liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 206
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Division of overall duration of stay into operative stay and postoperative stay improves the overall estimate as a measure of quality of outcome in burn care.2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0174579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients and Methods: Surgically managed burn patients admitted between 2010-14 were included. Operative stay was defined as the time from admission until the last operation, postoperative stay as the time from the last operation until discharge. The difference in variation was analysed with F-test. A retrospective review of medical records was done to explore reasons for extended postoperative stay. Multivariable regression was used to assess factors associated with operative stay and postoperative stay.less thanbr /greater thanResults: Operative stay/TBSA% showed less variation than total duration/TBSA% (F test = 2.38, pless than0.01). The size of the burn, and the number of operations, were the independent factors that influenced operative stay (R2 0.65). Except for the size of the burn other factors were associated with duration of postoperative stay: wound related, psychological and other medical causes, advanced medical support, and accommodation arrangements before discharge, of which the two last were the most important with an increase of (mean) 12 and 17 days (pless than0.001, R2 0.51).less thanbr /greater thanConclusion: Adjusted operative stay showed less variation than total hospital stay and thus can be considered a more accurate outcome measure for surgically managed burns. The size of burn and number of operations are the factors affecting this outcome measure.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. a Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Improvement in mortality at a National Burn Centre since 2000: Was it the result of increased resources?2017In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 96, no 25, article id e6727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The aim of this study was to find out whether the charging costs (calculated using interventional burn score) increased as mortality decreased. During the last 2 decades, mortality has declined significantly in the Linköping Burn Centre. The burn score that we use has been validated as a measure of workload and is used to calculate the charging costs of each burned patient. We compared the charging costs and mortality in 2 time periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). A total of 1363 admissions were included. We investigated the change in the burn score, as a surrogate for total costs per patient. Multivariable regression was used to analyze risk-adjusted mortality and burn score. The median total body surface area % (TBSA%) was 6.5% (10–90 centile 1.0–31.0), age 33 years (1.3–72.2), duration of stay/ TBSA% was 1.4 days (0.3–5.3), and 960 (70%) were males. Crude mortality declined from 7.5% in 2000–2007 to 3.4% in 2008–2015, whereas the cumulative burn score was not increased (P=.08). Regression analysis showed that risk-adjusted mortality decreased (odds ratio 0.42, P=.02), whereas the adjusted burn score did not change (P=.14, model R2 0.86). Mortality decreased but there was no increase in the daily use of resources as measured by the interventional burn score. The data suggest that the improvements in quality obtained have been achieved within present routines for care of patients (multidisciplinary/ orientated to patients’ safety).

    Abbreviation: TBSA% = total body surface area %.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: A prospective randomized cost billing comparison of local fasciocutaneous perforator versus free Gracilis flap reconstruction for lower limb in a developing economy2017In: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, ISSN 1748-6815, E-ISSN 1532-1959, Vol. 70, no 9, p. 1307-1308Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Mossaad, Bassem
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department Suez, Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Evaluation of Glandular Liposculpture as a Single Treatment for Grades I and II Gynaecomastia2018In: Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, ISSN 0364-216X, E-ISSN 1432-5241, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Gynaecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast, of which the psychological burden on the patient can be considerable, with the increased risk of disorders such as depression, anxiety, and social phobia. Minimal scarring can be achieved by liposuction alone, though it is known to have a limited effect on the dense glandular and fibroconnective tissues. We know of few studies published on “liposuction alone”, so we designed this study to evaluate the outcome of combining liposuction with glandular liposculpturing through two axillary incisions as a single treatment for the management of grades I and II gynaecomastia.

    Methods

    We made a retrospective analysis of 18 patients with grade I or II gynaecomastia who were operated on by combined liposuction and glandular liposculpturing using a fat disruptor cannula, without glandular excision, during the period 2014–2016. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ), which is a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very dissatisfied; 2 = dissatisfied; 3 = neither; 4 = satisfied; 5 = very satisfied). The post-operative aesthetic appearance of the chest was evaluated by five independent observers on a scale from 1 to 5 (5 = considerable improvement).

    Results

    The patient mean (SD) overall satisfaction score was 4.7 (0.7), in which 92% of the responders were “satisfied” to “very satisfied”. The mean (SD) BEQ for all questions answered increased from 2.1 (0.2) “dissatisfied” preoperatively to 4.1 (0.2) “satisfied” post-operatively. The observers’ mean (SD) rate for the improvement in the shape of the front chest wall was 4.1 (0.7). No haematomas were recorded, one patient developed a wound infection, and two patients complained of remnants of tissue. The median (IQR) body mass index was 27.4 (26.7–29.4), 11 patients had gynaecomastia grade I, and 7 patients grade II. The median (IQR) volume of aspirated fat was 700 ml (650–800), operating time was 67 (65–75) minutes, 14 patients had general anaesthesia, and hospital charges were US$ 538 (481–594).

    Conclusions

    Combined liposuction and liposculpturing using the fat disruptor cannula resulted in satisfied patients and acceptable outcomes according to the observers’ ratings. It could be a useful alternative with an outcome that corresponds to that of more expensive methods.

  • 5.
    Abrahams, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    The effects of human burn injury on urinary nitrate excretion. 1999In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 25, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 7.
    Backstrom, D.
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Al-Ayoubi, Fawzi
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Letter: Outcome of trauma patients2010In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 902-903Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 8.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiac dysfunction after burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

  • 9.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Hemodynamic Changes During Resuscitation After Burns Using the Parkland Formula2009In: Journal of Trauma, ISSN 0022-5282, E-ISSN 1529-8809, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 329-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Parkland formula (2-4 mL/kg/burned area of total body surface area %) with urine output and mean arterial pressure (MAP) as endpoints; for the fluid resuscitation in burns is recommended all over the world. There has recently been a discussion on whether central circulatory endpoints should be used instead, and also whether volumes of fluid should be larger. Despite this, there are few central hemodynamic data available in the literature about the results when the formula is used correctly.

    Methods: Ten burned patients, admitted to our unit early, and with a burned area of >20% of total body sur-face area were investigated at 12, 24, and 36 hours after injury. Using transesophageal echocardiography, pulmonary artery catheterization, and transpulmonary thermodilution to monitor them, we evaluated the cardiovascular coupling when urinary output and MAP were used as endpoints.

    Results: Oxygen transport variables, heart rate, MAP, and left ventricular fractional area, did not change significantly during fluid resuscitation. Left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic area and global end-diastolic volume index increased from subnormal values at 12 hours to normal ranges at 24 hours after the burn. Extravascular lung intrathoracal blood volume ratio was increased 12 hours after the burn.

    Conclusions: Preload variables, global systolic function, and oxygen transport recorded simultaneously by three separate methods showed no need to increase the total fluid volume within 36 hours of a major burn. Early (12 hours) signs of central circulatory hypovolemia, however, support more rapid infusion of fluid at the beginning of treatment.

  • 10.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rousseau, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human cardiovascular dose-response to supplemental oxygen2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the central and peripheral cardiovascular adaptation and its coupling during increasing levels of hyperoxaemia. We hypothesized a dose-related effect of hyperoxaemia on left ventricular performance and the vascular properties of the arterial tree.

    Methods: Oscillometrically calibrated arterial subclavian pulse trace data were combined with echocardiographic recordings to obtain non-invasive estimates of left ventricular volumes, aortic root pressure and flow data. For complementary vascular parameters and control purposes whole-body impedance cardiography was applied. In nine (seven males) supine, resting healthy volunteers, aged 23–48 years, data was collected after 15 min of air breathing and at increasing transcutaneous oxygen tensions (20, 40 and 60 kPa), accomplished by a two group, random order and blinded hyperoxemic protocol.

    Results: Left ventricular stroke volume [86 ± 13 to 75 ± 9 mL (mean ± SD)] and end-diastolic area (19.3 ± 4.4 to 16.8 ± 4.3 cm2) declined (P < 0.05), and showed a linear, negative dose–response relationship to increasing arterial oxygen levels in a regression model. Peripheral resistance and characteristic impedance increased in a similar manner. Heart rate, left ventricular fractional area change, end-systolic area, mean arterial pressure, arterial compliance or carbon dioxide levels did not change.

    Conclusion: There is a linear dose–response relationship between arterial oxygen and cardiovascular parameters when the systemic oxygen tension increases above normal. A direct effect of supplemental oxygen on the vessels may therefore not be excluded. Proximal aortic and peripheral resistance increases from hyperoxaemia, but a decrease of venous return implies extra cardiac blood-pooling and compensatory relaxation of the capacitance vessels.

  • 11.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Heller, Ute
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Samuelsson, C
    Hallands Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wickerts, CJ
    Danderyd Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Women with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are less likely to receive therapeutic hypothermia and more likely to die than men: Swedish nationwide cohort study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Banck, M
    et al.
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, G
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Nolin, T
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Kristianstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, C
    Svenska Intensivvårdsregistret, Karlstad.
    Är svensk intensivvård könsjämlik?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Banck, Malin
    et al.
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Karlström, Göran
    Centralsjukhuset, Karlstad.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Samuelsson, Carolina
    Hallands sjukhus, Halmstad.
    Män intensivvårdas mer än kvinnor: Med det är ändå oklart om intensivvården i Sverige är könsojämlik2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 9-10, p. 388-390Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bergkvist, Max
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Assessment of microcirculation of the skin using Tissue Viability Imaging: A promising technique for detecting venous stasis in the skin2015In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 101, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: : Venous occlusion in the skin is difficult to detect by existing measurement techniques. Our aim was to find out whether Tissue Viability Imaging (TiVi) was better at detecting venous occlusion by comparing it with results of laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) during graded arterial and venous stasis in human forearm skin. Methods: : Arterial and venous occlusions were simulated in 10 healthy volunteers by inflating a blood pressure cuff around the upper right arm. Changes in the concentration of red blood cells (RBC) were measured using TiVi, while skin perfusion and concentration of moving red blood cells (CMBC) were measured using static indices of LDF during exsanguination and subsequent arterial occlusion, postocclusive reactive hyperaemia, and graded increasing and decreasing venous stasis. Results: : During arterial occlusion there was a significant reduction in the mean concentration of RBC from baseline, as well as in perfusion and CMBC (p less than 0.008). Venous occlusion resulted in a significant 28% increase in the concentration of RBC (p = 0.002), but no significant change in perfusion (mean change -14%) while CMBC decreased significantly by 24% (p = 0.02). With stepwise increasing occlusion pressures there was a significant rise in the TiVi index and reduction in perfusion (p = 0.008), while the reverse was seen when venous flow was gradually restored. Conclusion: : The concentration of RBC measured with TiVi changes rapidly and consistently during both total and partial arterial and venous occlusions, while the changes in perfusion, measured by LDF, were less consistent This suggests that TiVi could be a more useful, non-invasive clinical monitoring tool for detecting venous stasis in the skin than LDF.

  • 15.
    Bergstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källman, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Dermatology, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås, Sweden.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions2014In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 761-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia at different sacral tissue depths in different populations under clinically relevant pressure exposure.

    METHODS: Forty-two subjects (< 65 years), 38 subjects (≥ 65 years), and 35 patients (≥ 65 years) participated. Interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at tissue depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm (using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography) were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load in a supine position.

    RESULTS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia were observed at three tissue depths. At 10 mm depth, the proportion of subjects with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation was higher compared to superficial depths. The patients had higher interface pressure during load than the healthy individuals, but there were no significant differences in blood flow. Twenty-nine subjects in all three study groups were identified with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia.

    CONCLUSIONS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia can be measured at different tissue depths. A lack of these responses was found in healthy individuals as well as in patients indicating an innate susceptibility in some individuals, and are potential important factors to evaluate in order to better understand the etiology of pressure ulcers.

  • 16. Berkenstam, Anders
    et al.
    Kristensen, Jens
    Mellström, Karin
    Carlsson, Bo
    Malm, Johan
    Rehnmark, Stefan
    Garg, Neeraj
    Andersson, Carl Magnus
    Rudling, Mats
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Angelin, Bo
    Baxter, John D.
    The thyroid hormone mimetic compound KB2115 lowers plasma LDL cholesterol and stimulates bile acid synthesis without cardiac effects in humans2008In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 663-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major problem despite the availability of drugs that influence major risk factors. New treatments are needed, and there is growing interest in therapies that may have multiple actions. Thyroid hormone modulates several cardiovascular risk factors and delays atherosclerosis progression in humans. However, use of thyroid hormone is limited by side effects, especially in the heart. To overcome this limitation, pharmacologically selective thyromimetics that mimic metabolic effects of thyroid hormone and bypass side effects are under development. In animal models, such thyromimetics have been shown to stimulate cholesterol elimination through LDL and HDL pathways and decrease body weight without eliciting side effects. We report here studies on a selective thyromimetic [KB2115, (3-[[3,5-dibromo-4- [4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)-phenoxy]-phenyl]-amino]-3-oxopropanoic acid)] in humans. In moderately overweight and hypercholesterolemic subjects KB2115 was found to be safe and well tolerated and elicited up to a 40% lowering of total and LDL cholesterol after 14 days of treatment. Bile acid synthesis was stimulated without evidence of increased cholesterol production, indicating that KB2115 induced net cholesterol excretion. KB2115 did not provoke detectable effects on the heart, suggesting that the pharmacological selectivity observed in animal models translates to humans. Thus, selective thyromimetics deserve further study as agents to treat dyslipidemia and other risk factors for atherosclerosis. © 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  • 17.
    Berkius, J
    et al.
    Västervik, Sweden .
    Engerström, L
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN COPD PATIENTS FOLLOWED 24 MONTHS AFTER ICU CARE in INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, vol 36, issue , pp S228-S2282010In: INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Springer Science Business Media , 2010, Vol. 36, p. S228-S228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Berkius, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Västervik County Hospital, Västervik, Sweden.
    Engerström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordlund, Peter
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping,.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A prospective longitudinal multicentre study of health related quality of life in ICU survivors with COPD2013In: Critical Care, ISSN 1364-8535, E-ISSN 1466-609X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. R211-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Mortality amongst COPD patients treated on the ICU is high. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) after intensive care is a relevant concern for COPD patients, their families and providers of health care. Still, there are few HRQL studies after intensive care of this patient group. Our hypothesis was that HRQL of COPD patients treated on the ICU declines rapidly with time.

    METHODS: Fifty-one COPD patients (COPD-ICU group) with an ICU stay longer than 24 hours received a questionnaire at 6, 12 and 24 months after discharge from ICU. HRQL was measured using two generic instruments: the EuroQoL instrument (EQ-5D and EQ-VAS) and the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The results were compared to HRQL of two reference groups from the general population; an age- and sex-adjusted reference population (Non-COPD reference) and a reference group with COPD (COPD reference).

    RESULTS: HRQL of the COPD-ICU group at 6 months after discharge from ICU was lower compared to the COPD reference group: Median EQ-5D was 0.66 vs. 0.73, P=0.08 and median EQ-VAS was 50 vs.55, P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the SF-36 dimensions between the COPD-ICU and COPD-reference groups, although the difference in physical functioning (PF) approached statistical significance (P=0.059). Patients in the COPD-ICU group who were lost to follow-up after 6 months had low HRQL scores at 6 months. Scores for patients who died were generally lower compared to patients who failed to respond to the questionnaire. The PF and social functioning (SF) scores in those who died were significantly lower compared to patients with a complete follow up. HRQL of patients in the COPD-ICU group that survived a complete 24 months follow up was low but stable with no statistically significant decline from 6 to 24 months after ICU discharge. Their HRQL at 24 months was not significantly different from HRQL in the COPD reference group.

    CONCLUSIONS: HRQL in COPD survivors after intensive care was low but did not decline from 6 to 24 months after discharge from ICU. Furthermore, HRQL at 24 months was similar to patients with COPD who had not received ICU treatment.

  • 19. Bäckman, C
    et al.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Nordlund, P
    Simonsson, E
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Do ICU-diaries influence health related quality of life after critical illness?2007In: in Intensive Care Medicine(ISSN 0342-4642), vol 33, 2007, Vol. 33, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Bäckman, Carl G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten M
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    A case-control study of the influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness six months after critical illnessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ICU-diary concept is associated with less post-traumatic stress syndrome and improved perceived health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after critical illness, but little is known about its effect on the coping- mastery process, or whether it reduces hopelessness.

    Objective: To see if the ICU-diary concept improves the patient’s ability to master his/her situation after critical illness, and if it reduces the feeling of hopelessness.

    Design: Case control study (subgroup analysis of a multi-centre study on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL).

    Setting: Non-academic 8-bed general ICU.

    Patients: Adults admitted between March 2002 and June 2004.

    Measurements: Mastery and hopelessness were determined using validated questionnaires (the Mastery-Coping scale and a consolidated 2–item hopelessness questionnaire) which were sent home to patients 6 months after critical illness. Responses were compared between patients that received (Cases: n=38) or did not receive an ICU-diary (Controls: n=76) . Diaries were used when a long and complicated stay on the ICU was expected. Controls were matched with diary patients by gender and age. The effect of the ICU-diary was also examined using a multiple regression model.

    Results: The ICU-diary concept group scored significantly higher than the No-diary group in mastery (22.1 vs. 20.4, P<0.05) and lower in hopelessness scores (1.3 vs. 1.6, P<0.05). The positive influence of the ICU-diary disappeared after adjustment for confounding factors in a multiple regression model.

    Conclusion: We were unable to verify any positive influence of the ICU-diary concept on mastery and hopelessness 6 months after critical illness.

  • 21.
    Bäckman, Carl
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walther, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Long-term effect of the ICU-diary concept on quality of life after critical illness2010In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Critically ill patients often spend time in the intensive care unit (ICU) either unconscious or sedated. On recovery, they are often in a state of confusion with memory loss that may be associated with a longstanding reduction in health-related quality of life (QoL). We hypothesised that the ICU-diary concept could improve their QoL by filling in their memory gaps. Methods A non-randomised, prospective study in a non-academic eight-bedded general ICU. A group of patients (n=38) were selected to receive the ICU-diary concept (keeping a diary with photos while on the ICU plus a follow-up meeting) when a long and complicated course was expected. Health-related QoL at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months was compared with a group that did not receive the ICU-diary (n=224). The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) was used to measure health-related QoL. Multiple regression models adjusted for age, sex, illness severity, pre-existing disease and diagnostic category was used to analyse the effects of the ICU-diary concept at 6 months, and changes over time were analysed using repeated measures MANOVA. Results Crude and adjusted scores for two dimensions of SF-36 (general health and vitality) and the physical component summary score were significantly higher at 6 months in the ICU-diary group (P andlt; 0.05) and some of the effects remained during the 3-year follow-up period (P andlt; 0.05). Conclusion The ICU-diary concept was associated with improved health-related QoL during the 3-year follow-up period after a critical illness. The effect of this intervention needs to be confirmed in a larger randomised study.

  • 22.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Larsen, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Deaths caused by injury among people of working age (18-64) are decreasing, while those among older people (64+) are increasing2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Injury is an important cause of death in all age groups worldwide, and contributes to many losses of human and economic resources. Currently, we know a few data about mortality from injury, particularly among the working population. The aim of the present study was to examine death from injury over a period of 14 years (1999-2012) using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry (CDR) and the National Patient Registry, which have complete national coverage.

    METHOD: CDR was used to identify injury-related deaths among adults (18 years or over) during the years 1999-2012. ICD-10 diagnoses from V01 to X39 were included. The significance of changes over time was analyzed by linear regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of prehospital death decreased significantly (coefficient -0.22, r (2) = 0.30; p = 0.041) during the study period, while that of deaths in hospital increased significantly (coefficient 0.20, r (2) = 0.75; p < 0.001). Mortality/100,000 person-years in the working age group (18-64 years) decreased significantly (coefficient -0.40, r (2) = 0.37; p = 0.020), mainly as a result of decrease in traffic-related deaths (coefficient -0.34, r (2) = 0.85; p < 0.001). The incidence of deaths from injury among elderly (65 years and older) patients increased because of the increase in falls (coefficient 1.71, r (2) = 0.84; p < 0.001) and poisoning (coefficient 0.13, r (2) = 0.69; p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The epidemiology of injury in Sweden has changed during recent years in that mortality from injury has declined in the working age group and increased among those people 64 years old and over.

  • 23.
    Bäckström, Denise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Change in child mortality patterns after injuries in Sweden: a nationwide 14-year study.2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 343-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sweden has one of the world's lowest child injury mortality rates, but injuries are still the leading cause of death among children. Child injury mortality in the country has been declining, but this decline seems to decrease recently. Our objective was therefore to further examine changes in the mortality of children's death from injury over time and to assess the contribution of various effects on mortality. The underlying hypothesis for this investigation is that the incidence of lethal injuries in children, still is decreasing and that this may be sex specific.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied all deaths from injury in Sweden under-18-year-olds during the 14 years 1999-2012. We identified those aged under 18 whose underlying cause of death was recorded as International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis from V01 to X39 in the Swedish cause of death, where all dead citizens are registered.

    RESULTS: From the 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2012, 1213 children under the age of 18 died of injuries in Sweden. The incidence declined during this period (r = -0.606, p = 0.02) to 3.3 deaths/100,000 children-years (95 % CI 2.6-4.2). Death from unintentional injury was more common than that after intentional injury (p < 0.0001). There was a reduction in the incidence of unintentional injuries during the study period (r = -0.757, p = 0.03). The most common causes of death were injury to the brain (n = 337, 41 %), followed by drowning (n = 109, 13 %). The number of deaths after intentional injury increased (r = 0.585, p = 0.03) and at the end of the period was 1.5 deaths/100,000 children-years. The most common causes of death after intentional injuries were asphyxia (n = 177, 45 %), followed by injury to the brain (n = 76, 19 %).

    DISCUSSION: Mortality patterns in injured children in Sweden have changed from being dominated by unintentional injuries to a more equal distribution between unintentional and intentional injuries as well as between sexes and the overall rate has declined further. These findings are important as they might contribute to the preventive work that is being done to further reduce mortality in injured children.

  • 24.
    Danielsson, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jergovic, Davor
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enhetlig handläggning av brännskador höjer vårdkvalitet på svenska sjukhus2000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 97, p. 2318-2319Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Droog, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Steenbergen, W
    Nederländerna.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging2001In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 561-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in the assessment of burn wounds. However, several methodological issues that are inherent in the LDPI technique, and are relevant for the assessment of burn depth, must be clarified. These include the effect of scanning distance, curvature of the tissue, thickness of topical wound dressings, and pathophysiological effects of skin colour, blisters, and wound fluids. Furthermore, we soon realised that to examine the perfusion image generated by LDPI adequately the process of analysis was appreciably improved by the simultaneous use of digital photography. In the present investigation we used both in vitro and in vivo models and also examined burned patients, and found that the listed factors all significantly affected the LDPI output signal. However, if these factors are known to the examiner, most of them can be adjusted for. If the technique is further improved by minimizing such effects and by reducing the practical difficulties of applying it to a burned patient in the burns unit, the technique may find uses in everyday clinical decision-making.

  • 26.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henricson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gert E.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    A protocol for iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside that minimises nonspecific vasodilatory effects2004In: Microvascular research, ISSN 0026-2862, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 197-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iontophoresis of vasoactive substances is a promising tool for studying pharmacological aspects of the (patho)physiology of the microvasculature. However, nonspecific microvascular responses are a common problem in most protocols used. We studied the effect of current density (mA/cm2), charge density (mC/cm2), drug concentration (mass %) and vehicle concentration (M) on the nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis of sodium chloride, acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP).

    We found that nonspecific vasodilatation depended on current density and charge density in both anodal and cathodal iontophoresis. The responses to ACh and SNP were dependent on current density, charge density and drug concentration. We found that by limiting current density (<0.01 mA/cm2) and charge density (<7.8 mC/cm2) and with adjusted concentrations for drugs and vehicles, it is possible to prevent nonspecific effects during iontophoresis of ACh and SNP, while maximum drug effects (plateaus in the dose–response curves) are still obtained. These new findings are important for future iontophoresis studies in which vasoactive drugs are used to assess microvascular function because the presented approach has advantages compared to older techniques, which mainly have attempted to suppress or compensate for the nonspecific responses during iontophoresis by the use of local anaesthetics or the measurement of drug-minus-vehicle responses, both of which present well-known experimental shortcomings.

  • 27.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nonspecific vasodilatation during transdermal iontophoresis: the effect of voltage over the skin2003In: Microvascular research, ISSN 0026-2862, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) to study nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis. In iontophoresis studies, nonspecific vasodilatation occurs as a result either of galvanic currents or of the applied voltage over the skin. We made dose–response measurements to study the effect of ionic strength of the vehicle on the nonspecific vasodilatation during iontophoresis of sodium chloride and deionized water, while we monitored the voltage over the skin. We found that anodal and cathodal ionotophoresis induced a voltage over the skin that was dependent on the ionic strength of the test solution. The nonspecific vasodilatation during anodal iontophoresis was less pronounced than during cathodal iontophoresis, and was independent of the voltage over the skin. The nonspecific vasodilatation in cathodal iontophoresis was related to the voltage over the skin, and was possibly mediated by depolarization of local sensory nerves. In experiments using cathodal iontophoresis, therefore, the ionic strengths of the vehicle and the drug are important when vasoactive drugs are examined, as the nonspecific vasodilatation needs to be controlled for. As the vasodilatation that we observed was heterogeneously distributed within the area of iontophoresis, LDPI may provide more accurate measurements than conventional laser Doppler perfusion monitoring.

  • 28.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 772-773Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 29.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nagi, M.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Scald management protocols - outcome differences in two different time periods using different treatment strategies.2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years the treatment of scalds in our centre has changed, moving more towards the use of biological dressings (xenografts). Management of scalds with mid dermal or deep dermal injuries differs among centers using different types of dressings, and recently biological membrane dressings were recommended for this type of injury. Here we describe differences in treatment outcome in different periods of time. All patients with scalds who presented to the Linkoping Burn Centre during two periods, early (1997-98) and later (2010-12) were included. Data were collected in the unit database and analyzed retrospectively. A lower proportion of autograft operations was found in the later period, falling from 32% to 19%. Hospital stay was shorter in the later period (3.5 days shorter, p=0.01) and adjusted duration of hospital stay/TBSA% was shorter (1.2 to 0.7, p=0.07). The two study groups were similar in most of the studied variables: we could not report any significant differences regarding outcome except for unadjusted duration of hospital stay. Further studies are required to investigate functional and aesthetic outcome differences between the treatment modalities.

  • 30.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Staged excisions of moderate-sized burns compared with total excision with immediate autograft: an evaluation of two strategies.2017In: International journal of burns and trauma, ISSN 2160-2026, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Different surgical techniques have evolved since excision and autografting became the treatment of choice for deep burns in the 1970s. The treatment plan at the Burn Center, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden, has shifted from single-stage excision and immediate autografting to staged excisions and temporary cover with xenografts before autografting. The aim of this study was to find out if the change in policy resulted in extended duration of hospital stay/total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA%).

    METHODS: Retrospective clinical cohort including surgically-managed patients with burns of 15%-60% TBSA% within each treatment group. The first had early full excisions of deep dermal and full thickness burns and immediate autografts (1997-98), excision and immediate autograft group) and the second had staged excisions before final autografts using xenografts for temporary cover (2010-11, staged excision group).

    RESULTS: The study included 57 patients with deep dermal and full-thickness burns, 28 of whom had excision and immediate autografting, and 29 of whom had staged excisions with xenografting before final autografting. Adjusted (LOS/TBSA%) was close to 1, and did not differ between groups. Mean operating time for the staged excision group was shorter and the excised area/operation was smaller. The total operating time/TBSA% did not differ between groups.

    CONCLUSION: Staged excisions with temporary cover did not affect adjusted LOS/TBSA% or total operating time. Staged excisions may be thought to be more expensive because of the cost of covering the wound between stages, but this needs to be further investigated as do the factors that predict long term outcome.

  • 31.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abbas, A.H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, O.A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Temporary coverage of burns with a xenograft and sequential excision, compared with total early excision and autograft2016In: Annals of burns and fire disasters, ISSN 1592-9558, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 196-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 80s and 90s, early and total excision of full thickness burns followed by immediate autograft was the most common treatment, with repeated excision and grafting, mostly for failed grafts. It was hypothesized, therefore, that delayed coverage with an autograft preceded by a temporary xenograft after early and sequential smaller excisions would lead to a better wound bed with fewer failed grafts, a smaller donor site, and possibly also a shorter duration of stay in hospital. We carried out a case control study with retrospective analysis from our National Burn Centre registry for the period 1997-2011. Patients who had been managed with early total excision and autograft were compared with those who had had sequential smaller excisions covered with temporary xenografts until the burn was ready for the final autograft. The sequential excision and xenograft group (n=42) required one-third fewer autografts than patients in the total excision and autograft group (n=45), who needed more than one operation (p<0.001). We could not detect any differences in duration of stay in hospital / total body surface area burned% (duration of stay/TBSA%) (2.0 and 1.8) (p=0.83). The two groups showed no major differences in terms of adjusted duration of stay, but our findings suggest that doing early, smaller, sequential excisions using a xenograft for temporary cover can result in shorter operating times, saving us the trouble of making big excisions. However, costs tended to be higher when the burns were > 25% TBSA.

  • 32.
    Ericsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, p. e0155913-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion.

  • 33.
    Ericsson, Hans
    et al.
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Heijer, Maria
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Dorani, Hassan
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Johansson, Peter
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Wollbratt, Maria
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    Norjavaara, Ensio
    AstraZeneca RandD, Sweden .
    The glucokinase activator AZD6370 decreases fasting and postprandial glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with effects influenced by dosing regimen and food2012In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 436-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety of the glucokinase activator AZD6370 after 1 day of administration under fed and fasted conditions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: This was a two-part study. In Part A, patients received a single oral dose of AZD6370 (20, 60 or 180 mg) or placebo in the fasted or fed states (both n = 8). In Part B, patients (n = 8) received placebo and a total dose of AZD6370 180 mg given in one, two or four divided doses. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide changes versus placebo were assessed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: AZD6370 provided dose-dependent reductions in plasma glucose of up to 30% versus placebo in both fasted and fed patients (p andlt; 0.001 at 60 and 180 mg doses). Insulin secretion increased with dose, but absolute increases were relatively small in the fasted versus fed state (0-4 h). Dosing AZD6370 twice or four-times over 1 day gave a smoother 24-h glucose profile than single-dose. AZD6370 was rapidly absorbed. Pharmacokinetics of AZD6370 were dose-independent and unaffected by food. AZD6370 was generally well tolerated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: AZD6370 produced dose-dependent glucose reductions and increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in patients with T2DM.

  • 34.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Karlander, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjögren, Florence
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Continuous assessment of concentrations of cytokines in experimental injuries of the extremity2009In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ISSN 1940-5901, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 354-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Inflammation plays an important part in the healing process. Little is known about the extent local inflammatory trauma response interacts with the central circulation and inflammation produced by central organs. The aim of the present study was to examine whether high cut-off microdialysis catheters offer potential to in real time assess interstitial cytokines variations in conjunction to markers of metabolism distal to a blunt vascular contusion. Methods. In a standardised contusion trauma model, microdialysis catheters (high MW (100kDa)) were inserted in the gracilis muscle distal to the trauma for the local assessment of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a, total protein and the metabolic mediators (glycerol, puruvate and lactate). The contra lateral uninjured leg served as control of the centrally mediated inflammation propagated to the extremities. Results. The trauma led to a significant and quantitatively large (8-10 fold) increase in inflammatory cytokines (IL6 and 8) as measured both in the injured and control legs. There was only a minor, and not significant increase in concentrations of cytokines in the injured leg compared to the control leg.. There were no signs of ischemia in either leg. Conclusion. The new finding in this study is that both central, and local, inflammatory responses as well as metabolic mediators may be assessed continuously in skeletal muscle tissue distal to a major injury in an animal model. The findings suggest that the large trauma elicits a generalised inflammatory response to trauma rather than propagating a local one distal to the trauma.

  • 35.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, A.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Henriksson, J.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol and Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlander, Lars-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urea clearance: a new method to register local changes in blood flow in rat skeletal muscle based on microdialysis2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pgreater thanIncreasing evidence suggests that local blood flow should be monitored during microdialysis (MD) as the recovery of analytes is affected by local blood flow. At present ethanol clearance is the standard technique for this purpose, but it is not functional at very low perfusion velocities. Here, we introduce a technique for MD whereby local tissue blood flow is recorded by the use of urea clearance (changes inflow/outflow concentration), in conjunction with measurements of tissue metabolism (glucose, lactate and puruvate). MD probes were inserted into the gracilis muscle of 15 rats and perfused with a medium containing urea (20 mmol l-1). Changes in muscle blood flow were made by addition of noradrenaline (5 mu g ml-1) to the perfusion medium at two perfusion velocities (0 center dot 6 and 0 center dot 4 mu l min-1). The clearance of urea from the perfusion medium was then calculated and examined in relation to the dose of noradrenaline and to the coexisting changes in extracellular metabolites. The results showed reproducible and dose-dependent changes in blood flow that were induced by noradrenaline. These were characterized by dose-dependent changes in the urea clearance as well as blood-flow-specific changes in the MD metabolic markers (reduction in glucose and increase in lactate). The sensitivity for blood flow changes as assessed by urea clearance (MD) was increased at 0 center dot 4 compared with the 0 center dot 6 mu l min-1 perfusion speed. The results indicate that inclusion of urea to the perfusion medium may be used to monitor changes in skeletal muscle blood flow at low perfusion velocities and in parallel assess metabolic variables with a high recovery (greater than 90%).

  • 36.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Winbladh, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Gullstrand, P
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urea Clearance: A New Technique Based on Microdialysis to Assess Liver Blood Flow Studied in a Pig Model of Ischemia/Reperfusion2010In: EUROPEAN SURGICAL RESEARCH, ISSN 0014-312X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Delayed detection of ischemia is one of the most feared postoperative complications. Early detection of impaired blood flow and close monitoring of the organ-specific metabolic status may therefore be critical for the surgical outcome. Urea clearance is a new technique for continuous monitoring of alterations in blood flow and metabolic markers with acceptable temporal characteristics. We compare this new microdialysis technique with the established microdialysis ethanol technique to assess hepatic blood flow. Six pigs were used in a liver ischemia/reperfusion injury model. Microdialysis catheters were placed in liver segment IV and all circulation was stopped for 80 min, followed by reperfusion for 220 min. Urea and ethanol clearance was calculated from the dialysate and correlated with metabolic changes. A laser Doppler probe was used as reference of restoration of blood flow. Both urea and ethanol clearance reproducibly depicted changes in liver blood flow in relation to metabolic changes and laser Doppler measurements. The two techniques highly correlated both overall and during the reperfusion phase (r = 0.8) and the changes were paralleled by altered perfusion as recorded by laser Doppler.

  • 37.
    Farnebo, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Assessment of blood flow changes in human skin by microdialysis urea clearance2011In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 198-204Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the urea clearance technique for the measurement of drug-induced blood flow changes in human skin, and compare it with two non-invasive techniques: polarization light spectroscopy and laser Doppler perfusion imaging.

    Methods: Fifteen microdialysis catheters were placed intracutaneously on the volar aspect of the forearms of healthy human subjects, and were perfused with nitroglycerine, noradrenaline, and again nitroglycerine, to induce local tissue hyperaemia, hypoperfusion, and hyperaemia, respectively.

    Results: Urea clearance, but not the other techniques, detected the changes in blood flow during all three periods of altered flow.  The last hyperaemic response was detected by all three methods.

    Conclusion: Urea clearance can be used as a relatively simple method to estimate blood flow changes during microdialysis of vasoactive substances, in particular when the tissue is preconditioned in order to enhance the contrast between baseline and the responses to the provocations. Our results support that, in the model described, urea clearance was superior to the optical methods as it detected both the increases and decrease in blood flow, and the returns to baseline between these periods.

  • 38.
    Folkesson, Tchou
    et al.
    Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden,.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, B.
    Berzelius Clinical Research Center, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    A human vascular model based on microdialysis for the assessment of the vasoconstrictive dose-response effects of noradrenaline and vasopressin in skin: in JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, vol 48, pp 320-3202011In: JOURNAL OF VASCULAR RESEARCH, Karger , 2011, p. 320-320Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis is a well-established technique for continuous sampling of small, water-soluble molecules within the extracellular fluid space in vivo. It also allows the use of microdoses of drugs, and the simultaneous evaluation of their related effects at the site of action. The present study was an experimental, randomized microdose trial to develop a human vascular model of dose response. We aimed to evaluate a microdialysis dosing method using urea clearance as a marker of druginduced changes in dermal blood flow and metabolism (glucose and lactate) in 12 healthy volunteers. We found that asymptomatic vasoconstriction can be detected by continuous microdialysis measurements of urea clearance in dermal tissue. More importantly, dose-effect relations using the Emax model could be constructed using the corresponding data on drug doses and both the urea clearance-based flow estimates and the changes in concentrations of tissue metabolites. This in vivo human experimental skin model offers an interesting tool with which both the dose-response effects on blood flow and concentrations of tissue metabolites of potent vasoactive substances can be evaluated.

  • 39.
    Furubacke, A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Berlin, Gösta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Lack of significant treatment effect of plasma exchange in the treatment of drug-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis? 1999In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 25, p. 1307-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Professor Gösta Arturson (1927–2013): Obituary2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1654-1655Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Golster, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyllienmark, Lars
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing microvascular function in children and adolescents with diabetes using laser Doppler perfusion imaging: implications on flow models and measurement sitesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if functional impairment of the skin microvasculature is present in young diabetic patients with and without neurophysiological signs of nerve dysfunction. Dorsal foot skin blood flow was measured in young diabetics and controls using laser Doppler perfusion irnaging (LDPI). Blood flow was- measured during supine resting flow, during change in posture and during post occlusive hyperemia. Peripheral nerve function was measured by electrophysiological studies of peroneal and sural nerve conduction. Fifty seven (57%) percent of the diabetic patients had abnormal nerve conduction in two or several nerves. Diabetics with poor metabolic control (HbAlc > 7,5 %) showed an increase in supine resting blood flow compared to better regulated diabetics and controls. No other differences in skin blood flow between diabetics and controls were seen. During change in posture, blood flow increased instead of decreased in a majority of the study subjects. Low resting blood !low levels are suggested to contribute to this absence of postural vasoconstrictor response. It is concluded that nerve conduction defects arc much more common than microvascular abnormalities measured by LDPI in the present models in young diabetic patients. Our recommendation is to increase basal resting flow before applying vasoconstricting models in yotmg subjects when using LDPI in low flow areas, as the foot skin.

  • 42.
    Golster, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bertuglia, Silvia
    CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa, Italy.
    Calantuoni, Antonio
    CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa, Italy.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Red Blood Cell Velocity and Volumetric Flow Assessment by Enhanced High-Resolution Laser Doppler Imaging in Separate Vessels of the Hamster Cheek Pouch Microcirculation1999In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 62-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An enhanced high-resolution laser Doppler imager (EHR-LDI), configured to fit the demands of a measurement area containing separate microvessels, was evaluated for perfusion measurements in hamster cheek pouch preparations during ischemia, reperfusion, and pharmacologically induced vasodilation and vasoconstriction. Measurements in separate microvessels where the laser beam was smaller than the vessel diameter were referred to as red blood cell (RBC) velocity estimates, as previously validated in vitro, whereas a relative flow index, RFI (mean RBC velocity/tissue area), was introduced as a volumetric flow measure. Microvessel diameter and RBC velocity changes during ischemia, reperfusion, as well as during vasoconstriction and vasodilation correlated to the data obtained from the microscope. Correspondingly, during the described provocations anticipated volumetric flow changes were registered as changes in the RFI. When data on intravessel RBC velocity profiles are presented they reflect a parabolic flow profile usually seen in this size microvessel. The EHR-LDI appears a promising tool for investigation of the microvasculature, as it almost simultaneously provides information on relative changes of both in vivo RBC velocity and volumetric flow (RFI), although the latter estimate needs to be further refined.

  • 43.
    Golster, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thulesius, Olav
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, G.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heterogeneous blood flow response in the foot on dependency, assessed by laser Doppler perfusion imaging1997In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 159, no 2, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exact nature of the decrease in foot skin blood flow seen after a change in posture remains unsettled. This mechanism has previously been examined by non-invasive techniques such as the laser Doppler perfusion monitor (laser Doppler flowmetry). Taking into account the shortcomings of laser Doppler perfusion monitoring when applied to the determination of skin blood flow, which normally shows substantial heterogeneity, we have applied an emerging technology, the laser Doppler perfusion imager (LDPI). This technique provides a more comprehensive picture of the blood flow distribution in the skin, as it maps skin blood flow over a surface area (120×120 mm, 4096 measurement sites). It was used to examine if the reduction in tissue perfusion or the alterations in flow distributions seen after a change in posture (supine to dependency) could be fully explained by an increase in venous pressure (venous stasis of 50 mmHg) or if the data suggest a complementary mechanism.

    Skin blood flow of the forefoot decreased from 0.60 V (volt) (median) during rest to 0.40 and 0.38 V during venous stasis and dependency, respectively. Although almost identical median values were obtained during stasis and dependency, the flow distributions were different, with a loss of high flow values during venous stasis. Biological zero was 0.24 V.

    As the LDPI technique readily records skin perfusion during variations in venous stasis and posture, as well as information on flow distribution changes, it appears promising for future application in stimuli-response studies of skin blood flow. The difference in flow distribution seen between increased venous pressure and dependency suggests an additive regulatory mechanism to the veni-vasomotor reflex during a change in posture.

  • 44.
    Gölster, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hyllienmark, Lars
    Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Impaired microvascular function related to poor metabolic control in young patients with diabetes2005In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to identify whether young patients with type 1 diabetes using modern multiple insulin injection therapy (MIT) have signs of microvascular dysfunction and to elucidate possible correlations with various disease parameters. Skin blood flow on the dorsum of the foot was measured with laser Doppler perfusion imaging in 37 patients (age 10–21 years, disease duration 6·0–16 years) and 10 healthy controls. Measurements were performed at rest, after change in posture (the leg was lowered below heart level) and during postocclusive hyperaemia. Following a change in posture blood flow increased instead of decreased in a majority of the study subjects. Patients with acute HbA1c >7·5% (n = 22) had an increase in skin blood flow at rest and a significantly reduced blood flow when the leg was lowered below heart level as compared with patients with HbA1c <7·5% (0·26 V versus 0·17 V, P<0·01 and 0·12 V versus 0·23 V, P<0·05, respectively) and healthy controls. Following occlusion of the macrocirculation for 3 min a small non-significant decrease in the hyperaemic response was seen in the patients. The postocclusive hyperaemic response and the venoarteriolar reflex were not correlated to duration of disease, long-term metabolic control or electrophysiological signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction. It is concluded that signs of microvascular dysfunction related to poor metabolic control are present in young patients with MIT treatment and rather well-controlled diabetes. Low resting blood flow levels are suggested to contribute to the absence of postural vasoconstrictor response.

  • 45.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baiat, Yashma
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Local Heating as a Predilatation Method for Measurement of Vasoconstrictor Responses with Laser-Doppler Flowmetry2011In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 214-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying microvascular responses to iontophoresis of vasoconstricting drugs contributes to a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of cutaneous vessels, but measuring these responses with laser-Doppler flowmetry at basal blood flow conditions is technically challenging. This study aimed to investigate whether the measurement of cutaneous vasoconstrictor responses to noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (PE), delivered by iontophoresis, is facilitated by predilatation of the microvascular bed using local heating. We used different drug delivery rates (100 s x 0.12 mA, 200 s x 0.06 mA, 300 s x 0.04 mA) to investigate whether predilatation affects the local drug dynamics by an increased removal of drugs from the skin. In a predilatated vascular bed, iontophoresis of NA and PE resulted in a significant decrease in perfusion from the thermal plateau (p andlt; 0.001). The decrease was 25-33%, depending on drug delivery rate. In unheated skin, a significant vasoconstriction was observed (p andlt; 0.001), with 17% and 14% decrease from baseline for NA and PE, respectively. These results indicate that predilatating the cutaneous vascular bed by local heating facilitates measurement of vasoconstriction with laser-Doppler flowmetry and does not seem to significantly affect the result by an increased removal of drugs from the skin.

  • 46.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baiat, Y
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Assessment of microvascular response to iontophoresis ofnoradrenaline and phenylephrine using local heating andlaser Doppler flowmetryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is an attractive method to assess blood flow responses butlacks sensitivity to accurately measure low perfusion values during iontophoresis of vasoconstricting drugs without predilatation of the microvascular bed.

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for iontophoresis of noradrenaline (NA) andphenylephrine (Phe) in the skin, using local heating to predilate the microvascular bed andLDF to measure blood flow responses. Three protocols with the same electrical charge (12mC) but different durations and current strengths (100 s x 0.12 mA, 200 s x 0.06 mA, 300 s x0.04 mA) were used to study the effect of pulse duration and current strength on the responses.

    Skin perfusion decreased to 68-78% of the predilatated state with both NA and Phe. Doseresponse plateaus were not obtained with any protocol. The extent of the vasoconstriction depended on the protocol used.

    These results suggest that predilatation by local heating appears less suitable duringiontophoresis of NA and Phe, due to limited vascular responses and especially absence of response plateaus, even at high current strengths. The latter leads to difficulties in performing proper dose response analyses. Another interesting finding was that the actual dose of NA and Phe given to the tissue was affected not only by the size of the electrical charge, but local blood flow as well.

  • 47.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Droog Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Assessment of microvascular function by study of the dose‐response effects of iontophoretically applied drugs (acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside): Methods and comparison with in vitro studies2007In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, E-ISSN 1095-9319, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current knowledge about vascular function stems mainly from pharmacological in vitro studies using mounted vascular strips on a strain gauge. We know of no paper that has systematically examined the possibility of assessing the conventional dose–response effects of iontophoresis and laser Doppler investigation of vasoactive substances and compared those relations to data obtained from strips mounted on a strain gauge.

    We used the vasoactive substances acetylcholine (endothelium dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium independent) and an antagonist (atropine) to enable further investigations in the receptor physiology of iontophoresis.

    Dose–response curves from the iontophoresis experiments showed close similarity to those obtained by vascular strips mounted on a strain gauge. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the dose–response factors found in iontophoresis (both inter and intra experimental variability) was low. The iontophoretic effective dose of 50% (ED50) for acetylcholine and nitroprusside had only CVs of 25% and 26%, respectively, compared with 71% and 77% for the vascular strips. Acetylcholine-induced response was antagonized by iontophoresis of atropine. Contrary to expectations, this antagonism was not competitive.

    The results show that iontophoresis in combination with laser Doppler technology produces reproducible and reliable dose–response curves that picture the vascular effects of vasoactive drugs.

  • 48.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Nilsson, A.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Sub-epidermal imaging using polarized light spectroscopy for assessment of cutaneous microvascular function during iontophoresis of nor-adrenaline and phenylephrine2007In: 8th World Congress for microcirculation,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Berzelius Clinical Research Center AB.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Berzelius Clinical Research Center AB.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Tissue viability imaging: Microvascular response to vasoactive drugs induced by iontophoresis2009In: Microvascular Research, ISSN 0026-2862, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 199-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When one is studying the physiology of the cutaneous microcirculation there is a need for relevant non-invasive and versatile techniques. In this study we used a new optical device, the tissue viability imager (TiVi), to map changes in cutaneous microvascular concentrations of red blood cells during iontophoresis of vasoactive substances (noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (Phe) for vasoconstriction and acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for vasodilatation). We aimed to present data both individually and pooled, using a four-variable logistic dose response model that is commonly used in similar in vitro vascular studies. The accuracy of the TiVi was also investigated by calculating the coefficient of variation and comparing it with similar tests previously done using laser Doppler imaging.

    Tests were also performed using the TiVi and LDPI simultaneously to further compare the two methods. Results showed that the TiVi is capable of quantifying vascular responses to iontophorised noradrenaline and phenylephrine without the need to increase background flow first. Fitting the TiVi data to the dose response model resulted in ED50-values with narrow confidence intervals and acceptable r2 values. Mean ED50-values for the TiVi did not differ significantly from similar values obtained using laser Doppler.

    Results further seem to suggest that when the blood perfusion increases during vasodilatation in skin the initial phase relies mainly on an increase in red blood cell concentration whereas the further perfusion increase is due to an increase in red blood cell velocity.

  • 50.
    Henricson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gert
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Microvascular response to iontophoretically applied acetylcholine investigated by Tissue Viability Imaging2006Conference paper (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 206
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf