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  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nettelblad, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Versatility of the Extensor Digitorum Brevis Muscle Flap in Lower Limb Reconstruction2018In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – Global Open, E-ISSN 2169-7574, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e2071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reconstruction of complex defects in the lower leg is a challenge. Although microvascular free tissue transfer is a popular technique, experience and available resources limit its use. Furthermore, free tissue transfer is not always required in the reconstruction of small lower leg defects, as many of them can be reconstructed with local alternatives such as an extensor digitorum brevis flap (EDB). Our aim was to describe our experience of the last 20 years with the EDB as a local muscle flap to cover small complex lower leg defects to establish its clinical feasibility and to document its associated complications. Methods: All adult patients who were operated with EDB flap reconstruction of the lower limb during 1997–2017 at the Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linköping University Hospital, were included in this retrospective study. Results: Of 64 patients operated, only 7 had total flap failure, and the rate of complete success was 73% (47/64). Most of the skin defects were associated with fractures or complications thereof and were located in the ankle region, the dorsum of the foot, and the distal third of tibia or even the proximal tibia. Defects in the malleolar region and coexisting cardiovascular condition were factors associated with flap loss (either partial or total). Conclusion: The pedicled EDB-flap has, in our hands, proved to be a versatile and safe reconstructive option in the reconstruction of small defects in the lower leg and foot. Long-time follow-up is, however, recommended. 

  • 5.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Use of the burn intervention score to calculate the charges of the care of burns2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To our knowledge this is the first published estimate of the charges of the care of burns in Sweden. The Linköping Burn Interventional Score has been used to calculate the charges for each burned patient since 1993. The treatment of burns is versatile, and depends on the depth and extension of the burn. This requires a flexible system to detect the actual differences in the care provided. We aimed to describe the model of burn care that we used to calculate the charges incurred during the acute phase until discharge, so it could be reproduced and applied in other burn centres, which would facilitate a future objective comparison of the expenses in burn care. Methods All patients admitted with burns during the period 2010–15 were included. We analysed clinical and economic data from the daily burn scores during the acute phase of the burn until discharge from the burn centre. Results Total median charge/patient was US$ 28 199 (10th–90th centiles 4668-197 781) for 696 patients admitted. Burns caused by hot objects and electricity resulted in the highest charges/TBSA%, while charges/day were similar for the different causes of injury. Flame burns resulted in the highest mean charges/admission, probably because they had the longest duration of stay. Mean charges/patient increased in a linear fashion among the different age groups. Conclusion Our intervention-based estimate of charges has proved to be a valid tool that is sensitive to the procedures that drive the costs of the care of burns such as large TBSA%, intensive care, and operations. The burn score system could be reproduced easily in other burn centres worldwide and facilitate the comparison regardless of the differences in the currency and the economic circumstances.

  • 7.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Surg Dept, Plast Surg Unit, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 1222-1230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 8.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

    Method

    All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

    Results

    Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

    Conclusion

    These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

  • 9.
    Backstrom, D.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Al-Ayoubi, Fawzi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Outcome of trauma patients2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 902-903Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiac dysfunction after burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

  • 11.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula2009In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Parkland formula (2-4 mL/kg/burned area of total body surface area %) with urine output and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as endpoints; for the fluid resuscitation in burns is recommended all over the world. There has recently been a discussion on whether central circulatory endpoints should be used instead, and also whether volumes of fluid should be larger. Despite this, there are few central hemodynamic data available in the literature about the results when the formula is used correctly.

    Methods: Ten burned patients, admitted to our unit early, and with a burned area of >20% of total body sur-face area were investigated at 12, 24, and 36 hours after injury. Using transesophageal echocardiography, pulmonary artery catheterization, and transpulmonary thermodilution to monitor them, we evaluated the cardiovascular coupling when urinary output and MAP were used as endpoints.

    Results: Oxygen transport variables, heart rate, MAP, and left ventricular fractional area, did not change significantly during fluid resuscitation. Left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic area and global end-diastolic volume index increased from subnormal values at 12 hours to normal ranges at 24 hours after the burn. Extravascular lung intrathoracal blood volume ratio was increased 12 hours after the burn.

    Conclusions: Preload variables, global systolic function, and oxygen transport recorded simultaneously by three separate methods showed no need to increase the total fluid volume within 36 hours of a major burn. Early (12 hours) signs of central circulatory hypovolemia, however, support more rapid infusion of fluid at the beginning of treatment.

  • 12.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree.

    Methods: Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23–48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol.

    Results: Left ventricular stroke volume [86 ± 13 to 75 ± 9 mL (mean ± SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 ± 4.4 to 16.8 ± 4.3 cm2) declined (P < 0.05), and showed a linear, negative dose–response relationship to increasing arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change.

    Conclusion: There is a linear dose–response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

  • 13.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Deaths caused by injury among people of working age (18-64) are decreasing, while those among older people (64+) are increasing2018In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 589-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury is an important cause of death in all age groups worldwide, and contributes to many losses of human and economic resources. Currently, we know a few data about mortality from injury, particularly among the working population. The aim of the present study was to examine death from injury over a period of 14 years (1999-2012) using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the National Patient Registry, which have complete national coverage.

    METHOD: CDR was used to identify injury-related deaths among adults (18 years or over) during the years 1999-2012. ICD-10 diagnoses from V01 to X39 were included. The significance of changes over time was analyzed by linear regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of prehospital death decreased significantly (coefficient -0.22, r (2) = 0.30; p = 0.041) during the study period, while that of deaths in hospital increased significantly (coefficient 0.20, r (2) = 0.75; p < 0.001). Mortality/100,000 person-years in the working age group (18-64 years) decreased significantly (coefficient -0.40, r (2) = 0.37; p = 0.020), mainly as a result of decrease in traffic-related deaths (coefficient -0.34, r (2) = 0.85; p < 0.001). The incidence of deaths from injury among elderly (65 years and older) patients increased because of the increase in falls (coefficient 1.71, r (2) = 0.84; p < 0.001) and poisoning (coefficient 0.13, r (2) = 0.69; p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The epidemiology of injury in Sweden has changed during recent years in that mortality from injury has declined in the working age group and increased among those people 64 years old and over.

  • 14.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Change in child mortality patterns after injuries in Sweden: a nationwide 14-year study.2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sweden has one of the world's lowest child injury mortality rates, but injuries are still the leading cause of death among children. Child injury mortality in the country has been declining, but this decline seems to decrease recently. Our objective was therefore to further examine changes in the mortality of children's death from injury over time and to assess the contribution of various effects on mortality. The underlying hypothesis for this investigation is that the incidence of lethal injuries in children, still is decreasing and that this may be sex specific.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied all deaths from injury in Sweden under-18-year-olds during the 14 years 1999-2012. We identified those aged under 18 whose underlying cause of death was recorded as International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis from V01 to X39 in the Swedish cause of death, where all dead citizens are registered.

    RESULTS: From the 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2012, 1213 children under the age of 18 died of injuries in Sweden. The incidence declined during this period (r = -0.606, p = 0.02) to 3.3 deaths/100,000 children-years (95 % CI 2.6-4.2). Death from unintentional injury was more common than that after intentional injury (p < 0.0001). There was a reduction in the incidence of unintentional injuries during the study period (r = -0.757, p = 0.03). The most common causes of death were injury to the brain (n = 337, 41 %), followed by drowning (n = 109, 13 %). The number of deaths after intentional injury increased (r = 0.585, p = 0.03) and at the end of the period was 1.5 deaths/100,000 children-years. The most common causes of death after intentional injuries were asphyxia (n = 177, 45 %), followed by injury to the brain (n = 76, 19 %).

    DISCUSSION: Mortality patterns in injured children in Sweden have changed from being dominated by unintentional injuries to a more equal distribution between unintentional and intentional injuries as well as between sexes and the overall rate has declined further. These findings are important as they might contribute to the preventive work that is being done to further reduce mortality in injured children.

  • 15.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 798-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common type of burn injury in children, and the initial evaluation of burn depth is a problem. Early identification of deep dermal areas that need excision and grafting would save unnecessary visits and stays in hospital. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows promise for the evaluation of this type of burn. The aim of this study was to find out whether perfusion measured with LSCI has an influence on the decision for operation, duration of healing and care period, and costs, in children with scalds.

    Methods

    We studied a group of children with scalds whose wounds were evaluated with LSCI on day 3–4 after injury during the period 2012–2015. Regression (adjustment for percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), age, and sex) was used to analyse the significance of associations between degree of perfusion and clinical outcome.

    Results

    We studied 33 children with a mean TBSA% of 6.0 (95% CI 4.4–7.7)%. Lower perfusion values were associated with operation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.86, 95% CI 0.73–1.00). The perfusion cut-off with 100% specificity for not undergoing an operation was ≥191 PU units (66.7% sensitivity and 72.7% accurately classified). Multivariable analyses showed that perfusion was independently associated with duration of healing and care period.

    Conclusion

    Lower perfusion values, as measured with LSCI, are associated with longer healing time and longer care period. By earlier identification of burns that will be operated, perfusion measurements may further decrease the duration of care of burns in children with scalds.

  • 16.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 772-773Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

  • 18.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 19.
    El-Serafi, Ahmed T.
    et al.
    Sharjah Institute for Medical Research and College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, UAE(a); Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    El-Serafi, Ibrahim T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Division of Experimental Cancer Medicine, Faculty of MDepartment of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Skin regeneration in three dimensions, current status, challenges and opportunities2017In: Differentiation, ISSN 0301-4681, E-ISSN 1432-0436, Vol. 96, p. 4p. 26-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin regeneration is a life-saving need for many patients, whom list is stretched from burn victims to motor-car accidents. Spraying cells, either keratinocytes or stem cells, were associated with variable results and, in many cases, unfavorable outcomes. As the spatial configuration of the skin is distinctive, many trials investigated the bio-printing or the construction of three dimensional skin models where different layers of the skin were preserved. Although some of these models showed the histological configuration of the skin, their acceptance by the wound was questionable as a consequence of delayed vascularization. In this mini-review, different models for three dimensional regeneration of the skin will be discussed with their main points of strength and challenges as well as their possible opportunities.

  • 20.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Department Clin Science, Div Infect Med, Lund, Sweden .
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Department Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sjoberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Dynamics of leucocytes correlate with increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio early after major burns2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The lung is affected soon after a major burn as indicated by a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio. The exact mechanism underlying this is not known. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) are activated systemically and their numbers are largely increased soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal numbers within 24 hours, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data have supported the hypothesis that an important target for this extravasation is the lungs. Other studies also show that when PMN adhere to endothelial cells they increase vascular permeability, and this effect is mediated, at least in part, by release of heparin binding protein (HBP, also known as CAP-37 and azurocidin). We hypothesised that there is a relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratio and the dynamic change in blood leucocytes after a burn, possibly mediated by the local release of HBP.

    Material and methods: This is a prospective, descriptive, exploratory, singlecentre study at a national burn centre. We investigated the dynamic changes of leucocytes in blood, plasma concentrations of HBP, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO2 ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (20% >total burn surface area %).

    Results: Median total burn surface area was 40% (IQR 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (<24 hours) alteration in circulating white blood cell count and both early increased vascular permeability in the lung (r=0.63, p=0.004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO2 < 27 kPa (p=0.004). There were no associations between plasma concentrations of HBP and measured pulmonary vascular permeability or PaO2:FiO2 ratios.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that trapping of leucocytes in the lung may be an important factor in early increased pulmonary vascular permeability and decrease of the PaO2:FiO2 ratio. Our data do not support the idea that HBP, assessed by systemic plasma concentrations, mediate this effect.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Herwald, Heiko
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Lindbom, Lennart
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Alteration of Leukocyte Count Correlates With Increased Pulmonary Vascular Permeability and Decreased PaO2:FiO(2) Ratio Early After Major Burns2015In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 484-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leukocytes are activated systemically and their numbers increase soon after a burn followed by a rapid decline to low normal or subnormal levels, possibly by increased extravasation. Experimental data support that an important target for such extravasation is the lungs and that leukocytes when they adhere to endothelial cells cause an increase in vascular permeability. The authors investigated a possible relation between early increased pulmonary vascular permeability or a decreased PaO2:FiO(2) ratio and the dynamic change in concentration of blood leukocytes after a burn. This is a prospective, exploratory, single-center study. The authors measured the dynamic changes of leukocytes in blood starting early after the burn, pulmonary vascular permeability index by thermodilution, and PaO2:FiO(2)-ratios in 20 patients during the first 21 days after a major burn (greater than20% TBSA%). Median TBSA was 40% interquartile range (IQR, 25-52) and full thickness burn 28% (IQR, 2-39). There was a correlation between the early (less than24 hours) alteration in white blood cell count and both early increased pulmonary vascular permeability (r = .63, P = .004) and the decreased oxygenation index defined as PaO2:FiO(2) less than 27 kPa (P = .004). The authors have documented a correlation between dynamic change of blood leukocytes and pulmonary failure early after burns.

  • 22.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Scarring At Donor Sites After Split-Thickness Skin Graft: A Prospective, Longitudinal, Randomized Trial2018In: Advances in Skin & Wound Care, ISSN 1527-7941, E-ISSN 1538-8654, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate scarring at split-thickness skin graft donor sites 8 years after surgery.

    METHODS: At surgery, 67 patients were randomized to hydrofiber, polyurethane foam, or porcine xenograft treatment. Scars were evaluated with the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in observed scar outcomes at donor sites, leaving the polyurethane foam–treated and the porcine xenograft–treated patients with the least satisfying scars. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with the xenografts had worse scores for overall opinion of the scar than did the other groups (P = .03), the most important factor being pigmentation. There was no correlation between duration of healing time and quality of the scar.

    CONCLUSIONS: There were significant differences among the groups, with the hydrofiber group being the most satisfied with the appearance of their scar.

  • 23.
    Larsen, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Decreased risk adjusted 30-day mortality for hospital admitted injuries: a multi-centre longitudinal study2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interpretation of changes in injury-related mortality over time requires an understanding of changes in the incidence of the various types of injury, and adjustment for their severity. Our aim was to investigate changes over time in incidence of hospital admission for injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults, and to assess the risk-adjusted short-term mortality for these patients.less thanbr /greater thanMethods: All patients admitted to hospital with injuries caused by falls, traffic incidents, or assaults during the years 2001-11 in Sweden were identified from the nationwide population-based Patient Registry. The trend in mortality over time for each cause of injury was adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity and severity of injury as classified from the International Classification of diseases, version 10 Injury Severity Score (ICISS).less thanbr /greater thanResults: Both the incidence of fall (689 to 636/100000 inhabitants: p = 0.047, coefficient - 4.71) and traffic related injuries (169 to 123/100000 inhabitants: p less than 0.0001, coefficient - 5.37) decreased over time while incidence of assault related injuries remained essentially unchanged during the study period. There was an overall decrease in risk-adjusted 30-day mortality in all three groups (OR 1.00; CI95% 0.99-1.00). Decreases in traffic (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97) and assault (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.99) related injuries was significant whereas falls were not during this 11-year period.less thanbr /greater thanDiscussion: Risk-adjustment is a good way to use big materials to find epidemiological changes. However after adjusting for age, year, sex and risk we find that a possible factor is left in the pre- and/or in-hospital care.less thanbr /greater thanConclusions: The decrease in risk-adjusted mortality may suggest changes over time in pre- and/or in-hospital care. A non-significantdecrease in risk-adjusted mortality was registered for falls, which may indicate that low-energy trauma has not benefited for the increased survivability as much as high-energy trauma, ie traffic- and assault related injuries.

  • 24.
    Larsen, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Life Regiment Hussars, K3 Karlsborg, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Rolf, Gedeborg
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Female risk-adjusted survival advantage after injuries caused by falls, traffic or assault: a nationwide 11-year study2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A female survival advantage after injury has been observed, and animal models of trauma have suggested either hormonal or genetic mechanisms as component causes. Our aim was to compare age and riskadjusted sex-related mortality in hospital for the three most common mechanisms of injury in relation to hormonal effects as seen by age.

    Methods: All hospital admissions for injury in Sweden during the period 2001–2011 were retrieved from the National Patient Registry and linked to the Cause of Death Registry. The International Classification of Diseases Injury Severity Score (ICISS) was used to adjust for injury severity, and the Charlson Comorbidity Index to adjust for comorbidity. Age categories (0–14, 15–50, and ≥ 51 years) were used to represent pre-menarche, reproductive and post- menopausal women.

    Results: Women had overall a survival benefit (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.53) after adjustment for injury severity and comorbidity. A similar pattern was seen across the age categories (0–14 years OR 0.56 (95% CI 0.25 to 1.25), 15–50 years OR 0.70 (95% CI 0.57 to 0.87), and ≥ 51 years OR 0.49 (95% CI 0.48 to 0.51)).

    Conclusion: In this 11-year population-based study we found no support for an oestrogen-related mechanism to explain the survival advantage for females compared to males following hospitalisation for injury.

  • 25.
    Larsson Viksten, Jessica
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Children aged 0-16 admitted to Swedish intensive care units and paediatric intensive care units showed low mortality rates.2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study described the basic characteristics of children aged 0-16 years who were treated in intensive care units (ICUs) and paediatric ICUs (PICUs), compared their outcomes and examined any causes of death.

    METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of admissions to 74 ICUs and three PICUs in Sweden that were recorded in the Swedish Intensive Care Registry from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012.

    RESULTS: We retrieved data on 12 756 children who were admitted 17 003 times. The case mix differed between the ICUs, which were mainly admissions for injuries, accidents and observation, and PICUs, which were mainly admissions for malformations, genetic abnormalities and respiratory problems (p < 0.001). The median stays in the ICUs and PICUs were 1.4 and 3.5 days (p < 0.001), respectively. The respective crude mortality rates were 1.1% and 2.0, and the Paediatric Index of Mortality version 2 standardised mortality ratios were 0.43 and 0.50. None of these differences were significant. Most deaths were within 24 hours: About 57% in the ICUs, mainly from brain anomalies, and 13% in the PICUs, mainly from circulatory problems.

    CONCLUSION: Sweden had a low mortality rate in both ICUs and PICUs and the children admitted to these two types of unit differed.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Letter: Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation. Are studies always adequately powered and analyzed? Response2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 948-950Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Liköping University hospital.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients' preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 929-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient controlled sedation (PCS) enables patients to titrate doses of drugs by themselves during different procedures involving pain or discomfort. Methods: We studied it in a prospective crossover design using a fixed protocol without lockout time to examine it as an alternative method of sedation for changing dressings in burned patients. Eleven patients with >10% total burn surface area (TBSA) had their dressings changed, starting with sedation by an anaesthetist (ACS). The second dressing change was done with PCS (propofol/alfentanil) and the third time the patients had to choose ACS or PCS. During the procedures, data on cardiopulmonary variables, sedation (bispectral index), pain intensity (VAS), procedural details, doses of drugs, and patients' preferences were collected to compare the two sedation techniques. Results: The study data indicated that wound care in burned patients is feasible with a standardized PCS protocol. The patients preferred PCS to ACS on the basis of self-control, and because they had less discomfort during the recovery period. Wound care was also considered adequate by the staff during PCS. No respiratory (respiratory rate/transcutaneous PCO2) or cardiovascular (heart rate/blood pressure) adverse events were recorded at any time during any of the PCS procedures. The doses of propofol and alfentanil and BIS index decrease were less during PCS than ACS. Procedural pain was higher during PCS but lower after the procedure. Conclusion: We suggest that PCS using a standard protocol is an interesting alternative to anaesthetist-provided sedation during dressing changes. It seems effective, saves resources, is safe, and at same time is preferred by the patients. The strength of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small size of this investigation and therefore further studies are warranted. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 28.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Department of Surgery, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Are there any differences in the provided burn care between men and women? A retrospective study2018In: Burns & Trauma, E-ISSN 2321-3876, Vol. 6, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Disparity between medical treatment for men and women has been recorded worldwide. However, it is difficult to find out if the disparities in both the use of resources and outcome depend entirely on sex-related discrimination. Our aim was to investigate if there are differences in burn treatments between the sexes.

    Methods

    All patients admitted with burns to Linköping University Hospital during the 16-year period 2000–2015 were included. Interventions were prospectively recorded using the validated Burn SCoring system (BSC). Data were analysed using a multivariable panel regression model adjusted for age, percentage total body surface area (%TBSA), and in-hospital mortality.

    Results

    A total of 1363 patients were included, who generated a total of 22,301 daily recordings while they were inpatients. Males were 70% (930/1363). Sex was not an independent factor for daily scores after adjustment for age, %TBSA, and mortality in hospital (model R2=0.60, p < 0.001).

    Conclusion

    We found no evidence of inequity between the sexes in treatments given in our burn centre when we had adjusted for size of burn, age, and mortality. BSC seems to be an appropriate model in which to evaluate sex-related differences in the delivery of treatments.

  • 29.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

  • 30.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 31.
    Rakkolainen, Ilmari
    et al.
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Vuola, Jyrki
    Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki Burn Centre, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    N-Terminal Brain Natriuretic Peptide First Week After Burn Injury2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 805-810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    B-type natriuretic peptide has shown promising results as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in general intensive care patients. It may also indirectly reflect fluid balance of the circulation. Among burn patients, it has been observed to indicate excessive fluid resuscitation and organ dysfunction, although its clinical use to indicate acute kidney injury or guide fluid resuscitation has not been validated. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values are related to the amount of fluids given after severe burn injury and whether it can act as a novel biomarker for acute kidney injury in these patients. Nineteen consecutive burn patients were included. Plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide was measured daily during 1 week from admission. Other variables such as laboratory values and intravenous infusions were also recorded. The association between acute kidney injury and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values was analyzed with a multivariable panel regression model, adjusted for burned total body surface area, age, body mass index, and laboratory values. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values varied between single patients, and even more between the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Older age, lower body mass index, and cumulative infusions were independently associated with higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values, whereas acute kidney injury was not. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values correlated with cumulative infusions given during the first week. The authors could not validate the role of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in burns.

  • 32.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Microdialysis shows metabolic effects in skin during fluid resuscitation in burn-injured patients2006In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 10, no 6, p. Art.no: R172-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Established fluid treatment formulas for burn injuries have been challenged as studies have shown the presence of tissue hypoxia during standard resuscitation. Such findings suggest monitoring at the tissue level. This study was performed in patients with major burn injuries to evaluate the microdialysis technique for the continuous assessment of skin metabolic changes during fluid resuscitation and up to four days postburn. Methods: We conducted an experimental study in patients with a burn injury, as represented by percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA), of more than 25% in a university eight-bed burns intensive care unit serving about 3.5 million inhabitants. Six patients with a median TBSA percentage of 59% (range 33.5% to 90%) and nine healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous MD, in which recordings of glucose, pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and urea were performed. Results: Blood glucose concentration peaked on day two at 9.8 mmol/l (6.8 to 14.0) (median and range) and gradually declined on days three and four, whereas skin glucose in MD continued to increase throughout the study period with maximum values on day four, 8.7 mmol/l (4.9 to 11.0). Controls had significantly lower skin glucose values compared with burn patients, 3.1 mmol/l (1.5 to 4.6) (p < 0.001). Lactate from burn patients was significantly higher than controls in both injured and uninjured skin (MD), 4.6 mmol/l (1.3 to 8.9) and 3.8 mmol/l (1.6 to 7.5), respectively (p < 0.01). The skin lactate/pyruvate ratio (MD) was significantly increased in burn patients on all days (p < 0.001). Skin glycerol (MD) was significantly increased at days three and four in burn patients compared with controls (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite a strategy that fulfilled conventional goals for resuscitation, there were increased lactate/pyruvate ratios, indicative of local acidosis. A corresponding finding was not recorded systemically. We conclude that MD is a promising tool for depicting local metabolic processes that are not fully appreciated when examined systemically. Because the local response in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate metabolism seems to differ from that recorded systemically, this technique may offer a new method of monitoring organs. © 2006 Samuelsson et al., licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 33.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Bäckström, Denise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Könsperspektiv på traumatologin - män skadar sig oftare och blir sjukare av ett fysiskt trauma2010In: Genus och kön inom medicin- och vårdutbildningar / [ed] Barbro Wijma, Goldina Smirthwaite och Katarina Swahnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2010, 1, p. 416-426Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kvinnor och män är delvis lika, delvis olika. Det innebär att kvinnor och män både har behov av likadan behandling och av behandling som är anpassad till det egna könets förutsättningar. Denna antologi belyser kvinnors och mäns förutsättningar och behov inom en rad olika medicinska områden och tar upp både biologiska och sociala faktorer som påverkar hälsa och behandling. Den behandlar även den roll som kön spelar inom vårdens arbetsliv samt hur köns- och genusperspektiv kan integreras inom olika typer av medicin- och vårdutbildningar. Ett av bokens teman är våld, kränkningar och diskriminering, och inom ramen för detta behandlas några av de olika maktordningar som kommer till uttryck vid behandlingar inom hälso- och sjukvården. Antologin har en stor spännvidd när det gäller ämnen och författare. Förhoppningsvis ska den bredd som antologin uppvisar, leda fram till frågeställningar där läsaren utmanar sina förgivettaganden inom både genusvetenskap och mer traditionell medicin samt väcka nya frågor: Om könet snarare ses som en konstruktion än en fysisk realitet - kan då kvinnor lika gärna äta mediciner som är utprovade på män och opereras med metoder och verktyg anpassade till mäns fysiologi? Å andra sidan - hur objektiv är den naturvetenskapligt inriktade medicinska forskningen egentligen om man börjar granska den utifrån frågeställningar om perspektivval och genus? Antologin vänder sig till lärare på utbildningar inom medicin, hälsa och vård. Andra målgrupper är studenter på sådana utbildningar, vårdpersonal och en intresserad allmänhet.

  • 34.
    Skog, Mårten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sivlér, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    The Effect of Enzymatic Digestion on Cultured Epithelial Autografts2019In: Cell Transplantation, ISSN 0963-6897, E-ISSN 1555-3892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Severe burns are often treated by means of autologous skin grafts, preferably following early excision of the burnt tissue. In the case of, for example, a large surface trauma, autologous skin cells can be expanded in vitro prior to transplantation to facilitate the treatment when insufficient uninjured skin is a limitation. In this study we have analyzed the impact of the enzyme (trypsin or accutase) used for cell dissociation and the incubation time on cell viability and expansion potential, as well as expression of cell surface markers indicative of stemness. Skin was collected from five individuals undergoing abdominal reduction surgery and the epidermal compartment was digested in either trypsin or accutase. Trypsin generally generated more cells than accutase and with higher viability; however, after 7 days of subsequent culture, accutase-digested samples tended to have a higher cell count than trypsin, although the differences were not significant. No significant difference was found between the enzymes in median fluorescence intensity of the analyzed stem cell markers; however, accutase digestion generated significantly higher levels of CD117- and CD49f-positive cells, but only in the 5 h digestion group. In conclusion, digestion time appeared to affect the isolated cells more than the choice of enzyme.

  • 35.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Brännskadad2005In: Sjukdomsvärldar: om människors erfarenhet av kroppslig ohälsa / [ed] Bengt Richt och Gunilla Tegern, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2005, p. 197-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En stor andel av befolkningen i de västerländska samhällena och en växande andel världen över lever med långvarig kroppslig ohälsa. Den utbredda förekomsten har en djupgående påverkan på sättet att leva, både bland de redan sjuka och bland dem som är friska. Kunskap om den kroppsliga ohälsans personliga, sociala och kulturella dimensioner är därför av grundläggande betydelse för förståelsen av tendenser och processer i samtiden. Boken bygger på berättelser från personer som själva lever med olika former av långvarig och ibland svår kroppslig ohälsa. Några kapitel är rättframt rapporterande, medan andra ansluter till sådana förståelseramar som fenomenologi, symbolisk interaktionism och analytisk filosofi. Texten ansluter sig till den internationella vetenskapliga tradition som under senare tid har försökt ge den levda erfarenheten av ohälsa ett språk och en röst, i opposition mot eller som komplement till ett rent biomedicinskt perspektiv. Den är utpräglat tvärvetenskaplig och skriven av personer med olika ämnesbakgrund, alltifrån omvårdnadsvetenskap, filosofi, sociologi och pedagogik till sjukgymnastik och arbetsterapi. Sjukdomsvärldar vänder sig till alla med intresse för vad det kan innebära att leva med kroppslig ohälsa i vardagslivet och för hur de möjliga innebörderna formas av mer övergripande sociala och kulturella omständigheter. Den tvärvetenskapliga inriktningen gör boken väl användbar på såväl olika vårdutbildningar som kurser i både samhällsvetenskap och humaniora.

  • 36.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Organ dysfunction among patients with major burns2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of patients who are admitted for in-hospital care in Sweden because of burns is about 12/100,000, and only a small proportion of these have larger burns. Among them, and particularly among those who die in hospital, a condition referred to as “organ dysfunction” is common and an important factor in morbidity and mortality. The fact that the time of the initial event is known, and the magnitude of the insult is quantifiable, makes the burned patient ideal to be studied. In this doctoral thesis organ dysfunction and mortality were studied in a descriptive, prospective, exploratory study (no interventions or control groups) in patients admitted consecutively to a national burn centre in Sweden.

    The respiratory dysfunction that is seen after burns was found to be equally often the result of acute respiratory distress syndrome and inhalation injury. We found little support for the idea that this early dysfunction is caused by pneumonia, ventilator-induced lung injury, or sepsis. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was also common, and mortality was associated with severity. Importantly, renal dysfunction recovered among the patients who survived. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome developed before the onset of AKI. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor for AKI in 48% of 31 patients; but we could find no support for the idea that late AKI was mainly associated with sepsis. We found that older age (over 60 years), greater TBSA%, and respiratory dysfunction were associated with increased mortality, but there was no association between the overall mortality and sex. We also found that early transient liver dysfunction was common, and recorded early hepatic “hyper”- function among many young adults. Persistent low values indicating severe liver dysfunction were found among patients who eventually died.

    We conclude from this investigation that overall organ dysfunction is an early and common phenomenon among patients with severe burns. Our data suggest that the prognosis of organ dysfunction among these patients is good, and function recovers among most survivors. Multiple organ failure was, however, the main cause of death. The findings of the early onset in respiratory dysfunction and a delay in signs of sepsis are congruous with the gutlymphatic hypothesis for the development of organ dysfunction, and the idea of the lung as an inflammatory engine for its progression. We think that the early onset favours a syndrome in which organ dysfunction is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis.

    Our data further suggest that clinical strategies to improve burn care further should be focused on early interventions, interesting examples of which include: selective decontamination of the gastrointestinal tract to prevent translocation of gut-derived toxic and inflammatory factors; optimisation of fluid replacement during the first 8 hours after injury by goal-directed resuscitation; and possible improvement in the fluid treatment given before admission.

    List of papers
    1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns
    2008 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

    Keywords
    Burns, Inflammation, Leukocytes, Organ dysfunction, Permeability, Viscoelastic properties
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43096 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2007.10.007 (DOI)71559 (Local ID)71559 (Archive number)71559 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study
    2008 (English)In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16218 (URN)10.1186/cc7032 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-27 Created: 2009-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference
    2011 (English)In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 530 WALNUT ST, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19106-3621 USA, 2011
    Keywords
    Burns, Outcome, Dimorphism, Age, Total body surface area
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67966 (URN)10.1097/TA.0b013e3181e59dbe (DOI)000289558700039 ()
    Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2012-03-25
    4. Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study
    2012 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2012
    Keywords
    Burns, organ dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green, age, cardiac index, sepsis
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70059 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2011.08.017 (DOI)000301621500010 ()
    Note

    On the day of the defence date the status of this article was "Manuscript".

    Funding agencies|Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Linkoping University Hospital||PULSION Medical Systems AG, Munich, Germany||

    Available from: 2011-08-17 Created: 2011-08-17 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
  • 37.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute kidney injury is common, parallels organ dysfunction or failure, and carries appreciable mortality in patients with major burns: a prospective exploratory cohort study2008In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 12, no R124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, time course, and outcome of acute kidney injury after major burns and to evaluate the impact of possible predisposing factors ( age, gender, and depth and extent of injury) and the relation to other dysfunctioning organs and sepsis.

    Method: We performed an explorative cohort study on patients with a TBSA% (percentage burned of total body surface area) of 20% or more who were admitted to a national burn centre. Acute kidney injury was classified according to the international consensus classification of RIFLE ( Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease). Prospectively collected clinical and laboratory data were used for assessing organ dysfunction, systemic inflammatory response, and sepsis.

    Results: The incidence of acute kidney injury among major burns was 0.11 per 100,000 people per year. Of 127 patients, 31 (24%) developed acute kidney injury (12% Risk, 8% Injury, and 5% Failure). Mean age was 40.6 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 36.7 to 44.5), TBSA% was 38.6% (95% CI 35.5% to 41.6%), and 25% were women. Mortality was 14% and increased with increasing RIFLE class (7% normal, 13% Risk, 40% Injury, and 83% Failure). Renal dysfunction occurred within 7 days in 55% of the patients and recovered among all survivors. Age, TBSA%, and extent of full thickness burns were higher among the patients who developed acute kidney injury. Pulmonary dysfunction and systemic inflammatory response syndrome were present in all of the patients with acute kidney injury and developed before the acute kidney injury. Sepsis was a possible aggravating factor in acute kidney injury in 48%. Extensive deep burns (25% or more full thickness burn) increased the risk for developing acute kidney injury early (risk ratio 2.25).

    Conclusions: Acute kidney injury is common, develops soon after the burn, and parallels other dysfunctioning organs. Although acute kidney injury recovered in all survivors, in higher acute kidney injury groups, together with cardiovascular dysfunction, it correlated with mortality.

  • 38.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

  • 39.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n = 1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 40.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

  • 41.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Mortality After Thermal Injury: No Sex-Related Difference2011In: JOURNAL OF TRAUMA-INJURY INFECTION AND CRITICAL CARE, ISSN 0022-5282, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 959-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Young women have been reported to be more likely to survive than men after severe trauma. Girls also have less inflammation and hypermetabolism after major burns. Yet burned women have been found to have a twofold greater risk of death than men. Our aim was to find out if there is a sex-related difference in mortality after thermal injury, particularly in the age group between 16 years and 49 years, when hormonal differences would be most influential. Methods: All patients admitted to the Linkoping University Hospital Burn Unit with thermal injuries during the years 1993-2008 were included and the variables percentage burned total body surface area (TBSA%), age, type of burn, mechanical ventilation, and year were included in a multiple regression (Poisson log) model. Results: Of 1,119 patients with thermal injury, 792 (71%) were men. Crude mortality was 5% among men, and 8% among women (p = 0.04). After adjustment for age and TBSA%, there was no correlation between mortality and sex, in any age group. Eight men and four women died in the group of young adults (16-49 years) in which TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.01) but age did not. Mortality was 14% (32 of 221) among the men and 23% (23 of 102) of women in the group of older adults (50 years and older), and both age and TBSA% correlated with mortality (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: There is no relevant sex-related difference in survival after thermal injury. The conclusion is, however, tempered by the few deaths, particularly among younger adults.

  • 42.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, p. 718-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common cause of burns in children, yet there is little information available about the inflammatory response. The aim of the study was to investigate the response to treatment with antibiotics among scalded children by following the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, procalcitonin (PCT) concentration, and white blood cell count (WCC) during the first two weeks after injury.

    Methods

    All children with scalds who presented to the Burn Centre during 2010–2016 were included in this retrospective study. All measurements of CRP, PCT, and WCC from the first 14 days after injury were recorded, and each patient’s maximum values during days 0–2, 3–7, and 8–14 were used for calculations. Multivariable regression for panel data was used to study the inflammatory response after antibiotic treatment.

    Results

    A total of 216 children were included. C-reactive protein was 45 mg/L (p < 0.001) higher in the group treated with antibiotics, and decreased with 8.8 mg/L per day over the studied time in this group, which was more than twice as fast as among the children who were not given antibiotics.

    Conclusion

    The CRP response, among children with minor scalds treated with antibiotics, shows an appreciable rise during the first week of injury that subsided rapidly during the second week.

  • 43.
    Zötterman, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Surgery Department, Plastic Surgery Unit, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Better Protection of Glass-Fronted Stoves Is Needed in Sweden Because of the Increase in the Number of Contact Burns Among Small Children2018In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 618-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impression among the attending physicians at their Burn Centre is that the number of contact burns caused by glass-fronted stoves is increasing, particularly in the youngest group of patients. It is an interesting subgroup, as these injuries are preventable. The authors’ aim of this study was to find out whether the incidence of burns after contact with glass-fronted stoves has increased.

    The authors included all patients aged between 0 and 3.9 years who presented to the National Burn Centre during the period 2008–2015 with contact burn injuries caused by glass-fronted stoves. The change in incidence over time was calculated from national records and analyzed with simple linear regression.

    Fifty-six patients were included, of whom 20 were treated during the past 2 years of the study. Thirty-seven of the 56 were boys (66%), median (10–90 percentiles) age was 1.1 (0.7–2.5) years, percentage total body surface area burned was 0.6% (0.1–2.0), 12 were admitted for overnight stay in hospital, and seven needed operations. The incidence was 0.34/100 000 children-years during the first 2 years, and it was three times as high during the past 2 years. The increase in incidence was 0.24/100 000 children-years by each 2-year period (P = .02).

    The authors’ results indicate that contact burns among children caused by glass-fronted stoves are increasing in Sweden. The authors propose that there should be a plan for their prevention put in place.

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