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  • 1.
    Alickovic, Emina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rortangvej, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Gustafsson, Fredrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för systemteknik, Reglerteknik. Linköpings universitet, Tekniska fakulteten.
    A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals2016Ingår i: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, s. 31-35Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

  • 2.
    Andersen, Martin R.
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kristensen, Michael
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmar.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkerste.
    Side-Effects of Binaural Tone Vocoding on Recognising Target Speech Presented Against Spatially Separated Speech Maskers2012Ingår i: Speech Perception and Auditory Disorders / [ed] T Dau et al., Speech perception and auditory disorders. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Audiological and Auditory Research (ISAAR), Denmark, 2012, , s. 103-110s. 103-110Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous experiments have indicated that monaural Temporal Fine Structure (mTFS) information aids Speech Reception. In these experiments mTFS was either kept or substituted using a tone-vocoder. Results showed that hearing-impaired (HI) subjects were not able to utilise mTFS information to the same degree as normal-hearing (NH) subjects. A first step towards a more ecological experiment would be to exploit the tone-vocoder paradigm in a simulated spatial setup, and measure binaural TFS (bTFS) benefit.However, by the introduction of a binaural tone-vocoder, a concern arose that not only will the original Interaural Time Difference (ITD) cues be removed, but artificial ITD cues pointing to a direction determined by the phase difference between the carriers of the two channels, will also be introduced.This experiment investigated this concern, by measuring speech reception for target speech presented against spatially separated speech maskers. 21 NH and 21 HI subjects were tested in a fixed spatial condition with either the artificial ITD pointing forward (0º azimuth) or ±50º. Furthermore, a third condition utilising a paradigm that did not make use of a tone-vocoder, was included.Results showed that the artificial ITD affected NH and HI listeners equally, favouring the source whose direction it was pointing towards.

  • 3.
    Andersen, Martin Rune
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Smed Kristensen, Michael
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neher, Tobias
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Effect of binaural tone vocoding on recognising target speech presented against spatially separated speech maskers2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E.
    University of Louisville, KY 40292 USA.
    Internet and Audiology: A Review of the First International Meeting2015Ingår i: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 269-270Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this research forum article is to describe the impetus for holding the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology (October 2014) and to introduce the special research forum that arose from the meeting. Method: The rationale for the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology is described. This is followed by a short description of the research sections and articles appearing in the special issue. Six articles consider the process of health care delivery over the Internet; this includes health care specific to hearing, tinnitus, and balance. Four articles discuss the development of effective Internet-based treatment programs. Six articles describe and evaluate Internet-based interventions specific to adult hearing aid users. Conclusion: The fledgling field of Internet and audiology is remarkably broad. The Second International Meeting on Internet and Audiology ocurred in September 2015.

  • 5.
    Arehart, Kathryn H.
    et al.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Communication Sciences and Disorders.
    Kates, James M.
    University of Colorado Boulder, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre,Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael Syskind
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Relationship between distortion, hearing loss and working memory for digital noise reduction2015Ingår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 505-516Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality.

    Design: The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise.

    Results: The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listener’s intelligibility scores for binary mask processing applied to speech in babble. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity did not predict listeners’ quality ratings.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that envelope fidelity is a primary factor in determining the combined effects of noise and binary mask processing for intelligibility and quality of speech presented in babble noise. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity are significant factors in explaining variability in listeners’ speech intelligibility scores but not in quality ratings.

  • 6.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, IL USA.
    Kates, James
    University of Colorado, CO 80309 USA.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Syskind Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Relationship Among Signal Fidelity, Hearing Loss, and Working Memory for Digital Noise Suppression2015Ingår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, nr 5, s. 505-516Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study considered speech modified by additive babble combined with noise-suppression processing. The purpose was to determine the relative importance of the signal modifications, individual peripheral hearing loss, and individual cognitive capacity on speech intelligibility and speech quality. Design: The participant group consisted of 31 individuals with moderate high-frequency hearing loss ranging in age from 51 to 89 years (mean = 69.6 years). Speech intelligibility and speech quality were measured using low-context sentences presented in babble at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-suppression strategy with systematic manipulations of two parameters (error rate and attenuation values). The cumulative effects of signal modification produced by babble and signal processing were quantified using an envelope-distortion metric. Working memory capacity was assessed with a reading span test. Analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of signal processing parameters on perceptual scores. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine the role of degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity in individual listener response to the processed noisy speech. The model also considered improvements in envelope fidelity caused by the binary mask and the degradations to envelope caused by error and noise. Results: The participants showed significant benefits in terms of intelligibility scores and quality ratings for noisy speech processed by the ideal binary mask noise-suppression strategy. This benefit was observed across a range of signal-to-noise ratios and persisted when up to a 30% error rate was introduced into the processing. Average intelligibility scores and average quality ratings were well predicted by an objective metric of envelope fidelity. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity were significant factors in explaining individual listeners intelligibility scores for binary mask processing applied to speech in babble. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity did not predict listeners quality ratings. Conclusions: The results indicate that envelope fidelity is a primary factor in determining the combined effects of noise and binary mask processing for intelligibility and quality of speech presented in babble noise. Degree of hearing loss and working memory capacity are significant factors in explaining variability in listeners speech intelligibility scores but not in quality ratings.

  • 7.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    University of Colorado, UCB 409, Boulder, Departmen of Speech , Language and Hearing Sciences.
    Souza, Pamela
    Northwestern University, Roxelyn and Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, United States.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Syskin Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon.
    James M, Kate
    University of Colorado at Boulder , Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences (SLHS), Electrical Engineering..
    Relationship between distortion and working memory for digital noise-reduction processing in hearing aids2014Ingår i: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 133, nr 5Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent studies have shown a relationship between working memory and the ability of older adults to benefit from specific advanced signal processing algorithms in hearing aids. In this study, we quantify tradeoffs between benefit due to noise reduction and the perceptual costs associated with distortion caused by the noise reduction algorithm. We also investigate the relationship between these tradeoffs and working memory abilities. Speech intelligibility, speech quality, and perceived listening effort were measured in a cohort of elderly adults with hearing loss. Test materials were low-context sentences presented in fluctuating noise conditions at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-reduction strategy. The amount of distortion produced by the noise reduction algorithm was parametrically varied by manipulating two binary mask parameters, error rate, and attenuation rate. Working memory was assessed with a reading span test. Results will be discussed in terms of the extent to which intelligibility, quality, and effort ratings are explained by the amount of distortion and/or noise and by working memory ability. [Funded by NIH, Oticon, and GN ReSound.].

  • 8.
    Arehart, Kathryn
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Souza, Pamela
    Eriksholm Research Centre Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten.
    Syskin Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon A/S, Smo/rum, Denmark .
    Kates, James
    Speech Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Relationship between distortion and working memory for digital noise-reduction processing in hearing aids2013Ingår i: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: ICA 2013 Montreal, Acoustical Society of America (ASA), 2013, s. 050084-1-050084-8Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Several recent studies have shown a relationship between working memory and the ability of older adults to benefit from specific advanced signal processing algorithms in hearing aids. In this study, we quantify tradeoffs between benefit due to noise reduction and the perceptual costs associated with distortion caused by the noise reduction algorithm. We also investigate the relationship between these tradeoffs and working memory abilities. Speech intelligibility, speech quality and perceived listening effort were measured in a cohort of elderly adults with hearing loss. Test materials were low-context sentences presented in fluctuating noise conditions at several signal-to-noise ratios. Speech stimuli were processed with a binary mask noise-reduction strategy. The amount of distortion produced by the noise reduction algorithm was parametrically varied by manipulating two binary mask parameters, error rate and attenuation rate. Working memory was assessed with a reading span test. Results will be discussed in terms of the extent to which intelligibility, quality and effort ratings are explained by the amount of distortion and/or noise and by working memory ability.[Funded by NIH, Oticon and GN ReSound]

  • 9.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Clinical trial of a digital hearing aid1998Ingår i: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 27, nr 1, s. 51-61Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A clinical trial of Oticon DigiFocus hearing aid was performed. The test aid was evaluated on 33 subjects with several years' experience as users of modern analog hearing aids. These aids were used as reference for the 1-month-long trial. The Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) showed a mean difference in benefit with superior ratings for the test aid concerning ease of communication, speech in reverberation and speech in background noise. The subjects' own aids were rated somewhat better concerning aversiveness of sounds, but this difference was not statistically significant. The Gothenburg Profile showed a statistically significant difference between the test aid and the reference aids in favour of the test aid. The difference was not most evident with regard to speech communication and the effects of hearing loss on social interactions. Sound quality ratings concerning clearness were significantly higher for the test aid. Speech recognition thresholds in noise were on average 0.7 dB better for the test aids when tested at speech levels 60 and 75 dB. The difference was statistically significant only at 75 dB. There was significant interaction between general preference and hearing aid type, indicating that overall sound quality was an important factor affecting the general preference for either the test aid or the reference aid. Twenty-three subjects generally preferred the test aid, six preferred their own aid and four stated no difference.

  • 10.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Assessment of speech perception in noise using a conventional speech recognition and a subjective adjustment method.1994Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 11.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Oto-Rhino-Laryngologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Rekonstruktionscentrum, Öronkliniken US.
    Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen
    University of Toronto.
    The emergence of cognitive hearing science.2009Ingår i: Scandinavian journal of psychology, ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 50, nr 5, s. 371-384Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive Hearing Science or Auditory Cognitive Science is an emerging field of interdisciplinary research concerning the interactions between hearing and cognition. It follows a trend over the last half century for interdisciplinary fields to develop, beginning with Neuroscience, then Cognitive Science, then Cognitive Neuroscience, and then Cognitive Vision Science. A common theme is that an interdisciplinary approach is necessary to understand complex human behaviors, to develop technologies incorporating knowledge of these behaviors, and to find solutions for individuals with impairments that undermine typical behaviors. Accordingly, researchers in traditional academic disciplines, such as Psychology, Physiology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Anthropology, and Sociology benefit from collaborations with each other, and with researchers in Computer Science and Engineering working on the design of technologies, and with health professionals working with individuals who have impairments. The factors that triggered the emergence of Cognitive Hearing Science include the maturation of the component disciplines of Hearing Science and Cognitive Science, new opportunities to use complex digital signal-processing to design technologies suited to performance in challenging everyday environments, and increasing social imperatives to help people whose communication problems span hearing and cognition. Cognitive Hearing Science is illustrated in research on three general topics: (1) language processing in challenging listening conditions; (2) use of auditory communication technologies or the visual modality to boost performance; (3) changes in performance with development, aging, and rehabilitative training. Future directions for modeling and the translation of research into practice are suggested.

