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  • 1. Bari, Muhammad Rizuanul
    et al.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Rastam, Lennart
    Lindblad, Ulf
    Abdominal obesity and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes in a Swedish community - Skaraborg Hypertension and Diabetes Project2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 211-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To explore the association between abdominal obesity and insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design. A cross-sectional observational study. Setting. Primary care in Skara, Sweden. Subjects. A total of 198 men and 186 women with type 2 diabetes who consecutively completed an annual check-up in 1992-1993. Main outcome measures. Abdominal obesity was defined according to criteria for the metabolic syndrome using the waist circumference (WC): > 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women. Insulin resistance was estimated using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA), and was dichotomized by the 75th percentile (IR). Results. Abdominal obesity was found in 66 men (33%), and in 106 women (57%). Pearson's correlation coefficients between components of the metabolic syndrome and IR were statistically significant for WC, waist-hip ratio, serum triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol, and were higher for WC (0.40) than for waist-hip ratio (0.23) in both genders (p < 0.001). The association between WC and IR was challenged by successively entering other components of the metabolic syndrome into the model in a logistic regression. In the final model, adjusting for differences in age, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c, serum triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and microalbuminuria, the association remained statistically significant both in men (OR 8.6, 95% CI 3.0-25.2, p < 0.001), and in women (OR 5.6, 95% CI 1.7-18.1, p = 0.004). Conclusions. WC provides a feasible measure for insulin resistance in the vast majority of subjects with type 2 diabetes. It is convenient and less expensive than direct means and could be used as a proxy for insulin resistance in population studies.

  • 2.
    Bergström, G
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Berglund, G
    Lund University.
    Blomberg, A
    Umeå University.
    Brandberg, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital / University of Gothenburg.
    Engström, G
    Lund University.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research.
    Eriksson, M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    de Faire, U
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm / Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Flinck, A
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Stockholm / University of Gothenburg.
    Hansson, M G
    Uppsala University.
    Hedblad, B
    Lund University.
    Hjelmgren, O
    University of Gothenburg / Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg.
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University.
    Jernberg, T
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johnsson, Å
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, L
    Unit of Radiology.
    Lind, L
    Uppsala University.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Lund University / Lund University Hospital.
    Melander, O
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, M
    Lund University / Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Sandström, A
    Umeå University.
    Schmidt, C
    University of Gothenburg.
    Söderberg, S
    Umeå University.
    Sundström, J
    Uppsala University / Uppsala Clinical Resarch Centre.
    Toren, K
    University of Gothenburg.
    Waldenström, A
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Wedel, H
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg.
    Vikgren, J
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg / University of Gothenburg.
    Fagerberg, B
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosengren, A
    University of Gothenburg.
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 3.
    Blomstrand, Peter
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Engvall, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Maret, Eva
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Maret-Ouda, John
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Left ventricular diastolic function, assessed by echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging, is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events, superior to global left ventricular longitudinal strain, in patients with type 2 diabetes.2015In: European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 2047-2412, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 1000-1007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to determine whether left ventricular systolic function, in terms of global left ventricular longitudinal strain (GLS), and diastolic function, expressed as the ratio between early diastolic transmitral flow and mitral annular motion velocities (E/e'), can predict cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: We prospectively investigated 406 consecutive patients, aged 55-65 years, with diabetes mellitus, who participated in the CARDIPP study. Echocardiography, pulse pressure (pp), and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were analysed. Twelve cases of myocardial infarction and seven cases of stroke were identified during the follow-up period of 67 ± 17 months. Univariate Cox regression analysis showed that E/e' was a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (hazards ratio 1.12; 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.18, P < 0.001). E/e' was prospectively associated with cardiovascular events independent of age, sex, GLS, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), pp, and HbA1c in multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that E/e' and HbA1c were the strongest predictors for cardiovascular events, both having an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.71 followed by LVEF with an AUC of 0.65 and GLS of 0.61. In a Kaplan-Meyer analysis, the cumulative probability of an event during the follow-up period was 8.6% for patients with an E/e' ratio >15 compared with 2.6% for patients with E/e' ≤15, P = 0.011.

    CONCLUSION: In middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes, E/e' is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction and stroke, comparable with HbA1c and superior to GLS and LVEF.

  • 4.
    Bodegard, J
    et al.
    AstraZeneca AB, Sweden .
    Sundstrom, J
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Svennblad, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Nilsson, P M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Johansson, G
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Changes in body mass index following newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A cohort study of 8486 primary-care patients2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. - Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study explored the association between BMI changes in the first 18 months of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and the risk of long-term CVD mortality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. - A total of 8486 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and no previous history of CVD or cancer were identified from 84 primary-care centres in Sweden. During the first year after diagnosis, patients were grouped according to BMI change: Increase, or andgt;= +1 BMI unit; unchanged, or between +1 and-1 BMI unit; and decrease, or andlt;=-1 BMI unit. Associations between BMI change and CVD mortality, defined as death from stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death, were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models (NCT 01121315). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. - Baseline mean age was 60.0 years and mean BMI was 30.2 kg/m(2). Patients were followed for up to 9 years (median: 4.6 years). During the first 18 months, 53.4% had no change in their BMI, while 32.2% decreased and 14.4% increased. Compared with patients with unchanged BMI, those with an increased BMI had higher risks of CVD mortality (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.11-2.39) and all-cause mortality (1.33, 1.01-1.76). BMI decreases had no association with these risks compared with unchanged BMI: 1.06 (0.76-1.48) and 1.06 (0.85-1.33), respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. - Increased BMI within the first 18 months of type 2 diabetes diagnosis was associated with an increased long-term risk of CVD mortality. However, BMI decrease did not lower the long-term risk of mortality.

  • 5.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Jakobsson, Ulf
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The nutritional situation in Swedish nursing homes - A longitudinal study2015In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poor nutritional status is widespread among the elderly and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to longitudinally describe the nutritional status in elderly people living in nursing homes. Nutritional status was recorded longitudinally in elderly people living in 11 different nursing homes in Sweden. Participants were examined at baseline by specially trained nurses who also assisted with questionnaires and collected data for current medical treatment from patient records. Nutritional status was evaluated at baseline and after 24 months with the mini nutritional assessment (MNA). The study included 318 subjects. The mean age of the participants was 85.0 years (range 65-101). At baseline, 41.6% were well nourished, 40.3% at risk of malnutrition, and 17.7% malnourished according to the MNA. Survival was significantly lower in the malnourished group. After 24 months, almost half of the population had died. The group of participants who survived at 24 months represents a population of better nutritional state, where 10.6% were malnourished at baseline increasing to 24.6% after 24 months. After 24 months, 38.7% of the participants showed a decline in nutritional state. The group with deteriorating MNA scores had higher weight, BMI values, and a higher hospitalization rate. The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing home residents increased over time and it is important to evaluate nutritional state regularly. Nutritional interventions should be considered in better nourished groups, as well as in malnourished individuals, to prevent a decline in nutritional state.

