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  • 1.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Benedikz, Eirikur
    Department of Neurobiology, Division of Neurodegeneration, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Amyloid-β Secretion, Generation, and Lysosomal Sequestration in Response to Proteasome Inhibition: Involvement of Autophagy2012In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 343-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proteasome is important for degradation of worn out and misfolded proteins. Decreased proteasome activity has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Proteasome inhibition induces autophagy, but it is still unknown whether autophagy is beneficial or deleterious to AD neurons, as the autophagosome has been suggested as a site of amyloid-β (Aβ) generation. In this study, we investigated the effect of proteasome inhibition on Aβ accumulation and secretion, as well as the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AβPPSwe transfected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We show that proteasome inhibition resulted in autophagy-dependent accumulation of Aβ in lysosomes, and increased levels of intracellular and secreted Aβ. The enhanced levels of Aβ could not be explained by increased amounts of AβPP. Instead, reduced degradation of the C-terminal fragment of AβPP (C99) by the proteasome makes C99 available for γ-secretase cleavage, leading to Aβ generation. Inhibition of autophagy after proteasome inhibition led to reduced levels of intracellular, but not secreted Aβ, and tended to further increase the C99 to AβPP ratio, supporting involvement of the autophagosome in Aβ generation. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition caused a reduction in cellular viability, which was reverted by inhibition of autophagy. Dysfunction of the proteasome could cause lysosomal accumulation of Aβ, as well as increased generation and secretion of Aβ, which is partly facilitated by autophagy. As a decrease in cellular viability was also detected, it is possible that upregulation of autophagy is an unsuccessful rescue mechanism, which instead of being protective, contributes to AD pathogenesis.

  • 2.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Lindström, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    An In Vitro Model for Neuroscience: Differentiation of SH-SY5Y Cells into Cells with Morphological and Biochemical Characteristics of Mature Neurons2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1069-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroscience, including research on Alzheimers disease, is hampered by the lack of suitable in vitro models to study the human nervous system. To counteract this, many attempts to differentiate cell lines into more neuron-like cells have been performed, resulting in partial expression of neuronal features. Furthermore, it has been reported that neuroblastoma cell lines lack mature isoforms of tau. Our aim was to develop an improved in vitro model, generating sustainable cells with morphology and biochemistry of human, mature neurons. To obtain cells with neuronal differentiation and function, we investigated the effect of combining three-dimensional culturing of SH-SY5Y cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel with several factors reported to have neuro-differentiating effects. This resulted in cells with apparent neuronal morphology with long, extensively branched neurites. Further investigation revealed expression of several neurospecific markers including synapse protein Sv2 and nuclear marker NeuN, as well as the presence of synapses and axonal vesicle transport. In addition, these cells expressed mature tau isoforms, and tau protein expression was significantly increased compared to undifferentiated cells, reaching levels found in adult human brain. In conclusion, we found that pre-treatment with retinoic acid followed by ECM gel culturing in combination with brain derived neurotrophic factor, neuregulin beta(1), nerve growth factor, and vitamin D-3 treatment generated sustainable cells with unambiguous resemblance to adult neurons. These cells also expresses adult splicing forms of tau with neuronal localization, making this cellular in vitro model useful in many areas of neuroscience research, particularly the Alzheimers disease field.

  • 3.
    Agholme, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Domert, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Proteasome Inhibition Induces Stress Kinase Dependent Transport Deficits – Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2014In: Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, ISSN 1044-7431, E-ISSN 1095-9327, Vol. 58, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of two misfolded and aggregated proteins, β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau. Both cellular systems responsible for clearance of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the lysosomal and the proteasomal, have been shown to be malfunctioning in the aged brain and more so in AD patients. This malfunction could be the cause of β-amyloid and tau accumulation, eventually aggregating in plaques and tangles. We have investigated how decreased proteasome activity affects AD related pathophysiological changes of microtubule transport and stability, as well as tau phosphorylation. To do this, we used our recently developed neuronal model where human SH-SY5Y cells obtain neuronal morphology and function through differentiation. We found that exposure to low doses of the proteasome inhibitor MG-115 caused disturbed neuritic transport, together with microtubule destabilization and tau phosphorylation. Furthermore, reduced proteasome activity activated several kinases implicated in AD pathology, including JNK, c-Jun and ERK 1/2. Restoration of the microtubule transport was achieved by inhibiting ERK 1/2 activation, and simultaneous inhibition of both ERK 1/2 and c-Jun reversed the proteasome inhibition-induced tau phosphorylation. Taken together, this study suggests that a decrease in proteasome activity can, through activation of c-Jun and ERK 1/2, result in several events contributing to AD pathology. Restoring proteasome function or inhibiting ERK 1/2 and c-Jun could therefore be used as novel treatments against AD.

  • 4.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antonsson, Bruno
    Geneva Research Centre, Switzerland .
    Steinfeld, Robert
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany .
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosome-Mediated Apoptosis is Associated with Cathepsin D-Specific Processing of Bid at Phe24,Trp48, and Phe1832012In: Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science, ISSN 0091-7370, E-ISSN 1550-8080, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 231-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bax-mediated permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and release of apoptogenic factors into the cytosol are key events that occur during apoptosis. Likewise, apoptosis is associated with permeabilization of the lysosomal membrane and release of lysosomal cathepsins into the cytosol. This report identifies proteolytically active cathepsin D as an important component of apoptotic signaling following lysosomal membrane permeabilization in fibroblasts. Lysosome-mediated cell death is associated with degradation of Bax sequestering 14-3-3 proteins, cleavage of the Box activator Bid, and translocation of Box to mitochondria, all of which were cathepsin D-dependent. Processing of Bid could be reproduced by enforced lysosomal membrane permeabilization, using the lysosomotropic detergent O-methyl-serine dodecylamine hydrochloride (MSDH). We identified three cathepsin D-specific cleavage sites in Bid, Phe24, Trp48, and Phe183. Cathepsin D-cleaved Bid induced Bax-mediated release of cytochrome c from purified mitochondria, indicating that the fragments generated are functionally active. Moreover, apoptosis was associated with cytosolic acidification, thereby providing a more favorable environment for the cathepsin D-mediated cleavage of Bid. Our study suggests that cytosolic cathepsin D triggers Bax-mediated cytochrome c release by proteolytic activation of Bid.

  • 5.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garner, Brett
    University of Wollongong.
    Brown, Andrew J
    University of New South Wales.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Attenuation of the Lysosomal Death Pathway by Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation2011In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 178, no 2, p. 629-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) has emerged as a significant component of cell death signaling. The mechanisms by which lysosomal stability is regulated are not yet fully understood, but changes in the lysosomal membrane lipid composition have been suggested to be involved. Our aim was to investigate the importance of cholesterol in the regulation of lysosomal membrane permeability and its potential impact on apoptosis. Treatment of normal human fibroblasts with U18666A, an amphiphilic drug that inhibits cholesterol transport and causes accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes, rescued cells from lysosome-dependent cell death induced by the lysosomotropic detergent 0-methyl-serine dodecylamide hydrochloride (MSDH), staurosporine (STS), or cisplatin. LMP was decreased by pretreating cells with U18666A, and there was a linear relationship between the cholesterol content of lysosomes and their resistance to permeabilization induced by MSDH. U18666A did not induce changes in expression or localization of 70-kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70) or antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins known to protect the lysosomal membrane. Induction of autophagy also was excluded as a contributor to the protective mechanism. By using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with lysosomal cholesterol overload due to a mutation in the cholesterol transporting protein Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1), the relationship between lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and protection from lysosome-dependent cell death was confirmed. Cholesterol accumulation in lysosomes attenuates apoptosis by increasing lysosomal membrane stability.

  • 6.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Intensive Care.
    Saftig, Paul
    Biochemical Institute, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sensitivity to Lysosome-Dependent Cell Death is Directly Regulated by Lysosomal Cholesterol Content2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2), which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determined the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  • 7.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The lysosome: from waste bag to potential therapeutic target2013In: Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, ISSN 1674-2788, E-ISSN 1759-4685, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 214-226Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-bound intracellular organelles with an acidic interior. They are central for degradation and recycling of macromolecules delivered by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy. In contrast to the rather simplified view of lysosomes as waste bags, nowadays lysosomes are recognized as advanced organelles involved in many cellular processes and are considered crucial regulators of cell homeostasis. The function of lysosomes is critically dependent on soluble lysosomal hydrolases (e.g. cathepsins) as well as lysosomal membrane proteins (e.g. lysosome-associated membrane proteins). This review focuses on lysosomal involvement in digestion of intra- and extracellular material, plasma membrane repair, cholesterol homeostasis, and cell death. Regulation of lysosomal biogenesis and function via the transcription factor EB (TFEB) will also be discussed. In addition, lysosomal contribution to diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, is presented.

  • 8.
    Armstrong, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Niklas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden University of Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA .
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Bob
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. AlzeCure Fdn.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden UCL Institute Neurol, England .
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lysosomal Network Proteins as Potential Novel CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimers Disease2014In: Neuromolecular medicine, ISSN 1535-1084, E-ISSN 1559-1174, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The success of future intervention strategies for Alzheimers disease (AD) will likely rely on the development of treatments starting early in the disease course, before irreversible brain damage occurs. The pre-symptomatic stage of AD occurs at least one decade before the clinical onset, highlighting the need for validated biomarkers that reflect this early period. Reliable biomarkers for AD are also needed in research and clinics for diagnosis, patient stratification, clinical trials, monitoring of disease progression and the development of new treatments. Changes in the lysosomal network, i.e., the endosomal, lysosomal and autophagy systems, are among the first alterations observed in an AD brain. In this study, we performed a targeted search for lysosomal network proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thirty-four proteins were investigated, and six of them, early endosomal antigen 1 (EEA1), lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1, LAMP-2), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), Rab3 and Rab7, were significantly increased in the CSF from AD patients compared with neurological controls. These results were confirmed in a validation cohort of CSF samples, and patients with no neurochemical evidence of AD, apart from increased total-tau, were found to have EEA1 levels corresponding to the increased total-tau levels. These findings indicate that increased levels of LAMP-1, LAMP-2, LC3, Rab3 and Rab7 in the CSF might be specific for AD, and increased EEA1 levels may be a sign of general neurodegeneration. These six lysosomal network proteins are potential AD biomarkers and may be used to investigate lysosomal involvement in AD pathogenesis.

  • 9.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    UVA/B induced apoptosis in human melanocytes involves translocation of cathepsins and Bcl-2 family members2006In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, ISSN 0022-202X, Vol. 126, no 5, p. 1119-1127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate UVA/B to induce apoptosis in human melanocytes through the mitochondrial pathway, displaying cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and fragmentation of nuclei. The outcome of a death signal depends on the balance between positive and negative apoptotic regulators, such as members of the Bcl-2 protein family. Apoptotic melanocytes, containing fragmented nucleus, show translocation of the proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bid from the cytosol to punctate mitochondrial-like structures. Bcl-2, generally thought to be attached only to membranes, was in melanocytes localized in the cytosol as well. In the fraction of surviving melanocytes, that is, cells with morphologically unchanged nucleus, the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were translocated to mitochondria following UVA/B. The lysosomal proteases, cathepsin B and D, which may act as proapoptotic mediators, were released from lysosomes to the cytosol after UVA/B exposure. Proapoptotic action of the cytosolic cathepsins was confirmed by microinjection of cathepsin B, which induced nuclear fragmentation. Bax translocation and apoptosis were markedly reduced in melanocytes after pretreatment with either cysteine or aspartic cathepsin inhibitors. No initial caspase-8 activity was detected, excluding involvement of the death receptor pathway. Altogether, our results emphasize translocation of Bcl-2 family proteins to have central regulatory functions of UV-induced apoptosis in melanocytes and suggest cathepsins to be proapoptotic mediators operating upstream of Bax.

  • 10.
    Boman, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. CBD Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halliday, Glenda
    Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, Australia / School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.
    Miller, Bruce
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Saftig, Paul
    Institute of Biochemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The role of LAMP-2 in AβPP processing and Aβ degradation; implications for Alzheimer’s Disease2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysfunction in the lysosomal network, i.e., the endosomal, lysosomal and autophagy systems, are implicated in the pathways in Alzheimer’s disease brain pathology. This dysfunction is mirrored in the cerebrospinal fluid where a specific subset of lysosomal network proteins are found at elevated levels, lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) being one of the identified lysosomal proteins. Here we report that hippocampus and frontal cortex in Alzheimer’s disease cases have increased mRNA and protein expression of LAMP-2, and thus these brain areas are likely involved in the increased LAMP-2 levels seen in cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer’s disease patients. The increased LAMP-2 levels correlated with increased levels of β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ1-42). Oligomeric Aβ1-42 caused an upregulation of intracellular LAMP-2 in neuroblastoma cells, but did not trigger the release of LAMP-2 to the extracellular milieu, indicating that other cell types or mechanisms are responsible for the LAMP-2 release seen in cerebrospinal fluid. Overexpression of LAMP-2 in neuroblastoma cells caused a trend of reduction of secreted Aβ1-42 and changed the processing pattern of the Aβ precursor protein. These results indicate that Aβ1-42 mediated increase of LAMP-2 expression can act as a regulator of Aβ generation and secretion. LAMP-2 overexpression did not change the cellular uptake of extracellularly added Aβ1-42, but caused a delayed clearance of Aβ1-42. Whether the prolonged intracellular localization of Aβ1-42 in LAMP-2 overexpressing cells can change the transmission or degradation of Aβ remains to be investigated.

  • 11.
    Boman, Andrea
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. CBD Solutions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boxer, Adam
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Rojas, Julio C.
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Seeley, William W.
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Karydas, Anna
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Miller, Bruce
    Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, United States.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svenningsson, Per
    Translational Neuropharmacology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Distinct lysosomal network protein profiles in parkinsonian syndrome cerebrospinal fluid2016In: Journal of Parkinson's Disease, ISSN 1877-7171, E-ISSN 1877-718X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Clinical diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes like Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy is hampered by overlapping symptomatology and lack of biomarkers for diagnosis, and definitive diagnosis is only possible post-mortem. Since impaired protein degradation plays an important role in many neurodegenerative disorders, we hypothesized that levels and profiles of lysosomal network proteins in cerebrospinal fluid could be changed in these parkinsonian syndromes.

    Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from Parkinson’s disease patients (n=18), clinically diagnosed 4-repeat tauopathy patients, corticobasal syndrome (n=6) and progressive supranuclear palsy (n=5), pathologically diagnosed progressive supranuclear palsy (n=8) and corticobasal degeneration patients (n=7). Each patient set was compared to its appropriate control group consisting of the same number of age and gender matched individuals. Lysosomal network protein levels were detected via Western blotting.

    Results: Lysosomal network proteins have markedly different cerebrospinal fluid protein levels and profiles in Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy. Lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 were significantly decreased in Parkinson´s disease; early endosomal antigen 1 was decreased and lysozyme increased in progressive supranuclear palsy; and lysosomal-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and lysozyme were increased in corticobasal degeneration.

    Conclusions: Lysosomal network proteins hold promise of being interesting novel candidates for biomarker studies and for elucidating disease mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, but further validation studies will be needed to assess the specificity and the predictive value of these proteins in CSF.

  • 12.
    Civitelli, Livia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Erin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Iqbal Khattak, Sikander
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic A beta(1-42) Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties2016In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 291, no 17, p. 9233-9243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggregation of the amyloid-(beta) peptide (A beta) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the A beta peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the A beta fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce A beta cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic A beta species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting A beta-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed A beta species and induced a rapid formation of beta-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable A beta species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential.

  • 13.
    Englund, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gertow, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elinder, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Voltage Dependent Non-Inactivating Na+ Channel Activated during Apoptosis in Xenopus Oocytes2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 0088381-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion channels in the plasma membrane are important for the apoptotic process. Different types of voltage-gated ion channels are up-regulated early in the apoptotic process and block of these channels prevents or delays apoptosis. In the present investigation we examined whether ion channels are up-regulated in oocytes from the frog Xenopus laevis during apoptosis. The two-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to record endogenous ion currents in the oocytes. During staurosporine-induced apoptosis a voltage-dependent Na+ current increased three-fold. This current was activated at voltages more positive than 0 mV (midpoint of the open-probability curve was +55 mV) and showed almost no sign of inactivation during a 1-s pulse. The current was resistant to the Na+-channel blockers tetrodotoxin (1 mM) and amiloride (10 mM), while the Ca2+-channel blocker verapamil (50 mM) in the bath solution completely blocked the current. The intracellular Na+ concentration increased in staurosporine-treated oocytes, but could be prevented by replacing extracellular Na+ whith either K+ or Choline(+). Prevention of this influx of Na+ also prevented the STS-induced up-regulation of the caspase-3 activity, suggesting that the intracellular Na+ increase is required to induce apoptosis. Taken together, we have found that a voltage dependent Na+ channel is up-regulated during apoptosis and that influx of Na+ is a crucial step in the apoptotic process in Xenopus oocytes.

  • 14.
    Göransson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kanmert, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, K. Peter R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of the toxic prefibrillar species formed by Aβ peptide variants2012In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 420, no 4, p. 895-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of Aβ. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of Aβ-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various Aβ aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those Aβ peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the Aβ peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  • 15.
    Helmfors, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Armstrong, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Civitelli, Livia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Garner, Brett
    Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute University of Wollongong, Australia.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A protective role of lysozyme in Alzheimer diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder where extracellular plaques composed of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides and neuroinflammation are some of the main hallmarks of the disease. Activated microglial cells, which are the resident macrophages in the central nervous system, are suggested to trigger the inflammation response in AD. To discover neuroinflammation biomarkers would be important to reveal the pathological mechanisms of AD and develop therapies that target inflammation mediators. Lysozyme is part of the innate immune system and is secreted from macrophages during various inflammation conditions. However, the involvement of lysozyme in AD pathology has not been explored previously. We have discovered that lysozyme is up-regulated in cerebrospinal fluid from AD patients. Cells exposed to Aβ increased the expression of lysozyme indicating that Aβ might be responsible for the upregulation of lysozyme detected in cerebrospinal fluid. In vitro studies revealed that lysozyme binds to monomeric Aβ1-42 and alters the aggregation pathway counteracting formation of toxic Aβ species. In a newly developed Drosophila model, co-expression of lysozyme with Aβ in brain neurons reduced the formation of insoluble Aβ species, prolonged the survival and improved the activity of the double transgenic flies compared to flies only expressing Aβ. Our findings identify lysozyme as a modulator of Aβ aggregation and toxicity and our discoveries has the potential to be used for development of new treatment strategies and to use lysozyme as a biomarker for AD.

  • 16.
    Helmfors, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Boman, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Civitelli, Livia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nath, Sangeeta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sandin, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Janefjord, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    McCann, Heather
    Neuroscience Research Australia and University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden / UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Halliday, Glenda
    UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, United Kingdom.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease2015In: Neurobiology of Disease, ISSN 0969-9961, E-ISSN 1095-953X, Vol. 83, p. 122-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Regulation of apoptosis-associated lysosomal membrane permeabilization2010In: APOPTOSIS, ISSN 1360-8185, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 527-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) occurs in response to a large variety of cell death stimuli causing release of cathepsins from the lysosomal lumen into the cytosol where they participate in apoptosis signaling. In some settings, apoptosis induction is dependent on an early release of cathepsins, while under other circumstances LMP occurs late in the cell death process and contributes to amplification of the death signal. The mechanism underlying LMP is still incompletely understood; however, a growing body of evidence suggests that LMP may be governed by several distinct mechanisms that are likely engaged in a death stimulus- and cell-type-dependent fashion. In this review, factors contributing to permeabilization of the lysosomal membrane including reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane lipid composition, proteases, p53, and Bcl-2 family proteins, are described. Potential mechanisms to safeguard lysosomal integrity and confer resistance to lysosome-dependent cell death are also discussed.

  • 18.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mild, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antonsson, Bruno
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Cathepsin D-mediated processing of Bid at Phe24, Trp48, and Phe1832008In: International Journal of Experimental PathologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kim, Woojin Scott
    et al.
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Bhatia, Surabhi
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia.
    Elliott, David A
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McCann, Heather
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia.
    Halliday, Glenda M
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Barnham, Kevin J
    Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
    Garner, Brett
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Randwick NSW, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW, Australia.
    Increased ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 expression in Alzheimer's disease hippocampal neurons2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD, ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 193-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) reduces amyloid-beta burden in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Associations between ABCA1 polymorphisms and AD risk are also established. Little is known regarding the regulation of ABCA1 expression in the brain and how this may be affected by AD. In the present study we assessed ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus of AD cases compared to controls. ABCA1 was clearly expressed in hippocampal neurons and expression was increased two- to three-fold in AD cases. The increased hippocampal ABCA1 expression was associated with increased APOE and PUMA gene expression, implying an association with neuronal stress. Consistent with this, treatment of SK-N-SH neurons with amyloid-beta peptide resulted in a 48% loss in survival and a significant upregulation of ABCA1, APOE, and PUMA gene expression. Studies in young (2 month) and old (12 month) transgenic mice expressing a familial AD form of human amyloid-beta protein precursor and presenilin-1 revealed a significant age-dependent upregulation of hippocampal Abca1 compared to wild-type control mice. However, hippocampal Apoe and Puma gene expression were not correlated with increased Abca1 expression in mice. Our data indicate that ABCA1 is upregulated in AD hippocampal neurons potentially via an amyloid-beta-mediated pathway.

  • 20.
    Kim, Woojin Scott
    et al.
    Neuroscience Research Australia, Barker Street, Randwick 2031, NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW, Australia.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Halliday, Glenda M
    Neuroscience Research Australia, Barker Street, Randwick 2031, NSW, Australia; School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW, Australia.
    Alpha-synuclein biology in Lewy body diseases.2014In: Alzheimer's research & therapy, ISSN 1758-9193, Vol. 6, no 5, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    α-Synuclein is an abundantly expressed neuronal protein that is at the center of focus in understanding a group of neurodegenerative disorders called α-synucleinopathies, which are characterized by the presence of aggregated α-synuclein intracellularly. Primary α-synucleinopathies include Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, with α-synuclein also found secondarily in a number of other diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Understanding how α-synuclein aggregates form in these different disorders is important for the understanding of its pathogenesis in Lewy body diseases. PD is the most prevalent of the α-synucleinopathies and much of the initial research on α-synuclein Lewy body pathology was based on PD but is also relevant to Lewy bodies in other diseases (dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease). Polymorphism and mutation studies of SNCA, the gene that encodes α-synuclein, provide much evidence for a causal link between α-synuclein and PD. Among the primary α-synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy is unique in that α-synuclein deposition occurs in oligodendrocytes rather than neurons. It is unclear whether α-synuclein originates from oligodendrocytes or whether it is transmitted somehow from neurons. α-Synuclein exists as a natively unfolded monomer in the cytosol, but in the presence of lipid membranes it is thought to undergo a conformational change to a folded α-helical secondary structure that is prone to forming dimers and oligomers. Posttranslational modification of α-synuclein, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination and nitration, has been widely implicated in α-synuclein aggregation process and neurotoxicity. Recent studies using animal and cell models, as well as autopsy studies of patients with neuron transplants, provided compelling evidence for prion-like propagation of α-synuclein. This observation has implications for therapeutic strategies, and much recent effort is focused on developing antibodies that target extracellular α-synuclein.

  • 21.
    Klionsky, Daniel J
    et al.
    Life Sciences Institute; Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology; Department of Biological Chemistry; University of Michigan; Ann Arbor, MI, USA .
    Abdalla, Fabio C
    Laboratory of Structural and Functional Biology; Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar); Campus Sorocaba; São Paulo State, Brazil .
    Abeliovich, Hagai
    Department of Biochemistry and Food Science; Hebrew University; Rehovot, Israel .
    Abraham, Robert T
    Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham
    Adeli, Khosrow
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Agnello, Maria
    Agostinis, Patrizia
    Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A
    Ahn, Hyung Jun
    Ait-Mohamed, Ouardia
    Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane
    Akematsu, Takahiko
    Akira, Shizuo
    Al-Younes, Hesham M
    Al-Zeer, Munir A
    Albert, Matthew L
    Albin, Roger L
    Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier
    Aleo, Maria Francesca
    Alirezaei, Mehrdad
    Almasan, Alexandru
    Almonte-Becerril, Maylin
    Amano, Atsuo
    Amaravadi, Ravi
    Amarnath, Shoba
    Amer, Amal O
    Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie
    Anantharam, Vellareddy
    Ann, David K
    Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra
    Aoki, Hiroshi
    Apostolova, Nadezda
    Auberger, Patrick
    Baba, Misuzu
    Backues, Steven K
    Baehrecke, Eric H
    Bahr, Ben A
    Bai, Xue-Yuan
    Bailly, Yannick
    Baiocchi, Robert
    Baldini, Giulia
    Balduini, Walter
    Ballabio, Andrea
    Bamber, Bruce A
    Bampton, Edward T W
    Bánhegyi, Gábor
    Bartholomew, Clinton R
    Bassham, Diane C
    Bast, Robert C
    Batoko, Henri
    Bay, Boon-Huat
    Beau, Isabelle
    Béchet, Daniel M
    Begley, Thomas J
    Behl, Christian
    Behrends, Christian
    Bekri, Soumeya
    Bellaire, Bryan
    Bendall, Linda J
    Benetti, Luca
    Berliocchi, Laura
    Bernardi, Henri
    Bernassola, Francesca
    Besteiro, Sébastien
    Bhatia-Kissova, Ingrid
    Bi, Xiaoning
    Biard-Piechaczyk, Martine
    Blum, Janice S
    Boise, Lawrence H
    Bonaldo, Paolo
    Boone, David L
    Bornhauser, Beat C
    Bortoluci, Karina R
    Bossis, Ioannis
    Bost, Frédéric
    Bourquin, Jean-Pierre
    Boya, Patricia
    Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël
    Bozhkov, Peter V
    Brady, Nathan R
    Brancolini, Claudio
    Brech, Andreas
    Brenman, Jay E
    Brennand, Ana
    Bresnick, Emery H
    Brest, Patrick
    Bridges, Dave
    Bristol, Molly L
    Brookes, Paul S
    Brown, Eric J
    Brumell, John H
    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola
    Brunk, Ulf T
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bulman, Dennis E
    Bultman, Scott J
    Bultynck, Geert
    Burbulla, Lena F
    Bursch, Wilfried
    Butchar, Jonathan P
    Buzgariu, Wanda
    Bydlowski, Sergio P
    Cadwell, Ken
    Cahová, Monika
    Cai, Dongsheng
    Cai, Jiyang
    Cai, Qian
    Calabretta, Bruno
    Calvo-Garrido, Javier
    Camougrand, Nadine
    Campanella, Michelangelo
    Campos-Salinas, Jenny
    Candi, Eleonora
    Cao, Lizhi
    Caplan, Allan B
    Carding, Simon R
    Cardoso, Sandra M
    Carew, Jennifer S
    Carlin, Cathleen R
    Carmignac, Virginie
    Carneiro, Leticia A M
    Carra, Serena
    Caruso, Rosario A
    Casari, Giorgio
    Casas, Caty
    Castino, Roberta
    Cebollero, Eduardo
    Cecconi, Francesco
    Celli, Jean
    Chaachouay, Hassan
    Chae, Han-Jung
    Chai, Chee-Yin
    Chan, David C
    Chan, Edmond Y
    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung
    Che, Chi-Ming
    Chen, Ching-Chow
    Chen, Guang-Chao
    Chen, Guo-Qiang
    Chen, Min
    Chen, Quan
    Chen, Steve S-L
    Chen, WenLi
    Chen, Xi
    Chen, Xiangmei
    Chen, Xiequn
    Chen, Ye-Guang
    Chen, Yingyu
    Chen, Yongqiang
    Chen, Yu-Jen
    Chen, Zhixiang
    Cheng, Alan
    Cheng, Christopher H K
    Cheng, Yan
    Cheong, Heesun
    Cheong, Jae-Ho
    Cherry, Sara
    Chess-Williams, Russ
    Cheung, Zelda H
    Chevet, Eric
    Chiang, Hui-Ling
    Chiarelli, Roberto
    Chiba, Tomoki
    Chin, Lih-Shen
    Chiou, Shih-Hwa
    Chisari, Francis V
    Cho, Chi Hin
    Cho, Dong-Hyung
    Choi, Augustine M K
    Choi, DooSeok
    Choi, Kyeong Sook
    Choi, Mary E
    Chouaib, Salem
    Choubey, Divaker
    Choubey, Vinay
    Chu, Charleen T
    Chuang, Tsung-Hsien
    Chueh, Sheau-Huei
    Chun, Taehoon
    Chwae, Yong-Joon
    Chye, Mee-Len
    Ciarcia, Roberto
    Ciriolo, Maria R
    Clague, Michael J
    Clark, Robert S B
    Clarke, Peter G H
    Clarke, Robert
    Codogno, Patrice
    Coller, Hilary A
    Colombo, María I
    Comincini, Sergio
    Condello, Maria
    Condorelli, Fabrizio
    Cookson, Mark R
    Coombs, Graham H
    Coppens, Isabelle
    Corbalan, Ramon
    Cossart, Pascale
    Costelli, Paola
    Costes, Safia
    Coto-Montes, Ana
    Couve, Eduardo
    Coxon, Fraser P
    Cregg, James M
    Crespo, José L
    Cronjé, Marianne J
    Cuervo, Ana Maria
    Cullen, Joseph J
    Czaja, Mark J
    D'Amelio, Marcello
    Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette
    Davids, Lester M
    Davies, Faith E
    De Felici, Massimo
    de Groot, John F
    de Haan, Cornelis A M
    De Martino, Luisa
    De Milito, Angelo
    De Tata, Vincenzo
    Debnath, Jayanta
    Degterev, Alexei
    Dehay, Benjamin
    Delbridge, Lea M D
    Demarchi, Francesca
    Deng, Yi Zhen
    Dengjel, Jörn
    Dent, Paul
    Denton, Donna
    Deretic, Vojo
    Desai, Shyamal D
    Devenish, Rodney J
    Di Gioacchino, Mario
    Di Paolo, Gilbert
    Di Pietro, Chiara
    Díaz-Araya, Guillermo
    Díaz-Laviada, Inés
    Diaz-Meco, Maria T
    Diaz-Nido, Javier
    Dikic, Ivan
    Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P
    Ding, Wen-Xing
    Distelhorst, Clark W
    Diwan, Abhinav
    Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan
    Dokudovskaya, Svetlana
    Dong, Zheng
    Dorsey, Frank C
    Dosenko, Victor
    Dowling, James J
    Doxsey, Stephen
    Dreux, Marlène
    Drew, Mark E
    Duan, Qiuhong
    Duchosal, Michel A
    Duff, Karen
    Dugail, Isabelle
    Durbeej, Madeleine
    Duszenko, Michael
    Edelstein, Charles L
    Edinger, Aimee L
    Egea, Gustavo
    Eichinger, Ludwig
    Eissa, N Tony
    Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan
    El-Deiry, Wafik S
    Elazar, Zvulun
    Elgendy, Mohamed
    Ellerby, Lisa M
    Eng, Kai Er
    Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart
    Engelender, Simone
    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina
    Escalante, Ricardo
    Esclatine, Audrey
    Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa
    Espert, Lucile
    Espina, Virginia
    Fan, Huizhou
    Fan, Jia
    Fan, Qi-Wen
    Fan, Zhen
    Fang, Shengyun
    Fang, Yongqi
    Fanto, Manolis
    Fanzani, Alessandro
    Farkas, Thomas
    Farré, Jean-Claude
    Faure, Mathias
    Fechheimer, Marcus
    Feng, Carl G
    Feng, Jian
    Feng, Qili
    Feng, Youji
    Fésüs, László
    Feuer, Ralph
    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E
    Fimia, Gian Maria
    Fingar, Diane C
    Finkbeiner, Steven
    Finkel, Toren
    Finley, Kim D
    Fiorito, Filomena
    Fisher, Edward A
    Fisher, Paul B
    Flajolet, Marc
    Florez-McClure, Maria L
    Florio, Salvatore
    Fon, Edward A
    Fornai, Francesco
    Fortunato, Franco
    Fotedar, Rati
    Fowler, Daniel H
    Fox, Howard S
    Franco, Rodrigo
    Frankel, Lisa B
    Fransen, Marc
    Fuentes, José M
    Fueyo, Juan
    Fujii, Jun
    Fujisaki, Kozo
    Fujita, Eriko
    Fukuda, Mitsunori
    Furukawa, Ruth H
    Gaestel, Matthias
    Gailly, Philippe
    Gajewska, Malgorzata
    Galliot, Brigitte
    Galy, Vincent
    Ganesh, Subramaniam
    Ganetzky, Barry
    Ganley, Ian G
    Gao, Fen-Biao
    Gao, George F
    Gao, Jinming
    Garcia, Lorena
    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo
    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel
    Garmyn, Marjan
    Gartel, Andrei L
    Gatti, Evelina
    Gautel, Mathias
    Gawriluk, Thomas R
    Gegg, Matthew E
    Geng, Jiefei
    Germain, Marc
    Gestwicki, Jason E
    Gewirtz, David A
    Ghavami, Saeid
    Ghosh, Pradipta
    Giammarioli, Anna M
    Giatromanolaki, Alexandra N
    Gibson, Spencer B
    Gilkerson, Robert W
    Ginger, Michael L
    Goncu, Ebru
    Gongora, Céline
    Gonzalez, Claudio D
    Gonzalez, Ramon
    González-Estévez, Cristina
    González-Polo, Rosa Ana
    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena
    Gorbunov, Nikolai V
    Gorski, Sharon
    Goruppi, Sandro
    Gottlieb, Roberta A
    Gozuacik, Devrim
    Granato, Giovanna Elvira
    Grant, Gary D
    Green, Kim N
    Gregorc, Aleš
    Gros, Frédéric
    Grose, Charles
    Grunt, Thomas W
    Gual, Philippe
    Guan, Jun-Lin
    Guan, Kun-Liang
    Guichard, Sylvie M
    Gukovskaya, Anna S
    Gukovsky, Ilya
    Gunst, Jan
    Gustafsson, Asa B
    Halayko, Andrew J
    Hale, Amber N
    Halonen, Sandra K
    Hamasaki, Maho
    Han, Feng
    Han, Ting
    Hancock, Michael K
    Hansen, Malene
    Harada, Hisashi
    Harada, Masaru
    Hardt, Stefan E
    Harper, J Wade
    Harris, Adrian L
    Harris, James
    Harris, Steven D
    Hébert, Marie-Joseé
    Heidenreich, Kim A
    Helfrich, Miep H
    Helgason, Gudmundur V
    Henske, Elizabeth P
    Herman, Brian
    Herman, Paul K
    Hetz, Claudio
    Hilfiker, Sabine
    Hill, Joseph A
    Hocking, Lynne J
    Hofman, Paul
    Hofmann, Thomas G
    Höhfeld, Jörg
    Holyoake, Tessa L
    Hong, Ming-Huang
    Hood, David A
    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S
    Houwerzijl, Ewout J
    Høyer-Hansen, Maria
    Hu, Bingren
    Hu, Chien-An A
    Hu, Hong-Ming
    Hua, Ya
    Huang, Canhua
    Huang, Ju
    Huang, Shengbing
    Huang, Wei-Pang
    Huber, Tobias B
    Huh, Won-Ki
    Hung, Tai-Ho
    Hupp, Ted R
    Hur, Gang Min
    Hurley, James B
    Hussain, Sabah N A
    Hussey, Patrick J
    Hwang, Jung Jin
    Hwang, Seungmin
    Ichihara, Atsuhiro
    Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin
    Inoki, Ken
    Into, Takeshi
    Iovane, Valentina
    Iovanna, Juan L
    Ip, Nancy Y
    Isaka, Yoshitaka
    Ishida, Hiroyuki
    Isidoro, Ciro
    Isobe, Ken-ichi
    Iwasaki, Akiko
    Izquierdo, Marta
    Izumi, Yotaro
    Jaakkola, Panu M
    Jäättelä, Marja
    Jackson, George R
    Jackson, William T
    Janji, Bassam
    Jendrach, Marina
    Jeon, Ju-Hong
    Jeung, Eui-Bae
    Jiang, Hong
    Jiang, Hongchi
    Jiang, Jean X
    Jiang, Ming
    Jiang, Qing
    Jiang, Xuejun
    Jiang, Xuejun
    Jiménez, Alberto
    Jin, Meiyan
    Jin, Shengkan
    Joe, Cheol O
    Johansen, Terje
    Johnson, Daniel E
    Johnson, Gail V W
    Jones, Nicola L
    Joseph, Bertrand
    Joseph, Suresh K
    Joubert, Annie M
    Juhász, Gábor
    Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne
    Jung, Chang Hwa
    Jung, Yong-Keun
    Kaarniranta, Kai
    Kaasik, Allen
    Kabuta, Tomohiro
    Kadowaki, Motoni
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kamada, Yoshiaki
    Kaminskyy, Vitaliy O
    Kampinga, Harm H
    Kanamori, Hiromitsu
    Kang, Chanhee
    Kang, Khong Bee
    Kang, Kwang Il
    Kang, Rui
    Kang, Yoon-A
    Kanki, Tomotake
    Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi
    Kanno, Haruo
    Kanthasamy, Anumantha G
    Kanthasamy, Arthi
    Karantza, Vassiliki
    Kaushal, Gur P
    Kaushik, Susmita
    Kawazoe, Yoshinori
    Ke, Po-Yuan
    Kehrl, John H
    Kelekar, Ameeta
    Kerkhoff, Claus
    Kessel, David H
    Khalil, Hany
    Kiel, Jan A K W
    Kiger, Amy A
    Kihara, Akio
    Kim, Deok Ryong
    Kim, Do-Hyung
    Kim, Dong-Hou
    Kim, Eun-Kyoung
    Kim, Hyung-Ryong
    Kim, Jae-Sung
    Kim, Jeong Hun
    Kim, Jin Cheon
    Kim, John K
    Kim, Peter K
    Kim, Seong Who
    Kim, Yong-Sun
    Kim, Yonghyun
    Kimchi, Adi
    Kimmelman, Alec C
    King, Jason S
    Kinsella, Timothy J
    Kirkin, Vladimir
    Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A
    Kitamoto, Katsuhiko
    Kitazato, Kaio
    Klein, Ludger
    Klimecki, Walter T
    Klucken, Jochen
    Knecht, Erwin
    Ko, Ben C B
    Koch, Jan C
    Koga, Hiroshi
    Koh, Jae-Young
    Koh, Young Ho
    Koike, Masato
    Komatsu, Masaaki
    Kominami, Eiki
    Kong, Hee Jeong
    Kong, Wei-Jia
    Korolchuk, Viktor I
    Kotake, Yaichiro
    Koukourakis, Michael I
    Kouri Flores, Juan B
    Kovács, Attila L
    Kraft, Claudine
    Krainc, Dimitri
    Krämer, Helmut
    Kretz-Remy, Carole
    Krichevsky, Anna M
    Kroemer, Guido
    Krüger, Rejko
    Krut, Oleg
    Ktistakis, Nicholas T
    Kuan, Chia-Yi
    Kucharczyk, Roza
    Kumar, Ashok
    Kumar, Raj
    Kumar, Sharad
    Kundu, Mondira
    Kung, Hsing-Jien
    Kurz, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kwon, Ho Jeong
    La Spada, Albert R
    Lafont, Frank
    Lamark, Trond
    Landry, Jacques
    Lane, Jon D
    Lapaquette, Pierre
    Laporte, Jocelyn F
    László, Lajos
    Lavandero, Sergio
    Lavoie, Josée N
    Layfield, Robert
    Lazo, Pedro A
    Le, Weidong
    Le Cam, Laurent
    Ledbetter, Daniel J
    Lee, Alvin J X
    Lee, Byung-Wan
    Lee, Gyun Min
    Lee, Jongdae
    Lee, Ju-Hyun
    Lee, Michael
    Lee, Myung-Shik
    Lee, Sug Hyung
    Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan
    Legembre, Patrick
    Legouis, Renaud
    Lehmann, Michael
    Lei, Huan-Yao
    Lei, Qun-Ying
    Leib, David A
    Leiro, José
    Lemasters, John J
    Lemoine, Antoinette
    Lesniak, Maciej S
    Lev, Dina
    Levenson, Victor V
    Levine, Beth
    Levy, Efrat
    Li, Faqiang
    Li, Jun-Lin
    Li, Lian
    Li, Sheng
    Li, Weijie
    Li, Xue-Jun
    Li, Yan-bo
    Li, Yi-Ping
    Liang, Chengyu
    Liang, Qiangrong
    Liao, Yung-Feng
    Liberski, Pawel P
    Lieberman, Andrew
    Lim, Hyunjung J
    Lim, Kah-Leong
    Lim, Kyu
    Lin, Chiou-Feng
    Lin, Fu-Cheng
    Lin, Jian
    Lin, Jiandie D
    Lin, Kui
    Lin, Wan-Wan
    Lin, Weei-Chin
    Lin, Yi-Ling
    Linden, Rafael
    Lingor, Paul
    Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer
    Lisanti, Michael P
    Liton, Paloma B
    Liu, Bo
    Liu, Chun-Feng
    Liu, Kaiyu
    Liu, Leyuan
    Liu, Qiong A
    Liu, Wei
    Liu, Young-Chau
    Liu, Yule
    Lockshin, Richard A
    Lok, Chun-Nam
    Lonial, Sagar
    Loos, Benjamin
    Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel
    López-Otín, Carlos
    Lossi, Laura
    Lotze, Michael T
    Lőw, Peter
    Lu, Binfeng
    Lu, Bingwei
    Lu, Bo
    Lu, Zhen
    Luciano, Frédéric
    Lukacs, Nicholas W
    Lund, Anders H
    Lynch-Day, Melinda A
    Ma, Yong
    Macian, Fernando
    MacKeigan, Jeff P
    Macleod, Kay F
    Madeo, Frank
    Maiuri, Luigi
    Maiuri, Maria Chiara
    Malagoli, Davide
    Malicdan, May Christine V
    Malorni, Walter
    Man, Na
    Mandelkow, Eva-Maria
    Manon, Stéphen
    Manov, Irena
    Mao, Kai
    Mao, Xiang
    Mao, Zixu
    Marambaud, Philippe
    Marazziti, Daniela
    Marcel, Yves L
    Marchbank, Katie
    Marchetti, Piero
    Marciniak, Stefan J
    Marcondes, Mateus
    Mardi, Mohsen
    Marfe, Gabriella
    Mariño, Guillermo
    Markaki, Maria
    Marten, Mark R
    Martin, Seamus J
    Martinand-Mari, Camille
    Martinet, Wim
    Martinez-Vicente, Marta
    Masini, Matilde
    Matarrese, Paola
    Matsuo, Saburo
    Matteoni, Raffaele
    Mayer, Andreas
    Mazure, Nathalie M
    McConkey, David J
    McConnell, Melanie J
    McDermott, Catherine
    McDonald, Christine
    McInerney, Gerald M
    McKenna, Sharon L
    McLaughlin, BethAnn
    McLean, Pamela J
    McMaster, Christopher R
    McQuibban, G Angus
    Meijer, Alfred J
    Meisler, Miriam H
    Meléndez, Alicia
    Melia, Thomas J
    Melino, Gerry
    Mena, Maria A
    Menendez, Javier A
    Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S
    Menon, Manoj B
    Menzies, Fiona M
    Mercer, Carol A
    Merighi, Adalberto
    Merry, Diane E
    Meschini, Stefania
    Meyer, Christian G
    Meyer, Thomas F
    Miao, Chao-Yu
    Miao, Jun-Ying
    Michels, Paul A M
    Michiels, Carine
    Mijaljica, Dalibor
    Milojkovic, Ana
    Minucci, Saverio
    Miracco, Clelia
    Miranti, Cindy K
    Mitroulis, Ioannis
    Miyazawa, Keisuke
    Mizushima, Noboru
    Mograbi, Baharia
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Molero, Xavier
    Mollereau, Bertrand
    Mollinedo, Faustino
    Momoi, Takashi
    Monastyrska, Iryna
    Monick, Martha M
    Monteiro, Mervyn J
    Moore, Michael N
    Mora, Rodrigo
    Moreau, Kevin
    Moreira, Paula I
    Moriyasu, Yuji
    Moscat, Jorge
    Mostowy, Serge
    Mottram, Jeremy C
    Motyl, Tomasz
    Moussa, Charbel E-H
    Müller, Sylke
    Muller, Sylviane
    Münger, Karl
    Münz, Christian
    Murphy, Leon O
    Murphy, Maureen E
    Musarò, Antonio
    Mysorekar, Indira
    Nagata, Eiichiro
    Nagata, Kazuhiro
    Nahimana, Aimable
    Nair, Usha
    Nakagawa, Toshiyuki
    Nakahira, Kiichi
    Nakano, Hiroyasu
    Nakatogawa, Hitoshi
    Nanjundan, Meera
    Naqvi, Naweed I
    Narendra, Derek P
    Narita, Masashi
    Navarro, Miguel
    Nawrocki, Steffan T
    Nazarko, Taras Y
    Nemchenko, Andriy
    Netea, Mihai G
    Neufeld, Thomas P
    Ney, Paul A
    Nezis, Ioannis P
    Nguyen, Huu Phuc
    Nie, Daotai
    Nishino, Ichizo
    Nislow, Corey
    Nixon, Ralph A
    Noda, Takeshi
    Noegel, Angelika A
    Nogalska, Anna
    Noguchi, Satoru
    Notterpek, Lucia
    Novak, Ivana
    Nozaki, Tomoyoshi
    Nukina, Nobuyuki
    Nürnberger, Thorsten
    Nyfeler, Beat
    Obara, Keisuke
    Oberley, Terry D
    Oddo, Salvatore
    Ogawa, Michinaga
    Ohashi, Toya
    Okamoto, Koji
    Oleinick, Nancy L
    Oliver, F Javier
    Olsen, Laura J
    Olsson, Stefan
    Opota, Onya
    Osborne, Timothy F
    Ostrander, Gary K
    Otsu, Kinya
    Ou, Jing-hsiung James
    Ouimet, Mireille
    Overholtzer, Michael
    Ozpolat, Bulent
    Paganetti, Paolo
    Pagnini, Ugo
    Pallet, Nicolas
    Palmer, Glen E
    Palumbo, Camilla
    Pan, Tianhong
    Panaretakis, Theocharis
    Pandey, Udai Bhan
    Papackova, Zuzana
    Papassideri, Issidora
    Paris, Irmgard
    Park, Junsoo
    Park, Ohkmae K
    Parys, Jan B
    Parzych, Katherine R
    Patschan, Susann
    Patterson, Cam
    Pattingre, Sophie
    Pawelek, John M
    Peng, Jianxin
    Perlmutter, David H
    Perrotta, Ida
    Perry, George
    Pervaiz, Shazib
    Peter, Matthias
    Peters, Godefridus J
    Petersen, Morten
    Petrovski, Goran
    Phang, James M
    Piacentini, Mauro
    Pierre, Philippe
    Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie
    Pierron, Gérard
    Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit
    Piras, Antonio
    Piri, Natik
    Platanias, Leonidas C
    Pöggeler, Stefanie
    Poirot, Marc
    Poletti, Angelo
    Poüs, Christian
    Pozuelo-Rubio, Mercedes
    Prætorius-Ibba, Mette
    Prasad, Anil
    Prescott, Mark
    Priault, Muriel
    Produit-Zengaffinen, Nathalie
    Progulske-Fox, Ann
    Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula
    Przedborski, Serge
    Przyklenk, Karin
    Puertollano, Rosa
    Puyal, Julien
    Qian, Shu-Bing
    Qin, Liang
    Qin, Zheng-Hong
    Quaggin, Susan E
    Raben, Nina
    Rabinowich, Hannah
    Rabkin, Simon W
    Rahman, Irfan
    Rami, Abdelhaq
    Ramm, Georg
    Randall, Glenn
    Randow, Felix
    Rao, V Ashutosh
    Rathmell, Jeffrey C
    Ravikumar, Brinda
    Ray, Swapan K
    Reed, Bruce H
    Reed, John C
    Reggiori, Fulvio
    Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne
    Reichert, Andreas S
    Reiners, John J
    Reiter, Russel J
    Ren, Jun
    Revuelta, José L
    Rhodes, Christopher J
    Ritis, Konstantinos
    Rizzo, Elizete
    Robbins, Jeffrey
    Roberge, Michel
    Roca, Hernan
    Roccheri, Maria C
    Rocchi, Stephane
    Rodemann, H Peter
    Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago
    Rohrer, Bärbel
    Roninson, Igor B
    Rosen, Kirill
    Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M
    Rouis, Mustapha
    Rouschop, Kasper M A
    Rovetta, Francesca
    Rubin, Brian P
    Rubinsztein, David C
    Ruckdeschel, Klaus
    Rucker, Edmund B
    Rudich, Assaf
    Rudolf, Emil
    Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson
    Russo, Rossella
    Rusten, Tor Erik
    Ryan, Kevin M
    Ryter, Stefan W
    Sabatini, David M
    Sadoshima, Junichi
    Saha, Tapas
    Saitoh, Tatsuya
    Sakagami, Hiroshi
    Sakai, Yasuyoshi
    Salekdeh, Ghasem Hoseini
    Salomoni, Paolo
    Salvaterra, Paul M
    Salvesen, Guy
    Salvioli, Rosa
    Sanchez, Anthony M J
    Sánchez-Alcázar, José A
    Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo
    Sandri, Marco
    Sankar, Uma
    Sansanwal, Poonam
    Santambrogio, Laura
    Saran, Shweta
    Sarkar, Sovan
    Sarwal, Minnie
    Sasakawa, Chihiro
    Sasnauskiene, Ausra
    Sass, Miklós
    Sato, Ken
    Sato, Miyuki
    Schapira, Anthony H V
    Scharl, Michael
    Schätzl, Hermann M
    Scheper, Wiep
    Schiaffino, Stefano
    Schneider, Claudio
    Schneider, Marion E
    Schneider-Stock, Regine
    Schoenlein, Patricia V
    Schorderet, Daniel F
    Schüller, Christoph
    Schwartz, Gary K
    Scorrano, Luca
    Sealy, Linda
    Seglen, Per O
    Segura-Aguilar, Juan
    Seiliez, Iban
    Seleverstov, Oleksandr
    Sell, Christian
    Seo, Jong Bok
    Separovic, Duska
    Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi
    Setoguchi, Takao
    Settembre, Carmine
    Shacka, John J
    Shanmugam, Mala
    Shapiro, Irving M
    Shaulian, Eitan
    Shaw, Reuben J
    Shelhamer, James H
    Shen, Han-Ming
    Shen, Wei-Chiang
    Sheng, Zu-Hang
    Shi, Yang
    Shibuya, Kenichi
    Shidoji, Yoshihiro
    Shieh, Jeng-Jer
    Shih, Chwen-Ming
    Shimada, Yohta
    Shimizu, Shigeomi
    Shintani, Takahiro
    Shirihai, Orian S
    Shore, Gordon C
    Sibirny, Andriy A
    Sidhu, Stan B
    Sikorska, Beata
    Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M
    Simmons, Alison
    Simon, Anna Katharina
    Simon, Hans-Uwe
    Simone, Cristiano
    Simonsen, Anne
    Sinclair, David A
    Singh, Rajat
    Sinha, Debasish
    Sinicrope, Frank A
    Sirko, Agnieszka
    Siu, Parco M
    Sivridis, Efthimios
    Skop, Vojtech
    Skulachev, Vladimir P
    Slack, Ruth S
    Smaili, Soraya S
    Smith, Duncan R
    Soengas, Maria S
    Soldati, Thierry
    Song, Xueqin
    Sood, Anil K
    Soong, Tuck Wah
    Sotgia, Federica
    Spector, Stephen A
    Spies, Claudia D
    Springer, Wolfdieter
    Srinivasula, Srinivasa M
    Stefanis, Leonidas
    Steffan, Joan S
    Stendel, Ruediger
    Stenmark, Harald
    Stephanou, Anastasis
    Stern, Stephan T
    Sternberg, Cinthya
    Stork, Björn
    Strålfors, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Subauste, Carlos S
    Sui, Xinbing
    Sulzer, David
    Sun, Jiaren
    Sun, Shi-Yong
    Sun, Zhi-Jun
    Sung, Joseph J Y
    Suzuki, Kuninori
    Suzuki, Toshihiko
    Swanson, Michele S
    Swanton, Charles
    Sweeney, Sean T
    Sy, Lai-King
    Szabadkai, Gyorgy
    Tabas, Ira
    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich
    Tafani, Marco
    Takács-Vellai, Krisztina
    Takano, Yoshitaka
    Takegawa, Kaoru
    Takemura, Genzou
    Takeshita, Fumihiko
    Talbot, Nicholas J
    Tan, Kevin S W
    Tanaka, Keiji
    Tanaka, Kozo
    Tang, Daolin
    Tang, Dingzhong
    Tanida, Isei
    Tannous, Bakhos A
    Tavernarakis, Nektarios
    Taylor, Graham S
    Taylor, Gregory A
    Taylor, J Paul
    Terada, Lance S
    Terman, Alexei
    Tettamanti, Gianluca
    Thevissen, Karin
    Thompson, Craig B
    Thorburn, Andrew
    Thumm, Michael
    Tian, FengFeng
    Tian, Yuan
    Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco
    Tolkovsky, Aviva M
    Tomino, Yasuhiko
    Tönges, Lars
    Tooze, Sharon A
    Tournier, Cathy
    Tower, John
    Towns, Roberto
    Trajkovic, Vladimir
    Travassos, Leonardo H
    Tsai, Ting-Fen
    Tschan, Mario P
    Tsubata, Takeshi
    Tsung, Allan
    Turk, Boris
    Turner, Lorianne S
    Tyagi, Suresh C
    Uchiyama, Yasuo
    Ueno, Takashi
    Umekawa, Midori
    Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika
    Unni, Vivek K
    Vaccaro, Maria I
    Valente, Enza Maria
    Van den Berghe, Greet
    van der Klei, Ida J
    van Doorn, Wouter
    van Dyk, Linda F
    van Egmond, Marjolein
    van Grunsven, Leo A
    Vandenabeele, Peter
    Vandenberghe, Wim P
    Vanhorebeek, Ilse
    Vaquero, Eva C
    Velasco, Guillermo
    Vellai, Tibor
    Vicencio, Jose Miguel
    Vierstra, Richard D
    Vila, Miquel
    Vindis, Cécile
    Viola, Giampietro
    Viscomi, Maria Teresa
    Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V
    von Haefen, Clarissa
    Votruba, Marcela
    Wada, Keiji
    Wade-Martins, Richard
    Walker, Cheryl L
    Walsh, Craig M
    Walter, Jochen
    Wan, Xiang-Bo
    Wang, Aimin
    Wang, Chenguang
    Wang, Dawei
    Wang, Fan
    Wang, Fen
    Wang, Guanghui
    Wang, Haichao
    Wang, Hong-Gang
    Wang, Horng-Dar
    Wang, Jin
    Wang, Ke
    Wang, Mei
    Wang, Richard C
    Wang, Xinglong
    Wang, Xuejun
    Wang, Ying-Jan
    Wang, Yipeng
    Wang, Zhen
    Wang, Zhigang Charles
    Wang, Zhinong
    Wansink, Derick G
    Ward, Diane M
    Watada, Hirotaka
    Waters, Sarah L
    Webster, Paul
    Wei, Lixin
    Weihl, Conrad C
    Weiss, William A
    Welford, Scott M
    Wen, Long-Ping
    Whitehouse, Caroline A
    Whitton, J Lindsay
    Whitworth, Alexander J
    Wileman, Tom
    Wiley, John W
    Wilkinson, Simon
    Willbold, Dieter
    Williams, Roger L
    Williamson, Peter R
    Wouters, Bradly G
    Wu, Chenghan
    Wu, Dao-Cheng
    Wu, William K K
    Wyttenbach, Andreas
    Xavier, Ramnik J
    Xi, Zhijun
    Xia, Pu
    Xiao, Gengfu
    Xie, Zhiping
    Xie, Zhonglin
    Xu, Da-zhi
    Xu, Jianzhen
    Xu, Liang
    Xu, Xiaolei
    Yamamoto, Ai
    Yamamoto, Akitsugu
    Yamashina, Shunhei
    Yamashita, Michiaki
    Yan, Xianghua
    Yanagida, Mitsuhiro
    Yang, Dun-Sheng
    Yang, Elizabeth
    Yang, Jin-Ming
    Yang, Shi Yu
    Yang, Wannian
    Yang, Wei Yuan
    Yang, Zhifen
    Yao, Meng-Chao
    Yao, Tso-Pang
    Yeganeh, Behzad
    Yen, Wei-Lien
    Yin, Jia-jing
    Yin, Xiao-Ming
    Yoo, Ook-Joon
    Yoon, Gyesoon
    Yoon, Seung-Yong
    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro
    Yoshikawa, Yuko
    Yoshimori, Tamotsu
    Yoshimoto, Kohki
    You, Ho Jin
    Youle, Richard J
    Younes, Anas
    Yu, Li
    Yu, Long
    Yu, Seong-Woon
    Yu, Wai Haung
    Yuan, Zhi-Min
    Yue, Zhenyu
    Yun, Cheol-Heui
    Yuzaki, Michisuke
    Zabirnyk, Olga
    Silva-Zacarin, Elaine
    Zacks, David
    Zacksenhaus, Eldad
    Zaffaroni, Nadia
    Zakeri, Zahra
    Zeh, Herbert J
    Zeitlin, Scott O
    Zhang, Hong
    Zhang, Hui-Ling
    Zhang, Jianhua
    Zhang, Jing-Pu
    Zhang, Lin
    Zhang, Long
    Zhang, Ming-Yong
    Zhang, Xu Dong
    Zhao, Mantong
    Zhao, Yi-Fang
    Zhao, Ying
    Zhao, Zhizhuang J
    Zheng, Xiaoxiang
    Zhivotovsky, Boris
    Zhong, Qing
    Zhou, Cong-Zhao
    Zhu, Changlian
    Zhu, Wei-Guo
    Zhu, Xiao-Feng
    Zhu, Xiongwei
    Zhu, Yuangang
    Zoladek, Teresa
    Zong, Wei-Xing
    Zorzano, Antonio
    Zschocke, Jürgen
    Zuckerbraun, Brian
    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy2012In: Autophagy, ISSN 1554-8627, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 445-544Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.

  • 22.
    Klionsky, Daniel J.
    et al.
    University of Michigan, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; University of Michigan, Life Sciences Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, USA .
    Boman, Andrea
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kurz, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mohseni, Simin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Zughaier, Susu M.
    Emory University, School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition)2016In: Autophagy, ISSN 1554-8627, E-ISSN 1554-8635, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-222Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cathepsin D released from lysosomes mediates apoptosis2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Last year (2002), the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three scientists who have conducted pioneer research on programmed cell death. In the human body, more than a thousand billion cells are created every day, and an equal number die, thus programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is an important mechanism for maintaining tissue homeostasis and protecting against disease. Malfunctioning apoptosis is associated with many pathological conditions, for example, excess apoptosis is characteristic of AIDS, stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and myocardinal infarction, and insufficient apoptosis is seen in autoimmune conditions and cancer. Robert Horvitz, one of the mentioned Nobel Prize Laureates, was the first to identify death genes, namely ced-3, -4, and -9 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which were later discovered to have counterparts in humans.

    The aim of this thesis is to clarify the participation of lysosomes and lysosomal proteases in the initiation of apoptosis. The lysosomal enzyme cathepsin D regulates the human homologue of ced-3, which encoded the caspase family of proteases. Moreover, the human homologue of ced-9 encodes the Bcl-2 family of proteins such as Bax, which was involved in regulating the release of cathepsin D from lysosomes during apoptosis. In the present studies, apoptosis was induced by various substances, all of which first caused damage to lysosomes with ensuing release of lysosomal proteases. Fibroblasts exposed either to free radicals generated by the redox cycling quinone naphthazarin or to the kinase inhibitor staurosporine exhibited rapid translocation of cathepsin D from lysosomes to the cytosol and subsequent apoptosis. Malignant macrophages (J774 cells) and T lymphocytes (Jurkat cells) exposed to the lysosomotropic detergent sphingosine displayed early lysosomal destabilization and later apoptosis. Sphingosine also destabilized isolated lysosomes. Moreover, mimicking the translocation of cathepsin D by microinjecting cathepsin D into the cytosol induced apoptosis in fibroblasts.

    In the mentioned systems, lysosomes were destabilized before mitochondrial changes occurred and caspases were activated. Furthermore, apoptosis was prevented by inhibition of cathepsin D in the naphthazarin, staurosporine, and sphingosine systems and by inhibition of cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L in the sphingosine system. These results emphasize that cytosolic localization of lysosomal proteases is necessary for the ability of these enzymes to induce apoptosis.

    The present results also demonstrate that, during apoptosis, lysosomal membranes are destabilized by the following: (i) free-radical-mediated lipid peroxidation; (ii) pore formation through the Bcl-2 family member Bax; (iii) the impact of the lysosomotropic detergent sphingosine. All three of these events have been implicated in numerous other apoptosis systems. Accordingly, the participation of lysosomal enzymes in apoptosis may be more widespread than previously assumed. This new perspective on lysosomes as regulators of apoptosis may lead to novel treatment strategies for diseases associated with malfunctioning apoptosis.

    List of papers
    1. The lysosomal protease cathepsin D mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lysosomal protease cathepsin D mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress
    2001 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1592-1594Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

    Keywords
    caspases, cell death, naphthazarin p53, pepstatin A
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47905 (URN)10.1096/fj.00-0708fje (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Microinjection of cathepsin D induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in fibroblasts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microinjection of cathepsin D induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in fibroblasts
    2002 (English)In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 161, no 1, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reports have indicated that enzymes such as cathepsins D and B are translocated from lysosomal compartments to the cytosol early during apoptosis. We have previously noted that a translocation of cathepsins D and B occur before cytochrome c release and caspase activation in cardiomyocytes and human fibroblasts during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In the present report, we use a microinjection technique to investigate if cytosolic location of the cathepsins D and B are important for induction of apoptosis. We found that microinjection of cathepsin D into the cytosol of human fibroblasts caused apoptosis, which was detected as changes in distribution of cytochrome c, cell shrinkage, activation of caspases, chromatin condensation, and formation of pycnotic nuclei. No apoptosis was, however, induced by microinjection of cathepsin B. Moreover, apoptosis was prevented in fibroblasts pretreated with a caspase-3-like inhibitor, and also when microinjected with cathepsin D mixed with the cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A. These results show that cytosolic cathepsin D can act as a proapoptotic mediator upstream of cytochrome c release and caspase activation in human fibroblasts.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48872 (URN)10.1016/S0002-9440(10)64160-0 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization during apoptosis: Involvement of Bax?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lysosomal membrane permeabilization during apoptosis: Involvement of Bax?
    Show others...
    2005 (English)In: International journal of experimental pathology (Print), ISSN 0959-9673, E-ISSN 1365-2613, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Bcl-2 family members have long been known to control permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane during apoptosis, but involvement of these proteins in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) was not considered until recently. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the release of lysosomal proteases to the cytosol seen during apoptosis, with special emphasis on the role of Bax. In human fibroblasts, exposed to the apoptosis-inducing drug staurosporine (STS), the release of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D to the cytosol was observed by immunocytochemistry. In response to STS treatment, there was a shift in Bax immunostaining from a diffuse to a punctate pattern. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of Bax with both lysosomes and mitochondria in dying cells. Presence of Bax at the lysosomal membrane was confirmed by immuno-electron microscopy. Furthermore, when recombinant Bax was incubated with pure lysosomal fractions, Bax inserted into the lysosomal membrane and induced the release of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, we suggest that Bax is a mediator of LMP, possibly promoting the release of lysosomal enzymes to the cytosol during apoptosis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2005
    Keywords
    Bax, cathepsins, lysosomes, lysosomal membrane permeabilization, mitochondria
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13201 (URN)10.1111/j.0959-9673.2005.00442.x (DOI)
    Note

    The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Insertion of Bax into lysosomal membranes promotes release of lysosomal proteases during apoptosis.

    Available from: 2008-04-17 Created: 2008-04-17 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Sphingosine-induced apoptosis is dependent on lysosomal proteases
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sphingosine-induced apoptosis is dependent on lysosomal proteases
    2001 (English)In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 359, no 2, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new mechanism for sphingosine-induced apoptosis, involving relocation of lysosomal hydrolases to the cytosol. Owing to its lysosomotropic properties, sphingosine, which is also a detergent, especially when protonated, accumulates by proton trapping within the acidic vacuolar apparatus, where most of its action as a detergent would be exerted. When sphingosine was added in low-to-moderate concentrations to Jurkat and J774 cells, partial lysosomal rupture occurred dose-dependently, starting within a few minutes. This phenomenon preceded caspase activation, as well as changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. High sphingosine doses rapidly caused extensive lysosomal rupture and ensuing necrosis, without antecedent apoptosis or caspase activation. The sphingosine effect was prevented by pre-treatment with another, non-toxic, lysosomotropic base, ammonium chloride, at 10mM. The lysosomal protease inhibitors, pepstatin A and epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester ('E-64d'), inhibited markedly sphingosine-induced caspase activity to almost the same degree as the general caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethylketone ('Z-VAD-FMK'), although they did not by themselves inhibit caspases. We conclude that cathepsin D and one or more cysteine proteases, such as cathepsins B or L, are important mediators of sphingosine-induced apoptosis, working upstream of the caspase cascade and mitochondrial membrane-potential changes.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-27700 (URN)10.1042/0264-6021:3590335 (DOI)12438 (Local ID)12438 (Archive number)12438 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
  • 24.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Bironaite, D
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Anthraquinone toxicity and apoptosis in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.1999In: Free radical research, ISSN 1071-5762, E-ISSN 1029-2470, Vol. 31, p. 419-428Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heimlich, Gerd
    Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wang, Nancy S.
    Department of Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
    Jürgensmeier, Juliane M.
    Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization during apoptosis: Involvement of Bax?2005In: International journal of experimental pathology (Print), ISSN 0959-9673, E-ISSN 1365-2613, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bcl-2 family members have long been known to control permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane during apoptosis, but involvement of these proteins in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) was not considered until recently. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the release of lysosomal proteases to the cytosol seen during apoptosis, with special emphasis on the role of Bax. In human fibroblasts, exposed to the apoptosis-inducing drug staurosporine (STS), the release of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D to the cytosol was observed by immunocytochemistry. In response to STS treatment, there was a shift in Bax immunostaining from a diffuse to a punctate pattern. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of Bax with both lysosomes and mitochondria in dying cells. Presence of Bax at the lysosomal membrane was confirmed by immuno-electron microscopy. Furthermore, when recombinant Bax was incubated with pure lysosomal fractions, Bax inserted into the lysosomal membrane and induced the release of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, we suggest that Bax is a mediator of LMP, possibly promoting the release of lysosomal enzymes to the cytosol during apoptosis.

  • 26.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress2001In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1592-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

  • 27.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Scott Kim, Woojin
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chan, Sharon
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Cheng, Danni
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Agholme, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Barnham, Kevin
    University of Melbourne.
    McCann, Heather
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Halliday, Glenda
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Garner, Brett
    Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute.
    Increased expression of the lysosomal cholesterol transporter NPC1 in Alzheimers disease2010In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1801, no 8, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Niemann-Pick type Cl (NPC1) protein mediates the trafficking of cholesterol from lysosomes to other organelles. Mutations in the NPC1 gene lead to the retention of cholesterol and other lipids in the lysosomal compartment, and such defects are the basis of NPC disease. Several parallels exist between NPC disease and Alzheimers disease (AD), including altered cholesterol homeostasis, changes in the lysosomal system, neurofibrillary tangles, and increased amyloid-beta generation. How the expression of NPC1 in the human brain is affected in AD has not been investigated so far. In the present study, we measured NPC1 mRNA and protein expression in three distinct regions of the human brain, and we revealed that NPC1 expression is upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of AD patients compared to control individuals. In the cerebellum, a brain region that is relatively spared in AD, no difference in NPC1 expression was detected. Similarly, murine NPC1 mRNA levels were increased in the hippocampus of 12-month-old transgenic mice expressing a familial AD form of human amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (APP/PS1tg) compared to 12-month-old wild type mice, whereas no change in NPC1 was detected in mouse cerebellum. Immunohistochemical analysis of human hippocampus indicated that NPC1 expression was strongest in neurons. However, in vitro studies revealed that NPC1 expression was not induced by transfecting SK-N-SH neurons with human APP or by treating them with oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide. Total cholesterol levels were reduced in hippocampus from AD patients compared to control individuals, and it is therefore possible that the increased expression of NPC1 is linked to perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in AD.

  • 28.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhao, Ming
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Irene
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sphingosine-induced apoptosis is dependent on lysosomal proteases2001In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 359, no 2, p. 335-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a new mechanism for sphingosine-induced apoptosis, involving relocation of lysosomal hydrolases to the cytosol. Owing to its lysosomotropic properties, sphingosine, which is also a detergent, especially when protonated, accumulates by proton trapping within the acidic vacuolar apparatus, where most of its action as a detergent would be exerted. When sphingosine was added in low-to-moderate concentrations to Jurkat and J774 cells, partial lysosomal rupture occurred dose-dependently, starting within a few minutes. This phenomenon preceded caspase activation, as well as changes of mitochondrial membrane potential. High sphingosine doses rapidly caused extensive lysosomal rupture and ensuing necrosis, without antecedent apoptosis or caspase activation. The sphingosine effect was prevented by pre-treatment with another, non-toxic, lysosomotropic base, ammonium chloride, at 10mM. The lysosomal protease inhibitors, pepstatin A and epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-3-methyl-butane ethyl ester ('E-64d'), inhibited markedly sphingosine-induced caspase activity to almost the same degree as the general caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethylketone ('Z-VAD-FMK'), although they did not by themselves inhibit caspases. We conclude that cathepsin D and one or more cysteine proteases, such as cathepsins B or L, are important mediators of sphingosine-induced apoptosis, working upstream of the caspase cascade and mitochondrial membrane-potential changes.

  • 29.
    Neuzil, Jiri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Andrea, L
    Weber, Christian
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vitamin E analogs: A new class of multiple action agents with anti-neoplastic and anti-atherogenic activity2002In: Apoptosis (London), ISSN 1360-8185, E-ISSN 1573-675X, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 179-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of cancer and atherosclerosis, two most common causes of death in developed countries, has been stagnating or, even, increasing. Drugs effective against such conditions are needed and, in this regard, the potential anti-atherosclerotic activity of vitamin E analogs has been studied extensively. Surprisingly, recent results indicate that these agents may also exert anti-neoplastic effects. Here we review the evidence that particular analogs of vitamin E may act as both anti-atherogenic and anti-cancer agents, and discuss the possible molecular bases for these actions.

  • 30.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cytosolic acidification and lysosomal alkalinization during TNF-α induced apoptosis in U937 cells2006In: Apoptosis (London), ISSN 1360-8185, E-ISSN 1573-675X, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 1149-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptosis is often associated with acidification of the cytosol and since loss of lysosomal proton gradient and release of lysosomal content are early events during apoptosis, we investigated if the lysosomal compartment could contribute to cytosolic acidification. After exposure of U937 cells to tumor necrosis factor-α, three populations; healthy, pre-apoptotic, and apoptotic cells, were identified by flow cytometry. These populations were investigated regarding intra-cellular pH and apoptosis-associated events. There was a drop in cytosolic pH from 7.2 ± 0.1 in healthy cells to 6.8 ± 0.1 in pre-apoptotic, caspase-negative cells. In apoptotic, caspase-positive cells, the pH was further decreased to 5.7 ± 0.04. The cytosolic acidification was not affected by addition of specific inhibitors towards caspases or the mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase. In parallel to the cytosolic acidification, a rise in lysosomal pH from 4.3 ± 0.3, in the healthy population, to 4.8 ± 0.3 and 5.5 ± 0.3 in the pre-apoptotic- and apoptotic populations, respectively, was detected. In addition, lysosomal membrane permeability increased as detected as release of cathepsin D from lysosomes to the cytosol in pre-apoptotic and apoptotic cells. We, thus, suggest that lysosomal proton release is the cause of the cytosolic acidification of U937 cells exposed to TNF-α.

  • 31.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Analysis of cytosolic and lysosomal pH in apoptotic cells by flow cytometry2004In: Methods in Cell Science, ISSN 1381-5741, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several reports indicate that the cytosol is acidified during apoptosis although the mechanism is not yet fully elucidated. The most acidic organelle found in the cell is the lysosome, raising the possibility that lysosomal proton release may contribute to the cytosolic acidification. We here describe methods for measurement of the cytosolic and lysosomal pH in U937 cells by a dual-emission ratiometric technique suitable for flow cytometry. Cytosolic pH was analysed in cells loaded with the fluorescent probe BCECF, while lysosomal pH was determined after endocytosis of FITC-dextran. Standard curves were obtained by incubating cells in buffers with different pH in the presence of the proton ionophore nigericin. Apoptosis was induced by exposure of cells to 10ng/ml TNF- for 4h, and apoptotic cells were identified using a fluorescent marker for active caspases. By gating of control and apoptotic cells, the cytosolic and lysosomal pH were calculated in each population. The cytosolic pH was found to decrease from 7.2 ± 0.1 to 5.8s±0.1 and the lysosomal increased from 4.3±0.4 to 5.2±0.3. These methods will be useful in future attempts to evaluate the involvement of lysosomes in the acidification of the cytosol during apoptosis.

  • 32.
    Nystrom, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nelson, Erin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reitan, Nina
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Ellingsen, Pal
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Brorsson, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mason, Jeffrey
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Johansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sluzny, Chanan
    Appl Spectral Imaging, Migdal Haemeq.
    Handrick, Susann
    Charite.
    Prokop, Stefan
    Charite.
    Wegenast-Braun, Bettina
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease.
    Hornemann, Simone
    University of Zurich Hospital.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Heppner, Frank
    Charite.
    Jucker, Mathias
    German Centre Neurodegenerat Disease.
    Aguzzi, Adriano
    University of Zurich Hospital.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Monitoring amyloid formation and maturation in vitro and in vivo using LCO fluorescence in PRION, vol 6, issue , pp 13-132012In: PRION, Landes Bioscience , 2012, Vol. 6, p. 13-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 33.
    Nyström, Sofie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Maria
    Astra Zeneca R & D, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hedin, Linnea
    Astra Zeneca R & D, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Astra Zeneca R & D, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Properties of defined recombinant oligomeric forms of Aβ1‐42Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligomers of Aβ1-42 have been identified in human Alzheimer´s disease (AD) patients and in mouse models of AD. These species have attracted intense interest as possible neurological pathogens in AD. In our hands, expression of recombinant human Aβ1-42 in Escherichia coli followed by purification in the presence of cupric ions (CuCl2) afforded recovery of high quantities (>5 mg/L of culture) of well defined trimeric, hexameric, nonameric and dodecameric Aβ1-42. Strong denaturing conditions such as 6 M GuHCI, 8 M urea or boiling in 6.5 M urea supplemented with 2.5 % SDS all failed to separate the oligomers into smaller building blocks implicating that the oligomers are composed of covalently cross-linked Aβ1-42 monomers. Purification in the absence of cupric ions resulted in monomeric Aβ1-42. The Aβ1-42 oligomers were toxic and induced apoptosis when administered to neuroblastoma cells in culture. The described method producing oligomeric Aβ1-42 from a recombinant expression system paves the way for mechanistic studies, structural analysis, drug screening and opens up for vaccine development.

  • 34. Quinn, Carmel M.
    et al.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Terman, Alexei
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Stroikin, Yuri
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jessup, Wendy
    Garner, B
    Induction of fibroblast apolipoprotein E expression during apoptosis, starvation-induced growth arrest and mitosis2004In: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 378, no 3, p. 753-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) mediates the hepatic clearance of plasma lipoproteins, facilitates cholesterol efflux from macrophages and aids neuronal lipid transport. ApoE is expressed at high levels in hepatocytes, macrophages and astrocytes. In the present study, we identify nuclear and cytosolic pools of apoE in human fibroblasts. Fibroblast apoE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated during staurosporine-induced apoptosis and this was correlated with increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic morphological alterations. Because the transcription of apoE and specific pro-apoptotic genes is regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR (liver X receptor) α, we analysed LXRα mRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR and found it to be increased before apoE mRNA induction. The expression of ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) mRNA, which is also regulated by LXRα, was increased in parallel with apoE mRNA, indicating that LXRα probably promotes apoE and ABCA1 transcription during apoptosis. Fibroblast apoE levels were increased under conditions of serum-starvation-induced growth arrest and hyperoxia-induced senescence. In both cases, an increased nuclear apoE level was observed, particularly in cells that accumulated lipofuscin. Nuclear apoE was translocated to the cytosol when mitotic nuclear disassembly occurred and this was associated with an increase in total cellular apoE levels. ApoE amino acid sequence analysis indicated several potential sites for phosphorylation. In vivo studies, using 32P-labelling and immunoprecipitation, revealed that fibroblast apoE can be phosphorylated. These studies reveal novel associations and potential roles for apoE in fundamental cellular processes.

  • 35.
    Roberg, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Microinjection of cathepsin D induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in fibroblasts2002In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 161, no 1, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent reports have indicated that enzymes such as cathepsins D and B are translocated from lysosomal compartments to the cytosol early during apoptosis. We have previously noted that a translocation of cathepsins D and B occur before cytochrome c release and caspase activation in cardiomyocytes and human fibroblasts during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In the present report, we use a microinjection technique to investigate if cytosolic location of the cathepsins D and B are important for induction of apoptosis. We found that microinjection of cathepsin D into the cytosol of human fibroblasts caused apoptosis, which was detected as changes in distribution of cytochrome c, cell shrinkage, activation of caspases, chromatin condensation, and formation of pycnotic nuclei. No apoptosis was, however, induced by microinjection of cathepsin B. Moreover, apoptosis was prevented in fibroblasts pretreated with a caspase-3-like inhibitor, and also when microinjected with cathepsin D mixed with the cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A. These results show that cytosolic cathepsin D can act as a proapoptotic mediator upstream of cytochrome c release and caspase activation in human fibroblasts.

  • 36.
    Sörgjerd, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry.
    Klingstedt, Therése
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Norwegian University of Science & Technology.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammarström , Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prefibrillar transthyretin oligomers and cold stored native tetrameric transthyretin are cytotoxic in cell culture2008In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 377, no 4, p. 1072-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies Suggest that Soluble, oligomeric species, which are intermediates in the fibril formation process in amyloid disease, might be the key species in amyloid pathogenesis. Soluble oligomers of human wild type transthyretin (TTR) were produced to elucidate oligomer properties. Employing ThT fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of pyrene-labeled TTR, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy we demonstrated that early formed soluble oligomers (within minutes) from A-state TTR comprised on the average 20-30 TTR monomers. When administered to neuroblastoma cells these early oligomers proved highly cytotoxic and induced apoptosis after 48 h of incubation. More Mature fibrils (> 24 h of fibrillation) were non-toxic. Surprisingly, we also found that native tetrameric TTR, when purified and stored under cold conditions (4 degrees C) was highly cytotoxic. The effect Could be partially restored by increasing the temperature of the protein. The cytotoxic effects of native tetrameric TTR likely stems from a hitherto unexplored low temperature induced rearrangement of the tetramer conformation that possibly is related to the conformation of misfolded TTR in amyloigogenic oligomers.

  • 37.
    Sörgjerd, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klingstedt, Therése
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindgren, Mikael
    Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Prefibrillar Amyloid Aggregates and Cold Shocked Tetrameric Wild Type Transthyretin are CytotoxicManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies suggest that soluble, oligomeric species, which are intermediates in the fibril formation process in amyloid disease, might be the key species in amyloid pathogenesis. Soluble oligomers of TTR were produced by kinetic sampling from a TTR fibrillation reaction (A-state TTR, pH 2, 100 mM NaCl). The reaction was terminated at different time points, and different states in the aggregation process were captured and analyzed to elucidate the oligomer properties followed by sampling for cytotoxicity using exposure towards human SH-SYY5 neuroblastoma cells. Employing ThT fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of pyrenelabeled TTR, chemical cross-linking and electron microscopy we demonstrated that early formed oligomers from A-state TTR were soluble and comprised on the average 20-30 TTR monomers. Early oligomers were highly cytotoxic and induced apoptosis as indicated by the MTT assay and caspase-3 activation, whereas mature fibrils were non-toxic. We also indicate an activated unfolded protein response in cells exposed to oligomers as evidenced by an increased expression of the endoplasmic reticulum located molecular chaperone BiP. Following exposure, BiP appeared relocalized to the cytoplasm. Surprisingly, we also found that native tetrameric TTR purified and stored under cold conditions (4 °C) was highly cytotoxic. The effect could be partially restored by increasing the temperature of the protein. The molecular basis for this pathogenicity is rather unclear but likely stems from previously reported increased sensitivity towards dissociation and denaturation of TTR at low temperatures and opens the possibility that rearranged tetrameric TTR is cytotoxic towards neuroblastoma cells.

  • 38.
    Sörgjerd, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wiseman, R. Luke
    Skirball Institute, New York University School of Medicine, 540 First Avenue, New York, NY, USA.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klingstedt, Therése
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Budka, Herbert
    Institute of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Nilsson, K. Peter R.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Ron, David
    Skirball Institute, New York University School of Medicine, 540 First Avenue, New York, NY, USA.
    Hammarström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    BiP can function as a molecular shepherd that alleviates oligomer toxicity and amass amyloidManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide range of diseases are linked to protein misfolding and aggregation inside and outside the cell. It is of utmost interest to understand how the molecular chaperone machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) handles the expression of highly amyloidogenic proteins. We explored the hypothesis that the ER located Hsp70 molecular chaperone BiP plays a crucial role in amyloid diseases and influence the misfolding process and disease progression. We used the transthyretin mutant TTR D18G associated with an unusual central nervous system amyloid disease as the model substrate because it represents the most destabilized and degraded TTR variant known. Over-expression of TTR D18G in concert with BiP showed that BiP selectively recognize the amyloidogenic mutant protein as compared to wild type in human cells and collects the mutant in stable intermediate size oligomers within the ER. Furthermore, whereas TTR D18G was found to be highly cytotoxic to neuroblastoma cells, TTR D18G preincubated with BiP was non-toxic indicating that BiP protects the cell from cytotoxicity. BiP was also found present in cerebellar amyloid deposits and co-localized with TTR in a TTR D18G patient suggesting that the complex can be found in the extracellular space. We promote a fundamental role of BiP in misfolding diseases and describe a molecular shepharding function of BiP in sequestrating amyloidogenic protein molecules in benign oligomeric states.

  • 39.
    Terman, Alexei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Neuzil, Jiri
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Decreased apoptotic response of inclusion-cell disease fibroblasts: A consequence of lysosomal enzyme missorting?2002In: Experimental Cell Research, ISSN 0014-4827, E-ISSN 1090-2422, Vol. 274, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand the role of lysosomes in apoptosis, we compared the responses to apoptotic stimuli of normal fibroblasts with those of inclusion cells (I-cells), i.e., fibroblasts with impaired function of lysosomal enzymes due to their missorting and ensuing nonlysosomal localization. Although both cell types did undergo apoptosis when exposed to the lysosomotropic detergent MSDH, the redox-cycling quinone naphthazarin, or the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, I-cells exerted a markedly decreased response to these agonists than did normal fibroblasts. Furthermore, leupeptin and pepstatin A (inhibitors of cysteine and aspartic proteases, respectively) suppressed staurosporine-induced apoptosis of normal fibroblasts, whereas survival of I-cells was unaffected. These findings give further support for the involvement of lysosomal enzymes in apoptosis and suggest I-cells as a suitable model for studying the role of lysosomes in programmed cell death.

  • 40.
    Zheng, Lin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dehvari, Nodi
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Benedikz, Eirikur
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Cowburn, Richard
    AstraZeneca R&D.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Terman, Alexei
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Oxidative stress induces macroautophagy of amyloid beta-protein and ensuing apoptosis2009In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 422-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing evidence for the toxicity of intracellular amyloid beta-protein (A beta) to neurons and the involvement of lysosomes in this process in Alzheimer disease (AD). We have recently shown that oxidative stress, a recognized determinant of AD. enhances macroautophagy and leads to intralysosomal accumulation of A beta in Cultured neuroblastoma cells. We hypothesized that oxidative stress promotes AD by stimulating macroautophagy of A that further may induce cell death by destabilizing lysosomal membranes. To investigate such possibility, we compared the effects of hyperoxia (40% ambient oxygen) in cultured HEK293 cells that were transfected with an empty vector (Vector), wild-type APP (APPwt), or Swedish mutant APP (APPswe). Exposure to hyperoxia for 5 days increased the number of cells with A beta-containing lysosomes, as well as the number of apoptotic cells, compared to normoxic conditions. The rate of apoptosis in all three cell lines demonstrated dependence on intralysosomal A beta content (Vector<APPwt<APPswe). Furthermore, the degree of apoptosis was positively correlated with lysosomal membrane permeabilization, whereas inhibitors Of macroautophagy and lysosomal function decreased oxidant-induced apoptosis and diminished the differences in apoptotic response between different cell lines. These results suggest that oxidative stress can induce neuronal death through macroautophagy of A beta and consequent lysosomal membrane permeabilization, which may help explain the mechanisms behind neuronal loss in AD.

  • 41.
    Zheng, Lin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Terman, Alexi
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Hallbeck, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Dehvari, Nodi
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Cowburn, Richard F.
    AstraZeneca, Södertälje.
    Benedikz, Eirikur
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cedazo-Minguez, Angel
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Macroautophagy-generated increase of lysosomal amyloid β-protein mediates oxidant-induced apoptosis of cultured neuroblastoma cells2011In: Autophagy, ISSN 1554-8627, E-ISSN 1554-8635, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 1528-1545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing evidence suggests the toxicity of intracellular amyloid β-protein (Aβ) to neurons, as well as the involvement of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease (AD). Here we show that normobaric hyperoxia (exposure of cells to 40% oxygen for five days, and consequent activation of macroautophagy and accumulation of Aβ within lysosomes, induced apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cells under hyperoxia showed: (1) increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles that contained amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as Aβ monomers and oligomers, (2) increased reactive oxygen species production, and (3) enhanced apoptosis. Oxidant-induced apoptosis positively correlated with cellular Aβ production, being the highest in cells that were stably transfected with APP Swedish KM670/671NL double mutation. Inhibition of γ-secretase, prior and/or in parallel to hyperoxia, suggested that the increase of lysosomal Aβ resulted mainly from its autophagic uptake, but also from APP processing within autophagic vacuoles. The oxidative stress-mediated effects were prevented by macroautophagy inhibition using 3-methyladenine or ATG5 downregulation. Our results suggest that upregulation of macroautophagy and resulting lysosomal Aβ accumulation are essential for oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured neuroblastoma cells and provide aditional support for the interactive role of oxidative stress and the lysosomal system in AD-related neurodegeneration.

  • 42.
    Öllinger, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Induction of apoptosis by redoxcycling quinones2002In: Phospholipid metabolism in apoptosis / [ed] Peter J. Quinn and Valerian E. Kagan, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2002, p. 151-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion of both interest and knowledge about apoptosis, the process by which a cell actively commits suicide. It is now well recognised that apoptosis is essential in many aspects of normal development and is required for maintaining tissue homeostasis. The molecular mechanisms of apoptosis are presently unknown and the subject of focused research effort. It is clear that cell membrane structure and properties play an early part in the induction process. There is increasing evidence that the arrangement of polar lipids in the membrane lipid matrix is an important factor coupled with the homeostatic mechanisms responsible for preserving membrane lipid composition and asymmetry. Changes in membrane permeability are also likely to be involved, possibly as a direct consequence of disturbances in the lipid bilayer matrix. The purpose of this volume is to examine the involvement of membrane lipids in early events of apoptosis. In particular, the role of phospholipids in mitochondrial permeability, membrane lipid asymmetry, and sphingolipid and phospholipid signalling processes in early apoptotic events are reviewed by current researchers in these fields

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