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  • 1.
    Huus, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enskär, Karin
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, J ¨onk¨ oping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors in childhood obesity—findings from the All Babies In SoutheastSweden (ABIS) cohort2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1315-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our objective was to investigate whether overweight at a very young age predicts overweight at 5 years and to identify risk factors for overweight/obesity at 5 years, thereby making it easier for Child Health Services to focus their prevention strategies on risk groups.

    Methods: We analysed data from the ABIS study (All Babies In Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. Parents answered questionnaires between childbirth (n = 16,058) and 5 years (n = 7356).

    Results: High body mass index (BMI; >95th percentile) at 1 year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]= 6.57; 95% CI = 4.63–9.33; p < 0.001) and age-adjusted BMI > 25 at 2.5 years (AOR = 14.24; 95% CI = 10.52–19.29; p < 0.001) were associated with increased risk of obesity (age-adjusted BMI > 30) at 5 years. Heredity for type 2 diabetes (p = 0.022), high parental BMI and the child's own BMI at birth and at 1 year predicted higher BMI of the child at 5 years (p < 0.001). High parental education was inversely associated with child overweight (p = 0.054 respective p < 0.005).

    Conclusion: Obesity at age 1 and at 2.5 years predicts obesity at 5 years. Obese parents, especially in families with heredity for type 2 diabetes and low education, should be targeted in early obesity prevention strategies by the Child Health Service.

  • 2.
    Huus, Karina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Weight gain in children: possible relation to the development of diabetes2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children has increased the last decades and is now defined as a global epidemic disease by the World Health Organization. Also the incidence of type 1 diabetes has increased and there are some hypothesises that argue there is a connection between overweight/obesity and type 1 diabetes.

    Aim: The general aim of this thesis was to study factors contributing to the development of overweight and obesity among children and to study possible relations to the development of diabetes.

    Method: All Babies in Southeast Sweden, ABIS, is a prospective cohort study. The study includes all babies who were born in southeast Sweden between Oct 1st 1997 until Oct1st 1999 and the design was to follow them up to school age in ABIS I and to follow them until 14 years in ABIS II, of the eligible 74 % entered the study. The families have answered questionnaires and biological samples were taken mainly from the children at the different time points: birth, 1 year, 2.5 years, 5 years and 8-9 years. In this thesis studies have been made including the whole cohort, but some studies have also been made involving only a part of the children.

    Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among children in the ABIS study was 12.9% overweight and 2.5 % obese at 5 years of age. One risk factor which appeared to have a great impact on the development of overweight and obesity at 5 years of age was the child’s own BMI at an early age and also the heredity for overweight/ obesity and the heredity for type 2 diabetes. If the father had a university degree, the child was less likely to be obese at 5 years of age. Other factors, such as the parents´ age, if the child had any siblings, and if the child lived with a single parent, did not show any significant correlation to the child’s BMI at 5 years of age.

    Early nutrition has been studied and no correlation could be found between breastfeeding less than 4 months and the development of overweight/obesity at 5 years of age. The parents answered questions about how frequent the child ate different food at 2.5 years and at 5 years. Intake of sweet lemonade was the only single food which was correlated to a higher BMI in 5 years old children. Porridge seemed to be protective against overweight/ obesity. In one of the studies the physical activity was measured by a step counter. The fewer steps the children were taking, the higher BMI and waist circumference they had. Low physical activity was also associated with a higher C-peptide value and decreased insulin sensitivity. Children who spent more time in front of TV/video had a higher fasting blood glucose value.

    Conclusions: A strong factor for the development of overweight and obesity among children is the child’s own BMI at an early age and also its heredity for overweight/ obesity and the heredity for type 2 diabetes. Early nutrition did not show any obvious correlations with overweight and obesity at 5 year old children. Low physical activity was associated with higher fasting C-peptide value and decreased insulin sensitivity. Low physical activity may cause β-cell stress which might contribute to an autoimmune process in individuals genetically predisposed to autoimmunity and, thereby, to the increasing incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children.

    List of papers
    1. Risk factors in childhood obesity: findings from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors in childhood obesity: findings from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort
    2007 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1321-1325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-4690 (URN)17666104 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2007-11-22 Created: 2007-11-22 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study
    2008 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, no 42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered.

    Methods: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age.

    Results: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study wereoverweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05–1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05–1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43–3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61–0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58–0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55–0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00–2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance.

    Conclusion: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16604 (URN)10.1186/1471-2431-8-42 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-22 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Relationship of food frequencies as reported by parents to overweight and obesity at 5 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship of food frequencies as reported by parents to overweight and obesity at 5 years
    2009 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate if food frequencies are related to overweight/obesity in 5-year-old children.

    METHODS: During 1997-1999, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective, cohort study. Participants were followed from birth (n = 16 058) to 5 years (n = 7356). Food frequencies reported by parents at 2.5 and 5 years were studied in the relation to overweight/obesity at 5 years using multiple logistic regressions. A p-value < 0.01 was considered statistically significant.

    RESULTS: At 2.5 years frequencies of intake of cheese were positively associated with overweight/obesity at 5 years while porridge, fried potatoes/french fries and cream/crème fraiche showed a negative association. When adjusting for known risk factors, porridge and fried potatoes/french fries remained negatively associated with overweight/obesity. At 5 years, chocolate and lemonade were positively associated with overweight/obesity whereas cream/crème fraiche, pastries and candy were negatively associated. Candy remained negatively associated to overweight/obesity after adjustment for potential confounders.

    CONCLUSION: Food frequencies do not offer any simple explanation for overweight/obesity. Porridge at 2.5 years may protect against overweight/obesity at 5 years, while lemonade may contribute to overweight. Our finding that fried potatoes/french fries may protect against overweight/obesity is unexpected and must be interpreted with caution. These findings should be confirmed by prospective studies using objective recordings.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Research subject
    Social Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3480 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2008.01043.x (DOI)18823298 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2008-12-08 Created: 2008-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Fasting plasma glucose levels in healthy preschool children: effects of weight and lifestyle
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fasting plasma glucose levels in healthy preschool children: effects of weight and lifestyle
    Show others...
    2007 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 706-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate whether a modern lifestyle, with a high-energy intake and a low level of physical activity, influences fasting plasma glucose concentration in healthy children.

    Methods: As a part of the prospective study 'All Babies in Southeast Sweden', 127 children from six preschool units chose to participate. The children, 56% girls and 44% boys, were 5–7 years old. Parents answered a questionnaire about their children's heredity, and physical exercise and eating habits. In the morning, before the children ate breakfast, fasting plasma glucose levels and weight, height and waist circumference were measured.

    Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels varied between 3.7 and 6.1 mmol/L, with both mean and median values of 4.7 mmol/L. There was no association between fasting plasma glucose level and body mass index (BMI), eating habits or degree of physical exercise. BMI and waist circumference were significantly correlated (p < 0.01). Children who play outdoors most frequently had a significantly lower BMI (p < 0.05) and waist circumference (p < 0.01), whereas children who more often watch TV had a significantly higher BMI (p < 0.01).

    Conclusion: A modern lifestyle, with low levels of exercise and high-energy consumption, may explain the increasing weight and even obesity of otherwise healthy, preschool children, but does not influence their fasting plasma glucose levels.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley InterScience, 2007
    Keywords
    Accelerator hypothesis, BMI, Healthy children, Lifestyle, Plasma glucose
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16605 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2007.00253.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-06 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14
    5. Physical activity, blood glucose and c-peptide in healthy school-children
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity, blood glucose and c-peptide in healthy school-children
    2010 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing. This increase must be due to environmental factors. Low physical activity and overweight/obesity among children may play a role.

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate how lack of physical activity relates to blood glucose value and insulin sensitivity in healthy children. A second aim was to explore whether low physical activity is related to overweight/obesity in children.

    Methods: This study is part of the prospective cohort study ‘All Babies In southeast Sweden’ (ABIS). 199 children from different schools participated. Pedometersteps during 4 days were registered as well as height and weight, and fasting blood glucose and serum C-peptide were determined. Parents answered a questionnaire.

    Results: Fewer dailysteps correlated to higher BMI (P= 0.019) and waist circumference (P=0.018) as well as to higher C-peptide (P= 0.044), HOMA IR (P=0.046) and HOMA β-cell (P=0.022). Children who spent more hours/day in front of TV/Video had higher waist circumference (P= 0.033) and higher fasting blood glucose values (P=0.016).

    Conclusion: Already in early school-age low physical activity is related to increased BMI and waist circumference. These signs and low physical activity are accompanied by a decreased insulin sensitivity compensated for by significantly increased insulin secretion. Low physical activity may cause beta cell stress which might contribute to an autoimmune process in individuals predisposed to autoimmunity, and thereby to the increasing incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children.

    Keywords
    Blood glucose, Children, Obesity, Physical activity
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16606 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-02-06 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2010-04-20
  • 3.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Brekke, Hilde K
    Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy at G¨ oteborg University, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F
    Deptartment of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden/Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Relationship of food frequencies as reported by parents to overweight and obesity at 5 years2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate if food frequencies are related to overweight/obesity in 5-year-old children.

    Methods: During 1997-1999, 21 700 infants were invited to participate in ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective, cohort study. Participants were followed from birth (n = 16 058) to 5 years (n = 7356). Food frequencies reported by parents at 2.5 and 5 years were studied in the relation to overweight/obesity at 5 years using multiple logistic regressions. A p-value < 0.01 was considered statistically significant.

    Results: At 2.5 years frequencies of intake of cheese were positively associated with overweight/obesity at 5 years while porridge, fried potatoes/french fries and cream/creme fraiche showed a negative association. When adjusting for known risk factors, porridge and fried potatoes/french fries remained negatively associated with overweight/obesity. At 5 years, chocolate and lemonade were positively associated with overweight/obesity whereas cream/creme fraiche, pastries and candy were negatively associated. Candy remained negatively associated to overweight/obesity after adjustment for potential confounders.

    Conclusion: Food frequencies do not offer any simple explanation for overweight/obesity. Porridge at 2.5 years may protect against overweight/obesity at 5 years, while lemonade may contribute to overweight. Our finding that fried potatoes/french fries may protect against overweight/obesity is unexpected and must be interpreted with caution. These findings should be confirmed by prospective studies using objective recordings.

  • 4.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics.
    Enskär, Karin
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Adolescents experience of living with diabetes2007In: Paediatric nursing, ISSN 0962-9513, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 29-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 5.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics .
    Ludvigsson, Jonas F.
    Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Enskär, Karin
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Exclusive breastfeeding of Swedish children and its possible influence on the development of obesity: a prospective cohort study2008In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 8, no 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Overweight and obesity are increasing among children all over the world. Socio-economic factors may influence the development of overweight and obesity in childhood, and it has been proposed that breastfeeding may protect against obesity. The aim of our study was to examine the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and obesity when potential confounders, such as socioeconomic factors, are considered.

    Methods: The data analyzed was from ABIS (All Babies in Southeast Sweden), a prospective cohort study. All parents with children born between October 1, 1997 and October 1, 1999 in Southeast Sweden (n = 21,700) were asked to participate. Parents were asked to answer periodic questionnaires from the time of the child's birth (n = 16,058) until he/she was five years of age (n = 7,356). Cutoffs for overweight and obesity were defined according to Cole et al, age and gender adjusted. Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was defined as < 4 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Multiple logistic regressions were used to identify variables that predict the child's BMI (Body Mass Index) at five years of age.

    Results: At five years of age, 12.9% of the children in the study wereoverweight and 4.3% were obese. At the age of three months, 78.4% of the children were being breastfed exclusively. The median exclusive breastfeeding duration was four months. High maternal BMI > 30 (AOR = 1.07; CI = 1.05–1.09; P < 0.001), maternal smoking (AOR = 1.43; CI = 1.05–1.95; P = 0.023) and being a single parent (AOR = 2.10; CI = 1.43–3.09; P < 0.001) were associated with short-term exclusive breastfeeding (less than 4 months). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was less common if one of the parents had a university degree (Mother: AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.61–0.90; P = 0.003 Father: AOR = 0.73; CI = 0.58–0.92; P = 0.008) or if the father was more than 37 years old (AOR = 0.74; CI = 0.55–0.99; P = 0.045). Short-term exclusive breastfeeding was associated with obesity in five-year-old children (simple logistic regression: OR = 1.44; CI = 1.00–2.07; P = 0.050), but when including other independent factors in the analysis, short-term exclusive breastfeeding did not attain statistical significance.

    Conclusion: We cannot exclude the possibility that exclusive breastfeeding influences weight development, but it does not seem to protect against obesity at five years of age.

  • 6.
    Huus, Karina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Raustorp, Anders
    School of Human Sciences University of Kalmar, Sweden.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Physical activity, blood glucose and c-peptide in healthy school-children2010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing. This increase must be due to environmental factors. Low physical activity and overweight/obesity among children may play a role.

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to investigate how lack of physical activity relates to blood glucose value and insulin sensitivity in healthy children. A second aim was to explore whether low physical activity is related to overweight/obesity in children.

    Methods: This study is part of the prospective cohort study ‘All Babies In southeast Sweden’ (ABIS). 199 children from different schools participated. Pedometersteps during 4 days were registered as well as height and weight, and fasting blood glucose and serum C-peptide were determined. Parents answered a questionnaire.

    Results: Fewer dailysteps correlated to higher BMI (P= 0.019) and waist circumference (P=0.018) as well as to higher C-peptide (P= 0.044), HOMA IR (P=0.046) and HOMA β-cell (P=0.022). Children who spent more hours/day in front of TV/Video had higher waist circumference (P= 0.033) and higher fasting blood glucose values (P=0.016).

    Conclusion: Already in early school-age low physical activity is related to increased BMI and waist circumference. These signs and low physical activity are accompanied by a decreased insulin sensitivity compensated for by significantly increased insulin secretion. Low physical activity may cause beta cell stress which might contribute to an autoimmune process in individuals predisposed to autoimmunity, and thereby to the increasing incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children.

  • 7.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Huus, Karina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklöv, Kristina
    Div of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Klintström, Rebecka
    Div of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lahdenpera, Anne
    MSc, Div of Pediatrics and Diabetes Research Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Link ¨ oping University, Sweden.
    Fasting plasma glucose levels in healthy preschool children: effects of weight and lifestyle2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 5, p. 706-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate whether a modern lifestyle, with a high-energy intake and a low level of physical activity, influences fasting plasma glucose concentration in healthy children.

    Methods: As a part of the prospective study 'All Babies in Southeast Sweden', 127 children from six preschool units chose to participate. The children, 56% girls and 44% boys, were 5–7 years old. Parents answered a questionnaire about their children's heredity, and physical exercise and eating habits. In the morning, before the children ate breakfast, fasting plasma glucose levels and weight, height and waist circumference were measured.

    Results: Fasting plasma glucose levels varied between 3.7 and 6.1 mmol/L, with both mean and median values of 4.7 mmol/L. There was no association between fasting plasma glucose level and body mass index (BMI), eating habits or degree of physical exercise. BMI and waist circumference were significantly correlated (p < 0.01). Children who play outdoors most frequently had a significantly lower BMI (p < 0.05) and waist circumference (p < 0.01), whereas children who more often watch TV had a significantly higher BMI (p < 0.01).

    Conclusion: A modern lifestyle, with low levels of exercise and high-energy consumption, may explain the increasing weight and even obesity of otherwise healthy, preschool children, but does not influence their fasting plasma glucose levels.

  • 8.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov Hospital Jonköping, Sweden.
    Use of the national quality registry to monitor health-related quality of life of children with type I diabetes: A pilot study2015In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of diabetes is complicated, as treatment affects the everyday life of both children and their families. To enable optimal care for children with type I diabetes, it is important to highlight health-related quality of life (HrQoL) as well as medical outcomes to detect psychological problems that otherwise could be missed. The aim was to study HrQoL in children and adolescents with type I diabetes dependent on gender, age and co-morbidity and to study the consistency between childrens self-reporting and parents proxy reporting. The cross-sectional data were collected using the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure and the DISABKIDS diabetes module. Parents in the proxy report perceived their childrens HrQoL to be lower than children themselves. Boys reported their HrQoL to be better than girls. Results show that living with an additional disease has an impact on the HrQoL, which is an important factor to consider in the quality registry. Assessing HrQoL on a routine basis may facilitate detection and discussion of HrQoL-related questions in the national quality registry.

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