnostic performance in sera from clinically well-characterized patient groups. With the clinically defined groups as the gold standard, i.e. without knowledge of antibody status in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, the diagnostic performance of the kits was compared and important differences in diagnostic usefulness were found. The kits from Abbot and DAKO, that often predict clinically relevant Borrelia infection and do not detect antibodies in sera from patients without strong suspicion of Borrelia infection, were considered the most useful in the population studied. This kind of validation study is an important part of good laboratory practice and should be performed by laboratories serving patient populations with varying endemicity of Borrelia.

  • 42.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Detection of spontaneous and antigen-induced human interleukin-4 responses in vitro: Comparison of ELISPOT, a novel ELISA and real-time RT-PCR2002In: JIM - Journal of Immunological Methods, ISSN 0022-1759, E-ISSN 1872-7905, Vol. 260, no 1-2, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is an important T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine in man, driving Th2 polarisation and exerting the most antagonistic effects to the Th1 cytokine interferon-? (IFN-?). Nevertheless, few data on spontaneous and antigen-specific secretion of IL-4 in man are available, mainly due to difficulties in the detection of IL-4. In this study, we compared three assays that can detect antigen-induced IL-4 responses, ELISPOT, ELISA after blocking the IL-4 receptor during cell culture, and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Spontaneous, antigen- and allergen-induced responses were analysed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from three groups with different secretion patterns for IL-4: atopic individuals, nonatopic individuals and pregnant women. ELISPOT displayed the highest sensitivity and was the only assay that could detect spontaneous secretion of IL-4 in all analysed samples. The IL-4 receptor blocking ELISA was considered best for the detection of in vitro antigen- and allergen-induced responses, since the results obtained from the ELISPOT and real-time RT-PCR displayed lower specificity, possibly because of seemingly aberrant IL-4 responses in the group of pregnant women. The real-time RT-PCR for detection of IL-4 mRNA proved to be sensitive, but expression of IL-4 mRNA was not correlated with the secretion of IL-4.

  • 43.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Svenvik, Maria
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Bergström, S.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    A symptomatic Borrelia-seropositive individuals display the same incidence of Borrelia-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-secreting cells in blood as patients with clinical Borrelia infection.1999In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 115, p. 498-502Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jarefors, Sara
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Tynngard, N
    Hedlund, M
    Sander, B
    Bergström, S
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Phenotypes indicating cytolytic properties of Borrelia-specific interferon-? secreting cells in chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis2003In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 145, no 1-2, p. 115-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms underlying chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis are mainly unknown. Human Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) infection is associated with Bb-specific secretion of interferon-? (IFN-?), which may be important for the elimination of Bb, but this may also cause tissue injury. In order to increase the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic neuroborreliosis, we investigated which cell types that secrete IFN-?. Blood mononuclear cells from 13 patients with neuroborreliosis and/or acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans were stimulated with Bb antigen and the phenotypes of the induced IFN-?-secreting cells were analyzed with three different approaches. Cells expressing CD8 or TCR?d, which both have cytolytic properties, were the main phenotypes of IFN-?-secreting cells, indicating that tissue injury in chronic neuroborreliosis may be mediated by cytotoxic cells.

  • 45.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Charlotte
    Matthiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sharma, Surendra
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4, interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma by first trimester decidual mononuclear cells2002In: American Journal of reproductive immunology, ISSN 8755-8920, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 159-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PROBLEM: A T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cytokine dominated microenvironment has been predicted to be crucial for successful pregnancy. However, little information is available about local cytokine secretion in the human decidua. We determined the spontaneous secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10 by decidual mononuclear cells at the single cell level and compared it with their secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    METHODS OF STUDY: The cytokine secretion from decidual and blood cells was detected by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot-forming cell (ELISPOT)-assay.

    RESULTS: Cells secreting IL-4 (median 153, range 8–530), IL-10 (median 188, range 32–1600) and IFN-γ (median 123, range 15–1140) were detected in all decidual and blood samples. The cytokine secretion showed a co-linear pattern in both the blood and decidua, i.e. when one cytokine was secreted at high levels, the others followed the trend. No correlation was found between the number of cytokine secreting cells in blood and decidua for any of the cytokines.

    CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-4 and IL-10 are locally secreted in the decidua early during normal pregnancy, probably counteracting the fetal rejecting effects of co-expressed IFN-γ. The cytokine secretion by blood cells does not generally reflect the local secretion pattern during first trimester pregnancy.

  • 46.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion.
    Masreliez, C
    Svenvik, M
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Antibodies and T-cell reactivity to Borrelia burgdorferi in an asymptomatic population: A study of healthy blood donors in an Inland town district in the South-East of Sweden2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 806-808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the issue of whether Borrelia infection can be asymptomatic, blood donors with no history of borreliosis (n = 408) were screened for antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. Seropositive individuals (n = 17) were further investigated with respect to Borrelia-specific T-cell reactivity, using an interferon-? ELISPOT assay. Anti-Borrelia antibodies as well as Borrelia-specific T-cell responses were evident in 9 asymptomatic donors, strongly supporting a current or previous asymptomatic Borrelia infection.

  • 47.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mathiesen, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Berg, Göran
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th2-deviation of fetus-specific T cells1999In: Immunology today (Amsterdam. Regular ed.), ISSN 0167-5699, E-ISSN 1355-8242, Vol. 20, p. 534-534Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Elkarim, RA
    et al.
    Mustafa, M
    Link, H
    Bakhiet, M
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Induction of neutralizing autoantibodies to interferon-gamma in patients with polyneuropathy.1999In: Human Antibodies, ISSN 1093-2607, E-ISSN 1875-869X, Vol. 9, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cassel, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Letter: Increase in Th17-associated CCL20 and decrease in Th2-associated CCL22 plasma chemokines in active ANCA-associated vasculitis2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 80-83Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 50.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Andersson, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Relationship between serum levels of IL-18 and IgG1 in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and healthy controls2004In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 617-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is characterized by inflammation in salivary and lachrymal glands, with a local predominance of Th1-like cytokines, as well as the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin (IL) 18. High serum levels of polyclonal IgG are common, with a subclass imbalance in which IgG1 is increased and IgG2 is normal or low. IL-18 is also of pathogenetic importance in rheumatoid arthritis. In the present study we looked for any relationship between serum IL-18 as well as transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 versus IgA, IgM, and IgG subclass levels in SS (n = 16), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 15), and healthy controls (n = 15). SS was defined by the revised American-European classification criteria. IL-18 and TGF-β1 were analyzed with enzyme immunoassays (EIA), and IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 by single radial immunodiffusion. In the composite group of RA, SS and normal controls, IgG1 and IL-18 were related (R = 0.52, P = 0.0005). No relation was found neither between IL-18 versus IgG2, IgG3 or IgA, nor between serum TGF-β1 versus any of the immunoglobulins. Since serum levels of IL-18 are related to serum IgG1, IL-18 may be of importance for IgG1 switch and/or release.

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