  • 12.
    Bernstein, Joshua G
    et al.
    National Military Audiology and Speech Pathology Center Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Danielsson, Henrik
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids2014Ingår i: Spectrotemporal modulation sensitivity as a predictor of speech intelligibility in noise with hearing aids, 2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The audiogram predicts less than a third of the variance in speech reception thresholds (SRTs) for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners properly fit with individualized frequency-dependent gain. The remaining variance is often attributed to a combination of su-prathreshold distortion in the auditory pathway and non-auditory factors such as cogni-tive processing. Distinguishing between these factors requires a measure of suprathresh-old auditory processing to account for the non-cognitive contributions. Preliminary re-sults in 12 HI listeners identified a correlation between spectrotemporal modulation (STM) sensitivity and speech intelligibility in noise presented over headphones. The cur-IHCON 2014 27 August 13-17, 2014rent study assessed the effectiveness of STM sensitivity as a measure of suprathreshold auditory function to predict free-field SRTs in noise for a larger group of 47 HI listeners with hearing aids.SRTs were measured for Hagerman sentences presented at 65 dB SPL in stationary speech-weighted noise or four-talker babble. Pre-recorded speech and masker stimuli were played through a small anechoic chamber equipped with a master hearing aid pro-grammed with individualized gain. The output from an IEC711 Ear Simulator was played binaurally through insert earphones. Three processing algorithms were examined: linear gain, linear gain plus noise reduction, or fast-acting compressive gain.STM stimuli consist of spectrally-rippled noise with spectral-peak frequencies that shift over time. STM with a 2-cycle/octave spectral-ripple density and a 4-Hz modulation rate was applied to a 2-kHz lowpass-filtered pink-noise carrier. Stimuli were presented over headphones at 80 dB SPL (±5-dB roving). The threshold modulation depth was estimated adaptively in a two-alternative forced-choice task.STM sensitivity was strongly correlated (R2=0.48) with the global SRT (i.e., the SRTs averaged across masker and processing conditions). The high-frequency pure-tone aver-age (3-8 kHz) and age together accounted for 23% of the variance in global SRT. STM sensitivity accounted for an additional 28% of the variance in global SRT (total R2=0.51) when combined with these two other metrics in a multiple-regression analysis. Correla-tions between STM sensitivity and SRTs for individual conditions were weaker for noise reduction than for the other algorithms, and marginally stronger for babble than for sta-tionary noise.The results are discussed in the context of previous work suggesting that STM sensitivity for low rates and low carrier frequencies is impaired by a reduced ability to use temporal fine-structure information to detect slowly shifting spectral peaks. STM detection is a fast, simple test of suprathreshold auditory function that accounts for a substantial pro-portion of variability in hearing-aid outcomes for speech perception in noise.

  • 13. Borch Petersen, E
    et al.
    Wöstmann, M
    Obleser, J
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Compensated hearing loss predicts generation of auditory evoked potentials.2014Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 14.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark .
    Cognitive Hearing Aids? - Insights and Possibilities2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The working memory plays an important role in successfully overcoming adverse listening conditions and should consequently be considered when designing and testing hearing aids. A number of studies have established the relationship between hearing in noise and working memory involvement, but with the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall (SWIRL) test, it is possible to show that working memory is also involved in listening under favorable conditions and that noise reduction has a positive influence in situation with very little noise. Although the capacity of the working memory is a finite individual size, its involvement can differ with fatigue and other factors and individualization of hearing aids should take this into account to obtain the best performance. A way of individually adapting hearing aids is based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids. Such an adaptation could be done based on changes in the electrical activity of the brain (EEG). Here we present the possibilities that arise from using EEG and show that ear-mounted electrodes is able to record useful EEG that can be explored for individualization of hearing aids.

  • 15.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark,.
    Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance2016Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, nr 4, s. 254-261Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study provides descriptive statistics of the Danish reading span (RS) test for hearing-impaired adults. The combined effect of hearing loss, RS score, and age on speech-in-noise performance in different spatial settings was evaluated in a subset of participants. Design: Data from published and unpublished studies were re-analysed. Data regarding speech-in-noise performance with co-located or spatially separated sound sources were available for a subset of participants. Study sample: RS scores from 283 hearing-impaired participants were extracted from past studies, and 239 of these participants had completed a speech-in-noise test. Results: RS scores (mean = 41.91%, standard deviation = 11.29%) were related to age (p <0.01), but not pure-tone average (PTA) (p = 0.29). Speech-in-noise performance for co-located sound sources was related to PTA and RS score (both p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.226). Performance for spatially separated sounds was related to PTA (p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.10) but not RS score (p = 0.484). We found no differences between the standardized coefficients of the two regression models. Conclusions: The distribution of RS scores indicated a high test difficulty. We found that age should be controlled when RS scores are compared across populations. The experimental setup of the speech-in-noise test may influence the relationship between performance and RS score.

