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  • 1.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mass customization: perspectives, applications and implications for a 'New Manufacturing Paradigm'2001Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Production systems for mass customization: bridging theory and practice2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's siruation of rapid technological change and globalization is forcing businesses throughout the world to dramatically rethink their approaches for commercial success. At the same time, customer demands for quickly delivered product variety at a reasonable price - even down to a lot size of one - is fast becoming the rule rather than exception in a number of markets and industries.

    In the literature, a number of popular manufacturing systems and their associated enablers are positioned as solutions for meeting the demands of this opportunistic yet challenging scenario of customized production. The literature has also showcased a number of ''best business practice" cases in the area of efficient yet flexible customercentric production - a combination often referred to as "mass customization" - but these empirical descriptions are relacively few and often lacking in detail. Despite the positioning of mass customization as the next great manufacturing paradigm to succeed mass production, and the abundance of theory concerning its characteriscics and virtues, the challenge of widespread mass customization realizacion remains. In practice, mass customization initiatives are often misguided, ad-hoc and/ or reaccive in nature, with many ending in failure.

    While possible explanacions for these failures are many, a lack of capability may not be the culprit. In fact, there have been numerous technological and methodological advances in recent years that could facilitate the realization of mass customizacion. Rather, the difficulty may lie in effectively utilizing and combining these many enablers in successful systems for customized produccion. Not surprisingly, there appears to be a void of relevant frameworks that might aid manufacturers in capitalizing on the application of these numerous, already available enablers for mass customizacion, a view supported by this research's review of mass customization-related frameworks in the literature. Given this siruacion, it is little wonder that the gap between the theory of mass customization and its successful praccice in industry remains a wide one.

    With the objective of bridging this gap, this research reflects on mass customization theory and best business practice descriptions while adding empirical data to the field through a number of case studies in Swedish industry. In the investigation of these cases, various theoretical tools from the literature are utilized for the purposes of data collection, analysis and presentation, and to illustrate any links between theory and practice. Observations from the case studies, along with various perspectives and reflections from the literature, are considered in the presentation of guiding principles behind, and requirements for, a new framework for the analysis and/ or design of a production system for mass customizacion. Previous work in this research can be seen as culminating not only in the discovery of the need for such a framework, but also as a primary source of empirical and theoretical informacion from which to draw in its initial development.

    List of papers
    1. Hyper-flexibility: a concept for a new dimension in system variability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyper-flexibility: a concept for a new dimension in system variability
    2000 (English)In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 31, p. 425-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a common for the evolving, multi-dimensional concept called 'hyper-dimensional' is proposed. The purpose of the paper is foremost to generate a discussion concerning advanced flexibility to meet today's advanced challenges, but also to present a working proposal for a common definition to the manufacturing community. In the paper, current manufacturing flexibility theory is reviewed, the origins and current usage of hyper-flexibility ate presented, and a common definition addressing several manufacturing flexibility dimensions is developed. The relation of the new concept to the manufacturing strategy of mass customization is also highlighted.

    Keywords
    flexibility, automatic, assembly
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35219 (URN)25785 (Local ID)25785 (Archive number)25785 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2013-01-24
    2. Enabling mass customization in the mobile telephone industry: agility, flexibility and the changing role of assembly at Erisson
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling mass customization in the mobile telephone industry: agility, flexibility and the changing role of assembly at Erisson
    2001 (English)In: Proceedings of the 34th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems, Athens, Greece: CIRP , 2001, p. 195-204Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results of an investigation conducted to explore the status of Mass Customization in the mobile telephone industry and its implications for assembly operations. The study focused on the manufacture of two representative mobile telephone models at Sweden's Ericsson. The findings include the level of variety and customization in each model, where in the value chain this differentiation was implemented, and how it was conceptually, methodologically and technologically enabled. The analysis, aided by several frameworks from the literature, points to a changing role for assembly in this industry, and suggests research direction to meet future customized manufacturing challenges.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Athens, Greece: CIRP, 2001
    Keywords
    Agile Manufacturing, Flexibility, Assembly
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35551 (URN)27530 (Local ID)27530 (Archive number)27530 (OAI)
    Conference
    34th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems, Athens, Greece 16-18th May 2001
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-03-26
    3. Towards the mass customization of mobile telephones: current strategy and scenarios for realization at Ericsson
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards the mass customization of mobile telephones: current strategy and scenarios for realization at Ericsson
    2001 (English)In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Production Research, 2001Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paradigm of Mass Production is being challenged in a number of industries where fragmented markets and the customer's desire for individualized products have become the norm. In the largest consumer electronics industry in the world, that of mobile telephones, manufacturers are well aware of these trends. Many of these same manufacturers are responding with Mass Customization, which has been defined as customized production at Mass Production efficiency and speed. This research, conducted at Ericsson Mobile Communications AB in Sweden, explores the implications of implementing a Mass Customization strategy for the production of mobile telephones. The paper begins with an objective presentation of Mass Customization, which lays the foundation for a discussion of the strategy's applicability at Ericsson and in the mobile telephone industry as a whole. The study focused on the past, present, and projected roles of customized production at the company, and investigated its potential for Mass Customization in the future. Two frameworks from the customized manufacturing literature guided the data collection and analysis in the case. Findings from the study point towards minimal, yet increasing customization at Ericsson, and highlight recent efforts towards the realization of increasingly customer-focused production there. The applicability of different Mass Customization scenarios for Ericsson and its industry is also discussed.

    Keywords
    manufacturing strategy, mass customization, mobile communications industry
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14109 (URN)
    Conference
    The 16th International Conference on Production Research, 29 July - 3 August, Prague, Czech Republic
    Available from: 2006-11-01 Created: 2006-11-01 Last updated: 2016-09-26
    4. From mass production to mass customization: enabling perspectives from the Swedish mobile telephone industry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>From mass production to mass customization: enabling perspectives from the Swedish mobile telephone industry
    2004 (English)In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 362-372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Much has been written about the conceptual nature of mass customization, and the success of several best business practitioners in the area have been well documented. Most companies, however, are not textbook examples of best practice, but rather are making incremental progress towards mass customization based on a mass-production heritage. This paper presents the findings of a case study that investigated a mass customization initiative at a leading mobile telephone manufacturer in Sweden. The primary objective of the study was to determine the implications of a radically new manufacturing initiative for the company – the production of a customized, entry-level mobile telephone. The differences between the traditional scenario of the mass production of standardized products at the company and that of the new customized production were also sought. The findings of the study, which are presented using the product, process and system perspectives, are aided by a number of customization-related frameworks from the literature. The discussion includes the impact of moving the customization order point downstream in the value chain in terms of increased efficiency and reduced lead times, the reduced requirement for manufacturing flexibility with shifting production system boundaries, and the company's status as a mass customizer.

    Keywords
    mass customization, strategy, product design, process design, system design, case studies
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14111 (URN)10.1080/0953728042000238836 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-11-01 Created: 2006-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    5. Enabling mass customization through customer elicitation and concurrent engineering: reflections from a brest practice case in Swedish industry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enabling mass customization through customer elicitation and concurrent engineering: reflections from a brest practice case in Swedish industry
    2003 (English)In: Proceedings of the 19th ISPE Internationa Conference on Concurrent Engineering: Reasearch and Application / [ed] J. Cha, R. Jardim-Goncalves, A. Steiger-Garcão, 2003, p. 1109-1118Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements and so-called enablers for the realization of mass customization have been increasingly discussed and categorized in the literature, in tact with the concept's phenomenal rise in popularity since the early 1990s. The requirement for effective customer elicitation, and corresponding technological enablers like product configuration applications, are two such high-profile examples. Another, albeit much less obvious requirement, is the use of concurrent engineering in support of mass customization. In this paper, a case from Swedish industry is described which illustrates one company's industry-leading approach to both customer elicitation and concurrent engineering, and also how the company combines the two to achieve competitive advantage as a mass customizer. The analysis also compares this best practice case, describing "how it is done", to theoretical foundations describing ''how it could be done" - with surprising results.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87848 (URN)
    Conference
    The 10th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering: Research and Applications, 26-30 July 2003, Madeira, Portugal
    Available from: 2013-01-24 Created: 2013-01-24 Last updated: 2013-01-24
    6. Coordination in collaborative manufacturing mega-networks: a case study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coordination in collaborative manufacturing mega-networks: a case study
    2005 (English)In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 226-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative manufacturing networks are becoming popular. Today, the scale of these networks can be enormous, and include a complex myriad of partners from numerous companies and organizations spanning several countries and even continents. This paper explores how these partners successfully coordinate projects through an investigation of one such “collaborative manufacturing mega-network” or CMMN in the commercial aerospace industry. The case is analyzed with the aid of the literary state-of-the-art, and a number of organizational, structural, and cultural issues are discussed including mass customization. Finally, some of the most important factors for the successful CMMN are presented.

    Keywords
    Collaborative manufacturing, Collaborative networks, Commercial aerospace industry, Mass customization
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14115 (URN)10.1016/j.jengtecman.2005.06.005 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-11-01 Created: 2006-11-01 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    7. Beyond 'Read a plant - fast' (for lean): read an enterprise for mass customization
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond 'Read a plant - fast' (for lean): read an enterprise for mass customization
    2003 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd Interdisciplinary World Congress on Mass Customization and Personalization, 2003Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a preliminary tool is presented for use in the analysis of the mass customization situation at an enterprise. The new tool is a modification and expansion of an existing lean manufacturing tool called the Rapid Plant Assessment (RPA). To do so, the relationship between lean manufacturing and mass customization is first discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between the two manufacturing strategies. Next, a review of existing tools for lean production and mass customization is made, with a focus on a popular RPA lean manufacturing tool, which is described in detail in “Read a Plant – Fast” (Goodson, 2002). Following this, the requirements for a modified and expanded tool are suggested, leading to the initial development of what the authors call “Read an Enterprise for Mass Customization” (REMC). The REMC is then applied to a number of cases in Swedish industry, and the results of this application are presented. The ensuing discussion includes the applicability of the tool in practice and the benefits of such a tool for industry. Finally, suggestions are made for the further development of the tool and its continued utilization in industrial settings.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87849 (URN)
    Conference
    The 2nd Interdisciplinary World Congress on Mass Customization and Personalization, 6-8 October, 2003, Munich, Germany
    Available from: 2013-01-24 Created: 2013-01-24 Last updated: 2013-01-24
  • 3.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bröte, Staffan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Beyond 'Read a plant - fast' (for lean): read an enterprise for mass customization2003In: Proceedings of the 2nd Interdisciplinary World Congress on Mass Customization and Personalization, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a preliminary tool is presented for use in the analysis of the mass customization situation at an enterprise. The new tool is a modification and expansion of an existing lean manufacturing tool called the Rapid Plant Assessment (RPA). To do so, the relationship between lean manufacturing and mass customization is first discussed in terms of the similarities and differences between the two manufacturing strategies. Next, a review of existing tools for lean production and mass customization is made, with a focus on a popular RPA lean manufacturing tool, which is described in detail in “Read a Plant – Fast” (Goodson, 2002). Following this, the requirements for a modified and expanded tool are suggested, leading to the initial development of what the authors call “Read an Enterprise for Mass Customization” (REMC). The REMC is then applied to a number of cases in Swedish industry, and the results of this application are presented. The ensuing discussion includes the applicability of the tool in practice and the benefits of such a tool for industry. Finally, suggestions are made for the further development of the tool and its continued utilization in industrial settings.

  • 4.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bröte, Staffan
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Enabling mass customization through customer elicitation and concurrent engineering: reflections from a brest practice case in Swedish industry2003In: Proceedings of the 19th ISPE Internationa Conference on Concurrent Engineering: Reasearch and Application / [ed] J. Cha, R. Jardim-Goncalves, A. Steiger-Garcão, 2003, p. 1109-1118Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Requirements and so-called enablers for the realization of mass customization have been increasingly discussed and categorized in the literature, in tact with the concept's phenomenal rise in popularity since the early 1990s. The requirement for effective customer elicitation, and corresponding technological enablers like product configuration applications, are two such high-profile examples. Another, albeit much less obvious requirement, is the use of concurrent engineering in support of mass customization. In this paper, a case from Swedish industry is described which illustrates one company's industry-leading approach to both customer elicitation and concurrent engineering, and also how the company combines the two to achieve competitive advantage as a mass customizer. The analysis also compares this best practice case, describing "how it is done", to theoretical foundations describing ''how it could be done" - with surprising results.

  • 5.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards the mass customization of mobile telephones: current strategy and scenarios for realization at Ericsson2001In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Production Research, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paradigm of Mass Production is being challenged in a number of industries where fragmented markets and the customer's desire for individualized products have become the norm. In the largest consumer electronics industry in the world, that of mobile telephones, manufacturers are well aware of these trends. Many of these same manufacturers are responding with Mass Customization, which has been defined as customized production at Mass Production efficiency and speed. This research, conducted at Ericsson Mobile Communications AB in Sweden, explores the implications of implementing a Mass Customization strategy for the production of mobile telephones. The paper begins with an objective presentation of Mass Customization, which lays the foundation for a discussion of the strategy's applicability at Ericsson and in the mobile telephone industry as a whole. The study focused on the past, present, and projected roles of customized production at the company, and investigated its potential for Mass Customization in the future. Two frameworks from the customized manufacturing literature guided the data collection and analysis in the case. Findings from the study point towards minimal, yet increasing customization at Ericsson, and highlight recent efforts towards the realization of increasingly customer-focused production there. The applicability of different Mass Customization scenarios for Ericsson and its industry is also discussed.

  • 6.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Kihlman, Henrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Winroth, Mats
    Jönköpings tekniska högskola.
    Project Course within Assembly-NET2002Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winroth, Mats
    Department of Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    From mass production to mass customization: enabling perspectives from the Swedish mobile telephone industry2004In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 362-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much has been written about the conceptual nature of mass customization, and the success of several best business practitioners in the area have been well documented. Most companies, however, are not textbook examples of best practice, but rather are making incremental progress towards mass customization based on a mass-production heritage. This paper presents the findings of a case study that investigated a mass customization initiative at a leading mobile telephone manufacturer in Sweden. The primary objective of the study was to determine the implications of a radically new manufacturing initiative for the company – the production of a customized, entry-level mobile telephone. The differences between the traditional scenario of the mass production of standardized products at the company and that of the new customized production were also sought. The findings of the study, which are presented using the product, process and system perspectives, are aided by a number of customization-related frameworks from the literature. The discussion includes the impact of moving the customization order point downstream in the value chain in terms of increased efficiency and reduced lead times, the reduced requirement for manufacturing flexibility with shifting production system boundaries, and the company's status as a mass customizer.

  • 8.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hyper-flexibility: a concept for a new dimension in system variability2000In: CIRP - Journal of Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 31, p. 425-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a common for the evolving, multi-dimensional concept called 'hyper-dimensional' is proposed. The purpose of the paper is foremost to generate a discussion concerning advanced flexibility to meet today's advanced challenges, but also to present a working proposal for a common definition to the manufacturing community. In the paper, current manufacturing flexibility theory is reviewed, the origins and current usage of hyper-flexibility ate presented, and a common definition addressing several manufacturing flexibility dimensions is developed. The relation of the new concept to the manufacturing strategy of mass customization is also highlighted.

  • 9.
    Comstock, Mica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winroth, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enabling mass customization in the mobile telephone industry: agility, flexibility and the changing role of assembly at Erisson2001In: Proceedings of the 34th CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems, Athens, Greece: CIRP , 2001, p. 195-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results of an investigation conducted to explore the status of Mass Customization in the mobile telephone industry and its implications for assembly operations. The study focused on the manufacture of two representative mobile telephone models at Sweden's Ericsson. The findings include the level of variety and customization in each model, where in the value chain this differentiation was implemented, and how it was conceptually, methodologically and technologically enabled. The analysis, aided by several frameworks from the literature, points to a changing role for assembly in this industry, and suggests research direction to meet future customized manufacturing challenges.

  • 10.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winroth, Mats
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Jönköping University, School of Engineering, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Coordination in collaborative manufacturing mega-networks: a case study2005In: Journal of engineering and technology management, ISSN 0923-4748, E-ISSN 1879-1719, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 226-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative manufacturing networks are becoming popular. Today, the scale of these networks can be enormous, and include a complex myriad of partners from numerous companies and organizations spanning several countries and even continents. This paper explores how these partners successfully coordinate projects through an investigation of one such “collaborative manufacturing mega-network” or CMMN in the commercial aerospace industry. The case is analyzed with the aid of the literary state-of-the-art, and a number of organizational, structural, and cultural issues are discussed including mass customization. Finally, some of the most important factors for the successful CMMN are presented.

  • 11. Sakao, T
    et al.
    Shimomura, Y
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    A Method of Value Customization2006In: Intl Design Conference - Design 2006,2006, 2006, p. 339-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Tech Univ Darmstadt, Inst Prod Dev & Machine Elements Pmd, D-64289 Darmstadt, Germany.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Tokyo Metropolitan Univ, Dept Syst Design, Tokyo 1920397, Japan.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    A Method of Value Customization2007In: Strojarstvo, ISSN 0562-1887, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents a method of value customization based on the modelling and design methods of Service Engineering. This aims at increasing satisfaction levels of customers. The method remarkably addresses what customized means depending on the customers desire, while many theories and practices on customization have dealt only with how. Some design operations of the method are explained using an actual redesign of an existing industrial service in a hotel industry. This will be effective for designing products or services whose value varies from one customer to another. Furthermore, the value is expected to be a more important concept to be designed according to recent development of products and services for market individualisation servicification in industries.

  • 13.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Mitsubishi Research Institute.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Tokyo Metropolitan University.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Service Engineering for Value Customization2005In: Interdisciplinary World Congress on Mass Customization and Personalization,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Institute for Product Development and Machine Elements, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt, Germany.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Department of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modeling design objects in CAD system for Service/Product Engineering2009In: Computer-Aided Design, ISSN 0010-4485, E-ISSN 1879-2685, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 197-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a new type of service CAD system utilized in Service/Product Engineering (SPE), a much-needed and novel engineering discipline within the background of servicification. In this research a design-object model was defined, and a prototype named Service Explorer was implemented. The model represents critical concepts such as value, costs, functions either of products or of service activities, and entities. Through its application to business cases such as selling washing machines, providing pay-per-wash service, and cleaning washing machines, the Service Explorer was proven to support designers as they describe and operate design objects. In the future we expect that the Service Explorer can help designers with generating new ideas.

  • 15.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Department of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Achieving mass customisation through servicification2009In: International Journal of Internet Manufacturing and Services, ISSN 1751-6048, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 56-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies face many challenges today, one of theseis how to successfully meet increasingly diverse customer needs. This could beachieved through customisation. This paper elucidates how mass customisation could be enabled by companies adding more services to their customised products. This ‘servicification’ of products is made available by integratedproduct service engineering. This paper also describes how products and services can be developed in coherence through an integrated product service engineering approach. Furthermore, a software supporting this approach along with customisation named Service Explorer is described. This paper presents acase study of a forklift truck manufacturer called Toyota Material Handling Group (TMHG). TMHG customise their product/service offerings and by doing so they can offer its customers increased value than only selling standard forklift trucks. TMHG has managed to create successful customised offerings for its customers. However, with a more integrated development, TMHG could become even more successful.

  • 16.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Comstock, Mica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Shimomura, Yoshiki
    Tokyo Metropolitan University.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Mitsubishi Research Institute.
    Integrated Product and Service Engineering Enabling Mass Customization2007In: International Conference on Production Research,2007, 2007, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing companies face many challenges today. One of these is how to successfully meet increasingly diverse customer needs. This paper elucidates, from several perspectives, how mass customization could be enabled using integrated product and service engineering. BT Products AB (BT) produces forklift trucks in Sweden that are customized and sold through various kinds of product offerings, which are also customer-tailored. By doing so, BT can offer their customers increased value through customized product service offerings. This paper shows, through a case study at BT, how the customization issues are tackled by the company. Though the development of products and services is conducted in separate organizations at BT, the company has managed to create successful customized offerings for its customers. However, with a more integrated development BT could become even more successful in its customer offerings.

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