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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Statens Strålskyddsinstitut, Stockholm.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Response of Lithium Formate EPR Dosimeters at Photon Energies Relelvant to Brachytherapy2009In: IFMBE Proceedings, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg , 2009, p. 236-239Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    After development of sensitive dosimeter materials Electron Paramagnetic Resonance EPR dosimetry has been successfully used also in radiation therapy. The intensity of the EPR-signal is a measure of the amount of free radicals created by ionizing radiation which is proportional to the absorbed dose in the dosimeter. Lithium formate monohydrate is a dosimeter material with 2-6 times higher sensitivity than alanine, a linear dose response over a wide dose range and mass-energy absorption properties similar to water. These properties make lithium formate promising for verification of absorbed doses around high dose rate brachytherapy sources where the dose gradient is steep and the photon energy distribution changing with distance from the source. Calibration of the dosimeters is performed in 60Co or MV photon beams where high dosimetric accuracy is feasible. The use in brachytherapy field relies on the assumption that the production of free radicals per mean absorbed dose in the dosimeter is similar at the lower photon energies present there. The aim of this work was to test that assumption. The response of the dosimeters as a function of photon energy was determined by irradiations with four x-ray qualities in the range 100-250 kV and 137Cs, relative to the response when irradiated with 60Co, all photon beams with well-known air kerma rates at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Monte Carlo simulations were used to convert air kerma free in air to mean absorbed dose to the dosimeter. The measured response relative 60Co as a function of photon energy was below unity for all qualities. The maximum deviation from unity was 2.5% (100 kV, 135 kV) with a relative standard deviation of 1.5% (k = 1).

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy2010In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 4946-4959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at 60Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions.

    METHODS:

    Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in 137Cs and 60Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for 60Co was determined for each beam quality.

    RESULTS:

    Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages < or = 180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for 137Cs and 250 kV x rays.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    When calibrated in 60Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy range of 20-150 keV such as 169Yb and electronic sources.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Optimisation of an EPR dosimetry system for robust and high precision dosimetry2014In: Radiation Measurements, ISSN 1350-4487, E-ISSN 1879-0925, Vol. 70, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry systems demand high accuracy causing time consuming analysis. The need for high spatial resolution dose measurements in regions with steep dose gradients demands small sized dosimeters. An optimization of the analysis was therefore needed to limit the time consumption. The aim of this work was to introduce a new smaller lithium formate dosimeter model (diameter reduced from standard diameter 4.5 mm to 3 mm and height from 4.8 mm to 3 mm). To compensate for reduced homogeneity in a batch of the smaller dosimeters, a method for individual sensitivity correction suitable for EPR dosimetry was tested. Sensitivity and repeatability was also tested for a standard EPR resonator and a super high Q (SHQE) one. The aim was also to optimize the performance of the dosimetry system for better efficiency regarding measurement time and precision. A systematic investigation of the relationship between measurement uncertainty and number of readouts per dosimeter was performed. The conclusions drawn from this work were that it is possible to decrease the dosimeter size with maintained measurement precision by using the SHQE resonator and introducing individual calibration factors for dosimeter batches. It was also shown that it is possible reduce the number of readouts per dosimeter without significantly decreasing the accuracy in measurements.

  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Olsson, Sara
    Medical Physics and Technology, Växjö Central Hospital, Växjö, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    A system for remote dosimetry audit of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT based on lithium formate dosimetry2014In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 113, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to develop and test a remote end-to-end audit system using lithium formate EPR dosimeters. Four clinics were included in a pilot study, absorbed doses determined in the PTV agreed with TPS calculated doses within ±5% for 3D-CRT and ±7% (k=1) for IMRT/VMAT dose plans.

  • 5.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Sara
    Central Hospital Växjö, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Investigation of signal fading in lithium formate EPR dosimeters using a new sensitive method2012In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 57, no 8, p. 2209-2217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate signal fading in lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters used for clinical applications in radiotherapy. A new experimental method for determination of signal fading, designed to resolve small changes in signal from slowly decaying unstable radicals, was used. Possible signal fading in lithium formate due to different storage temperatures was also tested. Air humidity was kept at a constant level of 33% throughout the experiments. The conclusion drawn from the investigations was that the EPR signal from lithium formate is stable during at least 1 month after irradiation and is not sensitive to variations in storage temperature andlt;40 degrees C when kept at a relative air humidity of 33%. This makes lithium formate a suitable dosimeter for transfer dosimetry in clinical audits.

  • 6.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White, Shane
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Landry, Guillaume
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Lund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Reniers, Brigitte
    Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film2015In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 3869-3882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film.

    Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water.

    Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison.

    This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  • 7.
    Antonovic, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Evaluation of a lithium formate EPR dosimetry system for dose measurements around Ir-192 brachytherapy sources2009In: MEDICAL PHYSICS, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 2236-2247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A dosimetry system using lithium formate monohydrate (HCO2Li center dot H2O) as detector material and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for readout has been used to measure absorbed dose distributions around clinical Ir-192 sources. Cylindrical tablets with diameter of 4.5 mm, height of 4.8 mm, and density of 1.26 g/cm(3) were manufactured. Homogeneity test and calibration of the dosimeters were performed in a 6 MV photon beam. Ir-192 irradiations were performed in a PMMA phantom using two different source models, the GammaMed Plus HDR and the microSelectron PDR-v1 model. Measured absorbed doses to water in the PMMA phantom were converted to the corresponding absorbed doses to water in water phantoms of dimensions used by the treatment planning systems (TPSs) using correction factors explicitly derived for this experiment. Experimentally determined absorbed doses agreed with the absorbed doses to water calculated by the TPS to within +/- 2.9%. Relative standard uncertainties in the experimentally determined absorbed doses were estimated to be within the range of 1.7%-1.3% depending on the radial distance from the source, the type of source (HDR or PDR), and the particular absorbed doses used. This work shows that a lithium formate dosimetry system is well suited for measurements of absorbed dose to water around clinical HDR and PDR Ir-192 sources. Being less energy dependent than the commonly used thermoluminescent lithium fluoride (LiF) dosimeters, lithium formate monohydrate dosimeters are well suited to measure absorbed doses in situations where the energy dependence cannot easily be accounted for such as in multiple-source irradiations to verify treatment plans. Their wide dynamic range and linear dose response over the dose interval of 0.2-1000 Gy make them suitable for measurements on sources of the strengths used in clinical applications. The dosimeter size needs, however, to be reduced for application to single-source dosimetry.

  • 8.
    Ballester, Facundo
    et al.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Granero, Domingo
    Hospital Gen University, Spain.
    Haworth, Annette
    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre, DE 19713 USA.
    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel
    CNEN SP, Brazil; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Zourari, Kyveli
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Papagiannis, Panagiotis
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Siebert, Frank-Andre
    University Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Sloboda, Ron S.
    Cross Cancer Institute, Canada; University of Alberta, Canada.
    Smith, Ryan L.
    Alfred Hospital, Australia.
    Thomson, Rowan M.
    Carleton University, Canada.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; McGill University, Canada.
    Vijande, Javier
    University of Valencia, Spain; IFIC CSIC UV, Spain.
    Ma, Yunzhi
    CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Beaulieu, Luc
    CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    A generic high-dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism2015In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 3048-3062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic Ir-192 source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra (R) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision AcuRos (TM)]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and pENELopE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR Ir-192 source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then compared against dose calculated using TG-43 and MBDCA methods. Results: TG-43 and PSS datasets were generated for the generic source, the PSS data for use with the ACE algorithm. The dose-rate constant values obtained from seven MC simulations, performed independently using different codes, were in excellent agreement, yielding an average of 1.1109 +/- 0.0004 cGy/(h U) (k = 1, Type A uncertainty). MC calculated dose-rate distributions for the two plans were also found to be in excellent agreement, with differences within type A uncertainties. Differences between commercial MBDCA and MC results were test, position, and calculation parameter dependent. On average, however, these differences were within 1% for ACUROS and 2% for ACE at clinically relevant distances. Conclusions: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed and implemented in two commercially available TPSs employing different MBDCAs. Reference dose distributions for this source were benchmarked and used for the evaluation of MBDCA calculations employing a virtual, cubic water phantom in the form of a CT DICOM image series. The implementation of a generic source of identical design in all TPSs using MBDCAs is an important step toward supporting univocal commissioning procedures and direct comparisons between TPSs. (C) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  • 9.
    Beaulieu, Luc
    et al.
    Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Canada and Université Laval, Québec, Canada .
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carrier, Jean-François
    Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada and Département de physique, Université de Montréal, Québec Canada .
    Davis, Stephen D.
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA and McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada .
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware, USA.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    Thomson, Rowan M.
    Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Maastricht University Medical Center, the Netherlands and McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada .
    Wareing, Todd A.
    Transpire Inc., Gig Harbor, Washington, USA.
    Williamson, Jeffrey F.
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, USA.
    Report of the Task Group 186 on model-based dose calculation methods in brachytherapy beyond the TG-43 formalism: Current status and recommendations for clinical implementation2012In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 39, no 10, p. 6208-6236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The charge of Task Group 186 (TG-186) is to provide guidance for early adopters of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for brachytherapy (BT) dose calculations to ensure practice uniformity. Contrary to external beam radiotherapy, heterogeneity correction algorithms have only recently been made available to the BT community. Yet, BT dose calculation accuracy is highly dependent on scatter conditions and photoelectric effect cross-sections relative to water. In specific situations, differences between the current water-based BT dose calculation formalism (TG-43) and MBDCAs can lead to differences in calculated doses exceeding a factor of 10. MBDCAs raise three major issues that are not addressed by current guidance documents: (1) MBDCA calculated doses are sensitive to the dose specification medium, resulting in energy-dependent differences between dose calculated to water in a homogeneous water geometry (TG-43), dose calculated to the local medium in the heterogeneous medium, and the intermediate scenario of dose calculated to a small volume of water in the heterogeneous medium. (2) MBDCA doses are sensitive to voxel-by-voxel interaction cross sections. Neither conventional single-energy CT nor ICRU∕ICRP tissue composition compilations provide useful guidance for the task of assigning interaction cross sections to each voxel. (3) Since each patient-source-applicator combination is unique, having reference data for each possible combination to benchmark MBDCAs is an impractical strategy. Hence, a new commissioning process is required. TG-186 addresses in detail the above issues through the literature review and provides explicit recommendations based on the current state of knowledge. TG-43-based dose prescription and dose calculation remain in effect, with MBDCA dose reporting performed in parallel when available. In using MBDCAs, it is recommended that the radiation transport should be performed in the heterogeneous medium and, at minimum, the dose to the local medium be reported along with the TG-43 calculated doses. Assignments of voxel-by-voxel cross sections represent a particular challenge. Electron density information is readily extracted from CT imaging, but cannot be used to distinguish between different materials having the same density. Therefore, a recommendation is made to use a number of standardized materials to maintain uniformity across institutions. Sensitivity analysis shows that this recommendation offers increased accuracy over TG-43. MBDCA commissioning will share commonalities with current TG-43-based systems, but in addition there will be algorithm-specific tasks. Two levels of commissioning are recommended: reproducing TG-43 dose parameters and testing the advanced capabilities of MBDCAs. For validation of heterogeneity and scatter conditions, MBDCAs should mimic the 3D dose distributions from reference virtual geometries. Potential changes in BT dose prescriptions and MBDCA limitations are discussed. When data required for full MBDCA implementation are insufficient, interim recommendations are made and potential areas of research are identified. Application of TG-186 guidance should retain practice uniformity in transitioning from the TG-43 to the MBDCA approach.

  • 10.
    Candela-Juan, C.
    et al.
    La Fe University of and Polytech Hospital, Spain; University of Valencia, Spain.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundell, M.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ballester, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiat Safety Author, Sweden.
    Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies2015In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 2132-2142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, Ra-226 was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two Ra-226 sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose-effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg Ra-226 tube and a 10 mg Ra-226 needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a Ra-226 point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including gL(r), F(r,theta), Lambda, and s(K)] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that the uncertainty associated to the absorbed dose within the treatment volume is 10%-15%, whereas uncertainty of absorbed dose to distant organs is roughly 20%-25%. Conclusions: The results provided here facilitate retrospective dosimetry studies of Ra-226 using modern treatment planning systems, which may be used to improve knowledge on long term radiation effects. It is surely important for the epidemiologic studies to be aware of the estimated uncertainty provided here before extracting their conclusions.

  • 11.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Asa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Ahnesjö, Anders
    Uppsala University.
    Optimization of the computational efficiency of a 3D, collapsed cone dose calculation algorithm for brachytherapy.2008In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1611-1618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brachytherapy dose calculations based on point kernel superposition using the collapsed cone method have been shown to accurately model the influence from finite dimensions of the patient and effects from heterogeneities including those of high atomic numbers. The collapsed cone method is for brachytherapy applications most effectively implemented through a successive-scattering approach, in which the dose from once and higher order of scattered photons is calculated separately and in successive scatter order. The calculation speed achievable is directly proportional to the number of directions used for point kernel discretization and to the number of voxels in the volume. In this work we investigate how to best divide the total number of directions between the two steps of successive-scattering dose calculations. Results show that the largest fraction of the total number of directions should be utilized in calculating the first-scatter dose. Also shown is how the number of directions required for keeping discretization artifacts at acceptably low levels decreases significantly in multiple-source configurations, as a result of the dose gradients being less steep than those around single sources. Investigating the number of kernel directions required to keep artifacts low enough within the high dose region of an implant (i.e., for dose levels above approximately 5%-10% of the mean central target dose) reveals similar figures for brachytherapy as for external beam applications, where collapsed cone superposition is clinically used. Also shown is that approximating point kernels with their isotropic average leads to small dose differences at low and intermediate energies, implying that the collapsed cone calculations can be done in a single operation common to all sources of the implant at these energies. The current findings show that collapsed cone calculations can be achieved for brachytherapy with the same efficiency as for external beams. This, combined with recent results on gains in efficiency through implementing the algorithm on graphical card parallel hardware indicates that dose can be calculated with account for heterogeneities and finite dimensions within a few seconds for large voxel arrays and is therefore of interest for practical application to treatment planning.

  • 12.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Dose calculation and Monte Carlo simulations beyond the TG43 formalism2007In: 9th Biennial ESTRO meeting on physics and radiation technology for clinical radiotherapy,2007, 2007, p. S33-S33Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 13.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiation Physics.
    Ahnesjö, A
    Nucletron Scandinavia AB Uppsala and Department of Oncology, .
    Optimization of the computational efficiency of a 3D, collapsed cone dose calculation algorithm for brachytherapy2006In: Radiotherapy and Oncology ESTRO 25,2006, 2006, p. S197-S197Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

          

  • 14.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Evaluation of collapsed cone dose calculation accuracy for multiple source implants2008In: World Congress of Brachytherapy,2008, 2008, p. 136-136Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

          

  • 15.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Influence of phantom material and dimensions on experimental Ir-192 dosimetry2009In: MEDICAL PHYSICS, ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 2228-2235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In treatment planning of brachytherapy, absorbed dose is calculated by superposing predetermined distributions of absorbed dose to water in water for the single source according to the irradiation pattern [i.e., placement of the source(s) or dwelling position(s)]. Single-source reference water data are derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and/or experiments. For reasons of positional accuracy, experimental brachytherapy dosimetry is most often performed in plastic phantoms. This work investigates the water equivalence of phantoms made from polystyrene, PMMA, and solid water for Ir-192 dosimetry. The EGSnrc MC code is used to simulate radial absorbed dose distributions in cylindrical phantoms of dimensions ranging in size from diameter and height of 20 cm to diameter and height of 40 cm. Water equivalence prevails if the absorbed dose to water in the plastic phantom is the same as the absorbed dose to water in a water phantom at equal distances from the source. It is shown that water equivalence at a specified distance from the source depends not only on the size of the plastic phantom but also on the size of the water phantom used for comparison. Compared to equally sized water phantoms, phantoms of polystyrene are less water equivalent than phantoms of PMMA and solid water but compared to larger water phantoms they are the most water equivalent. Although phantom dimension is the most important single factor influencing the dose distributions around Ir-192 sources, the effect of material properties is non-negligible and becomes increasingly important as phantom dimensions increase. The importance of knowing the size of the water phantom whose data underlies treatment planning systems, when using such data as a reference in, e.g., detector evaluation studies, is discussed. To achieve the highest possible accuracy in experimental dosimetry, phantom-specific correction factors should be used.

  • 16.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy2013In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 2561-2579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium D-med then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue D-w,D- med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from I-125, Yb-169 and Ir-192 sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert D-med into D-w,D- med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 mu m cavities are large only at photon energies andlt;20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient D-w,D- med/D-med is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass -collision-stopping powers for converting D-med into D-w,D- med.

  • 17.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Bengtsson, Emil
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Hedtjärn, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics .
    Johansson, Asa
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Karlsson, Leif
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Lamm, Inger-Lena
    Lund University Hospital.
    Lundell, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mejaddem, Younes
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Munck af Rosenschold, Per
    Lund University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Josef
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Wieslander, Elinore
    Lund University Hospital.
    Wolke, Jeanette
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Experience from long-term monitoring of RAKR ratios in Ir-192 brachytherapy2008In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 217-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Ratios of values of brachytherapy source strengths, as measured by hospitals and vendors, comprise constant differences as, e.g., systematic errors in ion chamber calibration factors and measurement setup. Such ratios therefore have the potential to reveal the systematic changes in routines or calibration services at either the hospital or the vendor laboratory, which could otherwise be hidden by the uncertainty in the source strength values.

    Methods: The RAKR of each new source in 13 afterloading units at five hospitals were measured by well-type ion chambers and compared to values for the same source stated on vendor certificates.

    Results: Differences from unity in the ratios of RAKR values determined by hospitals and vendors are most often small and stable around their mean values to within +/- 11.5%. Larger deviations are rare but occur. A decreasing ratio, seen at two hospitals for the same source, was useful in detecting an erroneous pressure gauge at the vendors site.

    Conclusions: Establishing a mean ratio of RAKR values, as measured at the hospital and supplied on the vendor certificate, and monitoring this as a function of time are an easy way for the early detection of problems with equipment or routines at either the hospital or the vendor site.

  • 18.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjerke, Hans
    Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Österås, Norway.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hetland, Per-Otto
    Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Österås, Norway.
    Kosunen, Antti
    STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland.
    Paulsen Hellebust, Taran
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway .
    Persson, Linda
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sipila, Petri
    TUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland.
    Comparison of high-dose-rate Ir-192 source strength measurements using equipment with traceability to different standards2014In: Brachytherapy, ISSN 1538-4721, E-ISSN 1873-1449, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 420-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    According to the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism used for dose calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems, the absolute level of absorbed dose is determined through coupling with the measurable quantity air-kerma strength or the numerically equal reference air-kerma rate (RAKR). Traceability to established standards is important for accurate dosimetry in laying the ground for reliable comparisons of results and safety in adoption of new treatment protocols. The purpose of this work was to compare the source strength for a high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source as measured using equipment traceable to different standard laboratories in Europe and the United States.

    METHODS AND MATERIALS:

    Source strength was determined for one HDR (192)Ir source using four independent systems, all with traceability to different primary or interim standards in the United States and Europe.

    RESULTS:

    The measured HDR (192)Ir source strengths varied by 0.8% and differed on average from the vendor value by 0.3%. Measurements with the well chambers were 0.5% ± 0.1% higher than the vendor-provided source strength. Measurements with the Farmer chamber were 0.7% lower than the average well chamber results and 0.2% lower than the vendor-provided source strength. All of these results were less than the reported source calibration uncertainties (k=2) of each measurement system.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In view of the uncertainties in ion chamber calibration factors, the maximum difference in source strength found in this study is small and confirms the consistency between calibration standards in use for HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  • 19.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    de Luelmo, Sandro
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority.
    Characterization of a Co-60 unit at a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory: Monte Carlo simulations compared to measurements and results from the literature2010In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 2777-2786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To compare a Monte Carlo (MC) characterization of a Co-60 unit at the Swedish Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) with the results of both measurements and literature with the aims of (1) resolving a change in the ratio of air-kerma free in air K-air and absorbed dose to water D-w in a water phantom noted experimentally after a source exchange in the laboratory and (2) reviewing results from the literature on similar MC simulations. Although their use in radiotherapy is decreasing, the characteristics of Co-60 beams are of interest since Co-60 beams are utilized in calibrating ionization chambers for the absolute dosimetry of radiotherapy beams and as reference radiation quality in evaluating the energy dependence of radiation detectors and in studies on radiobiological effectiveness. Methods: The BEAMnrc MC code was used with a detailed geometrical model of the treatment head and two models of the Co-60 source representing the sources used before and after source exchange, respectively. The active diameters of the Co-60 sources were 1.5 cm in pellet form and 2.0 cm in sintered form. Measurements were performed on the actual unit at the Swedish SSDL. Results: Agreement was obtained between the MC and the measured results within the estimated uncertainties for beam profiles, water depth-dose curve, relative air-kerma output factors, and for the ratios of K-air/D-w before and after source exchange. The on-axis energy distribution of the photon fluence free in air for the unit loaded with its present (1.5 cm in diameter) source agreed closely with the results from the literature in which a source of the same make and active diameter, inside a different treatment head, was simulated. The spectrum for the larger (2.0 cm in diameter) source was in close agreement with another published spectrum, also modeling a Co-60 source with an active diameter of 2.0 cm inside a different treatment head. Conclusions: The reduction in the value of K-air/D-w following source exchange was explained by the spectral differences between the two sources that were larger in the free in-air geometry used for K-air calibrations than at 5 g/cm(2) depth in the water phantom used for D-w calibrations. Literature review revealed differences between published in-air Co-60 spectra derived for sources of different active diameters, and investigators in need of an accurately determined Co-60 in-air spectrum should be aware of differences due to source active diameter.

  • 20.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Elia, Rouba
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedtjärn, Håkan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Olsson, Sara
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Determination of absorbed dose to water around a clinical HDR 192-Ir source using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs demonstrates an LET dependence of detector response2012In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 1133-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Experimental radiation dosimetry with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), calibrated in a (60)Co or megavoltage (MV) photon beam, is recommended by AAPM TG-43U1for verification of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources. However, it has been shown by Carlsson Tedgren et al. [Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] that for TLDs of LiF:Mg,Ti, detector response was 4% higher in a (137)Cs beam than in a (60)Co one. The aim of this work was to investigate if similar over-response exists when measuring absorbed dose to water around (192)Ir sources, using LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters calibrated in a 6 MV photon beam.Methods: LiF dosimeters were calibrated to measure absorbed dose to water in a 6 MV photon beam and used to measure absorbed dose to water at distances of 3, 5, and 7 cm from a clinical high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. Measured values were compared to values of absorbed dose to water calculated using a treatment planning system (TPS) including corrections for the difference in energy absorption properties between calibration quality and the quality in the users' (192)Ir beam and for the use of a PMMA phantom instead of the water phantom underlying dose calculations in the TPS.Results: Measured absorbed doses to water around the (192)Ir source were overestimated by 5% compared to those calculated by the TPS. Corresponding absorbed doses to water measured in a previous work with lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters by Antonovic et al. [Med. Phys. 36, 2236-2247 (2009)], using the same irradiation setup and calibration procedure as in this work, were 2% lower than those calculated by the TPS. The results obtained in the measurements in this work and those obtained using the EPR lithium formate dosimeters were, within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainty, in agreement with the values derived by the TPS. The discrepancy between the results using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs and the EPR lithium formate dosimeters was, however, statistically significant and in agreement with the difference in relative detector responses found for the two detector systems by Carlsson Tedgren et al. [Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] and by Adolfsson et al. [Med. Phys. 37, 4946-4959 (2010)].Conclusions: When calibrated in (60)Co or MV photon beams, correction for the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti detector response will be needed as to measure absorbed doses to water in a (192)Ir beam with highest accuracy. Such corrections will depend on the manufacturing process (MTS-N Poland or Harshaw TLD-100) and details of the annealing and read-out schemes used.

  • 21.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Stockholm.
    Audit on source strength determination for HDR and PDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Sweden2008In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: To investigate the status of source strength determination in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) for HDR and PDR 192Ir brachytherapy in Sweden. Materials and methods: RAKR was determined in each of the 14 Swedish afterloaders, using calibrated equipment from the Swedish Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory. Results: Values of RAKR from the external audit, the hospitals and vendors agreed within the uncertainty limits guaranteed by the vendors. Conclusions: The accuracy in RAKR determination has increased over the last years as a result of increased availability of interpolation standards for HDR 192Ir and the increased use of robust well-type ion chambers designed for brachytherapy. It is recommended to establish a ratio between the RAKR value from own measurements at the hospital and that of the vendor since such a ratio embeds constant systematic differences due to e.g. varying traceability and therefore has the potential of being less uncertain than the RAKR alone. Traceability to primary standards for HDR 192Ir sources will in the future significantly decrease the uncertainty in RAKR of 192Ir brachytherapy. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Grindborg, J-E
    Stockholm.
    192-Ir source strength dosimetry audit in Sweden2007In: 9th Biennial ESTRO meeting on physics and radiation technology for clinical radiotherapy,2007, 2007, p. S143-S143Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Posters Brachytherapy, publicerad i Radiotherapy and Oncology.

  • 23.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Hedman, Angelica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Grindborg, Jan-Erik
    Swedish Radiation Safety Authority.
    Alm Carlsson, Gudrun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV.
    Response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy (andlt; 1 MeV)2011In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 5539-5550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since absorbed dose to water can be determined accurately and with traceability to primary standards in such beams, using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. For use in brachytherapy, beam quality correction factors are needed, which include corrections for differences in mass energy absorption properties between water and detector as well as variations in detector response (intrinsic efficiency) with radiation quality, caused by variations in the density of ionization (linear energy transfer (LET) -distributions) along the secondary electron tracks. The aim of this work was to investigate experimentally the detector response of LiF:Mg, Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to (60)Co and to address discrepancies between the results found in recent publications of detector response. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters of formulation MTS-N Poland were irradiated to known values of air kerma free-in-air in x-ray beams at tube voltages 25-250 kV, in (137)Cs- and (60)Co-beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free-in-air into values of mean absorbed dose in the dosimeters in the actual irradiation geometries were made using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. X-ray energy spectra were measured or calculated for the actual beams. Detector response relative to that for (60)Co was determined at each beam quality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: An increase in relative response was seen for all beam qualities ranging from 8% at tube voltage 25 kV (effective energy 13 keV) to 3%-4% at 250 kV (122 keV effective energy) and (137)Cs with a minimum at 80 keV effective energy (tube voltage 180 kV). The variation with effective energy was similar to that reported by Davis [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)] with our values being systematically lower by 2%-4%. Compared to the results by Nunn [Med. Phys. 35, 1861-1869 (2008)], the relative detector response as a function of effective energy differed in both shape and magnitude. This could be explained by the higher maximum read-out temperature (350 degrees C) used by Nunn [Med. Phys. 35, 1861-1869 (2008)], allowing light emitted from high-temperature peaks with a strong LET dependence to be registered. Use of TLD-100 by Davis [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)] with a stronger super-linear dose response compared to MTS-N was identified as causing the lower relative detector response in this work. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Both careful dosimetry and strict protocols for handling the TLDs are required to reach solid experimental data on relative detector response. This work confirms older findings that an over-response relative to (60)Co exists for photon energies below 200-300 keV. Comparison with the results from the literature indicates that using similar protocols for annealing and read-out, dosimeters of different makes (TLD-100, MTS-N) differ in relative detector response. Though universality of the results has not been proven and further investigation is needed, it is anticipated that with the use of strict protocols for annealing and read-out, it will be possible to determine correction factors that can be used to reduce uncertainties in dose measurements around brachytherapy sources at photon energies where primary standards for absorbed dose to water are not available.

  • 24.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Plamondon, Mathieu
    CHU Quebec, Canada; CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    Beaulieu, Luc
    CHU Quebec, Canada; CHU Quebec, Canada; University of Laval, Canada; University of Laval, Canada.
    The collapsed cone algorithm for Ir-192 dosimetry using phantom-size adaptive multiple-scatter point kernels2015In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 13, p. 5313-5323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this work was to investigate how dose distributions calculated with the collapsed cone (CC) algorithm depend on the size of the water phantom used in deriving the point kernel for multiple scatter. A research version of the CC algorithm equipped with a set of selectable point kernels for multiple-scatter dose that had initially been derived in water phantoms of various dimensions was used. The new point kernels were generated using EGSnrc in spherical water phantoms of radii 5 cm, 7.5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Dose distributions derived with CC in water phantoms of different dimensions and in a CT-based clinical breast geometry were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the Geant4-based brachytherapy specific MC code Algebra. Agreement with MC within 1% was obtained when the dimensions of the phantom used to derive the multiple-scatter kernel were similar to those of the calculation phantom. Doses are overestimated at phantom edges when kernels are derived in larger phantoms and underestimated when derived in smaller phantoms (by around 2% to 7% depending on distance from source and phantom dimensions). CC agrees well with MC in the high dose region of a breast implant and is superior to TG43 in determining skin doses for all multiple-scatter point kernel sizes. Increased agreement between CC and MC is achieved when the point kernel is comparable to breast dimensions. The investigated approximation in multiple scatter dose depends on the choice of point kernel in relation to phantom size and yields a significant fraction of the total dose only at distances of several centimeters from a source/implant which correspond to volumes of low doses. The current implementation of the CC algorithm utilizes a point kernel derived in a comparatively large (radius 20 cm) water phantom. A fixed point kernel leads to predictable behaviour of the algorithm with the worst case being a source/implant located well within a patient/phantom for which low doses at phantom edges can be overestimated by 2-5 %. It would be possible to improve the situation by using a point kernel for multiple-scatter dose adapted to the patient/phantom dimensions at hand.

  • 25.
    Holm, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Heuristics for Integrated Optimization of Catheter Positioning and Dwell Time Distribution in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy2016In: Annals of Operations Research, ISSN 0254-5330, E-ISSN 1572-9338, Vol. 236, no 2, p. 319-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a kind of radiotherapy used to treat, among others, prostate cancer. When applied to prostate cancer a radioactive source is moved through catheters implanted into the prostate. For each patient a treatment plan is constructed that decide for example catheter placement and dwell time distribution, that is where to stop the radioactive source and for how long.

    Mathematical optimization methods has been used to find quality plans with respect to dwell time distribution, however few optimization approaches regarding catheter placement have been studied. In this article we present an integrated optimization model that optimize catheter placement and dwell time distribution simultaneously. Our results show that integrating the two decisions yields greatly improved plans, from 15% to 94% improvement.

    Since the presented model is computationally demanding to solve we also present three heuristics: tabu search, variable neighbourhood search and genetic algorithm. Of these variable neighbourhood search is clearly the best, outperforming a state-of-the-art optimization software (CPLEX) and the two other heuristics.

  • 26.
    Holm, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail2013In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 40, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The authors new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  • 27.
    Holm, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impact of Using Linear Optimization Models in Dose Planning for HDR Brachytherapy2012In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 1021-1028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in HDR brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses of this work are a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and b) that alternative penalties, being piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times.

    Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analysed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients.

    Results: While most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly between the two types of penalties significant changes can be seen in the dwell times. On the average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 30%, using the alternative penalties.

    Conclusion: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for undesired longer dwell times appearing in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various constraints as to reduce the long dwell times have been developed our finding is of fundamental interest in showing the shape of the objective function to be one reason for their appearance.

  • 28.
    Holm, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    On the Correlation Between DVH Parameters and Linear Penalties in Optimization of HDR Prostate Brachytherapy Dose PlansManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When optimizing dwell times for HDR brachytherapy it is common to use a model comprising an objective of linear penalties. However whether a planis considered good or not depends on other measures such as DVH-based parameters. We show through experiments that the correlation between the value of the objective function and the values of DVH-based parameters, such as D90, is weak in some cases. It seems that the objective function can only classify solutions into better or worse, however it can not distinguish the best with respect to DVH-based parameters.

  • 29.
    Holm, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Optimization . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Study of the Relationship Between Dosimetric Indices and Linear Penalties in Dose Distribution Optimization for HDR Prostate Brachytherapy2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Most clinical software for optimizing dwelling time patterns is based on a linear penalty model. The quality of a dose distribution generated by the dwelling time pattern is, however, evaluated through a number of dosimetric indices. The purpose of this article is to investigate the relationship between the linear penalty model and the dosimetric indices.

    Method and Materials: Data sets from three patients, previously treated for prostate cancer with HDR brachytherapy as a boost to external beam therapy, were used for this study, and for each of them 300 random dwelling time patterns were generated. The relationship between the linear penalty model and the dosimetric indices were studied both by the Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient between the objective function value of the linear penalty model and the values of the dosimetric indices, and by scatter-grams.

    Results: For one of the three patients we found a clear connection between the linear penalty model and the values of the dosimetric indices, but not for the other two. For the two patients without a clear connection there where some dosimetric indices that actually improved with deteriorating objective function value.

    Conclusion: The dwelling time pattern found by using the linear penalty model does not correspond to the optimal dose distribution with respect to dosimetric indices.

  • 30.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Josef
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundell, Marie
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Monte Carlo dosimetry of the eye plaque design used at the St. Erik Eye Hospital for I-125 brachytherapy2014In: Brachytherapy, ISSN 1538-4721, E-ISSN 1873-1449, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 651-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: At St. Erik Eye Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, ocular tumors of apical height above 6 mm are treated with brachytherapy, using iodine-125 seeds attached to a gold alloy plaque while the treatment planning is performed assuming homogeneous water surroundings. The aim of this work was to investigate the dose-modifying effects of the plaque and the seed fixating silicone rubber glue. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The impact of the gold plaque and silicone rubber glue was studied with the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, version 5. RESULTS: For the 2 cm most proximal to the plaque surface along the plaques central axis, the eyeball received 104.6-93.0% of the dose in all-water conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The 0.3 mm thick layer of silicone rubber glue, used for seed fixation, attenuates photons little enough to allow characteristic X-rays from the gold alloy plaque to reach the eyeball. Close to the plaque, the dose rates were higher with the plaque and glue present, than in homogeneous water conditions. This is in contrast to what has been reported for more commonly used eye plaques, demonstrating the importance of investigating the dosimetry of individual treatment systems.

  • 31.
    Lindborg, L
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Hultqvist, M
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Nikjoo, H
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Lineal energy and radiation quality in radiation therapy: model calculations and comparison with experiment2013In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 58, no 10, p. 3089-3105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdosimetry is a recommended method for characterizing radiation quality in situations when the biological effectiveness under test is not well known. In such situations, the radiation beams are described by their lineal energy probability distributions. Results from radiobiological investigations in the beams are then used to establish response functions that relate the lineal energy to the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). In this paper we present the influence of the size of the simulated volume on the relation to the clinical RBE values (or weighting factors). A single event probability distribution of the lineal energy is approximated by its dose average lineal energy ((y) over bar (D)) which can be measured or calculated for volumes from a few micrometres down to a few nanometres. The clinical RBE values were approximated as the ratio of the alpha-values derived from the LQ-relation. Model calculations are presented and discussed for the SOBP of a C-12 ion (290 MeV u(-1)) and the reference Co-60 gamma therapy beam. Results were compared with those for a conventional x-ray therapy beam, a 290 MeV proton beam and a neutron therapy beam. It is concluded that for a simulated volume of about 10 nm, the alpha-ratio increases approximately linearly with the (y) over bar (D)-ratio for all the investigated beams. The correlation between y and alpha provides the evidence to characterize a radiation therapy beam by the lineal energy when, for instance, weighting factors are to be estimated.

  • 32.
    Lindborg, Lennart
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hultqvist, Martha
    RaySearch Labs, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Swedish Radiat Safety Author, Sweden.
    Nikjoo, Hooshang
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nanodosimetry and RBE values in radiotherapy2015In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 166, no 1-4, p. 339-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a recent paper, the authors reported that the dose mean lineal energy, (y) over bar (D) in a volume of about 10-15 nm is approximately proportional to the alpha-parameter in the linear-quadratic relation used in fractionated radiotherapy in both low- and high-LET beams. This was concluded after analyses of reported radiation weighting factors, W-isoE (clinical RBE values), and (y) over bar (D) values in a large range of volumes. Usually, microdosimetry measurements in the nanometer range are difficult; therefore, model calculations become necessary. In this paper, the authors discuss the calculation method. A combination of condensed history Monte Carlo and track structure techniques for calculation of mean lineal energy values turned out to be quite useful. Briefly, the method consists in weighting the relative dose fractions of the primary and secondary charged particles with their respective energy-dependent dose mean lineal energies. The latter were obtained using a large database of Monte Carlo track structure calculations.

  • 33.
    Lundell, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    New dosimetry for childhood skin hemangioma treatments with Ra-226 needles or tubes2015In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 139-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Stockholm Hemangioma Cohort is important for evaluation of late effects after exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood. Dose estimates in this cohort were based on both measurements and calculations using an old treatment planning system. Methods: We compare previously published and calculated dose estimates with new ones, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations, which mimic the hemangioma treatments with Ra-226 needles and tubes. The distances between the Ra-226 sources and the thyroid and breasts, respectively, were reassessed. Result:. The Monte Carlo calculations showed significantly lower dose values than those obtained earlier. The differences depended both on the modeling of the sources and on further individualized distances from the sources. The mean value of the new calculated doses was 25% of the old breast doses and 46% of the old thyroid doses. Conclusion: New dosimetry for hemangioma treatments gives significantly lower organ doses for the few cases receiving the highest absorbed dose values. This implies that radiation risk estimates will increase and have to be recalculated. For retrospective studies it is now possible to calculate organ doses from radium treatments using modern treatment planning systems by modeling the source geometry carefully and apply the TG-43 formalism. It is important to be aware of the large uncertainties in calculated absorbed dose values.

  • 34.
    Olsson, Sara
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Malke, Zelga
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Larsson, Peter
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    A system for mailed dose audit in radiotherapy using lithium formate EPR dosimetry2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel
    et al.
    IPEN CNEN SP, Brazil; Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Reniers, Brigitte
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; Hasselt University, Belgium.
    Nilsson, Josef
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Persson, Maria
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Yoriyaz, Helio
    IPEN CNEN SP, Brazil.
    Verhaegen, Frank
    Maastricht University, Netherlands; McGill University, Canada.
    Dose specification for Ir-192 high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium2015In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 4565-4579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with Ir-192 is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-inmedium (D-m,D-m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D-w,D-m). The relation between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m for Ir-192 is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D-w,D-m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D-m,D-m, D-w,D-m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D-w,D-m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (less than1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D-w,D-m (SCT) and D-w,D-m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

  • 36.
    Quast, Ulrich
    et al.
    Ex University Hospital, Germany.
    Kaulich, Theodor W.
    University Hospital, Germany.
    Alvarez-Romero, Jose T.
    ININ, Mexico.
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enger, Shirin A.
    McGill University, Canada.
    Medich, David C.
    Worcester Polytech Institute, MA 01609 USA.
    Mourtada, Firas
    Helen F Graham Cancer Centre and Research Institute, DE 19713 USA.
    Perez-Calatayud, Jose
    University Hospital La Fe, Spain; Clin Benidorm, Spain.
    Rivard, Mark J.
    Tufts University, MA 02111 USA.
    Abu Zakaria, G.
    University of Cologne, Germany; Gono University, Bangladesh.
    A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry2016In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detectors response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) ((E) over bar), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, D-w, around BT sources. Materials and methods: While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT) ((E) over bar) = TPR1020((E) over bar) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT) ((E) over bar) = D-prim(r = 2 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees)/D-prim(r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, D-prim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. Results and discussion: For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT) ((E) over bar) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient (mu) over bar (E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons E-prim(eff)(r(0), theta(0)) at the TG-43 reference position P-ref (r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees) being close to the mean total photon energy (E) over bar (tot)(r(0), theta(0)). If one has calibrated detectors, published (E) over bar (tot)(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor k(Q, Q0)(BT) ((E) over bar, r, theta) for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q(0), the detectors response can be determined and D-w(r, theta) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. Conclusions: This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon` s penetration probability and scattering potential. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.

  • 37.
    Thomson, R M.
    et al.
    Carleton University, Canada .
    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Williamson, J F.
    Virginia Commonwealth University, VA USA .
    On the biological basis for competing macroscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage dosimetry: cellular dosimetry for brachytherapy and diagnostic radiology2013In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 1123-1150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this work is to investigate how alternative macroscopic dose descriptors track absorbed dose to biologically relevant subcellular targets via Monte Carlo (MC) analysis of cellular models for a variety of cancerous and normal soft tissues for kilovoltage radiation. The relative mass distributions of water, light inorganic elements, and protein components of nuclear and cytoplasm compartments for various tissues are determined from a literature review. These data are used to develop representative cell models to demonstrate the range of mass elemental compositions of these subcellular structures encountered in the literature from which radiological quantities (energy absorption and attenuation coefficients; stopping powers) are computed. Using representative models of cell clusters, doses to subcellular targets are computed using MC simulation for photon sources of energies between 20 and 370 keV and are compared to bulk medium dose descriptors. It is found that cells contain significant and varying mass fractions of protein and inorganic elements, leading to variations in mass energy absorption coefficients for cytoplasm and nuclear media as large as 10% compared to water for sub-50 keV photons. Doses to subcellular structures vary by as much as 23% compared to doses to the corresponding average bulk medium or to small water cavities embedded in the bulk medium. Relationships between cellular target doses and doses to the bulk medium or to a small water cavity embedded in the bulk medium are sensitive to source energy and cell morphology, particularly for lower energy sources, e. g., low energy brachytherapy (andlt;50 keV). Results suggest that cells in cancerous and normal soft tissues are generally not radiologically equivalent to either water or the corresponding average bulk tissue. For kilovoltage photon sources, neither dose to bulk medium nor dose to water quantitatively tracks energy imparted to biologically relevant subcellular targets for the range of cellular morphologies and tissues considered.

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