  • 16.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Vestergaard, Martin
    University of Cambridge, Centre for the Neural Basis of Hearing.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    Snekkersten, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Normative Reading Span Data from 283 Hearing Aid Users and the Relationship to Performance in Speech-in-Noise Test2014Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Borch Petersen, Eline
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Logopedi, Audiologi och Otorhinolaryngologi. Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Wöstmann, Malte
    Department of Psychology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.
    Obleser, Jonas
    Department of Psychology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för Logopedi, Audiologi och Otorhinolaryngologi. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Neural tracking of attended versus ignored speech is differentially affected by hearing loss2017Ingår i: Journal of Neurophysiology, ISSN 0022-3077, E-ISSN 1522-1598, Vol. 117, nr 1, s. 18-27Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss manifests as a reduced ability to understand speech, particularly in multitalker situations. In these situations, younger normal-hearing listeners' brains are known to track attended speech through phase-locking of neural activity to the slow-varying envelope of the speech. This study investigates how hearing loss, compensated by hearing aids, affects the neural tracking of the speech-onset envelope in elderly participants with varying degree of hearing loss (n = 27, 62–86 yr; hearing thresholds 11–73 dB hearing level). In an active listening task, a to-be-attended audiobook (signal) was presented either in quiet or against a competing to-be-ignored audiobook (noise) presented at three individualized signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). The neural tracking of the to-be-attended and to-be-ignored speech was quantified through the cross-correlation of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and the temporal envelope of speech. We primarily investigated the effects of hearing loss and SNR on the neural envelope tracking. First, we found that elderly hearing-impaired listeners' neural responses reliably track the envelope of to-be-attended speech more than to-be-ignored speech. Second, hearing loss relates to the neural tracking of to-be-ignored speech, resulting in a weaker differential neural tracking of to-be-attended vs. to-be-ignored speech in listeners with worse hearing. Third, neural tracking of to-be-attended speech increased with decreasing background noise. Critically, the beneficial effect of reduced noise on neural speech tracking decreased with stronger hearing loss. In sum, our results show that a common sensorineural processing deficit, i.e., hearing loss, interacts with central attention mechanisms and reduces the differential tracking of attended and ignored speech.

  • 18.
    Bramsløw, Lars
    et al.
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken, Smørum, Denmark.
    Eneroth, Karin
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken, Smørum, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Schulte, Michael
    Hörzentrum, Oldenburg, Germany.
    Individual hearing aid performance for equal hearing loss in simple and complex listening situations and its relation to various screening measures2012Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    IntroductionFor some time now it has been acknowledged that there isa link between speech performance in noise, benefit fromamplification and DSP features and non-auditory factors,such as cognitive skills. [Humes, Lunner].The present study aims at 1) confirming this claim and 2)looking directly at the benefit of directionality in a complexfrontal listening task depending on the individual skills asassessed by a number of screening measures.

  • 19.
    Brännström, Jonas K
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Dept of clinical science, Section of Logopedics, Phoiatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten. Region Östergötland, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients2015Ingår i: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 320-324Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

  • 20.
    Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Clinical Sciences Lund, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neuro- och inflammationsvetenskap. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Medicinska fakulteten.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients2016Ingår i: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, nr 1, s. 82-91Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 21.
    Bünsow Boldt, Jesper
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark; Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark.
    Syskind Pedersen, Michael
    Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Wang, DeLiang
    Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Estimation of the Ideal Binary Mask using Directional Systems2008Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The ideal binary mask is often seen as a goal for time-frequencymasking algorithms trying to increase speech intelligibility, but therequired availability of the unmixed signals makes it difficult to calculatethe ideal binary mask in any real-life applications. In thispaper we derive the theory and the requirements to enable calculationsof the ideal binary mask using a directional system without theavailability of the unmixed signals. The proposed method has a lowcomplexity and is verified using computer simulation in both idealand non-ideal setups showing promising results.Index Terms— Time-Frequency Masking, Directional systems,Ideal Binary Mask, Speech Intelligibility, Sound separation

  • 22.
    C. Manchaiah, Vinaya K.
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Stages of change in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aidsManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate health behaviour change characteristics based on the transtheoretical stages-of-change model in adults noticing hearing difficulties but not using hearing aids using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) scale.

    Design: The study employed a cross-sectional design.

    Study Sample: The study was conducted in United Kingdom and 90 pre-clinical participants completed URICA as well as measures of self-reported hearing disability, self-reported anxiety and depression, self-reported hearing disability acceptance and also provided some demographic details online.

    Results: As predicted, the results indicate that a high percentage of participants (over 90%) were in the contemplation and preparation stages. This was in contrast to a previous study, which included participants attending audiology clinic, where most participants (about 80%) were in the action stage (Laplante-Lévesque et al., 2013). In addition, statistically significant differences were observed in terms of readiness to change composite and committed action composite between the study samples in the current and the previous study.

    Conclusions: Study results support the stages-of-change model. In addition, implications of the current study and areas for future research are discussed.

  • 23.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Ng, Hoi Ning Elaine
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linnaeus Centre HEAD.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Kilman, Lisa
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Avdelningen för neurovetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Reading span performance in 339 Swedish 50-89 year old individuals with hearing impairment: Effects of test version and age, and relation to speech recognition in noise2013Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg, Lyxell, Arlinger, & Kinnefors, 1989) is often used to assess working memory capacity (WMC) in the field of cognitive hearing science. The test has proven useful as a predictor of speech recognition in noise in adverse conditions. It has been used in a wide range of experimental studies and has been translated to several languages. The purpose of this paper was to provide reference data for the Swedish reading span test (Rönnberg et al., 1989) in a large sample of adults with hearing impairment aged 50-89 years that are representative of patients seeking rehabilitation at audiological clinics. Data from finished and ongoing projects were collated and reanalyzed for this purpose. The original full version and a shortened version of the test were compared, in terms of percentage correct. In addition, performance on the full version was compared across two different age-cohorts, 50-69 year olds and 70-89 year olds. Frequency distributions and percentile scores are reported, as well as relations with demographic variables, and speech recognition in noise. Results showed that reading span performance was related to age, but not sex, with lower scores in older participants. Pure tone hearing thresholds accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance such that higher reading span scores were related to better hearing. The frequency distributions of scores did not differ across the two versions of the test, but the long version seemed to be more sensitive to age. Performance in both versions was significantly correlated with speech recognition in noise. Regression analyses however showed that reading span explained additional variance in speech in noise recognition, after the effects of age and pure tone hearing thresholds were accounted for, only in the 50-69 year olds. These findings are discussed in relation to  age-related differences in the ability to recruit cognitive resources in the service of speech communication.

  • 24. Durrant, JD
    et al.
    Palmer, CV
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Analysis of counted behaviors in a single-subject design: Modeling of hearing-aid intervention in hearing-impaired patients with Alzheimer's disease2005Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, nr 1, s. 31-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical procedures related to patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) largely fail to address the patient's hearing. Given the challenges of this population, unconventional indicators of treatment efficacy may be required. Palmer et al (1999) reported on caregiver-tracked behaviors as outcome measures for hearing aid intervention. Using these data, hearing aid use and subsequent behavior was modeled as a first-order dynamic system, characterized by responses following an exponential time course. The results of such modeling suggest predictable outcomes of hearing aid intervention, or at least useful parameters of quantification (e.g. time-constant and steady-state response), permitting critical assessment of effects of intervention on negative behaviors versus hearing aid use, comparisons among behaviors, and/or comparisons of hearing-aid-use patterns and behavior counts among patients. Use in this and other difficult-to-test populations warrant further study to evaluate clinical efficacy of the analysis described. © 2005 British Society of Audiology, International Society of Audiology, and Nordic Audiological Society.

  • 25.
    Ellis, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Predicting speech-in-noise perception using the trail making task: Results from a large-scale internet study2015Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task. Computerised versions of the tests were completed, via the internet, by a large (1500+) sample of listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old, both with and without hearing loss. The results show that better performance on both the simple and complex versions of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. The findings suggest that the relation between performance in the TMT and speech recognition test may be due to the capacity of the TMT to index perceptual speed, as opposed to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

  • 26.
    Ellis, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark..
    Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study2016Ingår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, nr 1, s. 73-79Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task.

    Design: Data were taken from a sample of 1509 listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old. Participants completed computerized versions of the TMT and an adaptive speech-in-noise recognition test. All testing was conducted via the internet.

    Results: The results indicate that better performance on both the simple and complex subtests of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. Thirty-eight percent of the participants had scores on the speech-in-noise test that indicated the presence of a hearing loss.

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that the TMT may be a useful tool in the assessment, and possibly the treatment, of speech-recognition difficulties. The results indicate that the relation between speech-in-noise recognition and TMT performance relates both to the capacity of the TMT to index processing speed and to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

  • 27.
    Ellis, Rachel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Molander, Peter
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study2013Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 28.
    Fiedler, Lorenz
    et al.
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Brandmeyer, Alex
    Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences.
    Wöstmann, Malte
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    Graversen, Carina
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Obleser, Jonas
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    In-Ear-EEG indicates neural signatures of effortful auditory processing2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 29.
    Fiedler, Lorenz
    et al.
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Wöstmann, Malte
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    Graversen, Carina
    Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre.
    Obleser, Jonas
    University of Lübeck, Auditory Cognition.
    In-Ear-EEG indicates neural signatures of effortful auditory processing2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30. Flynn, Mark C
    et al.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Clinical verification of a hearing aid with artificial intelligence2005Ingår i: Hearing journal, ISSN 0745-7472, Vol. 58, s. 34-38Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 31. Foo, Catharina
    et al.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Avdelningen för kognition, utveckling och handikapp (CDD).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap.
    Speech recognition in noise and perceived effort2008Ingår i: The first International Work shop on Hearing and deafness HEAD,2008, 2008, s. 20-20Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 32.
    Foo, Catharina
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Recognition of speech in noise with new hearing instrument compression release settings requires explicit cognitive storage and processing capacity2007Ingår i: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 18, nr 7, s. 618-631Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence suggests that cognitive capacity predicts the ability to benefit from specific compression release settings in non-linear digital hearing instruments. Previous studies have investigated the predictive value of various cognitive tests in relation to aided speech recognition in noise using compression release settings that have been experienced for a certain period. However, the predictive value of cognitive tests with new settings, to which the user has not had the opportunity to become accustomed, has not been studied. In the present study, we compare the predictive values of two cognitive tests, reading span and letter monitoring, in relation to aided speech recognition in noise for 32 habitual hearing instrument users using new compression release settings. We found that reading span was a strong predictor of speech recognition in noise with new compression release settings. This result generalizes previous findings for experienced test settings to new test settings, for both speech recognition in noise tests used in the present study, Hagerman sentences and HINT. Letter monitoring, on the other hand, was not found to be a strong predictor of speech recognition in noise with new compression release settings. 

  • 33.
    Hellgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    System identification of feedback in hearing aids.1999Ingår i: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 105, s. 3481-3496Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 34.
    Hellgren, Johan
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för nervsystem och rörelseorgan, Teknisk audiologi.
    Variations in the feedback of hearing aids.1999Ingår i: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 106, s. 2821-2833Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 35.
    Hietkamp, Renskje K
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kristensen, Michael S
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Pontoppidan, Niels H
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    The TFS1-test reveals mild hearing loss2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 36.
    Hietkamp, Renskje K.
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, Martin R.Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.Lunner, ThomasEriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkerste.
    Perceptual audio evaluation by hearing-impaired listeners – some considerations on task training2010Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
  • 37.
    Holmberg, M.
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersen, JH
    riksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Simonsen, CS
    riksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    riksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Creating and validating a Danish Acceptable Noise Level test2010Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 38.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Brännström, K Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Logopedics, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon a/S, Denmark.
    Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.2016Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, nr Suppl 3, s. S52-S58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Acceptance and readiness to seek professional help have shown to be important factors for favourable audiological rehabilitation outcomes. Theories from health psychology such as the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model could help understand behavioural change in people with hearing impairment. In recent studies, the University of Rhode Island change assessment (URICA) has been found to have good predictive validity.

    DESIGN: In a previous study, 224 Swedish adults who had failed an online hearing screening completed URICA and two other measures of stages of change. This follow-up aimed to: (1) determine prevalence of help-seeking at a hearing clinic and hearing aid uptake, and (2) explore the predictive validity of the stages of change measures by a follow-up on the 224 participants who had failed a hearing screening 18 months previously.

    STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 122 people (54%) completed the follow-up online questionnaire, including the three measures and questions regarding experience with hearing help-seeking and hearing aid uptake.

    RESULTS: Since failing the online hearing screening, 61% of participants had sought help. A good predictive validity for a one-item measure of stages of change was reported.

    CONCLUSIONS: The Staging algorithm was the stages of change measure with the best ability to predict help-seeking 18 months later.

  • 39.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Boldt, Jesper B
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael S
    Oticon A/S, Kongebakken 9, DK-2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Kongevejen 243, DK-3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Wang, DeLiang
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering and Center for Cognitive Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 .
    Role of mask pattern in intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy speech2009Ingår i: Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 126, nr 3, s. 1415-1426Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech was measured on a group of normal hearing individuals across mixture signal to noise ratio (SNR) levels, masker types, and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals using two different schemes: an ideal binary mask computed by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units and a target binary mask computed by comparing the local target energy against the long-term average speech spectrum. By depicting intelligibility scores as a function of the difference between mixture SNR and local SNR threshold, alignment of the performance curves is obtained for a large range of mixture SNR levels. Large intelligibility benefits are obtained for both sparse and dense binary masks. When an ideal mask is dense with many ones, the effect of changing mixture SNR level while fixing the mask is significant, whereas for more sparse masks the effect is small or insignificant.

  • 40.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Boldt, Jesper B
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Pedersen, Michael S
    Oticon AS, Smørum, Denmark .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Oticon Research Centre Eriksholm, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Wang, DeLiang
    Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.
    Role of mask pattern in intelligibility of ideal binary-masked noisy speech2009Ingår i: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 126, nr 3, s. 1415-1426Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech was measured on a group of normal hearing individuals across mixture signal to noise ratio (SNR) levels, masker types, and local criteria for forming the binary mask. The binary mask is computed from time-frequency decompositions of target and masker signals using two different schemes: an ideal binary mask computed by thresholding the local SNR within time-frequency units and a target binary mask computed by comparing the local target energy against the long-term average speech spectrum. By depicting intelligibility scores as a function of the difference between mixture SNR and local SNR threshold, alignment of the performance curves is obtained for a large range of mixture SNR levels. Large intelligibility benefits are obtained for both sparse and dense binary masks. When an ideal mask is dense with many ones, the effect of changing mixture SNR level while fixing the mask is significant, whereas for more sparse masks the effect is small or insignificant.

  • 41.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Oticon Kongebakken 9, 2765 Smørum, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael SOticon Kongebakken 9, 2765 Smørum, Denmark.Boldt, Jesper BOticon Kongebakken 9, 2765 Smørum, Denmark.Lunner, ThomasOticon Research Centre Eriksholm Kongevejen 243, 3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.Wang, DeLiangDepartment of Computer Science & Engineering, and Center for Cognitive Science The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.
    Speech intelligibility of ideal binary masked mixtures.2009Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of intelligibility measurements of ideal binary masked speech in noise for a group of normal hearing lis-teners is presented. In the proposed model, speech cues in the processed mixtures are encoded by two information channels: a noisy speech channel and a vocoded noise channel. Results indicate that the former dominates for dense binary mask patterns, and the latter for sparse binary mask patterns, as controlled by a local SNR criterion used for forming the ideal mask. Moreover, speech cues from the target part of the processed mixture may be better utilized by the listeners as a result of the ideal binary masking. Finally, the analysis is extended to show a good qualitative agree-ment with several previous studies of intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech.

  • 42.
    Kjems, Ulrik
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Michael SEriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.Boldt, Jesper BEriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmar.Lunner, ThomasEriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkerste.Wang, DeLiangThe Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
    Speech intelligibility of ideal binary masked mixtures2010Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    An analysis of intelligibility measurements of ideal binary masked speech in noise for a group of normal hearing lis-teners is presented. In the proposed model, speech cues in the processed mixtures are encoded by two information channels: a noisy speech channel and a vocoded noise channel. Results indicate that the former dominates for dense binary mask patterns, and the latter for sparse binary mask patterns, as controlled by a local SNR criterion used for forming the ideal mask. Moreover, speech cues from the target part of the processed mixture may be better utilized by the listeners as a result of the ideal binary masking. Finally, the analysis is extended to show a good qualitative agree-ment with several previous studies of intelligibility of ideal binary masked noisy speech.

  • 43.
    Knudsen, Line V
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Conducting qualitative research in audiology: A tutorial2012Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, nr 2, s. 83-92Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted.

    DESIGN:

    This paper is based on a literature review and our recent experience with the conduction of an international interdisciplinary qualitative study in audiology.

    RESULTS:

    We describe some available qualitative methods for sampling, data collection, and analysis and we discuss the rationale for choosing particular methods. The focus is on four approaches which have all previously been applied to audiologic research: grounded theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis, conversational analysis, and qualitative content analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This article provides a review of methodological issues useful for those designing qualitative research projects in audiology or needing assistance in the interpretation of qualitative literature.

  • 44.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Danermark, Berth
    The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, 702 81 Örebro, Sweden.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, 20 Rørtangvej, 3070 Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Importance of “Process Evaluation” in Audiological Rehabilitation: Examples from Studies on Hearing Impairment2014Ingår i: International Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 1687-9201, E-ISSN 1687-921X, Vol. 2014, s. 1-7, artikel-id 168684Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of this paper is to discuss the importance of “evaluating the process of change” (i.e., process evaluation) in people with disability by studying their lived experiences. Detailed discussion is made about “why and how to investigate the process of change in people with disability?” and some specific examples are provided from studies on patient journey of persons with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, methodological aspects in process evaluation are discussed in relation to various metatheoretical perspectives. The discussion has been supplemented with relevant literature. The healthcare practice and disability research in general are dominated by the use of outcome measures. Even though the values of outcome measures are not questioned, there seems to be a little focus on understanding the process of change over time in relation to health and disability. We suggest that the process evaluation has an additional temporal dimension and has applications in both clinical practice and research in relation to health and disability.

  • 45.
    Kumar Channapatna Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK .
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV).
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Use of the ‘patient journey’ model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability: lessons from a failed clinical trial2014Ingår i: BMC Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders, ISSN 1472-6815, E-ISSN 1472-6815, Vol. 14, nr 3Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Persons with a hearing impairment have various experiences during their ‘journey’ through hearing loss. In our previous studies we have developed ‘patient journey’ models of person with hearing impairment and their communication partners (CPs). The study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of using the patient journey model in the internet-based pre-fitting counseling of a person with hearing disability (ClinicalTrials.gov Protocol Registration System: NCT01611129, registered 2012 May 14).

    Method

    The study employed a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with waiting list control (WLC) design. Even though we had intended to recruit 158 participants, we only managed to recruit 80 participants who were assigned to one of two groups: (1) Intervention group; and (2) WLC. Participants from both groups completed a 30 day internet-based counseling program (group 2 waited for a month before intervention) based on the ‘patient journey’ model. Various outcome measures which focus on self-reported hearing disability, self-reported depression and anxiety, readiness to change and self-reported hearing disability acceptance were administered pre- and post-intervention.

    Results

    The trial results suggest that the intervention was not feasible. Treatment compliancy was one of the main problems with a high number of dropouts. Only 18 participants completed both pre- and post-intervention outcome measures. Their results were included in the analysis. Results suggest no statistically significant differences among groups over time in all four measures.

    Conclusions

    Due to the limited sample size, no concrete conclusions can be drawn about the hypotheses from the current study. Furthermore, possible reasons for failure of this trial and directions for future research are discussed.

  • 46.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Stages of change in adults who failed an online hearing screening2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 47.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Knudsen, Line V
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för klinisk och experimentell medicin, Teknisk audiologi. Linköpings universitet, Hälsouniversitetet. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Öron- näsa- och halskliniken US.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment2012Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, nr 2, s. 93-102Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    DESIGN:

    Individual semi-structured interviews were completed.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users.

    RESULTS:

    Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 48.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Octicon A/S, Research Centre Eriksholm, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon A7S, Reserach Centre Eriksholm, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Adults with hearing impairment and their significant others searching for hearing impairment information on the Internet: Qualily and readability of English-language websites2011Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    People with health conditions and their significant others are increasingly turning to the Internet for health information. Accessing health information is, after email and search engine use, the third most common Internet activity (Pew Internet. 2011 ). For people facing a health decision, Internet is the second most influential source of information after clinician advice (Couper et al., 2010). Searching the Internet for a significant other’s health condition is also common (Pew Internet, 2011 ). However, clients do not always methodically analyse the quality of health information accessed on the Internet. For this reason, quality of Internet health information has been widely studied and has been found to vary greatly (for a systematic review, see Eysenbach, Powell, Kuss, & Sa, 2002). In audiology, it is largely unknown whether adults with hearing impairment and their significant others are informed or misinformed by the hearing impairment information they access on the Internet. This study aims to evaluate the Internet hearing information available to people with hearing impairment and their significant others. More specifically, the study is assessing the quality and readability of English-language websites available as of 2011. This study’s methods and emerging results are presented and discussed.

  • 49.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Brannstrom, Jonas K.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Institutet för handikappvetenskap (IHV). Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten. Oticon AS, Denmark.
    Stages of Change in Adults Who Have Failed an Online Hearing Screening2015Ingår i: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, nr 1, s. 92-101Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Hearing screening has been proposed to promote help-seeking and rehabilitation in adults with hearing impairment. However, some longitudinal studies point to low help-seeking and subsequent rehabilitation after a failed hearing screening (positive screening result). Some barriers to help-seeking and rehabilitation could be intrinsic to the profiles and needs of people who have failed a hearing screening. Theories of health behavior change could help to understand this population. One of these theories is the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model of health behavior change, which describes profiles and needs of people facing behavior changes such as seeking help and taking up rehabilitation. According to this model, people go through distinct stages toward health behavior change: precontemplation, contemplation, action, and finally, maintenance. The present study describes the psychometric properties (construct validity) of the stages of change in adults who have failed an online hearing screening. Stages of change were measured with the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA). Principal component analysis is presented, along with cluster analysis. Internal consistency was investigated. Finally, relationships between URICA scores and speech-in-noise recognition threshold, self-reported hearing disability, and self-reported duration of hearing disability are presented. Design: In total, 224 adults who had failed a Swedish online hearing screening test (measure of speech-in-noise recognition) completed further questionnaires online, including the URICA. Results: A principal component analysis identified the stages of precontemplation, contemplation, and action, plus an additional stage, termed preparation (between contemplation and action). According to the URICA, half (50%) of the participants were in the preparation stage of change. The contemplation stage was represented by 38% of participants, while 9% were in the precontemplation stage. Finally, the action stage was represented by approximately 3% of the participants. Cluster analysis identified four stages-of-change clusters: they were named decision making (44% of sample), participation (28% of sample), indecision (16% of sample), and reluctance (12% of sample). The construct validity of the model was good. Participants who reported a more advanced stage of change had significantly greater self-reported hearing disability. However, participants who reported a more advanced stage of change did not have a significantly worse speech-in-noise recognition threshold or reported a significantly longer duration of hearing impairment. Conclusions: The additional stage this study uncovered, and which other studies have also uncovered, preparation, highlights the need for adequate guidance for adults who are yet to seek help for their hearing. The fact that very few people were in the action stage (approximately 3% of the sample) signals that screening alone is unlikely to be enough to improve help-seeking and rehabilitation rates. As expected, people in the later stages of change reported significantly greater hearing disability. The lack of significant relationships between stages-of-change measures and speech-in-noise recognition threshold and self-reported duration of hearing disability highlights the complex interplay between impairment, disability, and behaviors in adults who have failed an online hearing screening and who are yet to seek help.

  • 50.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Brännström, K Jonas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Psykologi. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Handikappvetenskap. Linköpings universitet, Filosofiska fakulteten.
    Quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others2012Ingår i: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, nr 8, s. 618-626Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study evaluated the quality and readability of English-language internet information for adults with hearing impairment and their significant others. Design: Two keyword pairs (hearing loss and hearing aids) were entered into five country-specific versions of the most commonly used internet search engine in May 2011. Sample: For each of the 10 searches, the first 10 relevant websites were included. After removing duplicates, a total of 66 websites were assessed. Their origin (commercial, non-profit organization, or government), date of last update, quality (Health On the Net (HON) certification and DISCERN scores), and readability (Flesch Reading Ease Score, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Formula, and Simple Measure Of Gobbledygook) were assessed. Results: Most websites were of commercial origin and had been updated within the last 18 months. Their quality and readability was highly variable. Only 14% of the websites had HON certification. Websites that were of non-profit organization origin had significantly higher DISCERN scores. Readability measures show that on average, only people with at least 11-12 years of education could read and understand the internet information presented. Conclusions: Based on these results, this article provides a list of recommendations for website developers and clinicians wishing to incorporate internet information into their practice.

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