liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 72
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almroth, Gabriel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nephrology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Nephrology UHL.
    Lindell, Å
    Åselius, H
    Sörén, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Svensson, L
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Eribe, ERK
    Olsen, I
    Acute glomerulonephritis associated with streptococcus pyogenes with concomitant spread of streptococcus constellatus in four rural families2005In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 110, no 3, p. 217-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied history, renal histopathology and microbiology of an epidemic of acute glomerulonephritis associated with throat infections and uncommon culture results in four neighbour families. A 40-year-old man (index patient) was referred to a university hospital for dialysis and kidney biopsy due to a suspected acute glomerulonephritis. An acute tonsillitis had preceded the condition. Penicillin treatment had been started four days before the discovery of renal failure. Throat swabs were positive for β-hemolytic streptococci, group C (GCS). GCS were also found in throat cultures from his wife and two of their children. The bacteria were typed as Streptococcus constellatus. A third child had S. constellatus expressing Lancefield antigen group G. A neighbour and two of his children fell ill the following week with renal involvement. Throat swabs from both these children were positive for S. constellatus. His third child had erythema multiforme and S. constellatus in the throat while a fourth child had β-hemolytic streptococci group A, Streptococcus pyogenes. Kidney biopsies on the index patient and his neighbour showed an acute diffuse prolipherative glomerulonephritis compatible with acute post-streptococcal nephritis and microbiological analysis of renal tissue revealed in both cases S. pyogenes and S. constellatus. The families had had much contact and had consumed unpasteurized milk from our index patient's farm. In four of seven persons in two additional neighbouring families S. constellatus was found in throat swabs during the same month while two persons carried Streptococcus anginosus expressing the Lancefield C antigen. In conclusion spread of S. constellatus coincided with the occurrence of four cases of acute glomerulonephritis. The two biopsied patients had both S. pyogenes and S. constellatus present in renal tissue. The epidemic either suggested that the outbreak of glomerulonephritis was due to S. pyogenes but coincided with the transmission and colonization of S. constellatus or that the S. constellatus strains were highly pathogenic or nephritogenic and that this organism can be transmitted in such cases.

  • 2.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Ledin, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine.
    In the Forefront of Development:The New Undergraduate Medical Curriculu2006In: Celebrating the Past by Expanding the Future: The Faculty of Health Science, Linköping University 1986–2006 / [ed] Mats Hammar, Björn Bergdahl, Lena Öhman, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2006, 1, p. 98-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Läkarutbildningen i Linköpings förnyas. Problembaserat lärande, basvetenskap och folkhälsa förstärks2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 38, p. 2654-2658Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cauvi, David M
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, No. 0739, La Jolla, CA 92093-0739, USA.
    Gabriel, Rodney
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Kono, Dwight H
    Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K Michael
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    A tandem repeat in decay accelerating factor 1 is associated with severity of murine mercury-induced autoimmunity2014In: Autoimmune Diseases, ISSN 2090-0422, E-ISSN 2090-0430, Vol. 2014, no 260613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decay accelerating factor (DAF), a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA). Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  • 5.
    Cauvi, D.M.
    et al.
    University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K. Michael
    The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Autoimmune models2015In: Reference module in biomedical sciences, Elsevier, 2015, p. 413-438Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of autoimmunity fall into four categories: (a) those induced by immunization with self-antigen, (b) those induced by exogenous agents, (c) those which arise spontaneously, and (d) those which are produced by genetic manipulation. The autoimmunity exhibited by these models covers a spectrum of diseases which fall into the two broad categories, organ-specific and systemic autoimmunity. Animal models of autoimmune diseases have played an essential role in the discovery of many of mechanisms that result in the breaking of self-tolerance. This chapter describes a number of experimental animal models of autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms that lead to disease.

  • 6.
    Cauvi, DM
    et al.
    The Scripps Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Pollard, KM
    The Scripps Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Autoimmune models2010In: Comprehensive Toxicology / [ed] Charlene A. McQueen, Oxford: Academic Press , 2010, 2, p. 413-438Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Toxicology is the study of the nature and actions of chemicals on biological systems. In more primitive times, it really was the study of poisons. However, in the early 1500s, it was apparent to Paracelsus that "the dose differentiates a poison and a remedy". Clearly, the two most important tenets of toxicology were established during that time. The level of exposure (dose) and the duration of exposure (time) will determine the degree and nature of a toxicological response.

  • 7.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Anderson, C
    Andersson, T
    Marcusson-Ståhl, M
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Cytokine production, lymphocyte proliferation and T-cell receptor Vbeta expression in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from nickel-allergic individuals2003In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1018-2438, E-ISSN 1423-0097, Vol. 132, no 4, p. 373-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical history and patch test constitute the two cornerstones in the diagnosis of nickel (Ni) allergy. Due to technical and interpretative limits of the patch test, the in vitro lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) has been developed for confirming contact allergy, however, most studies show an overlap in lymphocyte proliferation between Ni-allergic and nonallergic subjects using the LTT. The aim of this study was to see if the secretion of cytokines, especially interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-17, or the use of T-cell receptor (TCR) V▀ families in Ni-stimulated primary peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures might be more useful for discriminating between allergic and nonallergic subjects. Methods: Ni2+-stimulated primary PBMC cultures derived from female subjects diagnosed as Ni-allergic (n = 5) or nonallergic (n = 5) on the basis of a positive or negative patch test were assessed for cell proliferation by tritiated thymidine incorporation and for production of interferon-?, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 in the culture supernatant by ELISA. The immunophenotype and TCR-V▀ family affiliation of the Ni2+-induced lymphoblasts were determined by flow cytometry. Results: Lymphocytes from Ni-allergic individuals challenged with a high and a low concentration of Ni showed significantly higher cell proliferation than lymphocytes from nonallergic individuals, but all subjects showed a positive LTT result (stimulation index>2). We found a significantly higher release of IL-10 in Ni2+-treated cultures from Ni-allergic compared with nonallergic subjects that provided better separation between individuals in the two groups than did lymphocyte proliferation. The proliferating lymphoblasts were predominantly CD4+, and in 2 of the 5 Ni-allergic subjects, but in none of the 5 nonallergic subjects, the CD4+ lymphoblasts showed a dominance of TCR-V▀17. Conclusions: Determination of IL-10 production in primary PBMC cultures is a potentially promising in vitro method for discrimination of Ni allergy in females, as compared with cell proliferation. Copyright ⌐ 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  • 8.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, T.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson-Ståhl, Maritha
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IL-10 production in primary PBMC cultures: an in vitro marker for nickel allergy?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nickel (Ni) is one of the most known contact allergens and at present, patch test and clinical history constitute the two cornerstones in the diagnostic procedure. Since the patch test is inherited with in vivo provocation and subjective interpretation of the test result, a non-invasive in vitro method with objective interpretation of the test result has long been searched for. Unfortunately, in vitro diagnosis of Ni- allergy is hampered by the fact that Ni2+ is able to trigger in vitro proliferative responses in lymphocytes from both Ni-allergic and non-allergic subjects. This constitutes a problem when LTT (lymphocyte transformation test), the most frequently used in vitro test as a complement in the diagnosis of contact allergy, is considered for Ni allergy. However, other parameters in the in vitro response might be more useful. In this study, Ni2+-stimulated primary PBMC-cultures derived from Ni-allergic and non-allergic subjects were assessed for IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17. Also, Ni2+ induced lymphoblasts from such cultures were characterized by their immunophenotype and T-cell receptor Vß-affiliation.

    We found a significantly higher release of IL-10 in Ni2+ treated cultures from allergic than from non-allergic subjects. The Ni2+-induced lymphoblasts from both groups were predominantly CD4+. Two of the allergic patients (n=5) showed a skewing towards TCR-Vß17, a Vß family earlier associated with Ni-allergy. A significant increase in CD134 and CD23 expression indicated that Ni2+ activates B-cells in vitro. In conclusion, IL-10 seems to be a promising marker for Ni-allergy using primary PBMC cultures. Further, flow cytometric screening of Ni2+ induced lymphoblasts can detect expanded TCR-Vß families that may be used for preparation of Ni-specific T cell clones.

  • 9.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, L-G
    Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology and Centre for Environmental Sensitivity, Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norda, R.
    Department of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohaemotherapy, Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tibbling-Grahn, L.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    In vitro Lymphoproliferative Assays with HgCl2 Cannot Identify Patients with Systemic Symptoms Attributed to Dental Amalgam1999In: Journal of Dental Research, ISSN 0022-0345, E-ISSN 1544-0591, Vol. 78, no 8, p. 1450-1458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic—for example, a susceptible immune system—might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 μg HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (≤ 0.5 μg/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 ≤ 0.5 μg/mL. Three different test protocols—lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA®)—were used. Other immune parameters—such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition-were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg°. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 ≤ 0.5 μg/mL, a high frequency of positive results was obtained among healthy subjects with or without dental amalgam. Consequently, in vitro lymphocyte proliferation with HgCl2 cannot be used as an objective marker for mercury allergy in dental amalgam-bearers.

  • 10.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of mercuric mercury (Hg2+)-induced lymphoblasts from patients with mercury allergy and from healthy subjects2000In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 121, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hg2+ induces lymphocyte proliferation when added to cell cultures from both healthy and mercury-allergic subjects. Consequently, when measuring DNA synthesis a possible Hg2+-specific response, resulting from proliferating memory cells, cannot be discriminated from a non-allergic response. The mechanism behind this non-allergic response is unknown but a superantigenic effect of Hg2+ has been suggested. In this study, five mercury-allergic patients, with oral lichen planus (OLP) lesions adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0, and five healthy subjects without amalgam were examined. The immunophenotype and the T cell receptor Vβ (TCR Vβ) repertoire of Hg2+-induced lymphoblasts as well as the expression of the lymphocyte activation markers CD23 and CD134 were analysed for possible differences between healthy and allergic subjects. The mechanism of Hg2+-induced proliferation was examined by comparing the TCR Vβ expression of Hg- and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-activated lymphoblasts, the latter used as a positive superantigen control. It was not possible to discriminate between mercury-allergic and healthy subjects using the immunophenotype or the TCR Vβ profile of the Hg2+-induced lymphoblasts or the expression of CD23 and CD134. However, Hg2+-induced CD4+ lymphoblasts showed a skewing towards Vβ2. This relative increase in Vβ2 was only detected in the CD4+ but not in the CD8+ lymphoblast population. In conclusion, Hg2+ induced a proliferation-dependent skewing towards CD4+ but not CD8+ lymphocytes expressing Vβ2. In this respect Hg2+ differs from the classical bacterial superantigen SEB, which also stimulates unique TCR Vβ families among CD8+ cells.

  • 11.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson, Jan A.
    Department of Dermatology, Huddinge Hospital, Huddinge.
    Tibbling, Lita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation as Compared to Patch Test Using Gold, Palladium and Nickel1997In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1018-2438, E-ISSN 1423-0097, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 212-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A conventional lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) was compared to the commercially available MELISA® (memory lymphocyte immuno-stimulation assay), a lymphoproliferative assay that has been suggested to be a valuable instrument for the diagnosis of metal allergy. Sensitivity and specificity of the two assays were calculated using a patch test as a reference method.

    Methods: 34 patients were patch-tested for gold sodium thiosulfate, palladium chloride and nickel sulfate, and the lymphocyte proliferation to these metals was tested in vitro using mononuclear cells from peripheral blood.

    Results: No significant differences regarding sensitivity and specificity were found between MELISA and conventional LTT. The sensitivity varied between 55 and 95% and the specificity between 17 and 79%.

    Conclusions: The low specificity of the two in vitro assays suggests that they are not useful for diagnosis of contact allergy to the metals gold, palladium and nickel, since a large number of false-positive results will be obtained.

  • 12.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Marcusson-Ståhl, M.
    AstraZeneca R & D Södertälje, Safety Assessment, Department of Molecular Toxicology and Immunotoxicology, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to bacampicillin in allergic subjects2000In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 1450-1459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Antigen-specific cell lines or clones are often used as models of drug-specific allergy. However, cloning procedures are time consuming, and the repeated antigen stimulation cycles as well as the addition of various growth enhancers may affect the in vivo relevance of these systems.

    Objective

    Using bacampicillin-allergic subjects, we wanted to investigate the applicability of primary recall in vitro lymphocyte responses to characterize type I and type IV allergy. The sensitivity and specificity of LTT (Lymphocyte transformation test), when used as an in vitro diagnostic tool, were also assessed.

    Methods

    A total of 39 patients with symptoms of type I (rhinitis) or type IV (allergic contact dermatitis, ACD) allergy following occupational exposure to bacampicillin, were included. Ten individuals without penicillin allergy or occupational exposure to bacampicillin served as controls. All subjects were LTT tested. Four patients with rhinitis and two patients with ACD were available for studying the immunophenotype and the TCR-Vβ repertoire of bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts as well as the cytokine profiles and expression of the activation markers CD23 and CD134 in primary PBMC cultures.

    Results

    LTT was positive in 87% and at least one of the skin tests was positive in 85% of the patients with allergic symptoms. 69% of the patients with type I allergies were patch test-positive. Results from LTT and skin test correlated in 87% of the cases. The combined sensitivity of LTT and skin tests was 92%. The specificity of LTT was 90% in healthy controls. Bacampicillin induced lymphoblasts were mainly CD4 + in both ACD and rhinitis patients. The TCR-Vβ profiles of the predominant CD4 + lymphoblasts were heterogeneous with individual skewing towards Vβ2, Vβ3, Vβ5.1 and/or Vβ14. An increased expression of IFNγ was detected in bacampicillin treated PBMC cultures from the ACD but not from rhinitis patients. IL-5 was detected in bacampicillin exposed PBMC cultures from all patients but not from healthy controls. This Th2 environment could also be verified by CD23 and CD134 expression.

    Conclusion

    LTT and skin tests are equally sensitive in identifying bacampicillin allergic subjects. When the two tests are combined, the sensitivity increases. The patch test is useful not only for detection of type IV but also for the identification of type I allergies. When using primary PBMC cultures, IFNγ is the most suitable cytokine to discriminate between type I and type IV allergy. IL-5 can possibly be used as a general marker for bacampicillin induced allergy. Thus, primary cell cultures may be considered as an alternative to T-cell lines or clones for the study of drug induced allergy.

  • 13.
    Christiansen Clifford, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Färm, Gunilla
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Eid-Forest, Ruth
    Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Cytology.
    Interferon-gamma secreted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a possible diagnostic marker for allergic contact dermatitis to gold2006In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 101-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    10% of patch-tested patients have a positive reaction to gold. Most lack clinical symptoms, but allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to gold is increasing. In this study, 77 dermatological outpatients were divided into 3 groups depending on epicutaneous patch test outcomes: a group positive to gold (EPI+), a group negative to gold (EPI-), and a group with irritant reactions to gold (EPI-IR). Lymphocytes were stimulated in vitro with gold sodium thiosulfate. Proliferation was assessed using the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and cytokine secretion was assessed using a multibead array (Luminex; Linco Research Inc., St. Charles, MO, USA), in order to evaluate whether an in vitro method with high diagnostic accuracy could be devised. The EPI+ group showed a significantly increased secretion of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-13 and also showed a significantly higher stimulation indexes for LTT, compared to the other 2 subject groups. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for all methods individually and combined, but IFN-gamma assessment alone was the most accurate method for identifying ACD to gold, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 82.1%, respectively. This method also identified 87.5% of the EPI-IR subjects as non-allergic. Therefore, assessment of secretion of IFN-gamma should be a valuable complement to patch test for diagnosing gold allergy.

  • 14.
    Clifford, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Dermatology and Venerology UHL.
    Karin, Cederbrant
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    T-cells expressing CD4, CD45RO and CLA from gold-allergic but not healthy subjects react to gold sodium thiosufate in vitroManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patch test positivity to gold is common in western societies, but in contrast to nickel (Ni) allergy it is uncommon that the patch test positive patient shows any clinical symptoms. In this study we investigated cytotoxic effects of gold sodium thiosulphate (GSTS) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), including different T-cell subsets. We also separated lymphocytes from allergic and non-allergic subjects into CD45RA and CD45R0 cell fractions. We also expressed CLA. The fraction of analyzed the effects of GSTS using lymphocyte transformation test, propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry to determine lymphocyte memory status, expression of chemokine receptors and cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA), and compared the results to what has previously been reported on Ni allergy. We found that only the cells from the allergic subjects proliferated in the lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), and in the CD45R0 fraction there was a dose-dependent increase in the fraction of CD3/CD4 cells. Similar to Ni-allergy, these CD3/CD4/CD45R0 cells also expressed CLA. The fraction of CD3/CD8 in the CD45R0 enriched fraction decreased with GSTS exposure. In contrast to Ni allergy, however, we found no differences between the allergic and non-allergic subjects regarding the chemokine receptors CCR4, CXCR3 and CCR10.

  • 15.
    Eintrei, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Revising a medical PBL-curriculum - the Linköping strategy2004In: Association for Medical Education in Europe,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bergström, S.
    Department of Microbiology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mercury exposure as a model for deviation of cytokine responses in experimental Lyme arthritis: HgCl2 treatment decreases T helper cell type 1-like responses and arthritis severity but delays eradication of Borrelia burgdorferi in C3H/HeN mice2007In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lyme borreliosis is a complex infection, where some individuals develop so-called ‘chronic borreliosis’. The pathogenetic mechanisms are unknown, but the type of immune response is probably important for healing. A strong T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-like response has been suggested as crucial for eradication of Borrelia and for avoiding development of chronic disease. Many studies aimed at altering the Th1/Th2 balance in Lyme arthritis employed mice deficient in cytokine genes, but the outcome has not been clear-cut, due possibly to the high redundancy of cytokines. This study aimed at studying the importance of the Th1/Th2 balance in murine Borrelia arthritis by using the Th2-deviating effect of subtoxic doses of inorganic mercury. Ninety-eight C3H/HeN mice were divided into four groups: Borrelia-infected (Bb), Borrelia-infected exposed to HgCl2 (BbHg), controls exposed to HgCl2 alone and normal controls. Mice were killed on days 3, 16, 44 and 65 post-Borrelia inoculation. Arthritis severity was evaluated by histology, spirochaetal load determined by Borrelia culture, IgG2a- and IgE-levels analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbemt assay (ELISA) and cytokine-secreting cells detected by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT). BbHg mice showed less severe histological arthritis, but delayed eradication of spirochaetes compared to Bb mice, associated with increased levels of IgE (Th2-induced) and decreased levels of IgG2a (Th1-induced), consistent with a Th2-deviation. Both the numbers of Th1 and Th2 cytokine-secreting cells were reduced in BbHg mice, possibly explained by the fact that numbers of cytokine-secreting cells do not correlate with cytokine concentration. In conclusion, this study supports the hypothesis that a Th1-like response is required for optimal eradication of Borrelia.

  • 17.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Jesper B
    University South Denmark.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zalups, Rudolfs K
    Mercer University.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mercury toxicokinetics-dependency on strain and gender2010In: TOXICOLOGY AND APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY, ISSN 0041-008X, Vol. 243, no 3, p. 283-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mercury (Hg) exposure from dental amalgam fillings and thimerosal in vaccines is not a major health hazard, but adverse health effects cannot be ruled out in a small and more susceptible part of the exposed population. Individual differences in toxicokinetics may explain susceptibility to mercury. Inbred, H-2-congenic A.SW and B10.S mice and their F1- and F2-hybrids were given HgCl2 with 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water and traces of Hg-203. Whole-body retention (WBR) was monitored until steady state after 5 weeks, when the organ Hg content was assessed. Despite similar Hg intake, A.SW males attained a 20-30% significantly higher WBR and 2- to 5-fold higher total renal Hg retention/concentration than A.SW females and B10.S mice. A selective renal Hg accumulation but of lower magnitude was seen also in B10.S males compared with females. Differences in WBR and organ Hg accumulation are therefore regulated by non-H-2 genes and gender. Lymph nodes lacked the strain- and gender-dependent Hg accumulation profile of kidney, liver and spleen. After 15 days without Hg A.SW mice showed a 4-fold higher WBR and liver Hg concentration, but 11-fold higher renal Hg concentration, showing the key role for the kidneys in explaining the slower Hg elimination in A.SW mice. The trait causing higher mercury accumulation was not dominantly inherited in the F1 hybrids. F2 mice showed a large inter-individual variation in Hg accumulation, showing that multiple genetic factors influence the Hg toxicokinetics in the mouse. The genetically heterogeneous human population may therefore show a large variation in mercury toxicokinetics.

  • 18.
    Frennesson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Ophthalmology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Larsson, R
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nilsson, SG
    Drusen and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in patients with dense deposit disease (membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis type II). Favourable effect of photodynamic treatment (PDT)2003In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, ISSN 0146-0404, E-ISSN 1552-5783, Vol. 44, p. 1774-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Fryland, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Tobias
    Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergström, Sven
    Department of Molecular Biology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Mapping of T-cell subsets in relation to disease course in experimental Borrelia burgdorferi infection2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Resolution of Lyme borreliosis has previously been shown to be associated with a strong initial Th1 response, followed by a subsequent Th2 response,  shutting off inflammation. We mapped markers for Th1, Th2, Th17, cytotoxic and T regulatory subsets in a murine model, where the outcome of Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) infection was altered by immune-deviation towards Th2 by exposure to a subtoxic dose of mercury. Twenty-one B. burgdorferi s.s.-infected (Bb), 21 immune-deviated B. burgdorferi s.s.-infected (BbId), and seven control C3H/HeN mice were sacrificed on days 15, 28 and 43 post-infection (p.i.) with B. burgdorferi s.s. BbId mice had increased joint swelling compared with Bb at the height of the disease (28 p.i.), and also showed a trend for increased spirochaetal load that became significant on day 43 p.i. BbId had an increased histopathology score on day 28 p.i. compared with both earlier and later time points. mRNA expression of IL-4 (p=0.018), IL-10 (p=0.018) and EBI-3 (p=0.009) decreased in Bb mice, but not in BbId, over the course of infection. A trend for higher expression of IL-12p40 mRNA in Bb mice compared with BbId was seen late in the disease course, while BbId showed trends for higher levels of Foxp3 and GM-CSF. At the protein level, BbId showed decreased levels of CXCL9 compared to the Bb group on day 15 p.i (p=0.007). Bb mice showed increases of CXCL9 and CXCL10 at all time points compared with day 0 p.i. (p≤0.014), whereas BbId mice showed an initial decrease in both chemokines at day 15 p.i. compared with day 0 (p≤0.008). In conclusion, both the clinical signs of infection and the trends for increased expression of pro-inflammatory GM-CSF and T-regulatory marker Foxp3 in BbId mice suggested ongoing inflammation. Although our findings support the need for a strong Th1 response followed by anti-inflammatory response for optimal resolution, the anti-inflammatory response seems to be more complex than only dampening the inflammation by a Th1-antagonistic Th2 response.

  • 20.
    Gabriela Sitaru, Ana
    et al.
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Sesarman, Alina
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Mihai, Sidonia
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Chiriac, Mircea T
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Zillikens, Detlef
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Solbach, Werner
    Medical University of Lubeck.
    Sitaru, Cassian
    University of Freiburg.
    T Cells Are Required for the Production of Blister-Inducing Autoantibodies in Experimental Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita2010In: JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY, ISSN 0022-1767, Vol. 184, no 3, p. 1596-1603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is a prototypical organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against type VII collagen of the dermal-epidermal junction. Although mechanisms of autoantibody-induced blister formation were extensively characterized, the initiation of autoantibody production in autoimmune blistering diseases is still poorly defined. In the current study, we addressed the role of T cells for the production of blister-inducing autoantibodies in mice immunized with type VII collagen. To detect autoreactive type VII collagen-specific T cells, lymph node cells from immunized SJL mice were stimulated in vitro with recombinant Ag, and their proliferation was measured by radioactive thymidine incorporation and flow cytometry analysis of CFSE-labeled cells. Interestingly, using synthetic peptides of the immunogen, partly different T and B cell epitopes in mice immunized with type VII collagen were demonstrated. In contrast to wild-type mice, immunization with type VII collagen of SJL athymic nude mice lacking T cells did not induce an autoimmune response and blistering phenotype. Importantly, SJL nude mice repleted with T cells from immunized wild-type mice showed a robust and durable autoantibody production resulting in subepidermal blistering disease in the recipients. Our present results demonstrate that T cells are required for the initiation of autoimmunity against type VII collagen in experimental epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and provide a basis for developing T cell-directed immunomodulatory strategies for this and related autoimmune diseases.

  • 21.
    Ganowiak, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Ulla
    Ludwig Institute of Cancer Research, Uppsala Branch, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fibrils from Synthetic Amyloid-Related Peptides Enhance Development of Experimental AA-Amyloidosis in Mice1994In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 199, no 1, p. 306-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid enhancing factor is an incompletely characterized activity of extracts from many amyloid-containing tissues and which greatly shortens the preamyloidotic phase during experimental induction of AA-amyloidosis. In this communication we show that amyloid-like fibrils made in vitro from synthetic peptides, corresponding to segments of amyloid fibril proteins, have amyloid enhancing factor-like activity. Thus, there is a possibility that amyloid enhancing factor activity depends on small fibrils serving as nucleation centers for fibril elongation.

  • 22.
    Hadimeri, U.
    et al.
    Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Larsson, R.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Melander, S.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Nephrology.
    Mölne, J.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hadimeri, H.
    Kärnsjukhuset, Skövde, Sweden.
    Membranoproliferative Glomerulonephritis and Inflammatory Pseudotumour of the Spleen2013In: Case Reports in Oncology, ISSN 1662-6575, E-ISSN 1662-6575, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 84-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflammatory pseudotumour is a rare condition that can affect various organs. The clinical and histologic appearance of the pseudotumour may mimic haematological, lymphoproliferative, paraneoplastic or malignant processes. A previously healthy 39-year-old man presented with nephrotic syndrome. He had a history of headaches, nausea and swollen ankles. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a 6-cm mass in the spleen. Following a renal biopsy, a diagnosis of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) type I was made. Splenectomy was performed and the examination revealed a mixed population of lymphocytes with predominantly T-cells, B-cells and lymphoplasmacytoid cells. Immunostaining confirmed that the small cells were mostly T-cells positive for all T-cell markers including CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7 and CD8. A diagnosis of inflammatory pseudotumour was established. The removal of the spleen was followed by remission of glomerulonephritis, but it was complicated by a subphrenic abscess and pneumonia. This association between an inflammatory pseudotumour of the spleen and MPGN has not been previously described. Abnormal immune response due to the inflammation leading to secondary glomerulonephritis might be the main pathogenic mechanism.

  • 23.
    Hammar, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Strålning, cancer och forskarutbildning2007In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 104Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå Universitet.
    Ekstrand, Jimmy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Dose and Hg species determine the T-helper cell activation in murine autoimmunity2007In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 229, no 1-2, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride-HgCl2) induces in mice an autoimmune syndrome (HgIA) with T cell-dependent polyclonal B cell activation and hypergammaglobulinemia, dose- and H-2-dependent production of autoantibodies targeting the 34 kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin (AFA), and systemic immune-complex deposits. The organic mercury species methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg-in the form of thimerosal) induce AFA, while the other manifestations of HgIA seen after treatment with HgCl2 are present to varying extent. Since these organic Hg species are converted to the autoimmunogen Hg2+ in the body, their primary autoimmunogen potential is uncertain and the subject of this study. A moderate dose of HgCl2 (8 mg/L drinking water - internal dose 148 μg Hg/kg body weight [bw]/day) caused the fastest AFA response, while the induction was delayed after higher (25 mg/L) and lower (1.5 and 3 mg/L) doses. The lowest dose of HgCl2 inducing AFA was 1.5 mg/L drinking water which corresponded to a renal Hg2+ concentration of 0.53 μg/g. Using a dose of 8 mg HgCl2/L this threshold concentration was reached within 24 h, and a consistent AFA response developed after 8-10 days. The time lag for the immunological part of the reaction leading to a consistent AFA response was therefore 7-9 days. A dose of thimerosal close to the threshold dose for induction of AFA (2 mg/L drinking water-internal dose 118 μg Hg/kg bw per day), caused a renal Hg2+ concentration of 1.8 μg/g. The autoimmunogen effect of EtHg might therefore be entirely due to Hg2+ formed from EtHg in the body. The effect of organic and inorganic Hg species on T-helper type 1 and type 2 cells during induction of AFA was assessed as the presence and titre of AFA of the IgG1 and IgG2a isotype, respectively. EtHg induced a persistent Th1-skewed response irrespectively of the dose and time used. A low daily dose of HgCl2 (1.5-3 mg/L) caused a Th1-skewed AFA response, while a moderate dose (8 mg/L) after 2 weeks resulted in a balanced or even Th2-skewed response. Higher daily doses of HgCl2 (25 mg/L) caused a balanced Th2-Th1 response already from onset. In conclusion, while metabolically formed Hg2+ might be the main AFA-inducing factor also after treatment with EtHg, the quality of the Hg-induced AFA response is modified by the species of Hg as well as the dose. © 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå Universitet.
    Nielsen, Jesper B.
    Danmark.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mercury species in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues after exposure to methyl mercury: Correlation with autoimmune parameters during and after treatment in susceptible mice2007In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, E-ISSN 1096-0333, Vol. 221, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is present in the environment as a result of the global cycling of mercury, although anthropogenic sources may dramatically increase the availability in confined geographical areas. Accumulation of MeHg in the aquatic food chain is the dominating way of exposure in mammals, which accumulate MeHg in all organs, including the brain. Demethylation has been described in the organs, especially in phagocytic cells, but mainly in the flora of the intestinal tract. While most of the inorganic mercury (Hg2+) formed in the intestine is excreted, a fraction is reabsorbed which together with the local demethylation increases the organ Hg2+ concentration. MeHg is a well-known immunosuppressive agent, while Hg2+ is associated with immunostimulation and autoimmunity especially in genetically susceptible rodents, creating a syndrome, i.e. mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA). This study aimed at exploring the effect of MeHg with regard to HgIA, and especially the immunological events after stopping treatment, correlated with the presence of MeHg and Hg2+ in the organs. Treatment of A.SW mice for 30 days with 4.2 mg MeHg/L drinking water (corresponding to approximately 420 μg Hg/kg body weight/day) caused all the HgIA features observed after primary treatment with inorganic Hg, except systemic immune complex deposits. The total Hg concentration was 5-fold higher in the kidneys as compared with lymph nodes, but the fraction of Hg2+ was similar (17-20%). After stopping treatment, the renal and lymph node MeHg concentration declined according to first order kinetics during the initial 4-6 weeks, but then slower. A similar decline in the organ Hg2+ concentration occurred during the initial 2 weeks after stopping treatment but then ceased, causing the Hg2+ concentration to exceed that of MeHg in the lymph nodes and kidneys after 3 and 8 weeks, respectively. The selective increase in lymph node Hg2+ fraction is likely to be due to demethylation of MeHg in the macrophage-rich lymphoid tissue. The major autoantibody in HgIA, anti-fibrillarin antibodies, tended to increase during the initial 6 weeks after stopping treatment, while all other HgIA features including antichromatin antibodies declined to control levels after 2-4 weeks. This indicates differences in either dose requirement or induction mechanisms for the different HgIA parameters. The selective accumulation of Hg2+ in lymph nodes following MeHg treatment should be taken into account when the effect of MeHg on the immune system is evaluated. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alteration of the spontaneous systemic autoimmune disease in (NZB x NZW)F1 mice by treatment with thimerosal (ethyl mercury)2006In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, Vol. 214, no 1, p. 43-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic mercury may aggravate murine systemic autoimmune diseases which are either spontaneous (genetically determined) or induced by non-genetic mechanisms. Organic mercury species, the dominating form of mercury exposure in the human population, have not been examined in this respect. Therefore, ethyl mercury in the form of thimerosal, a preservative recently debated as a possible health hazard when present in vaccines, was administered in a dose of 0.156–5 mg/L drinking water to female (NZB × NZW)F1 (ZBWF1) mice. These mice develop an age-dependent spontaneous systemic autoimmune disease with high mortality primarily due to immune-complex (IC) glomerulonephritis. Five mg thimerosal/L drinking water (295 μg Hg/kg body weight (bw)/day) for 7 weeks induced glomerular, mesangial and systemic vessel wall IC deposits and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) which were not present in the untreated controls. After 22–25 weeks, the higher doses of thimerosal had shifted the localization of the spontaneously developing renal glomerular IC deposits from the capillary wall position seen in controls to the mesangium. The altered localization was associated with less severe histological kidney damage, less proteinuria, and reduced mortality. The effect was dose-dependent, lower doses having no effect compared with the untreated controls. A different effect of thimerosal treatment was induction of renal and splenic vessel walls IC deposits. Renal vessel wall deposits occurred at a dose of 0.313–5 mg thimerosal/L (18–295 μg Hg/kg bw/day), while splenic vessel wall deposits developed also in mice given the lowest dose of thimerosal, 0.156 mg/L (9 μg Hg/kg bw/day). The latter dose is 3- and 15-fold lower than the dose of Hg required to induce vessel wall IC deposits in genetically susceptible H-2s mice by HgCl2 and thimerosal, respectively. Further studies on the exact conditions needed for induction of systemic IC deposits by low-dose organic mercurials in autoimmune-prone individuals, as well as the potential effect of these deposits on the vessel walls, are warranted.

  • 27.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology .
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Organic mercury compounds and autoimmunity2005In: Autoimmunity Reviews, ISSN 1568-9972, E-ISSN 1873-0183, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 270-275Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on in vitro studies and short-term in vivo studies, all mercurials were for a long time considered as prototypic immunosuppressive substances. Recent studies have confirmed that organic mercurials such as methyl mercury (MeHg) and ethyl mercury (EtHg) are much more potent immunosuppressors than inorganic mercury (Hg). However, Hg interacts with the immune system in the presence of a susceptible genotype to cause immunostimulation, antinucleolar antibodies targeting fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits, a syndrome called Hg-induced autoimmunity (HgIA). Recent studies in mice with a susceptible genotype has revealed that the immunosuppressive effect of MeHg and EtHg will within 1-3 weeks be superseded by immunostimulation causing an HgIA-like syndrome. At equimolar doses of Hg, MeHg has the weakest immunostimulating, autoimmunogen, and IC-inducing effect, while the effect of thimerosal is similar to that of inorganic mercury. The immunosuppression is caused by the organic mercurials per se. Since they undergo rapid transformation to inorganic Hg, studies are being undertaken to delineate the importance of the organic substances per se and the newly formed inorganic Hg for induction of autoimmunity. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 28.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björn, Erik
    Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Pollard, K.M.
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immunosuppressive and autoimmune effects of thimerosal in mice2005In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, Vol. 204, no 2, p. 109-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possible health effects of the organic mercury compound thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylate), which is rapidly metabolized to ethylmercury (EtHg), have recently been much debated and the effect of this compound on the immune system is largely unknown. We therefore studied the effect of thimerosal by treating A.SW (H-2s) mice, susceptible to induction of autoimmunity by heavy metals, with 10 mg thimerosal/L drinking water (internal dose ca 590 μg Hg/kg body weight/day) for up to 30 days. The lymph node expression of IL-2 and IL-15 mRNA was increased after 2 days, and of IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA after 6 and 14 days. During the first 14 days treatment, the number of splenocytes, including T and B cells as well as Ig-secreting cells decreased. A strong immunostimulation superseded after 30 days treatment with increase in splenic weight, number of splenocytes including T and B cells and Ig-secreting cells, and Th2- as well as Th-1-dependent serum immunoglobulins. Antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex deposits developed. The H-2s strains SJL and B10.S also responded to thimerosal treatment with ANoA. The A.TL and B10.TL strain, sharing background genes with the A.SW and B10.S strain, respectively, but with a different H-2 haplotype (t1), did not develop ANoA, linking the susceptibility to H-2. Thimerosal-treated H-2s mice homozygous for the nu mutation (SJL-nu/nu), or lacking the T-cell co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (B10.S–CD28−/−), did not develop ANoA, which showed that the autoimmune response is T-cell dependent. Using H-2s strains with targeted mutations, we found that IFN-γ and IL-6, but not IL-4, is important for induction of ANoA by thimerosal. The maximum added renal concentration of thimerosal (EtHg) and inorganic mercury occurred after 14 days treatment and was 81 μg Hg/g. EtHg made up 59% and inorganic mercury 41% of the renal mercury. In conclusion, the organic mercury compound thimerosal (EtHg) has initial immunosuppressive effects similar to those of MeHg. However, in contrast to MeHg, thimerosal treatment leads in genetically susceptible mice to a second phase with strong immunostimulation and autoimmunity, which is T-cell dependent, H-2 linked and may at least partly be due to the inorganic mercury derived from the metabolism of ethyl mercury.

  • 29.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Pollard, KM
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gold causes genetically determined autoimmune and immunostimulatory responses in mice2007In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 179-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natrium aurothiomaleate (GSTM) is a useful disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, but causes a variety of immune-mediated adverse effects in many patients. A murine model was used to study further the interaction of GSTM with the immune system, including induction of systemic autoimmunity. Mice were given weekly intramuscular injections of GSTM and controls equimolar amounts of sodium thiomaleate. The effects of gold on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry. Humoral autoimmunity was measured by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and deposition of immunoglobulin and C3 used to assess immunopathology. Gold, in the form of GSTM, stimulated the murine immune system causing strain-dependent lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, including a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted autoantibody response against the nucleolar protein fibrillarin. GSTM did not cause glomerular or vessel wall IgG deposits. However, it did elicit a strong B cell-stimulating effect, including both T helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-dependent isotypes. All these effects on the immune system were dependent on the MHC genotype, emphasizing the clinical observations of a strong genetic linkage for the major adverse immune reactions seen with GSTM treatment. © 2007 British Society for Immunology.

  • 30.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lambertsson, Lars
    Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Qvarnström, Johanna
    Department of Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Dose-response study of thimerosal-induced murine systemic autoimmunity2004In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, Vol. 194, no 2, p. 169-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organic compound ethylmercurithiosalicylate (thimerosal), which is primarily present in the tissues as ethylmercury, has caused illness and several deaths due to erroneous handling when used as a disinfectant or as a preservative in medical preparations. Lately, possible health effects of thimerosal in childhood vaccines have been much discussed. Thimerosal is a well-known sensitizing agent, although usually of no clinical relevance. In rare cases, thimerosal has caused systemic immune reactions including acrodynia. We have studied if thimerosal might induce the systemic autoimmune condition observed in genetically susceptible mice after exposure to inorganic mercury.

    A.SW mice were exposed to 1.25–40 mg thimerosal/l drinking water for 70 days. Antinucleolar antibodies, targeting the 34-kDa protein fibrillarin, developed in a dose-related pattern and first appeared after 10 days in the two highest dose groups. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for antifibrillarin antibodies was 2.5 mg thimerosal/l, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 147 μg Hg/kg bw and a concentration of 21 and 1.9 μg Hg/g in the kidney and lymph nodes, respectively. The same LOAEL was found for tissue immune-complex deposits. The total serum concentration of IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a showed a significant dose-related increase in thimerosal-treated mice, with a LOAEL of 5 mg thimerosal/l for IgG1 and IgE, and 20 mg thimerosal/l for IgG2a. The polyclonal B-cell activation showed a significant dose–response relationship with a LOAEL of 10 mg thimerosal/l. Therefore, thimerosal induces in genetically susceptible mice a systemic autoimmune syndrome very similar to that seen after treatment with inorganic mercury, although a higher absorbed dose of Hg is needed using thimerosal. The autoimmune syndrome induced by thimerosal is different from the weaker and more restricted autoimmune reaction observed after treatment with an equipotent dose of methylmercury.

  • 31.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pollard, K M
    Scripps Research Institute.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gold- and silver-induced murine autoimmunity - requirement for cytokines and CD28 in murine heavy metal-induced autoimmunity2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment with gold in the form of aurothiomaleate, silver or mercury (Hg) in genetically susceptible mouse strains (H-2(s) ) induces a systemic autoimmune condition characterized by anti-nuclear antibodies targeting the 34-kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, as well as lymphoproliferation and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits. In this study we have examined the effect of single-gene deletions for interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 or CD28 in B10.S (H-2(s) ) mice on heavy metal-induced autoimmunity. Targeting of the genes for IFN-gamma, IL-6 or CD28 abrogated the development of both anti-fibrillarin antibodies (AFA) and IC deposits using a modest dose of Hg (130 mu g Hg/kg body weight/day). Deletion of IL-4 severely reduced the IgG1 AFA induced by all three metals, left the total IgG AFA response intact, but abrogated the Hg-induced systemic IC deposits. In conclusion, intact IFN-gamma and CD28 genes are necessary for induction of AFA with all three metals and systemic IC deposits using Hg, while lack of IL-4 distinctly skews the metal-induced AFA response towards T helper type 1. In a previous study using a higher dose of Hg (415 mu g Hg/kg body weight/day), IC deposits were preserved in IL-4(-/-) and IL-6(-/-) mice, and also AFA in the latter mice. Therefore, the attenuated autoimmunity following loss of IL-4 and IL-6 is dose-dependent, as higher doses of Hg are able to override the attenuation observed using lower doses.

  • 32.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Environmental factors that contribute to autoimmunity.2006In: Autoantibodies and autoimmunity.: molecular mechanisms in health and disease / [ed] Michael Pollard, 2006, 1, p. 519-541Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first book to address all aspects of the biology of autoantibodies in a single volume, including a discussion of immunology, experimental models, clinical aspects, and the use of autoantibodies as probes in molecular and cellular biology. The editor, currently professor at the W.M. Keck Autoimmune Disease Center of The Scripps Research Institute, has assembled an all-star team of authors to report on the latest research, technologies, and applications. Following an introductory chapter, the book goes on to cover such topics as cellular mechanisms of autoantibody production, clinical and diagnostic usefulness in human disease, and animal models used to study the elicitation of autoantibodies. The whole is rounded off with a look at future perspectives. With its comprehensive coverage, this volume will appeal not only to immunologists and clinicians but also to cell and molecular biologists.

  • 33.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Environmental factors that contribute to autoimmunity.2005In: Autoantibodies and autoimmunity: molecular mechanisms in health and disease / [ed] Michael Pollard., WileyVCH , 2005, 1, p. 519-541Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first book to address all aspects of the biology of autoantibodies in a single volume, including a discussion of immunology, experimental models, clinical aspects, and the use of autoantibodies as probes in molecular and cellular biology. The editor, currently professor at the W.M. Keck Autoimmune Disease Center of The Scripps Research Institute, has assembled an all-star team of authors to report on the latest research, technologies, and applications. Following an introductory chapter, the book goes on to cover such topics as cellular mechanisms of autoantibody production, clinical and diagnostic usefulness in human disease, and animal models used to study the elicitation of autoantibodies. The whole is rounded off with a look at future perspectives.With its comprehensive coverage, this volume will appeal not only to immunologists and clinicians but also to cell and molecular biologists.

  • 34.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Immunotoxicology of metals2007In: Handbook on the toxicology of metals / [ed] Gunnar F. Nordberg, Elsevier , 2007, 3, p. 197-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals is the standard reference work for physicians, toxicologists and engineers in the field of environmental and occupational health. This new edition is a comprehensive review of the effects on biological systems from metallic elements and their compounds. An entirely new structure and illustrations represent the vast array of advancements made since the last edition. Special emphasis has been placed on the toxic effects in humans with chapters on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of metal poisoning. This up-to-date reference provides easy access to a broad range of basic toxicological data and also gives a general introduction to the toxicology of metallic compounds. * Covers up-to-date toxicological information on 31 metallic elements and their compounds, each in a separate chapter * New chapters on general chemistry, biological monitoring and biomarkers, essential metals, principles for prevention of the toxic effects of metals, and more

  • 35.
    Hultman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Hansson-Georgiadis, H
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Methyl mercury-induced autoimmunity in mice. 1999In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, ISSN 0041-008X, E-ISSN 1096-0333, Vol. 154, p. 203-211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hultman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Nielsen, J
    The effect of dose, gender, and non-H-2 genes in murine mercury-induced autoimmunity2001In: Journal of Autoimmunity, ISSN 0896-8411, E-ISSN 1095-9157, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the effect of dose, treatment time, gender and non-H-2 genes on immune parameters and toxicokinetics in murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgAI). The partly-proven mechanism for HgAI is the modification of the autoantigen fibrillarin by mercury, followed by a T cell-dependent immune response driven by the modified fibrillarin. In the H-2 congenic (H-2S) mouse strains A.SW and B10.S given 203HgCl2 in a dose of 0.25-8 mg Hg/l drinking water for up to 10 weeks, the internal dose measured as the whole-body retention of mercury reached steady state within 5 weeks. Fifty percent of the steady state level was reached already after 2 days. Conditions therefore exist for a rapid modification of fibrillarin, followed by a T cell-dependent immune response, which is consistent with the presence of anti-fibrillarin antibodies (AFA) in serum after 2 weeks. AFA developed in a dose-dependent pattern. Serum IgE showed a dose-dependent increase with a maximum after 1-2.5 weeks followed by a distinct decline towards the baseline level. Substantial polyclonal B-cell activation (PBA) developed in the highest dose groups only. Since AFA developed using lower doses too, PBA can be excluded as a general mechanism for induction of AFA. Tissue immune-complex (IC) deposits were present in the highest dose groups only, indicating a possible causality between PBA and IC deposits. The substantially lower whole body and organ mercury level needed to induce AFA in the A.SW strain as compared with the H-2 congenic B10.S strain, demonstrates that genetic factors outside the H-2 region, and not related to toxicokinetics, modifies the autoimmune response. In contrast, the difference in mercury thresholds for induction of IgE was only slight between A.SW and B10.S mice, indicating basically different mechanisms for induction of AFA and serum IgE.

  • 37.
    Hultman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, K. Michael
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA.
    Immunotoxicology of metals2014In: Handbook on the toxicology of metals, / [ed] Gunnar Nordberg, Bruce Fowler, Monica Nordberg, Academic Press, 2014, 4, p. 379-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hultman, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Taylor, A.
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Yang, J.M.
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA, United States.
    Pollard, K.M.
    Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, CA, United States.
    The effect of xenobiotic exposure on spontaneous autoimmunity in (SWR x SJL)F1 hybrid mice2006In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, ISSN 1528-7394, E-ISSN 1087-2620, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 505-523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    F1 hybrids of SWR (H-2q) and SJL (H-2s) mice spontaneously develop a lupuslike condition in an age-dependent manner, and these two H-2 haplotypes also confer susceptibility to induction of systemic autoimmunity by heavy metals such as mercury, silver, and gold with antifibrillarin antibodies (AFA) as marker. The aim of this study was to determine how the mixing of two susceptible genomes might influence expression of idiopathic and induced autoimmunity over a period of 14 mo of exposure to mercury and silver. Spontaneous autoimmunity first appeared as antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in females at 10 wk of age and in males at 10 mo of age, and was followed by development of anti-chromatin antibodies. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA developed in 60% of males and 20% of females. Thirty percent of males and 10% of females developed a coarsely speckled ANA pattern associated with high titers of anti-Sm antibodies. Glomerular immune complex (IC) deposits and a proliferative glomerulonephritis were seen at 17 mo of age. The F1 hybrids treated with metals showed no exaggeration of spontaneous autoimmunity. However, the metals suppressed the spontaneous development of anti-Sm and antichromatin antibodies. The metal-induced AFA, linked to the H-2s and H-2q haplotype, reached a maximum after 3-4 mo of treatment and then declined, 33% of the silver-treated hybrids finally became AFA-negative, despite continuous treatment. The decline in ANoA during metal treatment is contrary to the situation in metal-treated SJL mice. This indicates that dominant SWR background genes suppressed induction of certain autoimmune traits in the (SWR x SJL)F1 hybrid mice. Copyright© Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • 39.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Havarinasab, Said
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björn, Erik
    Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The immunosuppressive effect of methylmercury does not preclude development of autoimmunity in genetically susceptible mice2005In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 208, no 1, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a common environmental pollutant due to both natural and anthropogenic sources. Although the central nervous system (CNS) is considered the critical organ for the toxic effect of MeHg, it has recently been suggested that the immune system might be at least as sensitive as the CNS.

    We have examined the effects of MeHg on the immune system in genetically metal-susceptible mice. Subcutaneous (sc) injections of 2 mg MeHg/kg body weight (bw) every third day (internal dose ca. 540 μg Hg/kg bw/day) to A.SW mice of the H-2s haplotype, caused during the first week a 47 and 9% reduction of B- and T-cells, respectively, which indicates immunosuppression. Subsequently, an autoimmune syndrome developed which shared certain features with the syndrome induced by inorganic mercury in H-2s mice, including antibodies targeting the 34 kDa nucleolar protein fibrillarin, increased expression of IL-4 mRNA, increase of Th2-type of immunoglobulins (IgE and IgG1), and increased MHC class II expression on B-cells. However, the response using MeHg was attenuated compared with even lower doses of Hg in the form of inorganic mercury, and specifically lacked the increased expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA, the polyclonal B-cell activation (PBA), and the systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits which are induced by inorganic mercury. Increasing the dose of MeHg increased the titre of anti-nucleolar antibodies and shortened the induction time, but did not lead to stronger immunostimulation or systemic IC-deposits. The kidney and liver selectively accumulated MeHg, while the blood, spleen and lymph nodes showed lower levels of MeHg. The accumulation of MeHg and Hg2+ increased throughout the 30-day period. The fraction of Hg2+ in the kidney varied between 4 and 22%, and the lymph nodes showed a maximum of 30% Hg2+.

    We conclude first that MeHg has quantitatively different effect on the immune system compared with inorganic mercury, and secondly that an initial immunosuppression induced by a xenobiotic does not preclude subsequent immunostimulation and autoimmunity.

  • 40.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of deviating the Th2-response in murine mercury-induced autoimmunity towards a Th1-response2003In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 202-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T-helper cells type 1 (Th1) and type 2 (Th2) play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In many Th1-dependent autoimmune models, treatment with recombinant interleukin-12 (rIL-12) accelerates the autoimmune response. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is an H-2 regulated condition with antinucleolar antibodies targeting fibrillarin (ANoA), systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits and transient polyclonal B-cell activation (PBA). HgIA has many characteristics of a Th2 type of reaction, including a strong increase of IgE, but disease induction is critically dependent on the Th1 cytokine IFN-γ. The aim of this study was to investigate if a strong deviation of the immune response in HgIA towards Th1 would aggravate HgIA. Injections of both rIL-12 and anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody (α-IL-4) reduced the HgCl2-(Hg-)induced concentration of the Th2-dependent serum IgE and IgG1, but increased the Th1-dependent serum IgG2a. The IgG-ANoA developed earlier and attained a higher titre after combined treatment, and the ANoA titre of the IgG1 isotype decreased while the ANoA titre of the Th1-associated IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3-ANoA isotypes increased. Treatment with rIL-12 alone increased the Hg-induced IgG2a and IgG3 ANoA titres, the PBA, and the IC deposits in renal and splenic vessel walls, while treatment with α-IL-4 + Hg inhibited renal but not splenic vessel wall IC deposits. We conclude that manipulating the cytokine status, by altering the Th1/Th2 balance, will influence autoimmune disease manifestations. This might be an important way of modulating human autoimmune diseases.

  • 41.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IL-10 is not a major determinant for resistance to murine mercury-induced systemic autoimmunityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune diseases have a complicated and largely unknown etiology and pathogenesis, but they are at least partly obeying the rules of an ordinary immune response. Cytokines are therefore important in the pathogenesis as demonstrated by the recent success in treating rheumatoid arthritis with anti-cytokine agents. The suppressive fimctions in the immune system have lately received much interest. One of the cytokines in focus in this respect is IL-10. We recently observed that in heavy-metal induced systemic autoimmunity, genetically resistant mice show a strong increase in IL-10 mRNA expression, which was not seen in susceptible mice. We have therefore examined the possible regulating effect of IL-10 on induction and manifestation of systemic autoimmunity in this model. We took two approaches: a targeted mutation for the IL-10 gene in a strain resistant to heavy-metal induced autoimmunity, and treatment with recombinant IL-10 in the genetically susceptible A. SW strain during the induction of autoimmunity by metals.

    The wild-type C57BL/6J (B6-WT) strain did not react with lymphoproliferation, polyclonal B-cell activation, increases in antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) or tissue immune-complex (IC) deposits in response to inorganic mercury (Hg) or silver (Ag). However, in agreement with previous obsetvations there was a modest increase in serum IgG1, IgE and IgG2a. Treatment with Ag caused only a weak increase in IgE and IgG1. The B6.129P2-µ10tm1Cgn /J strain (IL-10 deficient B6 mice) did not develop antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) during Hg treatment, but compared with Hg-treated B6-WT mice there was a significant increase in homogeneous ANA and a higher serum IgE concentration. The IL-10 deficient B6 controls showed a spontaneous increase in splenic weight as well as serum IgM and IgG1 compared with the B6-WT control mice. These signs of immune activation were also present in the IL-10 deficient B6 mice treated with Hg, while treatment with Ag reduced these features making the response similar to that in the B6-WT controls.

    The susceptible A.SW mice treated with rIL-10 and Hg showed during ongoing intense rIL-10 treatment reduced induction of ANoA, reduction in antichromatin antibodies (ACA), and a reduced increase in serum IgE compared with mice which received Hg but not rIL-10. In conclusion, the reduced ANoA induction during riL-10 treatment indicates suppressive effect of IL-10 on autoimmune development. Lack of IL-10 may promote development of ANA, ACA, and serum IgE, but is not likely to be crucial for resistance to heavy-metal induced autoimmunity.

  • 42.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Interleukin-10 in murine metal-induced systemic autoimmunity2005In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 141, no 3, p. 422-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune diseases have a complicated and largely unknown aetiology and pathogenesis, but they are at least partly obeying the rules of an ordinary immune response. Cytokines are therefore important in the pathogenesis as demonstrated by the recent success in treating rheumatoid arthritis with anti-cytokine agents. The suppressive functions in the immune system have lately received much interest. One of the cytokines in focus in this respect is interleukin (IL)-10. We recently observed that in heavy-metal induced systemic autoimmunity, genetically resistant mice show a strong increase in IL-10 mRNA expression, which was not seen in susceptible mice. We have therefore examined the possible regulating effect of IL-10 on the induction and manifestation of systemic autoimmunity in this model. We took two approaches: a targeted mutation of the IL-10 gene in a strain resistant to heavy metal-induced autoimmunity, and treatment with recombinant IL-10 in the genetically susceptible A.SW strain during the induction of autoimmunity by metals. The wild-type C57BL/6 J (B6-WT) strain did not react with lymphoproliferation, polyclonal B cell activation, anti-nucleoar autoantibodies (ANoA) or tissue immune-complex (IC) deposits in response to inorganic mercury (Hg) or silver (Ag). However, serum IgG1 and IgE showed a modest increase during Hg treatment, while Ag caused a weak increase in IgE and IgG2a. The B6-129P2-Il10tm1Cgn/J strain (IL-10-deficient mice) did not develop antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) during Hg treatment, but showed a higher median titre of homogeneous ANA compared with Hg-treated B6-WT mice. Both control and Hg-treated (but not Ag-treated) IL-10-deficient mice showed an increase in splenic weight and serum IgG1 compared with B6-WT control and Hg-treated mice. An early, significant increase in serum IgE was seen in Hg-treated IL-10-deficient and WT mice compared with the controls, the increase was 42- and sixfold, respectively. During ongoing intense treatment with rIL-10 in combination with Hg the susceptible A.SW mice showed a reduced development of ANoA and antichromatin antibodies, as well as serum IgE, compared with mice receiving Hg but not rIL-10. In conclusion, IL-10 suppresses several aspects of HgIA, but is not crucial for resistance to heavy metal-induced autoimmunity. Peroral silver treatment suppresses the spontaneous immune activation seen in IL-10-deficient mice. © 2005 British Society for Immunology.

  • 43.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Interleukin-10 in murine mercury-induced systemic autoimmunity2005In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 141, no 3, p. 422-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic autoimmune diseases have a complicated and largely unknown etiology and pathogenesis, but they are at least partly obeying the rules of an ordinary immune response. Cytokines are therefore important in the pathogenesis as demonstrated by the recent success in treating rheumatoid arthritis with anti-cytokine agents. The suppressive fimctions in the immune system have lately received much interest. One of the cytokines in focus in this respect is IL-10. We recently observed that in heavy-metal induced systemic autoimmunity, genetically resistant mice show a strong increase in IL-10 mRNA expression, which was not seen in susceptible mice. We have therefore examined the possible regulating effect of IL-10 on induction and manifestation of systemic autoimmunity in this model. We took two approaches: a targeted mutation for the IL-10 gene in a strain resistant to heavy-metal induced autoimmunity, and treatment with recombinant IL-10 in the genetically susceptible A. SW strain during the induction of autoimmunity by metals.

    The wild-type C57BL/6J (B6-WT) strain did not react with lymphoproliferation, polyclonal B-cell activation, increases in antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) or tissue immune-complex (IC) deposits in response to inorganic mercury (Hg) or silver (Ag). However, in agreement with previous obsetvations there was a modest increase in serum IgG1, IgE and IgG2a. Treatment with Ag caused only a weak increase in IgE and IgG1. The B6.129P2-µ10tm1Cgn /J strain (IL-10 deficient B6 mice) did not develop antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) during Hg treatment, but compared with Hg-treated B6-WT mice there was a significant increase in homogeneous ANA and a higher serum IgE concentration. The IL-10 deficient B6 controls showed a spontaneous increase in splenic weight as well as serum IgM and IgG1 compared with the B6-WT control mice. These signs of immune activation were also present in the IL-10 deficient B6 mice treated with Hg, while treatment with Ag reduced these features making the response similar to that in the B6-WT controls.

    The susceptible A.SW mice treated with rIL-10 and Hg showed during ongoing intense rIL-10 treatment reduced induction of ANoA, reduction in antichromatin antibodies (ACA), and a reduced increase in serum IgE compared with mice which received Hg but not rIL-10. In conclusion, the reduced ANoA induction during riL-10 treatment indicates suppressive effect of IL-10 on autoimmune development. Lack of IL-10 may promote development of ANA, ACA, and serum IgE, but is not likely to be crucial for resistance to heavy-metal induced autoimmunity.

  • 44.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Murine metal-induced systemic autoimmunity: baseline and stimulated cytokine mRNA expression in genetically susceptible and resistant strains2001In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 126, no 1, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytokines play an important and complex role in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases. In susceptible H-2s mice, inorganic mercury (Hg) induces lymphoproliferation, antinucleolar antibodies against the 34-kDa-protein fibrillarin, and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits. Here, we report extensive analysis of cytokine mRNA levels in susceptible A.SW (H-2s) and resistant A.TL (H-2tl) mice under unstimulated conditions and during oral treatment with Hg and/or silver nitrate (Ag). Cytokine mRNA expression in lymphoid tissues was assessed using the ribonuclease protection assay and phosphorimaging. Baseline expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA was higher in A.SW than in A.TL mice. In A.SW mice, Hg treatment caused early up-regulation of IL-2 and IFN-γ levels, followed by substantial expression of IL-4 mRNA, which was significant compared to control A.SW and Hg-treated A.TL mice. Hg-exposed A.TL mice exhibited unchanged IFN-γ, reduced IL-2 and greatly increased IL-10 mRNA expression. Ag-treated A.SW mice, which develop antifibrillarin antibodies (AFA) but exhibit minimal immune activation and no IC deposits, showed an early increase in IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA, but only a small and delayed rise in IL-4 mRNA. In conclusion, H-2-linked resistance to Hg-induced AFA is characterized by low constitutive expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA, which is not increased by Hg, and a marked increase in IL-10 expression. Conversely, the key features of H-2-linked susceptibility to Hg- and Ag-induced AFA are up-regulation of IL-2, IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNA expression, and down-regulation of IL-10 expression.

  • 45.
    Johan, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engström, Ulla
    Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala Branch, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Acceleration of amyloid protein A amyloidosis by amyloid-like synthetic fibrils1998In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 2558-2563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid protein A (AA) amyloidosis is a consequence of some long-standing inflammatory conditions, and subsequently, an N-terminal fragment of the acute phase protein serum AA forms β-sheet fibrils that are deposited in different tissues. It is unknown why only some individuals develop AA amyloidosis. In the mouse model, AA amyloidosis develops after ≈25 days of inflammatory challenge. This lag phase can be shortened dramatically by administration of a small amount of amyloid extract containing an as yet undefined amyloid-enhancing factor. In the present study, we show that preformed amyloid-like fibrils made from short synthetic peptides corresponding to parts of several different amyloid fibril proteins exert amyloidogenic enhancing activity when given i.v. to mice at the induction of inflammation. We followed i.v. administered, radiolabeled, heterologous, synthetic fibrils to the lung and to the perifollicular area in the spleen and found that new AA–amyloid fibrils developed on these preformed fibrils. Our findings thus show that preformed, synthetic, amyloid-like fibrils have an in vivo nidus activity and that amyloid-enhancing activity may occur, at least in part, through this mechanism. Our findings also show that fibrils of a heterologous chemical nature exert amyloid-enhancing activity.

  • 46. Kono, DH
    et al.
    Park, MS
    Szydlik, A
    Haraldsson, KM
    Kuan, JD
    Pearson, DL
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pollard, KM
    Resistance to xenobiotic-induced autoimmunity maps to chromosome 11.2001In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 167, p. 2396-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Martinsson, Klara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cederbrant, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cytokines in induction of ANoA and hypergammaglobulinemia in mercury-induced autoimmunity: a lesson from Fc!RIII deficient miceManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Xenobiotic agents such as metals, drugs, toxic oils and pristane can induce autoimmune diseases. Heavy metal induction of autoimmunity has been observed for mercury (Hg), silver and gold in mice. Mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) in mice is characterised by lymphoproliferation, hypergammaglobulinemia, antinucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA) and immune complex deposits in the renal glomerular mesangium and systemically in vessel walls. HgIA is T-cell dependent, IFNγ is necessary for all manifestations of HgIA, and the activating Fc!RIII enhance development of ANoA. This study focused firstly on exploring the cytokine profile in the genetically susceptible DBA/1 (H-2q) wild type (wt) and DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice treated with 15 mg/l Hg, and secondly on the hypothesis that IFN-! producing NK cells are vital for induction of ANoA in the HgIA model. DBA/1 wt mice showed a significantly more marked Th1 profile compared to DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice following Hg treatment, whereas the total Th2 and Th17 profile increased in both DBA/1 wt and DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice. However, during Hg treatment IL-21 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice compared with DBA/1 wt mice. However, we were unable to show that the increased Th1 profile in the DBA/1 wt mice was due to IFN-γsecretion from NK cells. Our findings suggest that the delayed ANoA induction in DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice is due to the attenuated Th1 profile. In addition the reduced expression of IL-21 in DBA/1 FcγRIII-/- mice might be responsible for the lack of serum IgG1 response in these mice.

  • 48.
    Martinsson, Klara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lack of Fcγ-receptors increases circulating immune complexes but delays development of tissue immune complex depositsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic mercury (Hg) induces in susceptible mouse strains a T-cell dependent, systemic autoimmune condition (HgIA) characterized by immunostimulation, antinuclear antibodies, and immune-complex (IC) deposits in glomeruli and vessel walls. Activating Fcγ-receptors (FcγRs) are important for induction of HgIA. We have examined if activating FcγRs affect circulating immune complexes (CIC), the initial development of tissue IC deposits and their composition in HgIA. BALB/c mice with a targeted mutation for activating FcγRs and BALB/c mice without any mutation (wild type - wt - mice) were treated up to 35 days with Hg. Wild type mice showed a significant but modest increase of CIC from day 12 until day 18 and day 35 for IgG2a- and IgG1-containing CIC, respectively. Mercury-treated FcγR−/− mice showed significantly higher CIC levels than Hg-treated wt mice during the entire treatment time for IgG1-CIC, and after 26 and 35 days for IgG2a-CIC. Tissue IC deposits developed later in the FcγR−/− mice especially in the renal mesangium. After 35 days of Hg treatment the fraction of mice with and/or the amount of IgG1 and C3c deposits were significantly reduced in vessel walls and for IgG1 also in the renal mesangium compared with wt mice. We conclude that susceptible mice lacking activating FcγRs respond to an autoimmune stimulus with increased levels and altered quality of CIC compared with wt mice. It is likely that lack of FcγRs reduced elimination of CIC as indicated by delayed and significantly reduced IC deposits in the tissues of mice without activating receptors.

  • 49.
    Martinsson, Klara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The role of Fc-receptors in murine mercury-induced systemic autoimmunity2006In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 309-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inorganic mercury (Hg) in genetically susceptible mouse strains induces a T cell-dependent, systemic autoimmune condition (HgIA) characterized by immunostimulation, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits. The exact phenotypic expression of HgIA in different strains depends on H-2 and non-H-2 genes. Fc receptors (FcRs) are important in the development of many autoimmune diseases. In this study, the effect of targeted mutations for activating and inhibiting FcRs in the BALB/c model of HgIA was examined. Hg-treated BALB/c mice without mutation (wild-type, wt) showed heavy IC deposits in the renal glomerular mesangium, as well as in renal and splenic vessel walls. The renal mesangial IC deposits were severely reduced in Hg-treated BALB/c mice without the gamma-chain (lack of the activating receptors FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII and FcinRI), but unchanged in mice lacking the inhibitory FcgammaRIIB. The Hg-induced vessel wall IC deposits present in wt mice were abolished and reduced in the FcRgamma and FcgammaRIIB strains, respectively. Hg-treated BALB/c wt mice and mice without the gamma-chain showed an increase in serum IgE, while the increase in IgG1 was attenuated in the latter strain. In contrast, absence of the inhibiting FcgammaRIIB augmented the Hg-induced increase of both serum IgG1 and IgE. In conclusion, FcRs are important mainly for the induction of systmeic IC deposits in the HgIA model, but also affects serum IgG1 and IgE levels.

  • 50.
    Martinsson, Klara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kleinau, Sandra
    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    The effect of activating and inhibiting Fc-receptors on murine mercury-induced autoimmunity2008In: Journal of Autoimmunity, ISSN 0896-8411, E-ISSN 1095-9157, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 22-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fc-receptors for IgG (FcgammaR) link cellular and humoral immune responses, controlling the balance between activating and inhibitory immune responses, and are involved in autoimmune diseases. Mercury (Hg) induces an autoimmune condition in genetically (H-2(s,q,f)) susceptible mice characterized by lymphoproliferation, hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA). Here we investigate the role of activating (FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII) and inhibitory (FcgammaRIIb) Fc-receptors on mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA) using DBA/1 mice (H-2(q)) with targeted FcgammaR mutations and wild type (wt) mice. Mice deficient for the FcRgamma-chain or FcgammaRIII and treated with 15 mg/L HgCl(2) showed a delayed and attenuated IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b ANoA response compared to wt mice. Female Hg-treated FcgammaRIIB(-/-) mice showed a significant increased of IgG2b ANoA development compared to wt mice. The total serum IgG1 response due to Hg was attenuated in FcRgamma(-/-) and FcgammaRIII(-/-) mice compared to wt mice. Hg-treated FcgammaRIIB(-/-) mice showed an increase of both serum IgG1 and IgE compared to wt mice. We conclude that FcgammaRIII is of importance for the rapidity and final strength of the ANoA response and the increase in serum IgG1 in HgIA, while lack of FcgammaRIIb increases the IgG2b ANoA response and the serum IgG1 and IgE response.

12 1 - 50 of 72
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf