liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 83
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Almlöv, J
    et al.
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Paxling, B
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Dahlin, M
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Breitholtz, E
    Psyk Inst Stockholms universitet.
    Eriksson, T
    Specialistläkarna Specialistläkarna.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    A randomized controlled study of the effficacy of a web-administered guided self-help treatment for generalized anxiety disorder2007In: The third meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2007, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Asmundson, Gordon
    Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies University of Regina Regina, Sask. S4S 0A2, Canada.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Inst f Psykologi Uppsala universitet.
    Hofmann, Stefan
    Department of Psychology Boston University, Boston, MA, United States.
    Stewart, Sherry
    Department of Psychology Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
    Is CBT already the Dominant Paradigm in Psychotherapy Research and Practice?2005In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 34, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, Jan
    Buhrman, Monica
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Holländare, Fredrik
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth
    Paxling, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Ström, Lars
    Waara, Johan
    Development of a new approach to guided self-help via the Internet. The Swedish experience.2008In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 26, 161-181 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the development and empirical status of guided Internet-delivered self-help. The treatment approach combines the benefits of bibliotherapy with book-length text materials and the support given online via web pages and e-mail. Interactive features such as online registrations, tests, and online discussion forums are also included. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) guided the research and clinical implementations of this approach, as it lends itself more easily to the self-help format compared with other presently available psychotherapy approaches. We include an overview of the research, current issues and research in service delivery, lessons learned through a program of research, and directions for future investigations.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, Jan
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindefors, Nils
    The use of the internet in the treatment of anxiety disorders2005In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, ISSN 0951-7367, E-ISSN 1473-6578, Vol. 18, no 1, 73-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of review: The aim of this article is to review the emerging literature on the use of the Internet in the treatment of anxiety disorders. The questions asked are: (1) are Internet-delivered treatments for anxiety disorders supported by the research literature? (2) what is the quality of the evidence as it stands? (3) is there any evidence to suggest that Internet interventions can be harmful? Recent findings: Recent and ongoing trials on panic disorder show that Internet-based self-help with minimal therapist contact is a promising approach in the treatment of panic disorder. However, trials have been small and there is a need for large-scale trials and studies conducted in psychiatric settings as most studies have recruited patients via advertisement. There is no evidence in the literature that Internet intervention is harmful, but most likely a stepped-care approach would be feasible to handle cases who fail to respond. Summary: Internet-delivered interventions for anxiety disorders, and in particular panic disorder, are promising. There is however a need for further research and evaluation and there is also a need to find a proper place for such interventions in the clinical management of anxiety disorders, preferably using a stepped-care approach. © 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, Jan
    Holländare, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Carlbring, Per
    Uppsala University.
    kaldo, viktor
    Uppsala University.
    ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University.
    Internet-based self-help for depression: Randomised controlled trial2005In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 187, no NOV., 456-461 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Major depression can be treated by means of cognitive-behavioural therapy, but as skilled therapists are in short supply there is a need for self-help approaches. Many individuals with depression use the internet for discussion of symptoms and to share their experience. Aims: To investigate the effects of an internet-administered self-help programme including participation in a monitored, web-based discussion group, compared with participation in web-based discussion group only. Method: A randomised controlled trial was conducted to compare the effects of internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy with minimal therapist contact (plus participation in a discussion group) with the effects of participation in a discussion group only. Results: Internet-based therapy with minimal therapist contact, combined with activity in a discussion group, resulted in greater reductions of depressive symptoms compared with activity in a discussion group only (waiting-list control group). At 6 months' follow-up, improvement was maintained to a large extent. Conclusions: Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy should be pursued further as a complement or treatment alternative for mild-to-moderate depression.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    [Commentary] MOVING ON TO COMORBIDITY, NEW MODES OF DELIVERY AND ACCEPTABILITY: in Addiction(ISSN 0965-2140), vol 104, issue 4, pp 389-3902009In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 104, no 3, 389-390 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract is available for this article.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Commentary on Berger, Hohl, and Caspar's (2009) Internet-based treatment for social phobia: a randomized controlled trial in Journal of clinical psychology, ISSN 1097-4679, vol 65, issue 10, pp 1036-10382009In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 65, no 10, 1036-1038 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this commentary, we discuss the implications of the findings by Berger, Hohl, and Casper (this issue) together with the emerging database on the effects of Internet treatment for social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Their article is the third independent replication of guided Internet treatment of social anxiety disorder, and in this article, we comment on future research challenges and if Internet treatment now can be regarded as ready for dissemination into regular clinical settings.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grimlund, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Predicting treatment outcome in Internet versus face to face treatment of panic disorder2008In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 24, no 5, 1790-1801 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the advent of guided self-help via the Internet it has become increasingly important to investigate predictors of treatment outcome. The present study analyzed predictors of outcome using data from a randomized controlled trial on panic disorder [Carlbring, P. et al. (2005). Treatment of panic disorder: Live therapy versus self-help via Internet. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 43, 1321-1333]. Half of the sample received therapist guided Internet treatment (N = 25) and the other half face to face treatment (N = 24) in individual sessions during a 10-week study period. Results showed that agoraphobic avoidance was predictive of outcome in the face to face treatment, but not in the Internet treatment. A self-report screening of personality disorder (anxious cluster) was associated with worse outcome for the Internet treatment, but surprisingly associated with better outcome in face to face treatment. Cognitive capacity as measured by a test of verbal fluency was not predictive of outcome in the Internet group, and neither was a rating of treatment credibility. Overall, we conclude that in relation to face to face treatment different predictors of outcome should be investigated for Internet treatment. Internet treatment might be more suitable for certain clients who might benefit from remote treatment in the early phase of treatment.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Holmström, Annelie
    Sparthan, Elisabeth
    Furmark, Tomas
    Nilsson-Ihrfelt, Elisabeth
    Buhrman, Monica
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Internet-based self-help with therapist feedback and in vivo group exposure for social phobia: A randomized controlled trial2006In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 74, no 4, 677-686 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty-four individuals with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) were assigned to a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package or to a waiting list control group. Treatment consisted of a 9-week, Internet-delivered, self-help program that was combined with 2 group exposure sessions in real life and minimal therapist contact via e-mail. Results were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, including all randomized participants. From pre- to posttest, treated participants in contrast to controls showed significant improvement on most measured dimensions (social anxiety scales, general anxiety and depression levels, quality of life). The overall within- and between-groups effect sizes were Cohen's d = 0.87 and 0.70, respectively. Treatment gains were maintained at 1-year follow-up. The results from this study support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed, self-help programs for people diagnosed with social phobia. Copyright 2006 by the American Psychological Association.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Kognitiv beteendeterapi via internet - en behandlingsform för framtiden?2006In: Psykisk hälsa, ISSN 0033-3212, no 1, 50-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Kaldo, Viktor
    INst f psykologi Uppsala universitet.
    Obituary. Jeff Richards.2005In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 34, 128-128 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Effects of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety and mood disorders2007In: Review series. Psychiatry, ISSN 1401-9302, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has revolutionized access to health information and made communication over long distances easier. This article reviews the use of the Internet for delivery of cognitive behaviour therapy. As a starting point the concept of guided self-help is introduced. We next present the treatment approach and different protocols briefly. Next, Swedish studies on panic disorder, social phobia, and depression are summarized using meta-analytic techniques. Implementation in regular clinical setting is discussed with a focus on efficacy versus effectiveness, training of therapist, combined treatments and cost-effectiveness. We conclude that Internet treatment is likely to become a treatment option for suitable patients in the future.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Estling, Fanny
    Jakobsson, Ebba
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Can the patient decide which modules to endorse? An open trial of tailored internet treatment of anxiety disorders.2011In: Cognitive behaviour therapy, ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, no 1, 57-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy commonly consists of disorder-specific modules that are based on face-to-face manuals. A recent development in the field is to tailor the treatment according to patient profile, which has the potential to cover comorbid conditions in association with anxiety and mood disorders. However, it could be that the patients themselves are able to decide what modules to use. The authors tested this in an open pilot trial with 27 patients with mixed anxiety disorders. Modules were introduced with a brief description, and patients could choose which modules to use. The exception was the two first modules and the last, which involved psychoeducation and relapse prevention. The treatment period lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed large within-group effect sizes, with an average Cohen's d of 0.88. In a structured clinical interview, a majority (54%) had significantly improved 10 weeks after commencing treatment. Only one person dropped out. On the basis of results of this preliminary study, the authors suggest that the role of choice and tailoring should be further explored in controlled trials and that patient choice could be incorporated into Internet-delivered treatment packages.

  • 14.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lundén, Charlotte
    Landstinget Dalarna.
    Henriksson, Oskar
    Psykologifabriken AB.
    Fattahi, Kidjan
    Psykologpartners , Linköping.
    Zetterqvist Westin, Vendela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus patients2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hummerdal, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Department of Psychology , Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, 155-164 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

    AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

    A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

    ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

    ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Raghad, Bakhsh
    Johansson, Linda
    Kaldo, Viktor
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stroop facilitation in tinnitus patients: An experiment conducted via the World Wide Web2005In: Cyberpsychology & Behavior, ISSN 1094-9313, E-ISSN 1557-8364, Vol. 8, no 1, 32-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to play an important role in tinnitus. In the present study, tinnitus participants were administered an emotional Stroop test via the Internet, incorporating words related to tinnitus concerns. In line with previous research using this Web-based version of the emotional Stroop test, faster color naming was demonstrated for concern-relevant words relative to neutral words. The present results thus provided support for a role for cognitive factors that are important for the understanding of tinnitus. However, future research is warranted in order to clarify the precise mechanisms involved in tinnitus-related Stroop effects. 1© Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  • 17.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ritterband, Lee
    University of Virginia Health System.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A primer for the assessment, diagnosis and delivery of Internet interventions for (mainly) panic disorder. Lessons learned from our research groups.2008In: Clinical Psychologist, ISSN 1328-4207, E-ISSN 1742-9552, Vol. 12, no 1, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [ar]

    With the advent of the Internet, delivered assessment applications are likely to make a difference in clinical psychology and in health care in general. The purpose of the present paper was to present an overview of the authors' experience regarding Internet administration of diagnostic interviews, questionnaires, and information processing tests. A conclusion is made that psychiatric assessments via the Internet are not yet to be recommended, but that questionnaire assessments are likely to generate equivalent or even superior data quality than traditional paper and pencil administration. Finally, the use of Internet-delivered tests of information processing is commented upon. Although these tests have been influential in theory development in clinical psychology, large-scale dissemination of tests has been slowed down by the need for laboratory facilities. Internet administration can provide new opportunities to administer tests from the patient's own home.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Svedling, L
    Veilord, A
    Andersson, F
    Sleman, O
    Sarkohi, A
    Claesson, E
    Westin, V
    Eriksson, T
    Lamminen, M
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Internetbehandling kontra gruppbehandling vid egentlig depression. Krävs mer behandling och får vissa deltagare snabba plötsliga förbättringar?2007In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2007, Katrineholm: Hygiena , 2007, 94-94 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Veilord, A
    KI KI.
    Svedling, L
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Andersson, F
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Sleman, O
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Westin, Vendela
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Clason, E
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Sarkohi, Ali
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Lamminen, M
    Specialistläkarna Specialistläkarna.
    Eriksson, T
    Specialistläkarna Specialistläkarna.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Randomized trial of Internet delivered CBT versus group CBT, with the inclusion of a preference arm, stepped care and assessment of sudden gains2007In: The third meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2007, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Westöö, Johan
    Johansson, Linda
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Cognitive bias via the Internet: A comparison of web-based and standard emotional Stroop tasks in social phobia2006In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 35, no 1, 55-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is accumulating evidence to suggest that social phobia is associated with attentional bias for words related to social threat. Information processing in individuals with social phobia (n = 87) was investigated in the present study using 2 versions of the emotional Stroop task. Results from a standard emotional Stroop task indicated delayed colour naming of socially threatening words relative to neutral words, in line with previous research, whereas results from a Web-based emotional Stroop task indicated a facilitation effect, with faster manual indication of colour choice for socially threatening words than for neutral words. Possible explanations for these contrasting findings and issues for further research are discussed. © 2006 Taylor & Francis.

  • 21. Austin, David
    et al.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Richards, Jeff
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Internet administration of three commonly used questionnaires in panic research: equivalence to paper administration in Australian and Swedish samples of people with panic disorder2006In: International Journal of Testing, ISSN 1530-5058, E-ISSN 1532-7574, Vol. 6, 25-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Bendelin, N
    et al.
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Dahl, J
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Upplevelser av internetbaserad depressionsbehandling med kognitiv beteendeterapi. En kvalitativ studie2006In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2006, Katrieneholm: Hygiena , 2006, 86-86 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 23.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kadowaki, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Carlbring, Per
    Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial2012In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, no 1, 16- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Internet-administered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for a range of anxiety disorders. However, most studies have focused on one specific primary diagnosis and co-morbidity has not been considered. In primary care settings, patients with anxiety often suffer from more than one psychiatric condition, making it difficult to disseminate ICBT for specific conditions. The aim of this study will be to investigate if ICBT tailored according to symptom profile can be a feasible treatment for primary care patients with anxiety disorders. It is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the treatment against an active control group. METHODS: Participants with anxiety disorders and co-morbid conditions (N = 128), will be recruited from a primary care population. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression, anxiety, quality of life and loss of production and the use of health care. All assessments will be collected via the Internet and measure points will be baseline, post treatment and 12 months post treatment. DISCUSSION: This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of ICBT for anxiety disorders in primary care. The trial will also add knowledge on the long term effects of ICBT when delivered for regular clinic patients Trial registration: Clinical trials identifier NCT01390168.

  • 24.
    Bergström, J
    et al.
    KI KI.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Karlsson, A
    KI KI.
    Andreewitch, S
    KI KI.
    Rück, C
    KI KI.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Lindefors, N
    KI KI.
    The effectiveness of Internet-based treatment for panic disorder and its implementation in regular care2006In: Second international meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2006, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Bergström, J
    et al.
    KI KI.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Rück, C
    KI KI.
    Andreewitch, S
    KI KI.
    Ljotsson, B
    KI KI.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Lindefors, N
    KI KI.
    Internet-based CBT for panic disorder and depression: Effectiveness and implementation in regular care2007In: The third meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2007, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Berman, A
    et al.
    KI KI.
    Kristiansson, M
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Wiklund, G
    Wahlund, D
    Farzanfar, R
    Boston university.
    Friedman, R
    Boston university.
    Kan datorstyrt telefonstöd bidra till att minska våldshandlingar bland rättspsykiatriska patienter i öppenvård?2006In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2006, Katrieneholm: Hygiena , 2006, 93- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 27.
    Berman, A
    et al.
    KI KI.
    Stevens, A
    USA USA.
    Kristiansson, M
    RMV Stockholm.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Ludena, K
    Friedman, R
    Boston university.
    Farzanfar, R
    Boston university.
    Can Acts of Violence Among Forensic Psychiatric Outpatients be Minimized Using Computer Telephony?2006In: International Association of Forensic Mental Health Services,2006, Amsterdam: AFMHS , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    DSM-systemet2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Effektstorlekar2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

     Webbvideoinstruktion om effektstorlekar

  • 30.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Internet-Based Self-Help For Pathological Gambling2006In: Second international meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2006, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet-based treatment for pathological gambling2005In: 6 th European Conference on Gambling Studies and Policy Issues,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathological gambling is a public health problem. Two percent of the Swedish general population has an ongoing gambling problem. Although pathological gambling is associated with depression, anxiety and low quality of life, few sufferers seek treatment. Barriers to accessing expert assistance include shortage of skilled therapists, long waiting lists, cost and sometimes even shame. A major challenge therefore, is to increase the accessibility and affordability of evidence-based psychological treatments. Printed self-help manuals have been developed to assist people with mental health problems who are unwilling or unable to access professional assistance, although there has been little evaluation of their efficacy. A modern alternative to printed self-help manuals is computers. In an attempt to provide a cost-effective treatment for problem and pathological gambling, a randomized controlled trial was conducted. Thirty participants were randomized to either a waiting list or an 8-week internet-based treatment program with minimal therapist contact via e-mail. Each participant also had a weekly 10-minute telephone conversation with a therapist. The web-based treatment program will be presented as well as the preliminary results from the study.

  • 32.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Kort och långtidseffekter av biblioterapi vid paniksyndrom - ett sektionssymposie vid sektionen för psykiatri2006In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2006, Katrineholm: Hygiea , 2006, 30- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Policy into practice: Internet-based self-help for pathological gambling2005In: IUHPE European conference on the effectiveness and quality of health promotion,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Carlbring, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Psykologisk behandling via Internet2006In: Psykoterapimässan,2006, 2006, 18-18 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Successful Self-Treatment of a Case of Writer's Block.2011In: Cognitive behaviour therapy, ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, no 1, 1-4 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergman, L
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Furmark, T
    Psyk Inst Uppsala universitet.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Long term follow-up of Internet-based treatment of social phobia2007In: The third meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions,2007, Charlottesville: ISRII , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergman, L
    CS IBL.
    Furmark, T
    Inst f Psykologi Uppsala universitet.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Långtidseffekter av Internetbaserad KBT vid social fobi2007In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2007, Katrieneholm: Hygiena , 2007, 94- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bergman Nordgren, Lise
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Furmark, T.
    Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Long-term outcome of Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for social phobia: A 30-month follow-up2009In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, Vol. 47, no 10, 848-850 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet-delivered guided cognitive behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder has been found to generate promising short-term results, up to one year posttreatment. No study has however documented longer follow-up periods. In this 30-month follow-up we contacted 57 participants from the original study of which 77.2% (44/57) responded to the Internet-administered outcome measures and 66.7% (38/57) completed a telephone interview. Results showed large pretreatment to follow-up within-group effect sizes for the primary outcome measures (Cohens d 1.10-1.71), and a majority (68.4%; 26/38) reported improvements in the interview. The findings suggest that the long-term effects seen in previous live treatment CBT trials can occur in Internet-delivered treatment as well.

  • 39.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, M
    CS IBL.
    Lundgren, R
    CS IBL.
    Behandling av spelmani på distans: Två studier, varav en randomiserad och kontrollerad2007In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2007, Katrieneholm: Hygiena , 2007, 94- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, M
    CS/ IBL LiU.
    Lundgren, R
    CS/ IBL LiU.
    Internet-based treatment for pathological gambling2007In: ICAAs 50th International Conference on Dependencies,2007, Stockholm: ICAA , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 41.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bergström, M
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Lundgren, R
    CS / IBL LiU.
    Internet-based treatment for pathological gambling2007In: European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapiess 5th World Congress of Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies,2007, Barcelona, Spain: EABCT , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 42.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Björnstjerna, Eva
    Uppsala University.
    Norkrans, Anna
    Uppsala University.
    Waara, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University.
    Applied Relaxation: an experimental analog study of therapist vs. computer administration2007In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 23, no 1, 2-10 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This experimental analog component study compared two ways of administrating relaxation, either via a computer or by a therapist. The second phase of applied relaxation was used, which is called “release-only relaxation”. Sixty participants from a student population were randomized to one of three groups: computer-administered relaxation, therapist-administered relaxation, or a control group in which participants surfed on the Internet. Outcome was measures using psychophysiological responses and self-report. Objective psychophysiological data and results on the subjective visual analogue scale suggest that there was no difference between the two forms of administration. Both experimental groups became significantly more relaxed than the control group that surfed on the Internet. Practical applications and future directions are discussed.

  • 43.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Bohman, Susanna
    Brunt, Sara
    Buhrman, Monica
    Westling, Bengt
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Remote treatment of panic disorder: A randomized trial of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy supplemented with telephone calls2006In: American Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0002-953X, E-ISSN 1535-7228, Vol. 163, no 12, 2119-2125 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study evaluated a 10-week Internet-based bibliotherapy self-help program with short weekly telephone calls for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Method: After the authors confirmed the diagnosis by administering the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV by telephone, 60 participants were randomly assigned to either a wait-listed control group or a multimodal treatment package based on cognitive behavior therapy plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail. A 10-minute telephone call was made each week to support each participant. Total mean time spent on each participant during the 10 weeks was 3.9 hours. The participants were required to send in homework assignments before receiving the next treatment module. Results: Analyses were conducted on an intention-to-treat basis, which included all randomly assigned participants. From pretreatment to posttreatment, all treated participants improved significantly on all measured dimensions (bodily interpretations, maladaptive cognitions, avoidance, general anxiety and depression levels, and quality of life). Treatment gains on self-report measures were maintained at the 9-month follow-up. A blind telephone interview after the end of treatment revealed that 77% of the treated patients no longer fulfilled the criteria for panic disorder, whereas all of the wait-listed subjects still suffered from it. Conclusions: This study provides evidence to support the use of treatment distributed via the Internet with the addition of short weekly telephone calls to treat panic disorder. Replication should be made to compare self-help and telephone treatment based on cognitive behavior methods with nonspecific interventions.

  • 44.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Brung, Sara
    Bohman, Susanne
    Austin, David
    Richards, Jeff
    Öst, Lars-Göran
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Internet vs. paper and pencil administration of questionnaires commonly used in panic/agoraphobia research2007In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 23, no 3, 1421-1434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of Internet administered questionnaires used in panic research. Included were 494 people who had registered for an Internet-based treatment program for panic disorder (PD). Participants were randomly assigned to fill in the questionnaires either on the Internet or the paper-and-pencil versions, and then to fill in the same questionnaires again the next day using the other format. The questionnaires were the body sensations questionnaire [BSQ, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G. C., Bright, P., & Gallagher, R. (1984). Assessment of fear of fear in agoraphobics: the body sensations questionnaire and the agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 1090-1097], agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire [ACQ, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G. C., Bright, P., & Gallagher, R. (1984). Assessment of fear of fear in agoraphobics: the body sensations questionnaire and the agoraphobic cognitions questionnaire. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 52, 1090-1097], mobility inventory [MI, Chambless, D. L., Caputo, G., Jasin, S., Gracely, E. J., & Williams, C. (1985). The mobility inventory for agoraphobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 35-44], beck anxiety inventory [BAI, Beck, A. T., Epstein, N., Brown, G., & Steer, R. A. (1988). An inventory for measuring clinical anxiety: psychometric properties. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 56, 893-897], beck depression inventory II [Beck, A. T., & Steer, R. A. (1996). Beck Depression Inventory. Manual, Svensk version (Swedish version). Fagernes, Norway: Psykologiförlaget, AB], quality of life inventory [QOLI, Frisch, M. B., Cornell, J., Villanueva, M., & Retzlaff, P. J. (1992). Clinical validation of the quality of life inventory. A measure of life satisfaction for use in treatment planning and outcome assessment. Psychological Assessment, 4, 92-101], and montgomery Åsberg depression rating scale [MADRS, Svanborg, P., & Åsberg, M. (1994). A new self-rating scale for depression and anxiety states based on the comprehensive psychopathological rating scale. ACTA Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 89, 21-28]. Results showed largely equivalent psychometric properties for the two administration formats (Cronbach's α between 0.79 and 0.95). The results also showed high and significant correlations between the Internet and the paper-and-pencil versions. Analyses of order effects showed an interaction effect for the BSQ and the MI (subscale Accompanied), a main effect was identified for ACQ, MI-Alone, BAI and BDI II. However, in contrast to previous research, the Internet version did not consistently generate higher scores and effect sizes for the differences were generally low. Given the presence of an interaction effect, we recommend that the administration format should be stable in research across measurement points. Finally, the findings suggest that Internet versions of questionnaires used in PD research can be used with confidence. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 45.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Edlund, A
    Spelinstitutet Spelinstitutet.
    Enmark, B
    Spelinstitutet Spelinstitutet.
    Treatment Programmes on the Internet2007In: The Foundation Nordic Society for Information about Problem gamblings VI:s conferens on Gaming on the Internet Prevention of youth gambling problems,2007, Holland: SNUS , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Enmark, Birgitta
    Spelinstitutet.
    Edlund, Anki
    Spelinstitutet.
    Behandling av spelberoende via internet2005In: Stiftelsen Nordiska Sällskapet för Upplysning om Spelberoendes femte konferens,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Behandling av spelberoende via Internet - fungerar det?

  • 47.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Fager, M
    CS IBL.
    Reliabilitet och validitet hos ett nytt självskattningsforumär vid spelmani (NORC DSM-IV Screen for gambling problems, self-assessment version)2007In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Rikstämma,2007, Katrineholm: Hygiena , 2007, 59-59 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Steczkó, Johan
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    An open study of Internet-based bibliotherapy with minimal therapist contact via e-mail for social phobia2006In: Clinical Psychologist, ISSN 1328-4207, E-ISSN 1742-9552, Vol. 10, 30-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated a nine-week Internet-based self-help program for people suffering from social phobia. After confirming the diagnosis with a structured clinical interview for the DSM-IV (SCID) by telephone, 26 participants were treated with a multimodal treatment package based on cognitive behavioral therapy plus weekly therapist contact via e-mail. Results were analyzed on a basis of intention-to-treat. There were no differences between the two pre-treatment assessment points. However, from pre- to post-test, treated participants improved signi?cantly on all measured dimensions (social anxiety, general anxiety, depression levels, and quality of life). The overall within-group effect size measured with Cohen-s d was d=0.88. Treatment gains were maintained or improved at the 6-month follow-up (Cohen-s d=1.31). The results of this study support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed self-help programs for people diagnosed with social phobia. 

  • 49.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Gunnarsdottir, M.
    Gunnarsdóttir, M., Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hedensjo, L.
    Hedensjö, L., Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Ekselius, L.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Furmark, T.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Treatment of social phobia: Randomised trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy with telephone support2007In: British Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0007-1250, E-ISSN 1472-1465, Vol. 190, no FEB., 123-128 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although effective therapies for social phobia exist, many individuals refrain from seeking treatment owing to the embarrassment associated with help-seeking. Internet-based cognitive-behavioural self-help can be an alternative, but adherence is a problem. Aims: To evaluate a 9-week programme of internet-based therapy designed to increase treatment adherence by the addition of short weekly telephone calls, nine in all, with a total duration of 95 min. Method: In a randomised controlled trial the effects of internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy in the treatment group (n=29) were compared with a waiting-list control group (n=28). Results: Compared with the control group the treated participants experienced greater reductions on measures of general and social anxiety, avoidance and depression. Adherence to treatment was high, with 93% finishing the complete treatment package. One year later all improvements were maintained. Conclusions: This study provides evidence to support the use of internet-based treatment supplemented by short, weekly telephone calls.

  • 50.
    Carlbring, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Hanell, Å
    Folkbladet.
    Ingen panik: Fri från panik- och ångestattacker i 10 steg med kognitiv beteendeterapi.2007Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      För de cirka 200 000 svenskar som lider av panikångest innebär vardagen inte bara rädsla för nya attacker, utan också undvikande av platser och situationer som vi andra kan ta för självklara. Forskning visar entydigt att KBT har mycket god effekt vid paniksyndrom - mellan 80 och 95 procent är diagnosfria efter tio veckors behandling - och förbluffande nog ser man samma goda resultat vid självhjälpsbehandling! Det finns alltså mycket som talar för att även den som använder den här boken ska kunna bli fri från sina problem. Det som krävs är att avsätta tid för att läsa och att genomföra övningarna. Boken är i första hand avsedd för allmänheten (självhjälp). Metoden i den här boken bygger på ett flertal studier gjorda vid Uppsala och Linköpings universitet. Arbetsblad finns att ladda ner från hemsidan www.ingenpanik.se. Förord av Gerhard Andersson, professor i klinisk psykologi vid Linköpings Universitet.

12 1 - 50 of 83
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf