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  • 1.
    Alping, Peter
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Langer-Gould, Annette
    Kaiser Permanente, CA USA; Kaiser Permanente, CA USA.
    Frisell, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Fink, Katharina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Fogdell-Hahn, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Stockholm Hlth Serv, Sweden.
    Lycke, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Salzer, Jonatan
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Danderyd Hosp, Sweden.
    Virtanen, Suvi
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Validation of the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register Further Improving a Resource for Pharmacoepidemiologic Evaluations2019In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 230-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register is a national register monitoring treatment and clinical course for all Swedish multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, with high coverage and close integration with the clinic. Despite its great value for epidemiologic research, it has not previously been validated. In this brief report, we summarize a large validation of amp;gt;3,000 patients in the register using clinical chart review in the context of the COMBAT-MS study. While further improving the data quality for a central cohort of patients available for future epidemiologic research, this study also allowed us to estimate the accuracy and completeness of the register data.

  • 2.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Iacobaeus, Ellen
    Karolinska Institute Solna, Sweden.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Sweden; University Hospital Northern Sweden, Sweden.
    Lycke, Jan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Petra
    Skåne University Hospital Lund, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Sten
    Karolinska Institute Huddinge, Sweden.
    Martin, Claes
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandstedt, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Uggla, Bertil
    University of Örebro, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lenhoff, Stig
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Hagglund, Hans
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Carlson, Kristina
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: the Swedish experience2014In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 85, no 10, p. 1116-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a viable option for treatment of aggressive multiple sclerosis (MS). No randomised controlled trial has been performed, and thus, experiences from systematic and sustained follow-up of treated patients constitute important information about safety and efficacy. In this observational study, we describe the characteristics and outcome of the Swedish patients treated with HSCT for MS. Methods Neurologists from the major hospitals in Sweden filled out a follow-up form with prospectively collected data. Fifty-two patients were identified in total; 48 were included in the study and evaluated for safety and side effects; 41 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up and were further analysed for clinical and radiological outcome. In this cohort, 34 patients (83%) had relapsing-remitting MS, and mean follow-up time was 47 months. Results At 5 years, relapse-free survival was 87%; MRI event-free survival 85%; expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score progression-free survival 77%; and disease-free survival (no relapses, no new MRI lesions and no EDSS progression) 68%. Presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions prior to HSCT was associated with a favourable outcome (disease-free survival 79% vs 46%, p=0.028). There was no mortality. The most common long-term side effects were herpes zoster reactivation (15%) and thyroid disease (8.4%). Conclusions HSCT is a very effective treatment of inflammatory active MS and can be performed with a high degree of safety at experienced centres.

  • 3. Cheng, Q
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Fredrikson, S
    Link, H
    de Pedro-Cuesta, J
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Epidemiological surveillance of Guillain-Barré syndrome in Sweden, 1996-1997.2000In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 101, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Cheng, Q.
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Fredrikson, S
    Link, H
    de Pedro-Cuesta, J
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome in Sweden 1996.2000In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 7, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Cheng, Q.
    et al.
    Jiang, GX
    Press, R.
    Andersson, M.
    Ekstedt, B.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Clinical epidemiology of Guillain-Barre syndrome in Sweden 1996-1997: a prospective study.2000In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 7, p. 685-692Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Margareta
    Department of Neurology, County Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology.
    T helper type 2 like cytokine responses to peptides from P0 and P2 myelin proteins during the recovery phase of Guillain-Barré syndrome1997In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 153, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T-lymphocytes are probably involved in the pathogenesis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). T-helper-1 (Th1) cytokines activate macrophages and induce a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) inflammatory response, consistent with the morphology of the demyelination in GBS. Th2 cytokines encourage antibody production and downregulate Th1 responses. To study the Th1/Th2 cytokines in relation to the clinical course of GBS an ELISPOT method for determination of single cells secreting interferon-γ, IFN-γ (Th1) or interleukin-4, IL-4 (Th2) was used. We serially investigated antigen-induced cytokine secretion from circulating T-cells stimulated with human peptides from the P0 and P2 proteins in seven patients and compared to results from seven serially investigated healthy controls. Most patients (five of seven) showed IL-4 responses during the plateau- or recovery-phase as compared to controls. One patient with a prolonged disease course, on the other hand, had an IFN-γ dominated reactivity. We suggest that the IL-4 responses are beneficial in GBS, and may have a role in terminating the disease process in this self-limiting inflammatory disease.

  • 7.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Transfusion Medicine and Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    T lymphocyte subset abnormalities in peripheral blood from patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome1994In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    T lymphocytes are probably of pathogenic importance in many autoimmune diseases. Recently, deviations of circulating T-helper (CD4+) subpopulations have been noticed. Blood samples from 12 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) were studied with flow cytometry during their disease to define circulating T cell populations. The proportion of T-helper cells (CD4+) was decreased (mean value 41±15%, P = 0.01) and the proportion of T cytotoxic/suppressor cells (CD8+) was increased (35±18%, P = 0.0006) as compared to the control group of healthy blood donors (47±8% and 26±7% respectively). The CD4+ population is divided into the helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) and suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subsets. which normally are equally distributed (mean values in our control group were 45±15% and 44±15%, respectively). In patients with GBS, the helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) subset was increased (54±10%, P = 0.05) and the suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subset was decreased (31±9, P = 0.005) compared to the controls. The proportion of activated HLA-DR-expressing T cells was increased (7±8%, P = 0.005) as compared to control (3±3%). The total proportions of T cells (CD2+), B cells (CD19+) and natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+) were similar in pateints and controls. The CD4+ and CD8+ populations, as well as the activated HLA-DR+ T cells, normalized during the disease course. The derivations within the CD4+ population also tended to normalize, but even at follow up after 6–33 (mean 23) months, some abnormalities remained. In conclusion, we confirm previous reports of T cell activation in peripheral blood from patients with GBS. A new finding is the derivation of T helper subpopulations with an increased helper/inducer (CD4+ CD29+) subset and a decreased suppressor/inducer (CD4+ CD45RA+) subset, which indicates a possible autoimmune character of GBS.

  • 8.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Press, Rayomand
    Karolinska Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Th1/Th2/Th17 and Treg related transcription factors and cytokines in multiple sclerosis2008In: JOURNAL OF NEUROIMMUNOLOGY, 2008, Vol. 203, no 2, p. 131-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Gustafsson, Mika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Huddinge University Hospital.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Regulatory T cells in Multiple Sclerosis – Indications of impaired function of suppressive capacity and a role for chemokines2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical for immune regulation and homeostasis. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the function of these cells has been shown to be impaired, although the underlying mechanism has yet to be shown. In the current study, we aimed to characterize and assess the phenotypical, functional and transcriptional characteristics of memory and naïve Treg in MS patients and controls.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS 27 patients with relapsing-remitting disease were included, along with 29 healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used for detailed phenotyping of Treg subpopulations CD4+CD45RA+/- and CD4dimCD25++ and their expression of FOXP3, CD39 and HELIOS. CFSE (proliferation marker) and CD69 (activation marker) were used to investigate the functional capacity of Treg. A microarray was employed for genome-wide transcriptional characterization of isolated Treg.

    RESULTS CD4+CD45RA–CD25++ activated Treg displayed a higher expression of FOXP3 and CD39 than resting CD4+CD45RA+CD25+ Treg, while no significant phenotypical differences were observed in Treg subpopulations between patients and controls. However, a lower anti-proliferative capacity was observed in activated Treg of MS patients compared with those of controls (p<0.05), while suppression of activation was similar to controls. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data revealed enrichment for the GO gene set ‘chemokine receptor binding’ in MS Treg.

    CONCLUSION Although numerical phenotypical assessment of resting and activated Tregs did not reveal any significant difference between patients and controls, functional co-culturing experiments showed an impaired function in activated Treg of MS patients. Furthermore, GSEA revealed immune-related gene sets overexpressed in Treg of MS patients, possibly containing clues to the functional impairment. In particular over-activity in chemokine signalling in Treg would be of interest for further investigation.

  • 10.
    Edström, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Mjösberg, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Press, R
    Huddinge University Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Transcriptional characteristics of CD4+ T cells in multiple sclerosis: relative lack of suppressive populations in blood2011In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 57-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Multiple sclerosis (MS) is hypothetically caused by autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas Th2 and regulatory T cells may confer protection. The development of Th subpopulations is dependant on the expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    Objective:The aim of this study was to assess the balance of CD4+T cell populations in relapsing-remitting MS.

    Methods:Blood mRNA expression of TBX21, GATA3, RORC, FOXP3 and EBI3 was assessed in 33 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 20 healthy controls. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to assess T lymphocyte numbers.

    Results:In relapsing-remitting MS, diminished expression of FOXP3 (Treg) was found (p < 0.05), despite normal numbers of CD4+CD25hiTreg. Immunoregulatory EBI3 and Th2-associated GATA3 ([a-z]+) was also decreased in MS (p < 0.005 and p < 0.05, respectively). Expression of TBX21 (Th1) and RORC (Th17) did not differ between patients and controls. Similar changes were observed when analysing beta-interferon treated (n = 12) or untreated (n = 21) patients. Analysis of transcription factor ratios, comparing TBX21/GATA3 and RORC/FOXP3, revealed an increase in the RORC/FOXP3 ratio in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (p < 0.005).

    Conclusion:Our findings indicate systemic defects at the mRNA level, involving downregulation of beneficial CD4+phenotypes. This might play a role in disease development by permitting activation of harmful T cell populations.

  • 11.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Jönsson, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ärlehag, L
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lyme borreliosis in Sweden - Diagnostic performance of five commercial Borrelia serology kits using sera from well-defined patient groups2004In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 74-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Five commercial Borrelia serology kits available in Sweden were evaluated and compared for their diagnostic performance in sera from clinically well-characterized patient groups. With the clinically defined groups as the gold standard, i.e. without knowledge of antibody status in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, the diagnostic performance of the kits was compared and important differences in diagnostic usefulness were found. The kits from Abbot and DAKO, that often predict clinically relevant Borrelia infection and do not detect antibodies in sera from patients without strong suspicion of Borrelia infection, were considered the most useful in the population studied. This kind of validation study is an important part of good laboratory practice and should be performed by laboratories serving patient populations with varying endemicity of Borrelia.

  • 12. Elkarim, RA
    et al.
    Mustafa, M
    Link, H
    Bakhiet, M
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Induction of neutralizing autoantibodies to interferon-gamma in patients with polyneuropathy.1999In: Human Antibodies, ISSN 1093-2607, E-ISSN 1875-869X, Vol. 9, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gati, Istvan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Bengt-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Letter: Bent Spine Syndrome: A Phenotype of Dysferlinopathy or a Symptomatic DYSF Gene Mutation Carrier2012In: European Neurology, ISSN 0014-3022, E-ISSN 1421-9913, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 300-302Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 14.
    Gati, Istvan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Lindvall, B
    University Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Bengt-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    SENSORY ATAXIC NEUROPATHY WITH DYSARTHRIA/DYSPHAGIA AND OPHTHALMOPLEGIA (SANDO) - CASE HISTORIES in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, vol 18, issue SI, pp 282-2822011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, Vol. 18, no SI, p. 282-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Gunnarsson, Martin
    et al.
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Malmestrom, Clas
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Axelsson, Markus
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Sundstrom, Peter
    Norrlands University Hospital.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Karolinska Institute.
    Piehl, Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Norgren, Niklas
    UmanDiagnostics, Umea.
    Rosengren, Lars
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Norrlands University Hospital.
    Lycke, Jan
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Axonal Damage in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis is Markedly Reduced by Natalizumab2011In: ANNALS OF NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0364-5134, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The impact of present disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) on nerve injury and reactive astrogliosis is still unclear. Therefore, we studied the effect of natalizumab treatment on the release of 2 brain-specific tissue damage markers into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in MS patients. Methods: CSF samples from 92 patients with relapsing forms of MS were collected in a prospective manner prior to natalizumab treatment and after 6 or 12 months. In 86 cases, natalizumab was used as second-line DMT due to breakthrough of disease activity. The levels of neurofilament light (NFL) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined using highly sensitive in-house developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: Natalizumab treatment led to a 3-fold reduction of NFL levels, from a mean value of 1,300 (standard deviation [SD], 2,200) to 400 (SD, 270) ng/l (p andlt; 0.001). The later value was not significantly different from that found in healthy control subjects (350ng/l; SD, 170; n = 28). Subgroup analysis revealed a consistent effect on NFL release, regardless of previous DMT or whether patients had relapses or were in remission within 3 months prior to natalizumab treatment. No differences between pre- and post-treatment levels of GFAP were detected. Interpretation: Our data demonstrate that natalizumab treatment reduces the accumulation of nerve injury in relapsing forms of MS. It is anticipated that highly effective anti-inflammatory treatment can reduce axonal loss, thereby preventing development of permanent neurological disability.

  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Greta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Occurrence of epileptiform discharges and sleep during EEG recordings in children after melatonin intake versus sleep-deprivation2015In: Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1388-2457, E-ISSN 1872-8952, Vol. 126, no 8, p. 1493-1497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To determine if melatonin is equally efficient as partial sleep deprivation in inducing sleep without interfering with epileptiform discharges in EEG recordings in children 1-16years old.

    METHODS:

    We retrospectively analysed 129 EEGs recorded after melatonin intake and 113 EEGs recorded after partial sleep deprivation. Comparisons were made concerning occurrence of epileptiform discharges, the number of children who fell asleep and the technical quality of EEG recordings. Comparison between different age groups was also made.

    RESULTS:

    No significant differences were found regarding occurrence of epileptiform discharges (33% after melatonin intake, 36% after sleep deprivation), or proportion of unsuccessful EEGs (8% and 10%, respectively). Melatonin and sleep deprivation were equally efficient in inducing sleep (70% in both groups). Significantly more children aged 1-4years obtained sleep after melatonin intake in comparison to sleep deprivation (82% vs. 58%, p⩽0.01), and in comparison to older children with melatonin induced sleep (58-67%, p⩽0.05). Sleep deprived children 9-12years old had higher percentage of epileptiform discharges (62%, p⩽0.05) compared to younger sleep deprived children.

    CONCLUSION:

    Melatonin is equally efficient as partial sleep deprivation to induce sleep and does not affect the occurrence of epileptiform discharges in the EEG recording. Sleep deprivation could still be preferable in older children as melatonin probably has less sleep inducing effect.

    SIGNIFICANCE:

    Melatonin induced sleep have advantages, especially in younger children as they fall asleep easier than after sleep deprivation. The procedure is easier for the parents than keeping a young child awake for half the night.

  • 17.
    Hallin, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology.
    In vitro Th2 deviation of myelin-specific peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with multiple sclerosis2006In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 171, no 1-2, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at investigating if selective ex vivo immune deviation of myelin-specific cytokine secretion towards Th2 is possible in blood cells from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Interleukin (IL)-4 (Th2) and interferon-γ (Th1) secreting cells were recorded by ELISPOT in 13 MS patients. Deviation was successful in 10 patients. Interleukin-4 alone was most effective in inducing myelin-specific immune deviation in MS patients whereas IL-1 or IL-15 in combination with IL-4 did not improve the results. Further studies and improvements are needed before ex vivo immune deviation can be considered a potential treatment in patients with MS. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Jansson, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology.
    Elispot assay detection of cytokine secretion in multiple sclerosis patients treated with interferon-β1a or glatiramer acetate compared with untreated patients2003In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 440-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of interferon-β1a (IFN-β1a) and glatiramer acetate (GA) in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) are still uncertain. Altered cytokine patterns have been suggested including inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines like interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and enhancement of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-4 (IL-4). Twenty-nine patients with MS (10 untreated, nine treated with IFN-β1a and 10 with GA) were investigated with elispot of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Spontaneous and myelin induced (myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-14-39 and MOG 63-87) IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 secretion was studied. We found a significant reduction of spontaneous IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-5, but no difference in IL-10 secreting cells in both groups of treated patients compared with the untreated patients. Myelin-specific responses showed a significant decrease of IFN-γ and an increase of IL-5, but no change in IL-4 and IL-10 secreting cells in treated compared with untreated patients. Both treatment groups revealed similar cytokine secretion patterns except for a more pronounced decrease of both spontaneous and MOG 14-39 induced IL-4 secretion in the IFN-β1a treated group. Thus, immunological effects of IFN-β1a and GA were similar showing that disease promoting Th1 (IFN-γ) cells were reduced while the potentially beneficial Th2 response (IL-4) was maintained.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University,.
    Difficulties in Identification of Sleep Disordered Breathing in an Outpatient Clinic for Heart Failure– A Case Study2014In: Annals of Nursing and Practice, ISSN 2379-9501, Vol. 1, no 3, article id 1011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF). The clinical signs of newly diagnosed HF and untreated SDB may overlap and patients in need of SDB treatment can therefore be difficult to identify in patients participating in disease management programmes (DMP). The aim was to describe the care process of two patients with HF involved in a DMP, focusing on the difficulties to identify and initiate treatment of SDB.A prospective case study design was used to follow one male (70 yrs) and one female (74 yrs) patient during 18 months at a Swedish University hospital. It took 5 to 10 months from diagnosis of HF until optimal treatment was reached for their heart conditions and 12 to 17 months until SDB was treated. None of the patients complained of poor sleep, but suffered from fatigue. In the male SDB was detected by the wife’s complaints of her husband’s snoring, apnoeas and restless sleep. In the female, SDB was detected after a detailed assessment of fatigue which was shown to be sleepiness. After optimal treatment of HF but before imitation of SDB treatment both cases cardiac function improved. For the female case improvements also were found in the blood pressure. SDB treatment improved fatigue in both patients. Initiation of HF treatment and self-care routines, as well as identification of SDB is complex and time consuming. Treatment of HF and SDB can improve sleep, cardiac function as well as disturbing associated symptoms.

  • 20.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    IFN-ß treatment in multiple sclerosis: Longitudinal effects on secretion of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IL-17Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Proinflammatory cytokines like IFN-γ and TNF-α seem to have disease-promoting roles in multiple sclerosis (MS) whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines like IL-10 and TGF-ß may downregulate the disease. IFN-ß treatment reduces the frequency and severity of relapses, however, the mechanisms of action for IFN-ß are only partly understood and modulation of cytokine secretion could be one possible explanation for the therapeutic effects. The IFN-ß products approved for the treatment of MS differ in their composition and effects, and recently differences in effects on cytokine secretion were reported. Peripheral blood was collected from 25 patients with MS, both IFN-ß1a and IFN-ß1b treated, before onset of treatment and after 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and one year. Spontaneous as well as myelin specific secretion of IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10 was analysed with the ELISPOT technique. PHA stimulated secretion of IL-13 and IL-17 was analysed in cell supernatants with ELISA. A general finding was that surprisingly few changes occurred, and that most changes occurred early (6 weeks - 3 months). We found a shift in the cytokine balance towards more IL-4 and IL-10 secretion and/or less IFN-γ secretion during the treatment as the ratios of IL-4!IFN-y as well as of IL-10/IFN-γ were increased. The interesting pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17, that has been associated with T-cell mediated autoimmunity, has not been previously investigated during IFN-ß treatment in MS. Our findings of decreased IL-17 levels after one year of treatment, following an increase in early treatment, could be a beneficial result of the IFN-ß treatment. Further we noticed differences in effects on cytokines of IFN-ß1a and IFN-ß1b respectively; the latter seemed to have more effects on cytokine secretion.

  • 21.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sidorova, E.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderberg, O.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosén, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myelin protein P0-specific IgM producing monoclonal B cell lines were established from polyneuropathy patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)2002In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monoclonal expansion of B cells and plasma cells, producing antibodies against ‘self’ molecules, can be found not only in different autoimmune diseases, such as peripheral neuropathy (PN), but also in malignancies, such as Waldenström’s macroglobulinaemia and B-type of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL), as well as in precancerous conditions including monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). About 50% of patients with PN-MGUS have serum antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin, but the specific role of these antibodies remains uncertain. The aims of the study were to establish, and characterize, myelin-specific B cell clones from peripheral blood of patients with PN-MGUS, by selection of cells bearing specific membrane Ig-receptors for myelin protein P0, using beads coated with P0. P0-coated magnetic beads were used for selection of cells, which subsequently were transformed by Epstein–Barr virus. The specificity of secreted antibodies was tested by ELISA. Two of the clones producing anti-P0 antibodies were selected and expanded. The magnetic selection procedure was repeated and new clones established. The cells were CD5+ positive, although the expression declined in vitro over time. The anti-P0 antibodies were of IgM-λ type. The antibodies belonged to the VH3 gene family with presence of somatic mutations. The IgM reacted with P0 and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), and showed no evidence for polyreactivity, in contrast to other IgM CD5+ clones included in the study as controls. The expanded clones expressed CD80 and HLA-DR, which is compatible with properties of antigen-presenting cells. The immunomagnetic selection technique was successfully used for isolation of antimyelin protein P0-specific clones. The cell lines may provide useful tools in studies of monoclonal gammopathies, leukaemia, and autoimmune diseases, including aspects of antigen-presentation by these cells followed by T cell activation.

  • 22.
    Kvarnström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ydrefors, J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekerfelt, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Longitudinal interferon-β effects in multiple sclerosis: differential regulation of IL-10 and IL-17A, while no sustained effects on IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-132013In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 325, no 1-2, p. 79-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Recent studies in experimental models and in vitro indicate lowering of IL-17/Th17 as an important mechanism of interferon-beta (IFN-β) treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Material and methods:

    In this longitudinal study of MS patients (n = 25), spontaneous and myelin antigen-induced secretion of IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10 (ELISPOT), mitogen stimulated secretion of IL-13 and IL-17A (ELISA) and circulating cytokine levels (Luminex) were recorded at inclusion and after 1.5, 3, 6 and 12 months of IFN-β treatment.

    Results:

    Early changes were noted for IL-4, while after one year of treatment the only recorded significant effects were a decrease in secreted IL-17A levels and an increase in IL-10 secreting cells. While IL-17A levels tended to be higher in non-responders (n = 8), the decrease in IL-17A levels seemed to be more pronounced in responders (n = 17) showing significantly lower IL-17A levels after one year as compared with non-responders.

    Conclusion:

    IFN-β treatment seems to mainly affect IL-17/IL-10-associated pathways rather than the IFN-γ/IL-4 axis.

  • 23.
    Liedberg, Gunilla Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Polyneuropathy, with and without neurogenic pain, and its impact on daily life activities - a descriptive study2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 17, p. 1402-1408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. Few studies on disabilities relate to neurogenic chronic pain conditions and how pain influences the patient's ability to maintain life roles. Polyneuropathy is a condition with muscle weakness, sensory impairment and sometimes additional pain of neurogenic origin. The aim was to investigate disability reported in daily activities and quality of life in patients with polyneuropathy, with and without neurogenic pain. Method. A mail questionnaire designed to collect data on the state of health and impact on daily activities, including the Quality of Life-scale, Swedish version (QOLS-S), were sent to 60 patients with polyneuropathy. Forty-two (72.4%) responded. Results. Twenty-three patients were old-age pensioners (>65 years), ten had disability pension and nine were employed. Twenty-seven patients reported pain in addition to polyneuropathy. The neuropathy symptoms influenced occupational performance at work and leisure and in housework for 72% of the patients. Patients with additional neurogenic pain reported significantly greater performance problems in 55% of the daily activities compared with patients without pain. Quality of life was significantly lower for patients with pain concerning health and participation in active recreation. Conclusions. Symptoms in polyneuropathy, especially when accompanied by pain, give rise to disability that affects daily activities and ought to be considered in planning a successful intervention programme.

  • 24.
    Lindh, Jonas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hosseininia, Shahzad
    Yrkes och miljömedicin, Medicinska fakulteten, Teherans universitet, Teheran, Iran.
    Tondel, Martin
    Arbets- och miljömedicin, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Polymorphisms of GSTT1, GSTM1 and EPHX genotypes in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy: a case control study2011In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 135-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether polymorphisms for the null alleles of Glutathione S-Transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1) and Theta-1 (GSTT1) and a low activity genetic variation of epoxide hydrolase exon three (EPHX*3) affect the risk of developing polyneuropathy. The enzymes of these genes are important in the metabolism of toxic compounds. 79 patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy (equivalent to chronic idiopathic axonal neuropathy) and 398 controls were tested for the genetic polymorphism. Medical records were reviewed to collect data regarding clinical findings at diagnosis, and exposure data was collected via questionnaires. The odds ratios (OR) for the null forms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and the normal activity YY form of EPHX*3 were close to one except GSTT1, which reached 1.86. The highest risk of polyneuropathy was found in smokers with GSTT1 null, who had a 3.7 times increased risk. Interactions between genes were analyzed and confirmed the increased odds ratio for GSTT1, which was strongest if the patients had the low activity HH form of EPHX*3 (OR 2.37). Our hypothesis is that the GSTT1 null polymorphism may be related to an impaired metabolism of toxic substances that could lead to nerve damage in the peripheral nervous system.

  • 25.
    Lindh, Jonas
    et al.
    Section of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden, Department of Internal Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, S-551 85 Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tondel, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Osterberg, A.
    Österberg, A., Section of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Cryptogenic polyneuropathy: Clinical and neurophysiological findings2005In: Journal of the peripheral nervous system, ISSN 1085-9489, E-ISSN 1529-8027, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and neurophysiological features of cryptogenic polyneuropathy in 168 patients in the neurological departments at three Swedish hospitals. The medical records of all patients aged 40-79 years with the diagnosis of cryptogenic polyneuropathy from 1993 to 2000 were analysed. One hundred and fourteen patients (68%) were men. The mean age at first symptom was 61 years and at diagnosis it was 64 years. Distal numbness (n=115, 68%) was the most common symptom, but some patients complained of pain, pedal paresthesiae, and impairment of balance. The most common clinical findings were decreased or lost proprioception or sense of vibration (n=135, 80%) and loss of ankle jerks (n=131, 78%). Neurography in 139 patients showed mixed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of axonal or mixed axonal and demyelinating type in 97 (70%). Cryptogenic polyneuropathy is a slowly progressive sensorimotor nerve lesion of mainly axonal type. Men are more often affected than women. Most patients have a minor or moderate severe polyneuropathy.

  • 26.
    Lindh, Jonas
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Tondel, Martin
    University of Gothenburg.
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Health-related quality of life in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy compared with the general population2011In: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 617-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To evaluate the quality of life (QOL) in patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy. Method. Two validated instruments (SF-36 and EQ-5D) were sent to 86 patients with a 72% response rate (44 men, 18 women). As reference, 2721 individuals (1292 men, 1429 women; 59% response rate) from the general population responded to the same QOL instruments. Results. Compared to the general population, QOL was significantly more affected in patients with polyneuropathy concerning motor functions, with 42% of the patients reporting problems with walking, 7% having difficulties with washing and dressing, and 31% having problems with usual activities (work, study, household work, and family or leisure activities). The EQ-5D results showed that 85% of the patients were suffering from pain compared to 56% of the general population. Mental health was preserved among patients with polyneuropathy. Mobility was declining with increasing age in patients, but was not affected by disease duration. Conclusions. Our study showed that patients with cryptogenic polyneuropathy have a lower QOL compared to the general population, although mental health scores did not differ between the groups. This information may be helpful when explaining the disease and its impact on newly diagnosed patients.

  • 27. Masterman, Thomas
    et al.
    Ligers, Arturs
    Olerup, Olle
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Hillert, Jan
    CTLA-4 dimorphisms in gammopathyassociateperipheral neuropathy.1999In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 6, p. 491-493Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Edström, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    An Increase in B cell and Cytotoxic NK cell Proportions and Increased T cell Responsiveness in Blood of Natalizumab-treated Multiple Sclerosis Patients2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e81685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Changes in the peripheral blood lymphocyte composition probably both mediate and reflect the effects of natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis, with implications for treatment benefits and risks.

    Objectives

    To assess changes in circulating lymphocyte subpopulation compositions and T-cell responses during natalizumab treatment.

    Material and methods

    A broad panel of markers for blood lymphocyte populations, including states of activation and co-stimulation as well as T-cell responses to recall antigens and mitogens, was assessed by flow cytometry in 40 patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis before and after one-year natalizumab treatment.

    Results

    Absolute numbers of all major populations of lymphocytes increased after treatment, most markedly for NK- and B-cells. The fraction of both memory and presumed regulatory B-cell subsets increased, as did CD3-CD56dim cytotoxic NK-cells, whereas CD3-CD56bright regulatory NK-cells decreased. Treatment was also associated with a restored T-cell responsiveness to recall antigens and mitogens.

    Conclusions

    Our data confirms that natalizumab treatment increases the number of lymphocytes in blood, likely mirroring the expression of VLA-4 being highest on NK- and B-cells. This supports reduction of lymphocyte extravasation as a main mode of action, although the differential composition of lymphocyte subpopulations suggests cell-signalling effects may also be operative. The systemic increase in T-cell responsiveness reflects the increase in numbers, and while augmenting anti-infectious responses systemically, localized responses become correspondingly decreased.

  • 29.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Edström, Måns
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis: marked decline of chemokines and cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid2010In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 208-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natalizumab exerts impressive therapeutic effects in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The proposed main mode of action is reducing transmigration of leukocytes into the CNS, but other immunological effects may also be operative. Cytokines and chemokines are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses and may reflect the disease process in MS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of natalizumab treatment on cytokine and chemokine profiles systemically and intrathecally in multiple sclerosis. We used luminex to analyse a panel of cytokines (IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, GM-CSF) and chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL17, CCL22) in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 31 patients with relapsing MS before and after one year of natalizumab treatment. There was a marked decline in CSF levels of cytokines and chemokines, thus including pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8) as well as chemokines associated with both Th1 (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11) and Th2 (CCL22). Circulating plasma levels of some cytokines (GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10) also decreased after one year of treatment. This is the first study to show that natalizumab treatment is associated with a global decline in cytokine and chemokine levels at a protein level. This finding was most pronounced in CSF, in line with the reduced transmigration of cells into CNS, whereas reduction in plasma levels indicates other possible mechanisms of natalizumab treatment.

  • 30.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Blystad, Ida
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Olsson, Bob
    Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory, Institution of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Association between Change in Normal Appearing White Matter Metabolites and Intrathecal Inflammation in Natalizumab-Treated Multiple Sclerosis2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 9, p. e44739-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated not only with focal inflammatory lesions but also diffuse pathology in the central nervous system (CNS). Since there is no firm association between the amount of focal inflammatory lesions and disease severity, diffuse pathology in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) may be crucial for disease progression. Immunomodulating treatments for MS reduce the number of focal lesions, but possible effects on diffuse white matter pathology are less studied. Furthermore, it is not known whether intrathecal levels of inflammatory or neurodegenerative markers are associated with development of pathology in NAWM.

    Methods: Quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was used to investigate NAWM in 27 patients with relapsing MS before and after one year of treatment with natalizumab as well as NAWM in 20 healthy controls at baseline. Changes in 1H-MRS metabolite concentrations during treatment were also correlated with a panel of intrathecal markers of inflammation and neurodegeneration in 24 of these 27 patients.

    Results: The group levels of 1H-MRS metabolite concentrations were unchanged pre-to posttreatment, but a pattern of high magnitude correlation coefficients (r = 0.43–0.67, p<0.0005–0.03) were found between changes in individual metabolite concentrations (total creatine and total choline) and levels of pro-inflammatory markers (IL-1β and CXCL8).

    Conclusions: Despite a clinical improvement and a global decrease in levels of inflammatory markers in cerebrospinal fluid during treatment, high levels of pro-inflammatory CXCL8 and IL-1β were associated with an increase in 1H-MRS metabolites indicative of continued gliosis development and membrane turnover in NAWM.

  • 31.
    Mellergård, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Tisell, Anders
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    MR spectroscopy and quantitative MRI in multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab: changes in normal appearing white matter are associated to intrathecal inflammation and clinical variables2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Paues, Jakob
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with rituximab2010In: Journal of Clinical Virology, ISSN 1386-6532, E-ISSN 1873-5967, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 291-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in a woman with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chemotherapy in combination with rituximab. She presented with rapid deterioration of vision and subsequently cognitive decline. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain raised the suspicion of PML. The first PCR analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was negative, but a second sample was positive for JC virus DNA. Anti-viral treatment was ineffective and the patient died 7 months after debut of symptoms. Our case emphasizes the importance of the awareness of PML in patients with progressive neurological symptoms treated with antilymphocytic drugs and that consecutive CSF analyses may be needed to detect the JC virus.

  • 33.
    Persson, Bodil
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Murgia, Nicola
    University of Perugia, Italy.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Hällsten, Anna-Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tondel, Martin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Urinary 2,5-hexanedione excretion in cryptogenic polyneuropathy compared to the general Swedish population2013In: Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, ISSN 1745-6673, E-ISSN 1745-6673, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) is the main neurotoxic metabolite of methyl-n-butyl ketone (MBK) and n-hexane, and known to cause polyneuropathy. The aim of our study was to compare the urinary levels of 2,5-HD between cases with cryptogenic polyneuropathy and the general Swedish population, and to elucidate the role of certain external factors.

    Methods

    Morning urine samples were collected from 114 cases with cryptogenic polyneuropathy (77 men and 37 women) and 227 referents (110 men and 117 women) randomly selected from the population registry. None had any current occupational exposure to n-hexane or MBK. The urine samples were analysed by a gas chromatographic method based on acidic hydrolysis.

    Results

    Cases had statistically higher urinary levels of 2,5-HD (0.48 mg/L) than the general population (0.41 mg/L) and men higher excretion than women (0.48 mg/L and 0.38 mg/L, respectively). There was no difference in 2,5-HD levels between current smokers and non-smokers. Occupational exposure to xylene, alcohol consumption and ever exposed to general anaesthesia were associated with lower excretion in men while for occupational exposure to nitrous oxide in women higher excretion was seen. Higher excretion of 2,5 HD was inversely related to increasing age.

    Conclusions

    Significantly higher levels of urinary 2,5-HD were seen in men and cryptogenic polyneuropathy cases seemingly unexposed to n-hexane. Hypothetically, this might be due to either differences in metabolic patterns or some concealed exposure. The difference in means between cases and the general population is small and can therefore not allow any firm conclusions of the causality, however.

  • 34.
    Samuelsson, Kristin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kostulas, Konstantinos
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Rolfs, Arndt
    University of Rostock, Germany .
    Press, Rayomand
    Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Idiopathic Small Fiber Neuropathy: Phenotype, Etiologies, and the Search for Fabry Disease2014In: Journal of Clinical Neurology, ISSN 1738-6586, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 108-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose

    The etiology of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) often remains unclear. Since SFN may be the only symptom of late-onset Fabry disease, it may be underdiagnosed in patients with idiopathic polyneuropathy. We aimed to uncover the etiological causes of seemingly idiopathic SFN by applying a focused investigatory procedure, to describe the clinical phenotype of true idiopathic SFN, and to elucidate the possible prevalence of late-onset Fabry disease in these patients.

    Methods

    Forty-seven adults younger than 60 years with seemingly idiopathic pure or predominantly small fiber sensory neuropathy underwent a standardized focused etiological and clinical investigation. The patients deemed to have true idiopathic SFN underwent genetic analysis of the alpha-galactosidase A gene (GLA) that encodes the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (Fabry disease).

    Results

    The following etiologies were identified in 12 patients: impaired glucose tolerance (58.3%), diabetes mellitus (16.6%), alcohol abuse (8.3%), mitochondrial disease (8.3%), and hereditary neuropathy (8.3%). Genetic alterations of unknown clinical significance in GLA were detected in 6 of the 29 patients with true idiopathic SFN, but this rate did not differ significantly from that in healthy controls (n=203). None of the patients with genetic alterations in GLA had significant biochemical abnormalities simultaneously in blood, urine, and skin tissue.

    Conclusions

    A focused investigation may aid in uncovering further etiological factors in patients with seemingly idiopathic SFN, such as impaired glucose tolerance. However, idiopathic SFN in young to middle-aged Swedish patients does not seem to be due to late-onset Fabry disease.

  • 35.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Gerdin, G.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Taurine levels in plasma before and after three ECT treatments in EUROPEAN NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, vol 20, issue , pp S426-S4262010In: EUROPEAN NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 20, p. S426-S426Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Gerdin, George
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Taurine and glutathione levels in plasma before and after ECT treatment2012In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 198, no 1, p. 53-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taurine has been shown to be elevated in plasma and lymphocytes of depressed patients, but the level normalises after successful drug therapy. During depression, levels of glutathione (GSH) are decreased in the plasma and blood. This study was performed to examine taurine and GSH levels in depressed patients before and after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Fasting blood samples were collected from 23 patients before the first and after the third ECT treatment. The severity of depression was estimated with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We analysed GSH in blood and the levels of taurine and total GSH in plasma. After three ECTs, a significant decrease in MADRS scores was found for the entire group. Simultaneously, the decrease in the plasma taurine levels was significant for the seven responders but not for the sixteen non-responders. We observed no differences in blood or plasma GSH levels after three ECT treatments when compared to values before the therapy. Plasma taurine levels decrease significantly after three ECT treatments in patients who respond to treatment. GSH levels were not affected by ECT treatment. The results indicate that taurine may play a role in the pathophysiology of depression.

  • 37.
    Samuelsson, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Skogh, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Taurine and glutathione in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid in olanzapine treated patients with schizophrenia2013In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 210, no 3, p. 819-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Taurine and glutathione (GSH) have antioxidant and central nervous system protective properties and are proposed to be involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to compare the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of taurine and GSH in patients with schizophrenia medicated with oral olanzapine compared with controls.

    Methods: In total, 37 patients with schizophrenia being medicated with olanzapine and 45 healthy volunteers were recruited. Taurine and GSH levels were analysed in plasma and CSF and correlated to symptoms and level of function.

    Results: Plasma taurine levels were elevated in patients compared with controls (p=0.000003). No differences were found between patients and controls regarding taurine in CSF or GSH concentrations in plasma and CSF.

    Conclusion: The significantly higher levels of plasma but not CSF taurine in patients with schizophrenia treated with olanzapine compared with controls may implicate the involvement of taurine in the pathophysiology of the disease. The absence of GSH differences in plasma and CSF between patients and controls is interesting in the perspective of earlier research proposing a dysregulation of GSH metabolism as a vulnerability factor for the development of schizophrenia.

  • 38.
    Skogman, Barbro H
    et al.
    Falun General Hospital, Sweden Centre Clin Research Dalarna, Sweden .
    Glimaker, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordwall, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ödkvist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Long-term Clinical Outcome After Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Childhood2012In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine long-term clinical outcome in children with confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and to evaluate persistent subjective symptoms compared with a control group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: After a median of 5 years, 84 children with confirmed LNB underwent a neurologic re-examination, including a questionnaire. Medical records were analyzed, and a control group (n = 84) was included. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The total recovery rate was 73% (n = 61). Objective neurologic findings, defined as "definite sequelae," were found in 16 patients (19%). The majority of these children had persistent facial nerve palsy (n = 11), but other motor or sensory deficits occurred (n = 5). Neurologic signs and/or symptoms defined as "possible sequelae" were found in another 7 patients (8%), mainly of sensory character. Nonspecific subjective symptoms were reported by 35 patients (42%) and 32 controls (38%) (nonsignificant). Affected daily activities or school performance were reported to the same extent in both groups (23% vs 20%, nonsignificant). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: The long-term clinical recovery rate was 73% in children with confirmed LNB. Persistent facial nerve palsy occurred in 13%, whereas other motor or sensory deficits were found in another 14%. Neurologic deficits did not affect daily activities or school performance more often among patients than controls and should be considered as mild. Furthermore, nonspecific subjective symptoms such as headache, fatigue, or memory or concentration problems were reported as often among patients as controls and should not be considered as sequelae after LNB.

  • 39. Solders, G
    et al.
    Nennesmo, I
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Cruz, M
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies from patients with plasma cell dyscrasia and polyneuropathy. 1999In: Journal of the peripheral nervous system, ISSN 1085-9489, E-ISSN 1529-8027, Vol. 4, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Tedeholm, H
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lycke, J
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Skoog, B
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lisovskaja, V
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Hillert, J
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Fagius, J
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Fredrikson, S
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Malmestrom, C
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Martin, C
    University Hospital, Sweden .
    Piehl, F
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Runmarker, B
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stawiarz, L
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Nerman, O
    Chalmers, Sweden .
    Andersen, O
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Time to secondary progression in patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with first generation immunomodulating drugs2013In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 765-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is currently unknown whether early immunomodulatory treatment in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) can delay the transition to secondary progression (SP). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: To compare the time interval from onset to SP in patients with RRMS between a contemporary cohort, treated with first generation disease modifying drugs (DMDs), and a historical control cohort. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We included a cohort of contemporary RRMS patients treated with DMDs, obtained from the Swedish National MS Registry (disease onset between 1995-2004, n = 730) and a historical population-based incidence cohort (onset 1950-64, n = 186). We retrospectively analyzed the difference in time to SP, termed the "period effect" within a 12-year survival analysis, using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: We found that the "period" affected the entire severity spectrum. After adjusting for onset features, which were weaker in the contemporary material, as well as the therapy initiation time, the DMD-treated patients still exhibited a longer time to SP than the controls (hazard ratios: men, 0.32; women, 0.53). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Our results showed there was a longer time to SP in the contemporary subjects given DMD. Our analyses suggested that this effect was not solely driven by the inclusion of benign cases, and it was at least partly due to the long-term immunomodulating therapy given.

  • 41.
    Tisell, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Brain Atrophy in MS Patients Correlates with Creatine Concentrations2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Tisell, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Increased Glia in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Correlates with Intrathecal Inflammation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Tisell, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mellergård, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Lundberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) Correlates With Changes in NAWM Metabolism During Treatment2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Section of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping.
    Jönsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Persson, B.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Linköping.
    Occupational determinants of cryptogenic polyneuropathy2006In: Neuroepidemiology, ISSN 0251-5350, E-ISSN 1423-0208, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to investigate different occupational and leisure time exposures as determinants for cryptogenic polyneuropathy. Methods: A case-referent study was conducted in Sweden including 232 cases of cryptogenic polyneuropathy 40-79 years of age at diagnosis who were enrolled from the out-patient neurology departments of 3 hospitals. From the population register 853 referents were randomly selected. Information on occupational and leisure time exposure was obtained from a postal questionnaire. The response rate was 71% for cases and for referents. Crude odds ratios (CORs) and logistic regression odds ratios (LORs) were calculated for exposures with 5 or more exposed cases and referents taken together. The reference category was defined as individuals unexposed to any of the occupational or leisure time risk factors in the questionnaire. Results: As expected, male sex and increasing age were significant determinants for cryptogenic polyneuropathy. Occupational exposures in men to Stoddard solvent, petrol exhausts, herbicides or hand and foot vibrations generated significantly increased CORs. LORs >3.50 were found in men for occupational exposure to sulphur dioxide, xylene, methyl ethyl ketone, herbicides and in women for occupational exposure to lead, nitrous oxide and insecticides. Only solvent exposure in leisure time remained significant in the regression analysis indicating that not only occupational exposures were of importance. Interactions between occupational and leisure time exposure were seen for several agents. Conclusions: Several known determinants for polyneuropathy, from animal studies and case reports, were confirmed. New determinants were also indicated, i.e. sulphur dioxide, xylene and methyl ethyl ketone. Copyright © 2006 S. Karger AG.

  • 45.
    Tondel, Martin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Murgia, Nicola
    University of Perugia.
    Persson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    2,5-Hexanedione in the General Population: Environmental Exposure or Endogenous Production? in EPIDEMIOLOGY, vol 22, issue 1, pp S34-S352011In: EPIDEMIOLOGY, Williams and Wilkins , 2011, Vol. 22, no 1, p. S34-S35Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy: A clinical, neurophysiological and immunological study1994Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is based upon clinical, neurophysiological, and immunological studies of polyneuropathy (symmetrical impairment of sensory and motor nerve function) in patients with monoclonal gammopathies, that is, patients characterized by proliferation of a plasma-cell clone secreting homogeneous immWloglobulins (M-component), which in some patients has serum antibody reactivity against peripheral nerve myelin.

    The prevalence of clinical polyneuropathy in patients with monoclonal gammopathy (n=3) was 36%, and the prevalence of all forms of polyneuropathy including patients with neurophysiological signs only andpatients with probable polyneuropathy (signs but no symptoms) was 58%. IgM isotype of the M-component was associated with a high risk of clinical polyneuropathy (5 of 6; 83%). 3 patients, all with a demyelinating polyneuropathy, had antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin. It is concluded that polyneuropathy is common in patients with monoclonal gammopathy, but that only some polyneuropathies are of the demyelinating type and associated with circulating antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin.

    Immunofixation was superior to plasma agarose electrophoresis in detecting M-components in patients investigated for polyneuropathy (n=83). The prevalence of M-components was 7% (3 of 42 patients without obvious associated disease). The prevalence of M-components in the subgroup of patients with demyelinating polyneuropathy was even higher (21 %). Hence, patients with polyneuropathy should be screened for Mcomponents by a sensitive technique, not only to reveal a possible pathogenetie factor, but also because of the possibility of successful immunosuppressive treatment in some of them.

    Antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin were also shown to occur in healthy blood donors (25 of255; 10%). Only 2 of them had clinical and neurophysiological evidence of mild polyneuropathy. Their antibodies were shown to react with several proteins in peripheral nerve myelin, in contrast to patients with monoclonal gammopathy and polyneuropathy whose antibodies reacted with low molecular weight glycoproteins (14-30 kDa) in peripheral nerve myelin. The study confirms previous findings of autoantibodies in healthy persons.

    A positive correlation emerged between the amount of antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin and the proportion of circulating B-1 lymphocytes, known to be responsible for autoantibody production, in patients with polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy. The findings suggest that B-1 cells produce antimyelin antibodies and support the idea of an autoinunune mechanism for the pathogenesis of polyneuropathy in some patients.

    Soluble interleukin-2 receptor (siL-2R) is secreted by activated T cells, and was elevated in 7 of 19 patients with monoclonal gammopathy and demyelinating polyneuropathy, as compared to 2 of 19 patients withmonoclonal ganuuopathy without polyneuropathy and in 1 of 15 healthy controls. The finding supports the hypothesis that T cells may have a regulatory role in the M-component production.

    Genomic typing for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -DR and -DQ genes was done in 55 patients with monoclonal gammopathy. A polyneuropathy of demyelinating type was established in26 patients. Among these people an association was found with the presence of a tryptophan amino acid residue at position 9 of the DRB chain. This position is part of the first hypervariable region of the DRB chain, and may be of importance in detennining preferential peptide-binding capacity of the HLA-DR molecule. Anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibodies were fmmd in 15 of 17 patients with an IgM M-component and demyelinating polyneuropathy (14 of these 15 people carried a tryptophan at position 9), supporting the pathogenctic role of an autoimmune response against MAG. The finding of an HLA class II association may indicate a pathogenic role ofT cell immunity in this condition.

    3 of 5 patients with monoclonal IgM and antibodies against peripheral nerve myelin responded to immunosuppressive treatment. In 3 patients the clinical response and the antibody concentration correlated, but in2 patients there was no clear correlation, because 1 patient improved despite increasing antibody concentration and 1 patient did hot improve despite a lowered antibody concentration. It is possible that mechanisms other than anti-peripheral-nerve myelin antibodies may contribute to the effect of treatment.

    In summary, it emerged that polyneuropathy is common in monoclonal gammopathy and that the method used to uncover an M-component is important. Both B cell and T cell responses may be involved in the pathogenesis, and a genetic susceptibility to develop polyneuropathy is possible. It is important to establish the diagnosis in these patients because immunosuppressive treatment may prove useful in some cases.

  • 47.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Boivie, Jörgen
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Holmgren, Helen
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, EMK-endokrin.
    Painful polyneuropathy in patients with and without diabetes: Clinical, neurophysiologic, and quantitative sensory characteristics2002In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 122-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To study pain characteristics and peripheral nerve involvement in patients with painful diabetic and nondiabetic polyneuropathy in comparison with patients with nonpainful polyneuropathy. Patients and Methods: Fifty-five patients with polyneuropathy (37 with painful polyneuropathy, of whom 19 had diabetes and 18 had no diabetes, and 18 with painless polyneuropathy of different etiologies) were examined clinically using quantitative sensory tests and neurophysiology. Pain intensity and characteristics were analyzed by daily ratings on a 10-step verbal scale and by a questionnaire. Results: Most patients experienced pain of more than one character. There was no clear difference in character or duration of pain between patients with and without diabetes. The mean value of the daily rating of pain intensity showed that pain was more severe in the evenings than in the mornings and that diabetic patients reported worse pain than nondiabetic patients. Thirty-two of the 37 patients with pain had paresthesias and/or dysesthesias, whereas only 7 of 18 patients without pain had paresthesias. Pain was always located in the feet, and, in most patients, also in the lower part of the legs. Some patients also experienced pain in the hands. Tactile sensibility, measured by quantitative tests, was more affected in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients with painful polyneuropathy compared with patients without pain (p = 0.02). Temperature, pain, and vibratory sensibility were equally affected in all patient groups. Nerve conduction velocity, amplitudes, and distal latency were equally affected in the pain group as compared with the control group, indicating that both thin and thick nerve afferents are affected in patients with painful as well as nonpainful polyneuropathy and that etiology has no clear impact on nerve involvement. Conclusions: Neuropathy pain was always located in the feet and more severe in diabetic patients compared with patients with neuropathy pain of other etiologies. The authors also found evidence for a greater tactile sensibility involvement in patients with neuropathy pain, irrespective of etiology, whereas other quantitative sensibility and neurography parameters were equally affected in all patient groups.

  • 48.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Subacute neuronopathy in a young man: a possible association with tetracycline treatment2011In: Neurology international, ISSN 2035-8377, Vol. 3, no 3, p. e16-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A young man with subacute neuronopathy following tetracycline treatment is described. The symptoms started as a sensory dorsal root affection but by time also involved motor nerves. He developed a severe sensory ataxia with pseudoathetotic movements. Other possible aetiologies were scrutinized and excluded. Tetracycline induced neuronopathy is hitherto not reported in the literature. We propose a possible association between treatment with tetracycline and the development of sensory neuronopathy in this patient.

  • 49.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Fernlund, Ingrid
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Öhman, Sten
    Prognostic value of cerebrospinal fluid IgA and IgG in multiple sclerosis2004In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 469-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IgA antibodies do not activate complement and may compete with and protect against myelin degradation caused by IgM and IgG in multiple sclerosis (MS). We retrospectively evaluated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgA and IgG (as indices and extended indices) from 1980 to 1988 in 68 patients with definitive MS. Sixty-one of them had survived since the time of sampling (11 - 19 years). IgA Extended Index was significantly higher for surviving patients (median 0.65) than for the dead patients (median 0.33). CSF IgA or IgG indices did not correlate with disability, walking distance, or time from onset of symptoms to the need of walking aid. The retrospective experimental design allowed an unusually long follow-up time, but it also had the disadvantages of such a study. Thus the results warrant a prospective study to verify the prognostic vale of CSF IgA in MS.

  • 50.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Hellblom, L
    Widlund, M
    Ahl, M
    Danielsson, O
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Forsberg, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Infectious Diseases. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Infectious Diseases in Östergötland.
    Chronic symptoms are common in patients with neuroborreliosis - A questionnaire follow-up study2002In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 205-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives - The existence of chronic neuroborreliosis is controversial. The aim of our study was to investigate the existence and kind of persistent symptoms in patients previously treated because of neurological symptoms as a result of neuroborreliosis. Material and methods - A total of 106 patients with neuroborreliosis, according to established criteria, and a control group of 123 patients with Borrelia induced erythema migrans diagnosed in a general practitioner office were studied. A questionnaire was sent to patients and controls concerning their health situation. Time from onset of neurological symptoms to the questionnaire sendout was 32 months (mean) for the patients with neuroborreliosis and 33 months (mean) for the controls. Results - Fifty per cent of the individuals in the patient group compared with 16% of the individuals in the control group showed persistent complaints after their Borrelia infection (P < 0.0001). The most significant differences between the groups were the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as headache, attention problems, memory difficulties and depression. Paresthesia, pain and persistent facial palsy was also significantly more common in patients treated because of neuroborreliosis. Conclusion - Our study shows that persisting neurological symptoms are common after a neuroborreliosis infection. The pathological mechanisms that lay behind the development of chronic symptoms, however, are still uncertain.

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