  • 6.
    Borgstrom Bolmsjo, Beata
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Prevalence and treatment of heart failure in Swedish nursing homes2013In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 13, no 118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since the burden of care for elderly patients with heart failure (HF) can be decreased by therapeutic measures, it is important that such patients are identified correctly. This study explores the prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden, with special consideration of the risk of failure to diagnose HF in the study population. A second aim is to explore medication and the adherence to guidelines for the treatment of HF. Methods: 429 patients from 11 nursing homes were included during 2008-2011. Information about diagnoses and medications from patient records, blood samples, questionnaire responses and blood pressure measurements were collected. The baseline characteristics of the patients, their medications and one-year mortality were identified and then compared regarding HF diagnosis and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. A BNP level of greater than 100 ng/L was used to identify potential cases of HF. Results: The point prevalence of HF diagnosis in the medical records in the study population was 15.4%. With the recommended cut-off value for BNP, up to 196 subjects in the study population (45.7%) qualified for further screening of potential HF. The subjects in the HF and non-HF groups were similar with the exception of mean age, BNP levels and Mini Mental State Examination results which were higher in the HF group, and the eGFR and blood pressure, which were lower when HF. The subjects with higher BNP values were older and had lower eGFR, Hb, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. The subjects with HF diagnoses were in many cases not treated according to the guidelines. Loop diuretics were often used without concomitant ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. The subjects without HF diagnoses in the medical records at inclusion but with BNP values greater than 100 ng/L had less appropriate HF medication. The one-year mortality was 52.9% in the population with HF. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the estimated prevalence of HF in nursing homes in Sweden would increase if BNP measurements were used to select patients for further examinations. The pharmacological treatment of HF varied substantially, as did adherence to guidelines.

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Dalarna University,Falun Sweden.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 40-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. Methods: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used. Results: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p &lt; 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p &lt; 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p &lt; 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality. Conclusions/Interpretations: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, Axel Carl
    et al.
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 9.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andreasson, Thomas
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Cinthio, Magnus
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Is there an underestimation of intima-media thickness based on M-mode ultrasound technique in the abdominal aorta?2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measuring intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery (CCA) is a valuable resource for the evaluation of subclinical atherosclerosis. The main objective of this study was to explore whether a B-mode ultrasound technique, Philips ATL, and an M-mode ultrasound technique, Wall Track System (WTS), show interchangeable results when measured in CCA and the abdominal aorta (AA). A total of 24 healthy, young subjects were examined. IMT and lumen diameter (LD) of the AA and the CCA were measured twice by two skilled ultrasonographers with two different ultrasound equipment B-mode: (Philips, ATL and M-mode: WTS).The intra-observer variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode showed a coefficient of variation 8% and 9%, and with M-mode 11% and 15%, respectively. Interobserver variability of IMT in CCA and AA using B-mode was 6% and 12%, and with M-mode 11% and 18%, respectively. CCA IMT was 0·53 ± 0·07 and 0·53 ± 0·09 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. However, in AA, IMT was 0·61 ± 0·5 and 0·54 ± 0·10 mm using B-mode and M-mode, respectively. Thus, AA IMT was 11·5% thicker using B-mode (P<0·01). We received adequate IMT readings from the carotid artery as well as the AA using two commonly used B-mode and M-mode techniques. B-mode technique seems to show less variability, especially in the AA. More importantly, the two techniques measured different IMT thickness in the aorta, emphasizing the importance of using similar technique when comparing the impact of absolute values of IMT on cardiovascular disease.

  • 10.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Sagittal abdominal diameter is a more independent measure compared with waist circumference to predict arterial stiffness in subjects with type 2 diabetes - a prospective observational cohort study2013In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Anthropometric measurements are useful in clinical practice since they are non-invasive and cheap. Previous studies suggest that sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) may be a better measure of visceral fat depots. The aim of this study was to prospectively explore and compare how laboratory and anthropometric risk markers predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods

    Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55–65 years old.

    Results

    There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r = 0.144, p = 0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.172, p = 0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.130, p = 0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r = 0.147, p = 0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r = 0.184, p = 0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p = 0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusions

    We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 11.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjarnegård, Niklas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Sagittal Abdominal Diameter is a more Independent Measure compared with Waist Circumference to predict Arterial Stiffness in subjects with Type 2 DiabetesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to prospectively explore how laboratory and anthropometric risk factors predicted subclinical organ damage in 255 patients, with type 2 diabetes, after four years.

    Methods: Baseline investigations were performed in 2006 and were repeated at follow-up in 2010. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and at follow-up in a cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes aged 55-65 years old.

    Results: There were significant correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) (r= 0.144, p=0.03), C - reactive protein (CRP) (r=0.172, p=0.009) at baseline and IMT measured at follow-up. After adjustment for sex, age, treatment with statins and Hba1c, the associations remained statistically significant. HbA1c, total cholesterol or LDL-cholesterol did not correlate to IMT at follow-up. Baseline body mass index (BMI) (r=0.130, p=0.049), waist circumference (WC) (r=0.147, p=0.027) and sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD) (r=0.184, p=0.007) correlated to PWV at follow-up. Challenged with sex, SBP and HbA1c, the association between SAD, not WC nor BMI, and PWV remained statistically significant (p=0.036). In a stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    Conclusion: We conclude that apoB and CRP, but not LDL-cholesterol predicted subclinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SAD was more independent in predicting arterial stiffness over time, compared with WC, in middle-aged men and women with type 2 diabetes.

  • 12.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 13.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Vascular surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, T
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Complications Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55-66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden. RESULTS: The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA(1c), hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7-10.8, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 14.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Carotid intima-media thickness and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratio in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes2009In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 384-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To explore the association between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the apolipoprotein B (apoB)/apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) ratio compared with conventional lipids in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 247 patients with Type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, in the Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes—a Prospective study in Primary care (CARDIPP-1) study. Primary care nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics. Blood samples were taken for laboratory analyses. The carotid IMT was determined by ultrasonography at the University Hospital in Linköping and at the County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.

    Results The ApoB/apoA-I ratio (r = 0.207, P = 0.001), apoB (r = 0.166, P = 0.009) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-c) (r = 0.129, P = 0.046) correlated with IMT. Conventional lipids, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure were not significantly correlated to IMT. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted with IMT as the dependent variable and the apoB/apoA-I ratio, HbA1c, hsCRP, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), total cholesterol, non-HDL-c and treatment with statins as independent variables. Following adjustment for age and gender, only the apoB/apoA-I ratio remained significantly associated with IMT (odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.7–10.8, P = 0.002).

    Conclusions We conclude that there was a significant association between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and IMT in middle-aged patients with Type 2 diabetes. The association was independent of conventional lipids, hsCRP, glycaemic control and use of statins.

  • 15.
    Engström, Sven G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Lennart
    The Neurotec Department, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunnar H.
    The Neurotec Department, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of comorbidity in analysing patient costs in Swedish primary care2006In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The objective was to explore the usefulness of the morbidity risk adjustment system Adjusted Clinical Groups® (ACG), in comparison with age and gender, in explaining and estimating patient costs on an individual level in Swedish primary health care. Data were retrieved from two primary health care centres in southeastern Sweden.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional observational study. Data from electronic patient registers from the two centres were retrieved for 2001 and 2002, and patients were grouped into ACGs, expressing the individual combination of diagnoses and thus the comorbidity. Costs per patient were calculated for both years in both centres. Cost data from one centre were used to create ACG weights. These weights were then applied to patients at the other centre. Correlations between individual patient costs, age, gender and ACG weights were studied. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed in order to explain and estimate patient costs.

    Results

    The variation in individual patient costs was substantial within age groups as well as within ACG weight groups. About 37.7% of the individual patient costs could be explained by ACG weights, and age and gender added about 0.8%. The individual patient costs in 2001 estimated 22.0% of patient costs in 2002, whereas ACG weights estimated 14.3%.

    Conclusion

    ACGs was an important factor in explaining and estimating individual patient costs in primary health care. Costs were explained to only a minor extent by age and gender. However, the usefulness of the ACG system appears to be sensitive to the accuracy of classification and coding of diagnoses by physicians.

  • 16.
    Ernsth Bravella, Marie
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Westerlind, Björn
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Lannering, Christina
    Unit of Research and Development in Primary Care, Futurum, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Unit of Research and Development in Primary Care, Futurum, Jönköping, Sweden.
    How to assess frailty and the need for care? Report from the Study of Health and Drugs in the Elderly (SHADES) in community dwellings in Sweden2011In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Knowledge about the need for care of elderly individuals in community dwellings and the factors affecting their needs and support is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize the frailty of a population of elderly individuals living in community dwellings in Sweden in relation to co-morbidity, use of drugs, and risk of severe conditions such as malnutrition, pressure ulcers, and falls. In 2008, 315 elderly individuals living in community dwellings were interviewed and examined as part of the SHADES-study. The elderly demonstrated co-morbidity (a mean of three diseases) and polypharmacy (an average of seven drugs). More than half the sample was at risk for malnutrition, one third was at risk for developing pressure ulcers, and nearly all (93%) had an increased risk of falling and a great majority had cognitive problems. Age, pulse pressure, body mass index, and specific items from the modified Norton scale (MNS), the Downton fall risk index (DFRI), and the mini nutritional assessment (MNA-SF) were related to different outcomes, defining the need for care and frailty. Based on the results of this study, we suggest a single set of items useful for understanding the need for care and to improve individual based care in community dwellings.

     

  • 17.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Lindström, Torbjön
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Cardiovascular risk factors related to the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes are gender dependent2012In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism with diabetes and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We studied 173 women and 309 men in the observational CARDIPP trial in which determination of left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were performed. Blood pressures were measured with 24-h ambulatory technique (ABP). Heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala in the analyses. Men with Ala-isoform displayed higher waist circumference (Ala: 107 ± 14 cm, Pro: 104 ± 11 cm, p = 0.045) and body weight (Ala: 95.7 ± 18 kg, Pro: 91.6 ± 14 kg, p = 0.042) than Pro-homozygotes. Men with ALA-isoform also showed higher systolic ABP levels (Ala: 134 ± 15 mmHg, Pro: 130 ± 14 mmHg, p = 0.004), whereas left ventricular mass index, IMT and PWV were unrelated to isoforms. In contrast, carotid–radial PWV was lower in women with the Ala-isoform (Ala: 7.9 ± 1.0 m/s, Pro: 8.5 ± 1.3 m/s, p = 0.01) and levels of apolipoprotein A1 were higher (Ala: 1.43 ± 0.27 g/l, Pro: 1.35 ± 0.17 g/l, p = 0.03). In conclusion, we found that men with type 2 diabetes having the Ala-isoform of PPARγ Pro12Ala had an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile, whereas women with this isoform had lower carotid–radial PWV and higher apolipoprotein A1 levels suggesting a beneficial prognosis. These differences according to gender of the ALA isoform in type 2 diabetes deserve further attention.

  • 18.
    Franck, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Åstrand, Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Ala isoform of the PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism is related to increased abdominal obesity in men but has little impact on cardiovascular risk markers in patients with type 2 diabetes2009Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The interaction of the PPARγ Pro12Ala with obesity and cardiovascular risk is controversial. We aimed to study potential associations of the Ala isoform of this polymorphism with obesity, blood pressure and markers of cardiovascular disease and organ damage in middle aged patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Subjects and methods: We recruited 148 women and 246 men in the CArdiovascular Risk factors in Patients with DIabetes – a Prospective study in the Primary health care setting (CARDIPP) study in which early markers of organ damage by cardiac echocardiography, determination of carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) was performed. Blood pressures were measured as both as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and as a noninvasive recording of central blood pressure. Allelic discrimination was detected with the ABI prism 7500HT Sequence Detection System. Due to the low prevalence of Ala homozygotes, heterozygotes and homozygotes of Ala were defined as Ala isoform in the analyses.

    Results: Men with Ala isoform exhibited higher sagittal abdominal diameter (Pro: 25.4±3.4 cm, Ala: 26.7±4.9 cm, p= 0.04) waist circumference (Pro: 104±11 cm, Ala: 108±15 cm, p= 0.046) and body weight (Pro: 91.6±14, Ala: 96.5±18, p= 0.035) than homozygotes for the Pro isoform. However, there were no differences in either gender with respect to blood pressures, left-ventricular mass-index, carotid IMT or carotid-femoral PWV in the participants.

    Conclusion: It is unlikely that determination of the PPARγ Pro12Ala isoform in clinic practice adds any major information on cardiovascular risk or circulatory organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 19.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Johan Östgren, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care Centre.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reduced Arteriovenous Shunting Capacity After Local Heating and Redistribution of Baseline Skin Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Assessed With Velocity-Resolved Quantitative Laser Doppler Flowmetry2010In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 1578-1584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE-To compare the microcirculatory velocity distribution in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetic control subjects at baseline and after local heating. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The skin blood flow response to local heating (44 degrees C for 20 mm) was assessed in 28 diabetic patients and 29 control subjects using a new velocity-resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry technique (qLDF). The qLDF estimates erythrocyte (RBC) perfusion (velocity X concentration), in a physiologically relevant unit (grams RBC per 100 g tissue X millimeters per second) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions: v less than1 mm/s, v 1-10 mm/s, and v greater than10 mm/s. RESULTS-The increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity greater than1 mm/s. A significantly lower response in qLDF total perfusion was found in diabetic patients than in control subjects after heat provocation because of less high-velocity blood flow (v greater than10 mm/s). The RBC concentration in diabetic patients increased sevenfold for v between 1 and 10 mm/s, and 15-fold for v greater than10 mm/s, whereas no significant increase was found for v less than1 mm/s. The mean velocity increased from 0.94 to 7.3 mm/s in diabetic patients and from 0.83 to 9.7 mm/s in control subjects. CONCLUSIONS-The perfusion increase occurs in larger shunting vessels and not as an increase in capillary flow. Baseline diabetic patient data indicated a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions, associated with longer duration of diabetes. A lower perfusion was associated with a higher BMI and a lower toe-to-brachial systolic blood pressure ratio.

  • 20.
    Fredriksson, Ingemar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology .
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Microcirculatory changes in type 2 diabetes assessed with velocity resolved quantitative laser Doppler flowmetryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The response to local heating (44oC for 20 min) was evaluated in 28 type 2 diabetes patients (DM) and 29 non-diabetes controls (ND). Microcirculatory perfusion was assessed using conventional and quantitative Laser Doppler flowmetry (cLDF and qLDF), respectively. The qLDF estimates perfusion in a physiological relevant unit (g RBC / 100 g tissue × mm/s) in a fixed output volume, separated into three velocity regions, v < 1 mm/s, 1 - 10 mm/s, and v > 10 mm/s. Perfusion in cLDF is given in arbitrary units with unknown velocity distribution and measurement volume.

    A significantly lower response in DM than in ND was found after heat provocation both for the initial peak and the plateau response, while no significant differences were found at baseline. The qLDF showed increased perfusion for the velocity regions 1-10 mm/s and above 10 mm/s, while no significant increase was found for v < 1 mm/s. In conclusion, we found a lowered LDF response to local heating in DM. The new qLDF method showed that the increased blood flow occurs in vessels with a velocity above 1 mm/s. Baseline qLDF-data indicated that a redistribution of flow to higher velocity regions was associated with longer DM duration and for DM a negative correlation between perfusion and BMI.

  • 21.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Lindström, Kjell
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Ylikivelä, R
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Self-monitoring of B-Glucose (SMBG) in type 2 diabetes does not improve HbA1c level. Clin Chem Acta (Suppl).2005In: Focus on the patient. 16th IFCC Euromedlab.,2005, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Schöld, Anna-Karin
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Self monitoring of B-Glucose in Type 2 diabetes does not improve the HbA1c level nor the reassurance what to do if unsatisfactory value2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The cost of test strips for self monitoring of B-glucose (SMBG) has increased dramatically. However, the efficacy of SMBG for patients with type 2 diabetes has been questioned.

    Aim: The aim of this work was to study the association between glycaemic control and SMBG in patients with type 2 diabetes and their opinions and habits of SMBG.

    Method: A study was conducted at 18 primary health care centres (PHCC) where all patients with diabetes type 2 were surveyed (n= 6495). Age, gender, treatment category, and HbA1c were registered. Patients were categorised as users of SMBG if test strips had been prescribed within the last year. Users of SMBG (n=533) were telephone interviewed about the last time SMBG was used, the number of test-strips used the last week, the reason and value for SMBG, and strategy if unsatisfactory value.

    Results: The treatment categories; diet only (32%), oral agents (37%) and insulin (31%), were  similarly distributed at all PHCCs. Mean HbA1c (6.0%) was different in patients with oral agents at the PHCC with the highest frequency of SMBG users compared to the PHCC with the middle (6.8%, p<0.001) and to PHCC with the lowest (6.4%, p= 0.03) number of users. At one PHCC, users of SMBG with insulin treatment had higher HbA1c than non-users (7.0% vs 6.1%, p= 0.03). At two PHCCs, SMBG users with diet only, had higher HbA1c than non-users (5.5% vs 5.2% p=0.04, 6.8% vs 6.9% p=0.01). At one PHC non-users had higher HbA1c (6.4% vs 6.0%). The patients used 0-42 test-strips during the week prior to the interview. Reassurance was the main reason for using SMBG, and on a scale of 1 to10 the mean value was 7.5. Over 75% of the patients stated that self-modification of treatment was important but one third did not know what to do if the test-strip showed unsatisfactory value.

    Conclusions: The results showed that the use of SMBG was inconsistently associated with glycaemic control. This study lends support for clear guidelines and optimal use of test-strips with focus on the patient as a person with individual needs.

    * Ewa.Grodzinsky@lio.se

  • 23.
    Grundvold, Irene
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Bodegard, Johan
    AstraZeneca Nord, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Body weight and risk of atrial fibrillation in 7,169 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes; an observational study2015In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 14, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obesity, type 2 diabetes and atrial fibrillation (AF) are closely associated, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We aimed to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) or weight change with risk of AF in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: A total of 7,169 participations with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were stratified according to baseline BMI, and after a second BMI measurement within 18 months, further grouped according to relative weight change as "weight gain" (greater than 1 BMI unit), " stable weight" (+/- 1 BMI unit) and " weight loss" (less than 1 BMI unit). The mean follow-up period was 4.6 years, and the risk of AF was estimated using adjusted Cox regression models. Results: Average age at diabetes diagnosis was 60 years and the patients were slightly obese (mean BMI 30.2 kg/m(2)). During follow-up, 287 patients developed incident AF, and those with overweight or obesity at baseline had 1.9 fold and 2.9-fold higher risk of AF, respectively, than those with normal BMI. The 14% of the patients with subsequent weight gain had 1.5-fold risk of AF compared with those with stable weight or weight loss. Conclusions: In patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes, baseline overweight and obesity, as well as modest weight increase during the first 18 months after diagnosis, were associated with a substantially increased risk of incident AF. Patients with type 2 diabetes may benefit from efforts to prevent weight gain in order to reduce the risk of incident AF.

  • 24.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Endocrinology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    In type 2 diabetes, randomisation to advice to follow a low-carbohydrate diet transiently improves glycaemic control compared with advice to follow a low-fat diet producing a similar weight loss2012In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 2118-2127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The study aimed to compare the effects of a 2 year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD), based on four group meetings to achieve compliance. METHODS: This was a prospective randomised parallel trial involving 61 adults with type 2 diabetes consecutively recruited in primary care and randomised by drawing ballots. Patients that did not speak Swedish could not be recruited. The primary outcomes in this non-blinded study were weight and HbA(1c). Patients on the LFD aimed for 55-60 energy per cent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrate. RESULTS: The mean BMI and HbA(1c) of the participants were 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) and 57.0 ± 9.2 mmol/mol, respectively. No patients were lost to follow-up. Weight loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months: LFD -3.99 ± 4.1 kg (n = 31); LCD -4.31 ± 3.6 kg (n = 30); p < 0.001 within groups. At 24 months, patients on the LFD had lost -2.97 ± 4.9 kg and those on LCD -2.34 ± 5.1 kg compared with baseline (p = 0.002 and p = 0.020 within groups, respectively). HbA(1c) fell in the LCD group only (LCD at 6 months -4.8 ± 8.3 mmol/mol, p = 0.004, at 12 months -2.2 ± 7.7 mmol/mol, p = 0.12; LFD at 6 months -0.9 ± 8.8 mmol/mol, p = 0.56). At 6 months, HDL-cholesterol had increased with the LCD (from 1.13 ± 0.33 mmol/l to 1.25 ± 0.47 mmol/l, p = 0.018) while LDL-cholesterol did not differ between groups. Insulin doses were reduced in the LCD group (0 months, LCD 42 ± 65 E, LFD 39 ± 51 E; 6 months, LCD 30 ± 47 E, LFD 38 ± 48 E; p = 0.046 for between-group change). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Weight changes did not differ between the diet groups, while insulin doses were reduced significantly more with the LCD at 6 months, when compliance was good. Thus, aiming for 20% of energy intake from carbohydrates is safe with respect to cardiovascular risk compared with the traditional LFD and this approach could constitute a treatment alternative. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01005498 FUNDING: University Hospital of Linköping Research Funds, Linköping University, the County Council of Östergötland, and the Diabetes Research Centre of Linköping University.

  • 25.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Dizdar, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bunjaku, B.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Randomization to a low-carbohydrate diet advice improves health related quality of life compared with a low-fat diet at similar weight-loss in Type 2 diabetes mellitus2014In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 221-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To compare the effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of a 2-year intervention with a low-fat diet (LFD) or a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) based on four group-meetings to achieve compliance. To describe different aspects of taking part in the intervention following the LFD or LCD.

    Methods

    Prospective, randomized trial of 61 adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The SF-36 questionnaire was used at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. Patients on LFD aimed for 55–60 energy percent (E%) and those on LCD for 20 E% from carbohydrates. The patients were interviewed about their experiences of the intervention.

    Results

    Mean body-mass-index was 32.7 ± 5.4 kg/m2 at baseline. Weight-loss did not differ between groups and was maximal at 6 months, LFD: −3.99 ± 4.1 kg, LCD: −4.31 ± 3.6 kg (p < 0.001 within groups). There was an increase in the physical component score of SF-36 from 44.1 (10.0) to 46.7 (10.5) at 12 months in the LCD group (p < 0.009) while no change occurred in the LFD group (p < 0.03 between groups). At 12 months the physical function, bodily pain and general health scores improved within the LCD group (p values 0.042–0.009) while there was no change within the LFD group.

    Conclusions

    Weight-changes did not differ between the diet groups while improvements in HRQoL only occurred after one year during treatment with LCD. No changes of HRQoL occurred in the LFD group in spite of a similar reduction in body weight.

     

  • 26.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Healthy aging and age-adjusted nutrition and physical fitness2013In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, ISSN 1521-6934, E-ISSN 1532-1932, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 741-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expected life span is gradually increasing worldwide. Healthy dietary and exercise habits contribute to healthy ageing. Certain types of diet can prevent or reduce obesity, and may reduce the risk of diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease). Exercise also reduces the risk of diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, some cancers and some mental disturbances). A less sedentary life style seems at least as important as regular exercise. Exercise can probably be tailored to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and extent of bone loss. To ensure adherence, it is important to increase slowly the frequency, duration and intensity of exercise, and to find activities that suit the individual. More research is needed to find ideal modes and doses of exercise, and to increase long-term adherence. Dietary and exercise modification seem to be strong promoters of healthy ageing.

  • 27. Hellgren, M
    et al.
    Melander, A
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Malmö University Hospital.
    Rastam, L
    Lindblad, U
    Inverse association between plasma homocysteine, sulphonylurea exposure and physical activity: a community-based sample of type 2 diabetes patients in the Skaraborg hypertension and diabetes project.2005In: Diabetes, obesity and metabolism, ISSN 1462-8902, E-ISSN 1463-1326, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 421-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Holmberg, Sara
    et al.
    Växjö.
    André, Malin
    Uppsala.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Björkelund, Cecilia
    Göteborg.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Umeå.
    Thulesius, Hans
    Växjö.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund.
    Nager, Anna
    Stockholm.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Örebro.
    Slår vårdval undan fötterna för allmänmedicinsk forskning?2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 41, p. 2004-2005Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Jansson, S. P. O.
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Fall, K.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Brus, O.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, A.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Wandell, P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Rolandsson, O.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Letter: Response to Carlsson et al.: Prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus: a nationwide population-based pharmaco-epidemiological study in Sweden in DIABETIC MEDICINE, vol 33, issue 8, pp 1150-11522016In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 1150-1152Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Jansson, S. P. O.
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Fall, K.
    University of Örebro, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Brus, O.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, A.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Wandell, P.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Rolandsson, O.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus: a nationwide population-based pharmaco-epidemiological study in Sweden2015In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1319-1328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate the changes in prevalence and incidence of pharmacologically and non-pharmacologically treated diabetes in Sweden during 2005 to 2013. Methods We obtained data on gender, date of birth and pharmacologically and non-pharmacologically treated diabetes from national registers for all Swedish residents. Results During the study period a total of 240 871 new cases of pharmacologically treated diabetes was found. The age-standardized incidence during the follow-up was 4.34 and 3.16 per 1000 individuals in men and women, respectively. A decreasing time trend in incidence for men of 0.6% per year (0.994, 95% CI 0.989-0.999) and for women of 0.7% per year (0.993, 95% CI 0.986-0.999) was observed. The age-standardized prevalence increased from 41.9 and 29.9 per 1000 in 2005/2006 to 50.8 and 34.6 in 2012/2013 in men and women, respectively. This corresponds to an annually increasing time trend for both men (1.024, 95% CI 1.022-1.027) and women (1.019, 95% CI 1.016-1.021). The total age-standardized prevalence of pharmacologically and non-pharmacologically treated diabetes (2012) was 46.9 per 1000 (55.6 for men and 38.8 for women). This corresponds to an annually increasing time trend (2010-2012) for both men (1.017, 95% CI 1.013-1.021) and women (1.012, 95% CI 1.008-1.016). Conclusions The prevalence of pharmacologically treated diabetes increased moderately during 8 years of follow-up, while the incidence decreased modestly. This is in contrast to the results reported by most other studies. The total prevalence of diabetes (both pharmacologically and non-pharmacologically treated) in Sweden is relatively low, from a global viewpoint.

  • 31.
    Jennersjo, P E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship between dipper status and early cardiovascular organ damage2009In: in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 52, 2009, Vol. 52, p. S430-S430Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 32.
    Jennersjö, Pär E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage2011In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24 h. Individuals with ≥10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as <10% nocturnal decrease in SBP. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated and microalbuminuria was measured by albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries.

    Results

    We identified 433 dippers and 230 subjects with a nocturnal non-dipping pattern. Nocturnal SBP dipping was independently of office SBP associated with decreased PWV (p = 0.008), lower ACR (p = 0.001) and NT-proBNP (p = 0.001) and increased GFR (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    We conclude that diurnal BP variation provides further information about early macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage that goes beyond standardized office BP measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 33.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Guldbrand, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Björne, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A prospective observational study of all-cause mortality in relation to serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 and parathyroid hormone levels in patients with type 2 diabetes2015In: Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome, ISSN 1758-5996, E-ISSN 1758-5996, Vol. 7, no 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low levels of vitamin D have been related to increased mortality and morbidity in several non-diabetic studies. We aimed to prospectively study relationships between serum 25-OH vitamin D-3 (vitamin D) and of serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) to total mortality in type 2 diabetes. We also aimed to compare the levels of these potential risk-factors in patients with and without diabetes. Methods: The main study design was prospective and observational. We used baseline data from 472 men and 245 women who participated in the "Cardiovascular Risk factors in Patients with Diabetes-a Prospective study in Primary care" study. Patients were 55-66 years old at recruitment, and an age-matched non-diabetic sample of 129 individuals constituted controls for the baseline data. Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation-tonometry and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) with ultrasound. Patients with diabetes were followed for all-cause mortality using the national Swedish Cause of Death Registry. Results: Levels of vitamin D were lower in patients with diabetes than in controls, also after correction for age and obesity, while PTH levels did not differ. Nine women and 24 men died during 6 years of median follow up of the final cohort (n = 698). Vitamin D levels were negatively related to all-cause mortality in men independently of age, PTH, HbA1c, waist circumference, 24-h systolic ambulatory-blood pressure (ABP) and serum-apoB (p = 0.049). This finding was also statistically significant when PWV and IMT were added to the analyses (p = 0.028) and was not affected statistically when medications were also included in the regression-analysis (p = 0.01). In the women with type 2 diabetes, levels of PTH were positively related with all-cause mortality in the corresponding calculations (p = 0.016 without PWV and IMT, p = 0.006 with PWV and IMT, p = 0.045 when also adding medications to the analysis), while levels of vitamin D was without statistical significance (p greater than 0.9). Conclusions: Serum vitamin D in men and serum PTH in women give prognostic information in terms of total-mortality that are independent of regular risk factors in addition to levels of ABP, IMT and PWV.

  • 34.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Pedometer-determined physical activity is linked to low systemic inflammation and low arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes2012In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1119-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diabet. Med. 29, 11191125 (2012) Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to explore the association between pedometer-determined physical activity versus measures of obesity, inflammatory markers and arterial stiffness in people with Type 2 diabetes. Methods We analysed data from 224 men and 103 women with Type 2 diabetes, aged 5466 years. Physical activity was measured with waist-mounted pedometers during three consecutive days and the number of steps/day were calculated and classified in four groups: andlt; 5000 steps/day, 50007499 steps/day, 75009999 steps/day and andgt;= 10000 steps/day. Blood samples were analysed for lipids, HbA1c, inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and interleukin-6. Nurses measured blood pressure and anthropometrics. Aortic pulse wave velocity was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries. Results Mean steps/day was 7683 +/- 3883 (median 7222, interquartile range 486910 343). There were no differences in age, diabetes duration, blood pressure, lipids or glycaemic control between the four groups of pedometer-determined physical activity. Subjects with higher steps/day had lower BMI (28.8 vs. 31.5 kg/m2, P andlt; 0.001), waist circumference (101.7 vs. 108.0 cm, P andlt; 0.001), lower levels of C-reactive protein (1.6 vs. 2.6 mg/l, P = 0.007), lower levels of interleukin-6 (1.9 vs. 3.8 pg ml, P andlt; 0.001) and lower pulse wave velocity (10.2 vs. 11.0 m/s, P = 0.009) compared with less physically active people. Conclusions We conclude that physical activity measured with pedometer was associated not only with less abdominal obesity, but also with decreased systemic low-grade inflammation as well as with low arterial stiffness, in people with Type 2 diabetes.

  • 35.
    Jennersjö, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Pedometer-determined physical activity level and change in arterial stiffness in Type 2 diabetes over 4 years2016In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 992-997Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To explore prospectively the correlation between the level of pedometer-determined physical activity at the start of the study and the change in pulse wave velocity from baseline to 4 years later in people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Methods We analysed data from 135 men and 53 women with Type 2 diabetes, aged 54–66 years. Physical activity was measured with waist-mounted pedometers on 3 consecutive days and the numbers of steps/day at baseline were classified into four groups: <5000 steps/day, 5000–7499 steps/day, 7500–9999 steps/day and ≥10 000 steps/day. Pulse wave velocity was measured using applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries at baseline and after 4 years.

    Results The mean (±sd; range) number of steps/day was 8022 (±3765; 956–20 921). The participants with the lowest level of physical activity had a more pronounced increase in the change in pulse wave velocity compared with the participants with the highest. When change in pulse wave velocity was analysed as a continuous variable and adjusted for sex, age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, BMI, systolic blood pressure, pulse wave velocity at baseline, β-blocker use, statin use, unemployment, smoking and diabetes medication, the number of steps/day at baseline was significantly associated with a less steep increase in change in pulse wave velocity (P=0.005). Every 1000 extra steps at baseline corresponded to a lower increase in change in pulse wave velocity of 0.103 m/s.

    Conclusions We found that a high level of pedometer-determined physical activity was associated with a slower progression of arterial stiffness over 4 years in middle-aged people with Type 2 diabetes.

  • 36.
    Lannering, Christina
    et al.
    Futurum, Sweden.
    Ernsth Bravell, Marie
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Midlov, Patrik
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Factors related to falls, weight-loss and pressure ulcers - more insight in risk assessment among nursing home residents2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 7-8, p. 940-950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo describe how the included items in three different scales, Downton Fall Risk Index, the short form of Mini Nutritional Assessment and the Modified Norton Scale are associated to severe outcomes as falls, weight loss and pressure ulcers. BackgroundFalls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers are common adverse events among nursing home residents and risk scoring are common preventive activities, mainly focusing on single risks. In Sweden the three scales are routinely used together with the purpose to improve the quality of prevention. DesignLongitudinal quantitative study. MethodsDescriptive analyses and Cox regression analyses. ResultsOnly 4% scored no risk for any of these serious events. Longitudinal risk scoring showed significant impaired mean scores indicating increased risks. This confirms the complexity of this populations status of general condition. There were no statistical significant differences between residents categorised at risk or not regarding events. Physical activity increased falls, but decreased pressure ulcers. For weight loss, cognitive decline and the status of general health were most important. ConclusionsRisk tendencies for falls, malnutrition and pressure ulcers are high in nursing homes, and when measure them at the same time the majority will have several of these risks. Items assessing mobility or items affecting mobility were of most importance. Care processes can always be improved and this study can add to the topic. Relevance to clinical practiceA more comprehensive view is needed and prevention can not only be based on total scores. Mobility is an important factor for falls and pressure ulcers, both as a risk factor and a protective factor. This involves a challenge for care - to keep the inmates physical active and at the same time prevent falls.

  • 37.
    Lindberg, Malou
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Schöld, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Tilling, Björn
    Tunér, Kajsa
    AGREE-instrumentet praktisk metod för utvärdering av kliniska riktlinjer2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 41, p. 2942-2943Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ljungberg, Liza
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johan Östgren, Carl
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Associations of genetic polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin system with central aortic and ambulatory blood pressure in type 2 diabetic patients2014In: jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, ISSN 1470-3203, E-ISSN 1752-8976, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 61-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at high risk of developing hypertension and related cardiovascular disease. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a central role in regulation of blood pressure (BP). Accordingly, each component of this system represents a potential candidate in the etiology of hypertension. This study investigated the impact of polymorphisms within the RAS on ambulatory and central BP in T2D subjects. A cohort of 761 subjects (55-65 years) with T2D was studied. Ambulatory and central BP were measured, and ACE I/D genotype, angiotensinogen M235T, renin rs6693954 and ATR1-A1166C polymorphisms were analyzed. Women carrying the AA-genotype had lower 24-hour and day-time systolic and diastolic BP (pless than0.05), and lower night-time and central diastolic BP (pless than0.05), compared to T allele carriers. In men, the AA-genotype was instead associated with higher central diastolic BP (p=0.018) and higher augmentation index (p=0.016). Further, the associations between the renin rs6693954 SNP and diastolic BP were strongly gender dependent (p less than= 0.001). In T2D patients, there is a gender-dependent association of the renin rs6693954 SNP with central and ambulatory BP. Women carrying the renin rs6693954 AA-genotype may be protected against the higher BP seen in men with the same genotype.

  • 39.
    Midlov, Patrik
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Andersson, Martin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Molstad, Sigvard
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Depression and use of antidepressants in Swedish nursing homes: a 12-month follow-up study2014In: International psychogeriatrics, ISSN 1041-6102, E-ISSN 1741-203X, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 669-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The prescription of antidepressants in nursing homes has increased markedly since the introduction of SSRIs, while at the same time depressive symptoms often go unrecognized and untreated. The aim of this study was to examine whether depression among residents in nursing homes is treated adequately.

    METHODS:

    A sample of 429 participants from 11 Swedish nursing homes was selected and was assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and using medical records and drug prescription data. For 256 participants a follow-up assessment was performed after 12 months.

    RESULTS:

    The prevalence of depression, according to medical records, was 9.1%, and the prevalence of CSDD score of ≥8 was 7.5%. Depression persisted in more than 50% of cases at the 12-month follow-up. Antidepressants were prescribed to 33% of the participants without a depression diagnosis or with a CSDD score of <8. 46.2% of all participants were prescribed antidepressants. 14% of the participants without a depression diagnosis or with a CSDD score of <8 had psychotropic polypharmacy. 15.2% of all participants had psychotropic polypharmacy, which persisted at the 12-month follow-up in three-quarters of cases.

    CONCLUSION:

    The prescription of antidepressants in frail elderly individuals is extensive and may be without clear indication. The clinical implication is that there is a need for systematic drug reviews at nursing homes, paying special attention to the subjects which are on antidepressants.

  • 40.
    Modig, Sara
    et al.
    Lund University, Malmö.
    Lannering, Christina
    Futurum, Jönköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Lund University, Malmö.
    The assessment of renal function in relation to the use of drugs in elderly in nursing homes; a cohort study2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Renal function decreases with age. Dosage adjustment according to renal function is   indicated for many drugs, in order to avoid adverse reactions of medications and/or   aggravation of renal impairment. There are several ways to assess renal function in   the elderly, but no way is ideal. The aim of the study was to explore renal function   in elderly subjects in nursing homes and the use of pharmaceuticals that may be harmful   to patients with renal impairment.

    Methods

    243 elderly subjects living in nursing homes were included. S-creatinine and s-cystatin   c were analysed. Renal function was estimated using Cockcroft-Gault formula, Modification   of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and cystatin C-estimated glomerular filtration rate   (GFR). Concomitant medication was registered and four groups of renal risk drugs were   identified: metformin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), angiotensin-converting   enzyme -inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and digoxin. Descriptive statistics   and the Kappa test for concordance were used.

    Results

    Reduced renal function (cystatin C-estimated GFR < 60 ml/min) was seen in 53%. Normal   s-creatinine was seen in 41% of those with renal impairment. Renal risk drugs were   rather rarely prescribed, with exception for ACE-inhibitors. Poor concordance was   seen between the GFR estimates as concluded by other studies.

    Conclusions

    The physician has to be observant on renal function when prescribing medications to   the elderly patient and not only rely on s-creatinine level. GFR has to be estimated   before prescribing renal risk drugs, but using different estimates may give divergence   in the results.

  • 41.
    Mohamed, A F
    et al.
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Zhang, J
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Johnson, F R
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Lomon, I Duprat
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Malvolti, E
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Townsend, R
    AstraZeneca UK Limited, London, United Kingdom.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Parhofer, K G
    Klinikum der Universität München, Germany.
    Avoidance of weight gain is important for oral type 2 diabetes treatments in Sweden and Germany: patient preferences2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The aim of the study was to quantify patient preferences for outcomes associated with oral antidiabetic medications (OAMs) in Sweden and Germany through a discrete-choice experiment.

    Methods

    Adults taking OAMs who had a self-reported physician's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) made a series of nine choices between pairs of hypothetical profiles. Each profile had a predefined range of attributes: blood glucose control, frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia, annual severe hypoglycaemic events, annual weight gain, pill burden and frequency of administration, and cost. Choice questions were based on an experimental design with known statistical properties. Bivariate probit analysis estimated the probabilities of choice of medication administration from patient characteristics and, conditional on that choice, preferences for treatment outcomes.

    Results

    The final sample consisted of 188 Swedish and 195 German patients. For both countries, weight gain was the most important attribute, followed by blood glucose control. Avoiding a 5-kg weight gain was 1.5 times more important in Sweden and 2.3 times more important in Germany than achieving moderate blood glucose control, thereby, suggesting that blood glucose control is relatively more important to Swedish than to German patients. Least important outcomes were the number of daily pills (Sweden) and frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia (Germany).

    Conclusion

    Patients in both Sweden and Germany preferred OAMs not associated with weight gain.

  • 42.
    Nilsson, Peter
    et al.
    Skånes universitetssjukhus, Malmö.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Blodtryck och diabetes typ 2: ACCORD-studiens resultat måste respekteras2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 216-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Olofsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Midlöv, P.
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in Swedish nursing homes: A cross-sectional study2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 3-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening for bacterial colonization among risk populations could provide better estimates of the volume of the bacteria-related disease reservoir and the level of antimicrobial resistance, than do conventional laboratory reports. Methods: Two hundred and one participants at 10 Swedish nursing homes were screened for colonization with Staphylococcus aureus between January and October 2009. Of the 201 participants, 61 (30%) were male. The median age was 86 y. All participants were systematically sampled from the nasal mucosa, the pharyngeal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions, if any. Results: Ninety-nine of 199 participants (50%) were colonized with S. aureus. The colonization rate was 34% for the nose, 35% for throat, 10% for groin, and 54% for active skin lesions. An antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolate was identified in 8.5% of all participants regardless of colonization status. A total of 24 resistant isolates were detected, and 21 of these were resistant to fluoroquinolones. There was no case of colonization with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions: The presence of resistant isolates was generally low, and the greater part of the resistance was fluoroquinolone-related. To achieve reasonable precision, screening programmes of this kind must include samples from both the nose and throat, and, although low, the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Swedish nursing homes still calls for reflection on how to use the fluoroquinolones wisely. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

  • 44.
    Olofsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Toepfer, Michael
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Division of General Practice/Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University .
    Matussek, Andreas
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Lindgren, Per-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Division of General Practice/Family Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University.
    Low level of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli among Swedish nursing home residents2013In: Scandinavian journal of infectious diseases, ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening for bacterial colonization and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) among a defined population could aid in the identification of at-risk populations and provide targets for antibiotic stewardship and infection control programmes. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-eight participants at 11 Swedish nursing homes underwent serial screening for colonization with Escherichia coli between March 2008 and September 2010. Seventy-two of the 268 participants (27%) were male. The median age was 85 y. Samples were collected from urine, the rectal mucosa, the groin, and active skin lesions. Results: Two hundred and nine of 268 participants (78%) were colonized with E. coli at any body site/fluid. The specific colonization rates were 81% (rectum), 48% (urine), 30% (groin), 59% (unknown), and 13% (skin lesion). An antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolate was identified in 18% of all participants regardless of colonization status; all together, 87 resistant isolates were detected. Only 1 participant carried isolates with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins (cefotaxime and ceftazidime). Conclusions: The presence of resistance was generally low, and the greater part of the resistant cases was connected with 3 common antibiotics: ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and ciprofloxacin. In spite of generally increasing resistance against third-generation cephalosporins in E. coli in Sweden, this study does not implicate residence at a Swedish nursing home as a risk factor for the acquisition of expressed cephalosporin resistance.

  • 45.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, K.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Low levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are prospectively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT): The Söderåkra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study2009In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 198-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore the association between baseline levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), a marker of insulin sensitivity, and the development of type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in a specifically defined middle-aged population.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional population-based screening study was conducted in 1989-1990 and included baseline data for 664 non-diabetic subjects aged 40-59 years. Clinical data were collected and blood samples analyzed for blood glucose, serum lipids and insulin. Blood specimens were frozen at baseline and later analyzed for IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP). At the follow-up in 2006, the incidence of type 2 diabetes and IGT was reported based on primary-care medical records.

    RESULTS: During the 17-year observation period, 42 subjects (6.3%) developed type 2 diabetes/IGT. Those in the lowest quintile of IGFBP-1 (/=59mug/L), the incidence was 1.5%. Cox's proportional-hazards model regression analyses were used to determine the incidence of type 2 diabetes/IGT, corrected for age and gender, in relation to IGFBP-1, CRP and waist circumference. Subjects in the lowest IGFBP-1 quintile showed an independently increased risk of type 2 diabetes/IGT [hazards ratio (HR): 3.54; 95% CI 1.18-10.6; P=0.024]. For CRP and waist circumference, the corresponding figures were HR: 6.81; 95% CI 2.50-18.6; P<0.001 and HR: 3.33; 95% CI 1.47-7.6; P=0.004, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: Low levels of IGFBP-1 predicted the long-term development of type 2 diabetes or IGT in a middle-aged population. The association was independent of CRP and abdominal obesity.

  • 46.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö , Sweden.
    A consultation-based method is equal to SCORE and an extensive laboratory-based method in predicting risk of future cardiovascular disease2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention & Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-8267, E-ISSN 1741-8275, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 536-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: As cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the most common causes of mortality worldwide, much interest has been focused on reliable methods to predict cardiovascular risk.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional, population-based screening study with 17-year follow-up in Southern Sweden.

    METHODS: We compared a non-laboratory, consultation-based risk assessment method comprising age, sex, present smoking, prevalent diabetes or hypertension at baseline, blood pressure (systolic >/=140 or diastolic >/=90), waist/height ratio and family history of CVD to Systemic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) and a third model including several laboratory analyses, respectively, in predicting CVD risk. The study included clinical baseline data on 689 participants aged 40-59 years without CVD. Blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, serum lipids, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, C-reactive protein, asymmetric dimethyl arginine and symmetric dimethyl arginine. During 17 years, the incidence of total CVD (first event) and death was registered.

    RESULTS: A non-laboratory-based risk assessment model, including variables easily obtained during one consultation visit to a general practitioner, predicted cardiovascular events as accurately [hazard ratio (HR): 2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.18-3.39, P<0.001] as the established SCORE algorithm (HR: 2.73; 95% CI: 2.10-3.55, P<0.001), which requires laboratory testing. Furthermore, adding a combination of sophisticated laboratory measurements covering lipids, inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, did not confer any additional value to the prediction of CVD risk (HR: 2.72; 95% CI: 2.19-3.37, P<0.001). The c-statistics for the consultation model (0.794; 95% CI: 0.762-0.823) was not significantly different from SCORE (0.767; 95% CI: 0.733-0.798, P=0.12) or the extended model (0.806; 95% CI: 0.774-0.835, P=0.55).

    CONCLUSION: A risk algorithm based on non-laboratory data from a single primary care consultation predicted long-term cardiovascular risk as accurately as either SCORE or an elaborate laboratory-based method in a defined middle-aged population.

  • 47.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ovhed, Ingvar
    Blekinge Institute for R&D, Karlshamn, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Department of Clinical Sciences Medicine, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Predictors of successful, self-reported lifestyle changes in a defined middle-aged population: the Soderakra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study, Sweden2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 389-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is well established that the main cause of the development of cardiovascular disease can be found in unhealthy lifestyle habits. In our study, we wanted to explore the long-term predictors of self-reported lifestyle changes in a middle-aged population after screening for cardiovascular risk factors 10 years earlier.

    Methods: We conducted a 10-year follow-up telephone interview on self-reported lifestyle changes in a rural population in south-eastern Sweden, after a cardiovascular screening programme. The population comprised 90% of all inhabitants (n=705) aged 40-59 years at baseline, and 90% of these (n=629) were reached for the telephone interview.

    Results: When multivariate logistic regression was used, a higher success rate for lifestyle changes was independently associated with female gender (odds ratio (OR)=1.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-2.18). When stratified for gender, significant predictors for success in men were prevalent cardiovascular risk conditions (OR=4.77, 95% CI 2.18-10.5; p<0.001) and previous myocardial infarction (OR=22.8, 95% CI 4.73-110; p<0.001) at baseline. For women, elevated blood pressure (> or = 160 and/or > or = 90 mmHg) measured at baseline (OR=1.84, 95% CI 1.12-3.02; p=0.016) was significantly associated with successful lifestyle changes. Smoking at baseline was also associated with significant success: OR=3.36 (95% CI:2.05-5.51; p<0.001) and OR=1.81 (95% CI 1.11-2.95; p=0.017) for men and women, respectively.

    Conclusions: Female gender was associated with significant improvements in self-reported lifestyle changes. Furthermore, smoking, a medical history of diabetes, hypertension, angina pectoris or myocardial infarction at baseline predicted success in lifestyle change in this 10-year follow-up study.

  • 48.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    brismar, kerstin
    KI.
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Malmö.
    Association between elevated blood pressure and surrogate markers for insulin resistance in a defined population. The Söderåkra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study2006In: ESH,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Midlöv, Patrik
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Center for Primary Health Care Research Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Mölstad, Sigvard
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Center for Primary Health Care Research Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Blood pressure and all-cause mortality: a prospective study of nursing home residents2016In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 826-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the natural course of blood pressure development and its relation to mortality in a nursing home cohort.

    Methods: A cohort of 406 nursing home residents in south east Sweden was followed prospectively for 30 months. Participants were divided into four groups based on systolic blood pressure (SBP) at baseline. Data were analysed using a Cox regression model with all-cause mortality as the outcome measurement; paired Student t-tests were used to evaluate blood pressure development over time.

    Results: During follow-up, 174 (43%) people died. Participants with SBP <120 mmHg had a hazard ratio for mortality of 1.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.27) compared with those with SBP 120–139 mmHg, adjusted for age and sex. Risk of malnutrition or present malnutrition was most common in participants with SBP <120 mmHg; risk of malnutrition or present malnutrition estimated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment was found in 78 (71%). The levels of SBP decreased over time independent of changes in anti-hypertensive medication.

    Conclusions: In this cohort of nursing home residents, low SBP was associated with increased all-cause mortality. SBP decreased over time; this was not associated with altered anti-hypertensive treatment. The clinical implication from this study is that there is a need for systematic drug reviews in elderly persons in nursing homes, paying special attention to those with low SBP.

  • 50.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Chalmers, J.
    The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction: a nationwide register study2016In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 218-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the gender- and age-specific risk of developing a first myocardial infarction in people treated with antidiabetic and/or antidepressant drugs compared with people with no pharmaceutical treatment for diabetes or depression.

    Methods

    A cohort of all Swedish residents aged 45–84 years (n = 4 083 719) was followed for a period of 3 years. Data were derived from three nationwide registers. The prescription and dispensing of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs were used as markers of disease. All study subjects were reallocated according to treatment and the treatment categories were updated every year. Data were analysed using a Cox regression model with a time-dependent variable. The outcome of interest was first fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction.

    Results

    During follow-up, 42 840 people had a first myocardial infarction, 3511 of which were fatal. Women aged 45–64 years, receiving both antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs had a hazard ratio for myocardial infarction of 7.4 (95% CI 6.3–8.6) compared with women receiving neither. The corresponding hazard ratio for men was 3.1 (95% CI 2.8–3.6).

    Conclusions

    The combined use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction compared with use of either group of drugs alone. The increase in relative risk was greater in middle-aged women than in middle-aged men.

12 1 - 50 of 90
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