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  • 1. Alm, I
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Attitudes of hearing -impaired and normally hearing youngsters to hearing impairment.1989Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Alm, I.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Conceptions of hearing impairment in students1991In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 14, p. 69-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Alm, I
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Persson, U.B
    Dahlgren, L.O
    Gillström, Å
    Samuelsson, Stefan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings.
    Ausmeel, Heino
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Metakognitiv utveckling (Metacognitive development)1988Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Andersson, J
    et al.
    Helstrup, T
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Collaboration and memory: How is our ability to remember affected by others?2007In: Everyday Memory, London: Psychology press , 2007, p. 135-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 5. Andersson, J
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Collaboration and memory: Effects of dyadic retrieval on different memory tasks.1995In: The VIII Escop meeting,1995, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. Andersson, J.
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Recall suffers from collaboration: Joint recall effects of friendship and task complexity.1995In: Applied cognitive psychology., ISSN 0888-4080, Vol. 9, p. 199-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Försvarets forskningsinstitut.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Collaboration and memory: Effects of dyadic retrieval on different memory tasks.1996In: Applied cognitive psychology., Vol. 10, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Collaboration and memory: How social aspects of dyads affect memory performance.1996In: MEMORY,1996, 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Andersson, Jan
    et al.
    Försvarets forskningsinstitut.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Cued memory collaboration: Effects of friendship and type of retrieval cue.1997In: European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0954-1446, E-ISSN 1464-0635, Vol. 9, p. 273-287Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Cognitive Psychology.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spens, K-E.
    Cognitive skills and chronological age related to visual tactile supported visual speech understanding2001In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, E-ISSN 1465-7325, Vol. 6, p. 116-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxnell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Spens, Karl-Erik
    Cognitive correlates of visual speech understanding in hearing impaired individuals2001In: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, ISSN 1081-4159, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 103-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the extent to which different measures ofspeechreading performance correlated with particular cognitiveabilities in a population of hearing-impaired people. Althoughthe three speechreading tasks (isolated word identification,sentence comprehension, and text tracking) were highly intercorrelated,they tapped different cognitive skills. In this population,younger participants were better speechreaders, and, when agewas taken into account, speech tracking correlated primarilywith (written) lexical decision speed. In contrast, speechreadingfor sentence comprehension correlated most strongly with performanceon a phonological processing task (written pseudohomophone detection)but also on a span measure that may have utilized visual, nonverbalmemory for letters. We discuss the implications of this pattern.

  • 12.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Deaf signers are less reliant than hearing non-signers on fact retrieval from verbal long term memory during arithmetic processing: fMRI evidence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Greater reliance on magnitude manipulation during mental arithmetic in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers: fMRI evidence2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to verbal processing of numbers, whereas magnitude processing seems unaffected by deafness. Neuroimaging evidence from hearing individuals suggests that verbal processing of numbers engages primarily left angular gyrus (lAG), whereas magnitude processing engages primarily the horizontal portion of the right intraparietal sulcus (rHIP). In a ROI analysis of brain imaging data from 16 adult deaf signers and 16 adult hearing non-signers, who did not differ on sex, age or education, we examined if activity in lAG and rHIP changed as a result of task (multiplication vs subtraction) and group (deaf signers and hearing non-signers). We found a significant main effect of brain region (F(1,30) = 117.00, p < .001, η_p^2 = .80) and an interaction effect between region and group (F(1,30) = 20.70, p < .001, η_p^2 = .41). Further analyses showed that there were no significant differences in average activation between groups in lAG (F(1,30) = 0.16, p = .70). However, in rHIP deaf signers showed significantly greater average activation compared to non-signers (F(1,30) = 15.20, p < .001, η_p^2 = .34). There were no significant differences in activation between subtraction and multiplication (F(1,30) = 0.66, p = .42) and no behavioural differences between groups (F(1,30) = 1.70, p = .20). These results suggest that when engaging in arithmetic tasks deaf signers successfully make use of qualitatively difference processes, compared to hearing non-signers, with stronger emphasis on brain regions relating to magnitude manipulation.

  • 14.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers and hearing non-signers recruit similar networks for arithmetic and phonological tasks2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Profoundly deaf individuals sometimes have difficulty with arithmetic and phonological tasks. In the present study we investigate if these differences can be attributed to differences in recruitment of neurobiological networks. Seventeen hearing non-signers (HN) and sixteen deaf signers (DS) matched on age, gender and non-verbal intelligence took part in an fMRI study. In the scanner three digit/letter pairs were visually presented and the participants performed six different blocked tasks tapping processing of digit and letter order, multiplication, subtraction and phonological ability. Data were analysed using two 2x2x2 ANOVAs; process (arithmetic, language) x level (high, low) x group (DS, HN). A main effect of process revealed language networks in the left inferior frontal gryus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and insula. Arithmetic networks included left middle orbital gyrus and superior medial gyrus. A main effect of level revealed low level processing (digit/letter order) in the right middle occipital gyrus and the right precuneus and high level processing (subtraction/multiplication/phonological ability) in left inferior frontal gyrus. There was no main effect of group but a significant task x group interaction in the right temporal pole which in DS (but not HN) was activated more for arithmetic than language processing (pfwe = .022) when multiplication was included in the analysis. This region is implicated in conceptual representation. These results suggest that both arithmetic and language are processed similarly by DS and HN with possible between-group differences in the use of conceptual representation in arithmetic and language tasks.

  • 15.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

  • 16.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Multiplication engages phonological networks in Broca's area differently for deaf signers and hearing non-signers2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In hearing individuals, multiplication relies mainly on the phonological loop while subtraction relies on the visuo-spatial sketchpad (VSSP; Lee & Kang, 2002). Little is known about arithmetic neural networks in deaf signers (DS). Since DS often perform worse than hearing non-signers (NH) on arithmetic in general and multiplication in particular (Traxler, 2000), we hypothesized that there are strategic differences between how groups recruit the phonological loop in multiplication, but not in subtraction, leading to differential activation of phonological processing areas in left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area). We investigated this using a blocked fMRI-design in which nine DS and 17 HN matched on age, gender, education and non-verbal intelligence (Raven & Raven, 1998) were tested on tasks of multiplication, subtraction and phonology (rhyme). The contrasts rhyme versus multiplication and rhyme versus subtraction were examined across groups within the region of interest defined by a probability map of Broca’s area (Amunts, 1999). We observed a significant interaction between task (multiplication and rhyme) and group (F = 12.64, p = .034, FWE-corrected), where the HN showed higher activation for rhyme than for multiplication (T = 4.55, p = .001, FWE-corrected) whereas there were no differences in activations between tasks for DS. For subtraction versus rhyme no interaction with group was found. These results suggest that there are differences between DS and HN in the phonology dependent neural networks in Broca’s area used during multiplication, which may be part of the explanation for poorer performance in DS.

  • 17.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological processing during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ingvar, Martin
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological recruitment during arithmetic processing across language modalities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Fransson, Peter
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network2015In: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, p. 97-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 20.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Orfanidou, Eleni
    University of Crete, Rethymnon, Greece.
    Cardin, Velia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. University College London, UK.
    Holmer, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Capek, Cheryl M.
    School of Psychological Science, University of Manchester, UK.
    Woll, Bencie
    University College London, UK.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Similar digit-based working memory in deaf signers and hearing non-signers despite digit span differences2013In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, no 942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Similar working memory (WM) for lexical items has been demonstrated for signers and non-signers while short-term memory (STM) is regularly poorer in deaf than hearing individuals. In the present study, we investigated digit-based WM and STM in Swedish and British deaf signers and hearing non-signers. To maintain good experimental control we used printed stimuli throughout and held response mode constant across groups. We showed that deaf signers have similar digit-based WM performance, despite shorter digit spans, compared to well-matched hearing non-signers. We found no difference between signers and non-signers on STM span for letters chosen to minimize phonological similarity or in the effects of recall direction. This set of findings indicates that similar WM for signers and non-signers can be generalized from lexical items to digits and suggests that poorer STM in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers may be due to differences in phonological similarity across the language modalities of sign and speech.

  • 21.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf native signers2008In: The first meeting of the federation of the European societies of neuropsychology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Arithmetic and phonological processes in deaf signers and hearing non-signers - a cognitive study2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Arithmetic and phonological processing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2008In: First European Congress of Neuropsychology,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Complex symbol precessing in deaf native signers and hearing non-signers2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic2014In: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

  • 26.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dealing with digits: short-term memory differences in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2011Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language modality specific affects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010In: Second European Congress of Neuropsychology, September, Amsterdam, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Language modality specific effects on simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Phonological similarity and sensory memory traces modulate span size in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rhyme and Reason - do deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing non-signers2010In: BEHAVIOURAL NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0953-4180, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Andin, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Simple spans in deaf signers and hearing nonsigners2010In: Behavioural Neurology, ISSN 0953-4180, E-ISSN 1875-8584, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 207-208Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Communication in the profoundly hearing impaired and deaf: From signal to dialogue.1998In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, no 49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sternäng, Ola
    Stockholm University.
    Wahlin, Åke
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Nilsson, L-G
    Auditory deficits are related to episodic long-term memory deficits2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Backenroth-Ohsako, G
    et al.
    Hjelmquist, E
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wadensjö, E
    Funktionshindrades villkor i arbetslivet (Conditions for the disabled in working life)1996Book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Bernstein, Joshua G
    et al.
    National Military Audiology and Speech Pathology Center Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids2014In: Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiogram predicts less than a third of the variance in speech reception thresholds (SRTs) for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners properly fit with individualized frequency-dependent gain. The remaining variance is often attributed to a combination of su-prathreshold distortion in the auditory pathway and non-auditory factors such as cogni-tive processing. Distinguishing between these factors requires a measure of suprathresh-old auditory processing to account for the non-cognitive contributions. Preliminary re-sults in 12 HI listeners identified a correlation between spectrotemporal modulation (STM) sensitivity and speech intelligibility in noise presented over headphones. The cur-IHCON 2014 27 August 13-17, 2014rent study assessed the effectiveness of STM sensitivity as a measure of suprathreshold auditory function to predict free-field SRTs in noise for a larger group of 47 HI listeners with hearing aids.SRTs were measured for Hagerman sentences presented at 65 dB SPL in stationary speech-weighted noise or four-talker babble. Pre-recorded speech and masker stimuli were played through a small anechoic chamber equipped with a master hearing aid pro-grammed with individualized gain. The output from an IEC711 Ear Simulator was played binaurally through insert earphones. Three processing algorithms were examined: linear gain, linear gain plus noise reduction, or fast-acting compressive gain.STM stimuli consist of spectrally-rippled noise with spectral-peak frequencies that shift over time. STM with a 2-cycle/octave spectral-ripple density and a 4-Hz modulation rate was applied to a 2-kHz lowpass-filtered pink-noise carrier. Stimuli were presented over headphones at 80 dB SPL (±5-dB roving). The threshold modulation depth was estimated adaptively in a two-alternative forced-choice task.STM sensitivity was strongly correlated (R2=0.48) with the global SRT (i.e., the SRTs averaged across masker and processing conditions). The high-frequency pure-tone aver-age (3-8 kHz) and age together accounted for 23% of the variance in global SRT. STM sensitivity accounted for an additional 28% of the variance in global SRT (total R2=0.51) when combined with these two other metrics in a multiple-regression analysis. Correla-tions between STM sensitivity and SRTs for individual conditions were weaker for noise reduction than for the other algorithms, and marginally stronger for babble than for sta-tionary noise.The results are discussed in the context of previous work suggesting that STM sensitivity for low rates and low carrier frequencies is impaired by a reduced ability to use temporal fine-structure information to detect slowly shifting spectral peaks. STM detection is a fast, simple test of suprathreshold auditory function that accounts for a substantial pro-portion of variability in hearing-aid outcomes for speech perception in noise.

  • 37.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, The Netherlands .
    New measures of masked text recognition in relation to speech-in-noise perception and their associations with age and cognitive abilities2012In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 194-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This research aimed to increase the analogy between text reception threshold (TRT) and speech reception threshold (SRT) and to examine the TRT's value in estimating cognitive abilities important for speech comprehension in noise.

    Method: We administered five TRT versions, SRT tests in stationary (SRTSTAT) and modulated (SRTMOD) noise, and two cognitive tests: a reading span (RSpan) test for working memory capacity, and a letter-digit-substitution test for information processing speed. Fifty-five normal hearing adults (18–78 years, mean = 44) participated. We examined mutual associations of the tests and their predictive value for the SRTs with correlation and linear regression analyses.

    Results: SRTs and TRTs were well associated, also when controlling for age. Correlations for the SRTSTAT were generally lower than for the SRTMOD. The cognitive tests were only correlated to the SRTs when age was not controlled for. Age and the TRTs were the only significant predictors of SRTMOD. SRTSTATwas predicted by level of education and some of the TRT versions.

    Conclusions: TRTs and SRTs are robustly associated, nearly independent of age. The association between SRTs and RSpan is largely age-dependent. The TRT test and the RSpan test measure different non-auditory components of linguistic processing relevant for speech perception in noise.

  • 38.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    Vrije University of Amsterdam Medical Centre.
    Recognition of masked text and speech in noise in association with age and cognitive abilities2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Test Reception Threshold test revisited - strengthening associations with SRT and working memory2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold as a Measure for the Non-Auditory Components of Speech Understanding in Noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Besser, Jana
    et al.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Zekveld, Adriana
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Festen, Joost M.
    (ENT/Audiology & EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University medical center Amsterdam.
    The Text Reception Threshold (TRT) as a measure of the non-auditory component of speech comprehension in noise2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42. Borg, E
    et al.
    Hjälm, A
    Marklund, K
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, E
    Wilsson, M
    Detecting and localizing sounds: A problem for persons with severe hearing and visual handicaps1995In: The International Symposium on Communicative disability: Compensation and Development,1995, 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Borg, E
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dövblinda: Taktilt överförd information om skeenden i omgivningen.2001Report (Other academic)
  • 44. Borg, E
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research.
    Neovius, L
    Orebro Med Ctr Hosp, Ahlsen Res Inst, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden Hitech Dev AB Aldermansvagen, S-17148 Solna, Sweden.
    Vibratory-coded directional analysis: Evaluation of a three-microphone/four-vibrator DSP system2001In: Journal of rehabilitation research and development, ISSN 0748-7711, E-ISSN 1938-1352, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 257-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sound localization aid based on eyeglasses with three microphones and four vibrators was tested in a sound-treated acoustic test room and in an ordinary office. A digital signal-processing algorithm provided a determination of the source angle, which was transformed into eight vibrator codes each corresponding to a 45 degrees sector. The instrument was tested on nine deaf and three deaf-blind individuals. The results show an average hit rate of about 80% in a sound-treated room with 100% for the front 135 degrees sector. The results in a realistic communication situation in an ordinary office room were 70% correct based on single presentations and 95% correct when more realistic criteria for an adequate reaction were used. Ten of the twelve subjects were interested in participating in field tests using a planned miniaturized version.

  • 45. Borg, E
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Neovius, L
    Kjellander, M
    Monitoring the enviroment: Sound localistaion equipment for the deaf-blind1998In: ISAC 98, 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Borg, E
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Neovius, L
    Möller, K
    Monitoring enviromental events: problems, strategies and sensory compensation2000In: ISAC 00, 2000Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Universitetssjukhuset Örebro.
    Risberg, Arne
    Talöverföring och musikakustik, Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Gullaksen, AnnChristine
    Malmö högskola.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hörselvårdens vetenskapliga grund: Språngbräda mot framtiden2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Neovius, L.
    Monitoring the environment: Sound localization equipment for deaf-blind people1999In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 2, no 119, p. 146-149Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Samuelsson, E
    Wästlund, Helena
    IVO Örebro universitet.
    Danermark, Berth
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Communication in an audiological perspective: Theory and application to university level students1999In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 28, no 50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Borg, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Neovius, L
    Att ha koll - utveckling av en händelsedetektor för dövblinda.2000In: Audionytt, ISSN 0347-6308Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 672
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