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  • 1. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Hallberg, I R
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Renvert, S
    Oral health problems in elderly rehabiliation patients2004In: International Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1601-5029, E-ISSN 1601-5037, Vol. 2, 70-77 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kvalitetsindikationer för områdena smärta, munhålan, nutrition, trycksår2005Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Torsten
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wahlström, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and functional capacity after femoral neck fractures: a prospective randomized one-year follow-up study2000In: Aging, ISSN 1945-4589, E-ISSN 1945-4589, Vol. 12, no 5, 366-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different surgical methods on nutritional status and functional capacity during the first postoperative year in patients with displaced femoral neck fractures. A further aim was to evaluate the effect of nutritional support. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or osteosynthesis. Half of the patients in each treatment group received protein- and energy-enriched food in the hospital in addition to individual nutritional advice in order to optimize their intake of protein- and energy-rich food. Nutritional state and functional capacity were examined at baseline, one and three months, and one year after the operation. Pain was examined at three months and one year. The effect of nutritional intervention was equal within both surgical groups. Logistic regression showed that the dependent variable "living at one year" was significantly associated with serum albumin levels at one month. Advanced age, mental impairment and deteriorated nutritional status were predominant in the non-survivors. Overall, the primary THA group performed better compared with the osteosynthesis group concerning weight change over time, locomotion and pain. This study also showed that primary THA could safely be performed in the elderly without an increased postoperative mortality rate.

  • 4.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional state and functional capacity among elderly Swedish people with acute hip fracture2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 14, no 4, 268-274 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to describe characteristics in a group of elderly men and women with hip fracture, regarding presumed risk factors, such as nutritional state and functional capacity. A total of 142 men and women aged 75 years or more were consecutively included on admittance to the hospital. Anthropometry and body composition were measured 4-6 days after the fracture. Data on functional status, activities of daily living and living arrangements at the time of the fracture were collected. The women and men had a body mass index (BMI) of 22.3 ▒ 3.7 kg/m2 and 21.7 ▒ 2.1 kg/m2, respectively. Of the whole group, 71% had a BMI < 24 kg/m2 and 25% a BMI < 20.0 kg/m2. Forty-five percent of the patients needed daily home help, and a majority of them were mentally impaired (p < 0.0001). Women with a trochanteric hip fracture were shorter, had lower body weight, lower lean body mass and lower arm muscle circumference (AMC) than the cervical fracture group (p < 0.05). Fewer women with a trochanteric fracture and fewer women with mental impairment took walks outside before the fracture, (p = 0.023 and p = 0.002, respectively). Characteristics found in the group were low BMI, low muscle mass as indicated by low lean body mass and mental impairment. It seems important to evaluate such factors when developing post-operative care plans aimed at avoiding further deterioration. Extra frail sub-groups of patients, such as people who are mentally impaired, women with trochanteric fracture and women with high dependency concerning ADL functions were identified.

  • 5.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mental Impairment as a Risk Indicator for Underweight and Aggravated Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture in Elderly Women1999In: Journal of Nutritional & Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1359-0847, E-ISSN 1364-6907, Vol. 9, no 1, 55-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this prospective study was to analyze the role of mental impairment on nutritional status and functional capacity after hip fracture. Fifty-seven women aged 75 years or older, acutely admitted to a university hospital with a hip fracture, were consecutively included. Nutritional status with anthropometry and body composition, functional condition and activities of daily living (ADL) were collected 4-6 days and 3 months after surgery. Both lucid and mentally impaired women deteriorated in nutritional status in the postoperative period owing to loss of fat and muscle mass. In the mentally impaired group there was a 50% greater loss of body weight (not significant), causing underweight, mean body mass index 19.5 +/- 3.0 kg m-2, whereas body mass index remained normal in the lucid group, 21.3 +/- 3.0 kg m-2. Ability for activity, mobility and continence deteriorated significantly, whereas food and fluid intake remained unchanged in the mentally impaired group. Mental impairment is a major risk indicator for loss of functional capacities after an acute hip fracture. The development of malnutrition and underweight is explained by the lower pre-fracture body weight, giving little margin for the further post-fracture weight loss in this group. Actions to preserve preoperative ability regarding activity, mobility and continence among mentally impaired women seem warranted. A special caring programme directed towards the special needs of this high-risk group might increase their well-being and ability to continue living in their own homes.

  • 6.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnqvist, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of nutritional status using biochemical and anthropometric variables in a nutritional intervention study of women with hip fracture2001In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 20, no 3, 217-223 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: The aim of this study of women with hip fracture was to describe nutritional status with biochemical markers and anthropometric variables, and to evaluate the effect of nutritional intervention with the intention of increasing protein and energy intake.

    Methods: The first consecutive 44 women were included, and used as controls. The next 44 were matched for age, fracture and mental state. Anthropometric variables, IGF-I, hormones and serum albumin were collected 4–6 days (baseline), 1 and 3 months after surgery. Twenty-four women filled out a 7-day food record.

    Results: At baseline, one fourth had BMI <20 kg/m2and subnormal triceps skinfold thickness. Baseline serum albumin, IGF-I and growth hormone levels were low, probably as an acute response to trauma. Women with BMI <20 kg/m2had lower IGF-I levels compared to those with higher BMI. At 3 months, one-third of both groups were protein and energy malnourished. The intervention group obtained higher daily energy percentage from fat but none of the groups reached their calculated energy need.

    Conclusions: Using biochemical markers in the acute postoperative situation to assess nutritional status is not recommended. The intervention had no impact on anthropometric or biochemical variables.

  • 7.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Psychometric evaluation of the post-discharge surgical recovery scale2010In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 16, no 4, 794-801 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale, aim and objectives Day surgery patients are discharged after a short period of postoperative surveillance, and reliable and valid instruments for assessment at home are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the post-discharge surgical recovery (PSR) scale, an instrument to monitor the patients recovery after day surgery, in terms of data quality, internal consistency, dimensionality and responsiveness. Methods Data were collected on postoperative days 1 and 14 and included 525 patients. Data quality and internal consistency were evaluated using descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and Cronbachs alpha. The dimensionality of the scale was determined through an exploratory factor analysis. Responsiveness was evaluated using the standardized response mean and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). The correlation between change score in PSR and change score in self-rated health was assessed using Pearsons correlation coefficient. Patients ability to work and their self-rated health on postoperative day 14 were used as external indicators of change. Results Six items showed floor or ceiling effects. Cronbachs coefficient alpha was 0.90 and the average inter-item correlation coefficient was 0.44 after the deletion of two items. The items were closely related to each other, and a one-factor solution was decided on. A robust ability to detect changes in recovery (standardized response mean = 1.14) was shown. The AUC for the entire scale was 0.60. When initial PSR scores were categorized into three intervals, the ability to detect improved and non-improved patients varied (AUC 0.58-0.81). There was a strong correlation between change scores in PSR and health (0.63). Conclusions The Swedish version of the PSR scale demonstrates acceptable psychometric properties of data quality, internal consistency, dimensionality and responsiveness. In addition to previous findings, these results strengthen the PSR scale as a potential instrument of recovery at home.

  • 8.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery after different orthopedic day surgical procedures2011In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 15, no 4, 165-175 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopedic day surgery is common. Postoperative recovery may differ according to surgical procedures and personal factors. We studied postoperative recovery up to 2 weeks after different orthopedic day surgical procedures and tried to identify possible predictors associated with recovery. Three-hundred and fifty eight patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or surgery to the hand/arm, foot/leg or shoulder were included. Data were collected on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale, the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independence dimensions in the Quality of Recovery-23 and a general health question. Multiple linear regression was used to explore predictors of recovery. The shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health 1 and 2 weeks after surgery compared to the other patient groups (p < 0.001). Significant predictors of recovery were age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day and type of surgery. Postoperative recovery after common orthopedic day surgical procedures varies and factors influencing it need to be further explored. The impact of a patient’s emotional state on recovery after day surgery can be of particular interest in this work. Post-discharge planning needs to be tailored to the surgical procedure.

  • 9.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperativerecovery after different orthopaedic day surgical proceduresManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Orthopaedic day surgery is common. Postoperative recovery may differ according to surgical procedures and personal factors. We studied postoperative recovery up to two weeks after different orthopaedic day surgical procedures, and tried to identify possible predictors associated with recovery. Three-hundred and fifty-eight patients who had undergone knee arthroscopy or surgery on the hand/arm, foot/leg or shoulder were included. Data were collected preoperatively and on postoperative days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale, the emotional state, physical comfort and physical independence dimensions in the Quality of Recovery-23, and a general health question. A multiple linear regression was used to explore predictors of recovery. The shoulder patients experienced significantly lower postoperative recovery and general health one and two weeks after surgery compared to the other patient groups (p<0.001). Significant predictors of recovery were age, perceived health and emotional status on the first postoperative day, and type of surgery. Postoperative recovery after common orthopaedic day surgical procedures differs, and factors influencing it need to be further explored. The impact of a patient’s emotional state on recovery after day surgery can be of particular interest in this work. Post-discharge planning needs to be tailored to the surgical procedure.

  • 10.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Postoperative recovery for day surgery patients2004In: 12th Biennal Conference of the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers,2004, 2004, 77-77 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patientsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life 30 days after discharge. A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery Recovery scale and the Quality of Recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    Results: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). Health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. Recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    Conclusion: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

  • 12.
    Berg, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery and its association with health-related quality of life among day surgery patients2012In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 11, no 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Day surgery holds advantages for both the patient and the health care organization. However, recovery beyond the first Postoperative week and following different types of surgery has not been explored to any greater degree. The current aims were to prospectively describe Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life among different groups of day surgery patients and to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and healthrelated quality of life 30 days after discharge.

    METHODS: A consecutive sample of 607 adult day surgery patients undergoing orthopaedic, gynaecological or general surgery was included. Postoperative recovery was assessed on days 1, 7 and 14 using the Swedish Post-discharge Surgery recovery scale and the quality of recovery-23 scale. The EQ-5D was used to assess health-related quality of life preoperatively and 30 days following discharge. A repeated measure ANOVA was conducted to evaluate Postoperative recovery from day 1 to day 14 and between different surgical groups. Hierarchical multiple linear regression models were used to explore the association between Postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life.

    RESULTS: Postoperative recovery improved from day 1 to 14 in all surgical groups (p<0.001). The orthopaedic patients had lower Postoperative recovery on day 14 compared to the general and the gynaecological patients (p<0.001). health-related quality of life was lower among orthopaedic patients (p<0.001), even if significant improvements over time were seen in all groups. recovery on day 7 was associated with health-related quality of life 30 days after the day surgery (p<0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Particularly orthopaedic day surgical patients seem to favour a closer follow-up in order to support recovery and thereby also positively influence health-related quality of life.

  • 13.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Common Symptoms and Distress Experienced Among Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Qualitative part of Mixed Method Design2012In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 6, no 1, 100-107 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background :

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of tumour in the world. Treatment side effects, together with the tumour symptoms, can result in a ‘symptom burden’. To understand the patient’s burden during chemotherapy treatment and plan effective symptom relief there is a need for more knowledge about the experience of symptoms from the patients’ perspective.

    Objectives :

    The study was designed to qualitatively identify and describe the most common symptoms among patients treated for colorectal cancer, and discover whether there are barriers to reporting symptoms.

    Methods :

    Thirteen Swedish patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer and treated with chemotherapy were interviewed face-to-face. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analysed by following the principles of qualitative content analysis.

    Results :

    Nine symptoms/forms of distress were identified. Those most frequently expressed were fatigue, changed bowel habits, and affected mental well-being, closely followed by nausea, loss of appetite and neurological problems. Of particular note were the affected mental well-being, the magnitude of the neurological problems described, the symptoms related to skin and mucous membrane problems, and the reports of distressing pain. Barriers to symptom control were only expressed by the patients in passing and very vaguely.

    Conclusion :

    This study confirms other reports on most common symptoms in colorectal cancer. It also highlights the early onset of symptoms and provides data on less well-studied issues that warrant further study, namely affected mental well-being, the magnitude of the neurological problems and symptoms related to the skin and mucous membranes. Nurses need to be sensitive to the patients’ need presented and not only noting symptoms/distresses they have guidelines for.

  • 14.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individually adjusted meals for older people with protein-energy malnutrition: a single-case study2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, 491-502 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 3-month intervention programme consisting of meals based on individual nutritional requirements in residents assessed as protein-energy malnourished on admission to a municipal care Institution.

    • Using a single-case design, 11 malnourished residents were given individual care aimed at fulfilling their personal requirements for energy intake during a period of 12 weeks. The residents were selected from a sample of 261 newly admitted older adults of whom 87 were assessed to be malnourished on admission. Nutritional status, including anthropometric and biochemical variables and functional capacities were assessed before, during, and after the intervention. Energy intake was recorded every day. Body weight, and serum concentration of albumin and transthyretin were measured every other week.

    •  During a 3-month period, the mean value of energy intake reached the calculated energy requirement in 10 residents. Eight residents increased in weight, triceps skin-fold thickness, and transthyretin concentration. Nine residents increased in arm muscle circumference, and 10 showed increased serum albumin concentration and functional capacity.

    • We conclude that nursing care based on individual nutritional requirements, resources, and desires improves nutritional status and functional capacity in a group of malnourished residents.

  • 15.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attitudes of nursing staff towards nutritional nursing care2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 17, no 3, 223-231 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fulfilling nutritional requirements in residents with eating problems can be a challenge for both the person in need of help and for the caregiver. In helping and supporting these residents, a positive attitude is assumed to be as important as practical skill. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that nutritional education and implementation of a nutritional programme would change the attitudes towards nutritional nursing care among nursing staff with daily experience of serving food and helping residents in municipal care. The study was carried out as a before and after experimental design. An attitude scale, staff attitudes to nutritional nursing care (SANN scale), was developed and used. The response on the scale gives a total SANN-score and scores in five underlying dimensions: self ability, individualization, importance of food, assessment and secured food intake. Nursing staff at eight different residential units (n = 176) responded to the attitude scale and, of these, staff at three of the units entered the study as the experimental group. After responding to the attitude scale, nutritional education was introduced and a nutritional programme was implemented in the experimental units. One year later, attitudes were measured a second time (n = 192). Of these, 151 had also responded on the first occasion. Education and implementation of a nutritional programme did not significantly change attitudes. Overall, nursing staff responded with positive attitudes towards nutritional nursing care. Most of the positive attitudes concerned items within the dimension importance of food. In contrast, items within self ability showed the lowest number of staff with positive attitudes.

  • 16.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of nutritional assessment techniques in elderly people newly admitted to municipal care2002In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 56, no 9, 810-818 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) with regard to validity using a combination of anthropometric and serum-protein measurements as standard criteria to assess protein-energy malnutrition (PEM).

    Design: Cross-sectional study with consecutive selection of residents aged 65 y.

    Setting: A municipality in the south of Sweden.

    Subjects: During a year, starting in October 1996, 148 females and 113 males, aged 65-104 y of age, newly admitted to special types of housing for the elderly, were included in the study.

    Results: According to SGA, 53% were assessed as malnourished or moderately malnourished on admission. The corresponding figure from MNA was 79% malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Both tools indicated that anthropometric values and serum proteins were significantly lower in residents classified as being malnourished (P<0.05). Sensitivity in detecting PEM was in SGA 0.93 and in MNA 0.96 and specificity was 0.61 and 0.26, respectively. Using regression analysis, weight index and serum albumin were the best objective nutritional parameters in predicting the SGA- and MNA classifications. Item 'muscle wasting' in SGA and 'self-experienced health status' in MNA showed most predictive power concerning the odds of being assessed as malnourished.

    Conclusions: SGA was shown to be the more useful tool in detecting residents with established malnutrition and MNA in detecting residents who need preventive nutritional measures.

  • 17.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malnutrition in elderly people newly admitted to a community resident home1999In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 3, no 3, 133-139 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to assess nutritional status in elderly people, newly admitted to a community resident home, and to describe the characteristics of residents with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). The participants were 261 people, 65 to 103 years of age (M= 84.8+/-7.1 in women, 82.5+/-6.4 in men) who during one year entered special types of housing for the elderly in a municipality in the south of Sweden. During the first two weeks after admission nutritional status was assessed using weight index, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, serum albumin and transthyretin. Demographic and sociomedical data and eating-related factors were collected by using structured interviews and studying residents records. PEM was found in 29% of the residents who entered municipal care from their own homes, 33% among those moving within municipal care and 43% of the residents who entered from hospital care. Pressure sores or leg ulcers, psychological stress or acute disease in the previous 3 months, reduced fluid intake, deteriorated appetite, reduced mobility, need of help during meals and gastrointestinal symptoms were factors associated with PEM.

  • 18.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unossoon, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measurement of perceived health problems as a means of detecting elderly people at risk of malnutrition2003In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 7, no 4, 257-262 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    As nutritional preventative measures are more effective in elderly people assessed as non protein-energy malnourished (non-PEM) than such interventions are in those who are malnourished, early detection of those at risk of malnutrition is important.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study tests the hypothesis that health problems measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) can predict residents at risk of malnutrition.

    DESIGN:

    Nutritional status was assessed in 261 residents newly admitted to municipal care using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements. From this sample, 20 non-PEM residents, simultaneously assessed as moderately malnourished according to a subjective method, were consecutively included. Using a paired matched design, 20 other non-PEM residents, who were simultaneously subjectively assessed as well nourished, completed the pairs.

    RESULTS:

    Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that the dimensions of emotional reactions, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep had significant power to predict residents at risk of malnutrition. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, energy had the highest explanatory power.

    CONCLUSION:

    Non-PEM residents, assessed as moderately malnourished according to the Subjective Global Assessment, perceived significantly greater health problems than non-PEM residents subjectively assessed as well nourished. Measurement of health problems adds important information to that used in early detection of residents at risk of malnutrition.

  • 19.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Obese very old women have low relative handgrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulty in daily living2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 1, 20-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate how anthropometric and body composition variables, and handgrip strength (HS) affect physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.

    Participants: A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women, who were 88 years old with normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obesity (n=24) in Linköping, Sweden, was performed.

    Measures: Assessments of body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were performed by using an electronic scale and measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured by a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio with HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).

    Results: Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM, and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2: 0.52–0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2: 0.45–0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with the number of IADL with no difficulty.

    Conclusion: Obese very old women have a high WC, but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.

  • 20.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Health Consequences Associated with Being Overweight or Obese: A Swedish Population-Based Study of 85-Year-Olds2012In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 60, no 2, 243-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether being overweight or obese is associated with significant health outcomes in an 85-year-old population. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSETTING: Linkoping, Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPARTICIPANTS: Three hundred thirty-eight people born in 1922 were identified using the local authoritys register. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMEASUREMENTS: Data related to sociodemographic characteristics, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), assistance use, and the presence of diseases were collected using a postal questionnaire. Anthropometry and functional status were assessed during home and geriatric clinic visits. Diseases were double-checked in the electronic medical records, and information about health service consumption was obtained from the local healthcare register. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: Overweight (body mass index (BMI) 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI andgt;= 30.0 kg/m(2)) participants perceived more difficulty performing instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and had more comorbidity than their normal-weight counterparts (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), but their overall HRQoL and health service costs did not differ from those of normal-weight participants. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, being overweight did not influence IADLs or any comorbidity, but obese participants were more likely to perceive greater difficulty in performing outdoor activities (odds ratio (OR) = 2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-4) and cleaning (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.2-4.2) than their normal-weight counterparts. Although obesity was also associated with multimorbidity (OR = 3, 95% CI = 1.2-8), the health service cost of each case of multimorbidity (n = 251) was highest in normalweight participants and nearly three times as much as in obese participants (ratio: 2.9, 95% CI = 1.1-8.1). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSION: For 85-year-olds, being obese, as opposed to overweight, is associated with self-reported activity limitations and comorbidities. Overweight older adults living in their own homes in this population had well-being similar to that of those with normal weight.

  • 21.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine UHL.
    Kentsson, Magnus
    Landstinget i Jönköpings län.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad Universitet.
    Symptom Prevalence And Symptom Distress In Patients With COPD2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 23.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tödt, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kentsson, M.
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Theander, K.
    Karlstad University, Sweden; Värmland County Council, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Symptom burden in stable COPD patients with moderate or severe airflow limitation2014In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 43, no 4, 351-357 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe a multidimensional symptom profile in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and determine whether symptom experience differed between patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations.

    BACKGROUND:

    Patients with severe airflow limitation experience numerous symptoms, but little is known regarding patients with moderate airflow limitation.

    METHODS:

    A multidimensional symptom profile (Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale) was assessed in 42 outpatients with moderate and 49 with severe airflow limitations.

    RESULTS:

    The mean number of symptoms in the total sample was 7.9 (±4.3) with no difference between patients with moderate and severe airflow limitations. The most prevalent symptoms with the highest MSAS symptom burden scores were shortness of breath, dry mouth, cough, sleep problems, and lack of energy in both groups.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Patients with moderate or severe airflow limitations experience multiple symptoms with high severity and distress. An assessment of their multidimensional symptom profile might contribute to better symptom management.

  • 24.
    Ekdahl, Anne W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindh Mazya, Amelie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Wiklund, Rolf
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, 263-268 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged &gt;= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

  • 25.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, 497-503 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 26.
    Holst, M.
    et al.
    Hospital, Aalborg.
    Rasmussen, H.H.
    Hospital, Aalborg.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Well-established nutritional structure in Scandinavian hospitals is accompanied by increased quality of nutritional care2009In: e-SPEN, ISSN 1751-4991, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate Scandinavian nurses self-reported attitudes, practice and barriers towards nutrition practice, and to explore whether nurses working in departments with a well defined structure (w-DS) for nutritional aspects, have better nutritional practise. Preventing and treating undernutrition is shown to be complicated. Investigations are needed to priority efforts. The design is a questionnaire-based investigation of Scandinavian hospital nurses attitudes and practise to clinical nutrition. A questionnaire regarding nutritional care process sent to 6000 nurses in Scandinavia. A definition of w-DS and p-DS (less defined structure) was made according to ESPEN Guidelines. Nurses were classified as working at w-DS or p-DS departments, if three or more of five organisational structure markers were met. Overall 2759 responded. Discrepancy was found between attitudes and practise (p less than 0.0001). W-DS was found in 49%. Nurses who worked at departments with w-DS had higher frequency for nutrition actions (p less than 0.0001). Knowledge and time past graduation, were amongst independent factors for good nutritional structure (p less than 0.0001). Differences were seen between countries and specialities (p less than 0.0005). Organisation structure recommended by ESPEN seems important. Knowledge and experience were independent factors for good nutrition structure. The content of nutrition education needs consideration.

  • 27.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Differences between nurse and patient assessments on postoperative pain management in two hospitals2005In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 11, no 5, 444-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Differences between patient and professional assessments on pain and pain management have been reported, but no further analysis has described the statistical problems of pseudocorrelation concerning the nature of these differences. Aim: The aim of the present study was: (1) to investigate the differences between nurse and patient assessments of post-operative pain management in two hospitals, and (2) to discuss the nature and scope of these differences. Method: The subjects were 209 inpatients and 63 nurses from a central county hospital and 77 inpatients and 34 nurses from a university hospital. The 'Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management' questionnaire was used, comprising 14 items in four sub-scales (communication, action, trust and environment) and two questions concerning the worst pain experienced during the past 24 hours and general satisfaction. Result: Except for the trust sub-scale in one hospital, the correlations between patient and nurse ratings concerning all assessments were significant in both hospitals (r = 0.22 - 0.59). Both groups of patients had significantly higher (better) scores than judged by the nurses on the environment sub-scale and general satisfaction. In contrast, nurses from both hospitals tended to significantly underestimate patients' worst pain during the past 24 hours. Other differences between patient and nurse assessments were either non-significant or inconsistent between hospitals. Using so-called Oldham plots nurses tended to under-estimate severe pain more often than mild pain, as judged by the patients, but this association was weak and statistically significant in one hospital only. Conclusion: Although the effects of pseudocorrelation are minimized by using Oldham plots, they are not cancelled. This issue is discussed, and we conclude that this study does not support the notion that the nurses tend to underestimate severe pain more often than mild pain. © 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 28.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson , U
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Assessment of recovery after day surgery using a modified version of quality of recovery-402009In: ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, ISSN 0001-5172 , Vol. 53, no 5, 673-677 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Bergqvist, Anna
    Vrinnevisjukhuset Norrköping.
    Silverhjelm, Jenny
    Länssjukhuset Ryhov Jönköping.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Perspectives of Swedish patients on postoperative pain management2008In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 10, no 2, 131-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe the perspectives of surgical patients towards postoperative pain management during their hospital stay. Thirty strategically chosen postoperative inpatients from different surgical wards in a university hospital in Sweden participated. A qualitative, descriptive approach using individual interviews was chosen. These were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to a qualitative content analysis. The patients' descriptions of postoperative pain management indicated that pain was a symptom that was always in focus, either because it was constantly present or because pain could appear abruptly during different activities and movements. Although the focus was on pain and an awareness that it should be relieved or avoided, the solutions were often routine, short-term, and involved the regular intake of drugs, plus additional medication if needed for an acute pain episode. From the patients' descriptions of their experience with postoperative pain management, we distinguished three categories: "patients' pain knowledge", "patients' pain management approaches", and "patients' views of health-care professionals". The findings from this study highlight important aspects of nursing care that should receive greater attention in postoperative pain management. The patients' narratives could be a valuable asset in the quality improvement of postoperative pain management as these narratives highlight episodes difficult to elicit in other ways. © 2008 The Authors Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  • 30.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Department of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University and Department of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden .
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patient and nurse assessment of quality of care in postoperative pain management2002In: Quality & Safety in Health Care, ISSN 1475-3898, Vol. 11, no 4, 327-334 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe and compare patient and nurse assessments of the quality of care in postoperative pain management, to investigate differences between subgroups of patients, and to compare patient assessments in different departments.

    Design: Patient and nurse questionnaires.

    Setting: Five surgical wards in general surgery, orthopaedics, and gynaecology in a central county hospital in Sweden.

    Sample: Two hundred and nine inpatients and 64 registered nurses. The response rates were 96% for the patients and 99% for the nurses; there were 196 paired patient-nurse assessments.

    Method: The Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management patient questionnaire was used which comprises14 items in four subscales (communication, action, trust, and environment). The items were scored on a 5 point scale with higher values indicating a higher quality of care. Five complementary questions on levels of pain intensity and overall satisfaction with pain relief were scored on an 11 point scale. Twelve of the 14 items in the patient questionnaire and two of the complementary questions were adjusted for use in the nurse questionnaire.

    Results: The patients’ mean (SD) score on the total scale (scale range 14–70) was 58.6 (8.9) and the nurses’ mean (SD) score (scale range 12–60) was 48.1 (6.2). The percentage of patients who scored 1 or 2 for an individual item (disagreement) ranged from 0.5% to 52.0%, while for nurses the percentage ranged from 0.0% to 34.8%. Forty two patients (24%) reported more pain than they expected; these patients assessed the quality of care lower. There were differences between patient and nurse assessments concerning the environment subscale, the question on overall satisfaction, and patients’ experience of worst possible pain intensity.

    Conclusion: The results provided valuable baseline data and identified important areas for quality improvement in postoperative pain management.

  • 31.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Göteborg.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Patients and nurse assessment on quality of care in postoperative pain management2002In: 10th World congress on pain, San Diego, USA,2002, 2002, 563-563 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Department of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University and Department of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Quality indicators in postoperative pain management: a validation study2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 15, no 4, 331-338 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous study, strategic and clinical quality indicators were developed from a tentative model to assess high quality in postoperative pain management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the content validity of these 15 indicators. The indicators were compiled in a questionnaire, and two groups of nurses (n=210, n=321) scored each indicator on a 5-point scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree) from three different standpoints: whether it was essential for achieving high quality, whether it was realistic to carry out, and whether it was possible for nurses to influence management. The respondents were also asked to choose the most crucial indicators for the quality of care. The results showed that both groups of nurses judged the 15 indicators to have content validity from all three standpoints. Both groups also found the same six indicators to be the most crucial. These indicators concerned detecting and acting on signs and symptoms, performing prescriptions, informing and educating, acting on behalf of patients, competence/knowledge, and attitudes. The validated indicators should be useful to consider when implementing a strategy for postoperative pain management and when planning to evaluate the quality of care.

  • 33.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Development of an instrument to measure strategic and clinical quality indicators in postoperative pain management2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, Vol. 37, no 6, 532-540 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To develop and evaluate psychometric properties, that is reliability and validity, of an instrument to measure strategic and clinical quality indicators in postoperative pain management.

    BACKGROUND: Strategic and clinical quality indicators in postoperative pain management were previously developed from a tentative model of important aspects of surgical nursing care and assessed to have content validity, that is to be essential for the quality of care, realistic to carry out and possible for nurses to use to influence management.

    METHODS: The quality indicators were converted to items suitable for a patient questionnaire and were scored on a 5-point scale, with higher scores indicating higher quality of care. Inpatients from five surgical wards took part in this study on their second postoperative day. The response rate was 96% and the average ages of the female (n=120) and the male (n=78) respondents were 62 and 63 years, respectively.

    RESULTS: Items in the total scale had an average inter-item correlation >0.20 and an item-total correlation >0.30. Cronbach's coefficient alpha was 0.84 for the total scale. Four factors entitled 'communication', 'action', 'trust' and 'environment' emerged from an orthogonal factor analysis, with a cumulative variance of 61.4%. Patients who received epidural analgesia had higher scores on the total scale compared with those who did not receive epidural analgesia. Patients who reported more pain than expected had lower scores on the total scale compared with those who did not report more pain than expected. Correlation between the total scale and an overall pain relief satisfaction question was 0.53.

    CONCLUSION: The results suggest initial support for the new instrument as a measure of strategic and clinical quality indicators in postoperative pain management, but it must be further refined, tested and evaluated.

  • 34.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Development of an instrument to measure the quality of postoperative pain management2004In: 12th Biennal Conference of the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Development of an instrument to measure the quality of postoperative pain management.2003In: The 4th congres of the european federation of IASP chapters - Pain in Europe IV Prag - Tjeckien,2003, 2003, 774-774 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Hamrin, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Pharmacology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Kvalitetsindikatorer inom postoperativ smärtbehandling: en valideringsstudie2002In: Vårdfacket, ISSN 0347-0911, Vol. 3, 49-49 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, 2896-2908 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.

    BACKGROUND: Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, prospective survey.

    METHODS: In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.

    RESULTS: Patients` knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.

    CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.

  • 38.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Salanterä, Sanna
    Turku University, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fulfilment of knowledge expectations and emotional state among people undergoing hip replacement: A multi-national survey2014In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 51, no 11, 1491-1499 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Patient education in connection with hip replacement is intended to prepare patients for surgery, discharge and postoperative recovery. Patients experience symptoms and emotions due to disease or upcoming surgery which can affect how their knowledge expectations are fulfilled.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse how these differences are related to patients' characteristics, preoperative symptoms and emotions.

    DESIGN:

    A descriptive, prospective survey with two data collection points; before admission and at hospital discharge after surgery.

    SETTINGS:

    Two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    The population consisted of patients on a waiting list for hip replacement. Of the consecutively included patients, 320 answered questionnaires both before admission and at discharge and were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 years, and 55% were women.

    METHODS:

    Structured questionnaires were used; the knowledge expectations of hospital patients scale and self-reported scales for symptoms and emotions before admission and received knowledge of hospital patients scale at discharge. Fulfilment of knowledge expectation was assessed by calculating the difference between received and expected knowledge with a paired sample t-test. A multiple stepwise regression model was used to explain the variance of fulfilled knowledge expectations.

    RESULTS:

    Patients expected more knowledge than they received (p<0.001) and 77% of them had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Patients with a higher level of education were more likely to have unfulfilled knowledge expectations. A higher level of education was also related to a greater difference between received and expected knowledge. The difference was more correlated with patients' emotions than their symptoms. A depressive state was the major predictor of the variance in the difference between received and expected knowledge.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In order to better support patients by education it is necessary to assess their emotional state, educational level and knowledge expectations before surgery.

  • 39.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fulfilment of patients’ knowledge expectations in connection with hip or knee replacement – a Nordic perspective2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe and compare the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse if these differences are related to patients’ characteristics.

    Method: A descriptive, prospective and comparative survey of patients with osteoarthritis treated at two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals (n=612). Patients answered questionnaires about their knowledge expectations (KEhp) before surgery and about received knowledge (RKhp) at discharge. These two parallel instruments include: bio-physiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions of knowledge.

    Results: Among the 29% Finnish, 34% Icelandic and 37% Swedish patients (hip: 53%, knee: 47%) were 54% females and the mean age was 65 years. Patients` knowledge expectations were higher, mean: 3.6 (±SD 0.5), than their perception of received knowledge 3.0 (0.7). The difference between expected and received knowledge was larger in Sweden -0.9(0.8) compared with Finland -0.4(0.8) and Iceland -0.5(0.7) (p<0.001) but not statistically different between patients having hip or knee replacement. Patients perceived having received most bio-physiological -0.3(0.6) and functional -0.3(0.6) knowledge but least financial -1.2(1.2) knowledge. A relationship was found between the difference of expected and received knowledge and whether the hospital stay was as expected. For patients undergoing hip replacement this difference was also related to the level of education, for knee replacement patients if they had their first arthroplasty and employment in social or health care.

    Conclusions: Patients expect multidimensional knowledge during hospital stay which was inadequately met. Assessing patients’ knowledge needs could improve patient education.

  • 40.
    Johansson, U
    et al.
    Gävle.
    Larsson, J
    Huddinge.
    Rothenberg, E
    Göteborg.
    Stene, C
    Malmö.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Bosaeus, I
    Göteborg.
    Nutritionsbehandling inom slutenvården - Svenska sjukhus klarar inte Europasrådets riktlinjer2006In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, 1718-1724 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Johansson, Ulla M
    et al.
    Centrum för klinisk forskning, Gävleborg.
    Bosaeus, Ingvar
    Enheten för klinisk nutrition, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Larsson, Jörgen
    Clintec, Enheten för kirurgi, ­Karolinska institutet, Huddinge.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Avdelningen för Klinisk Näringslära, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Stene, Christina
    Kirurgiska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional therapy in elderly care--a forgotten perspective. A questionnaire study shows clear shortages in the care of the elderly2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 40, 2538-2542 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has previously been demonstrated that the use of clinical nutrition in Swedish hospitals did not fulfill European standards. In the present study, a questionnaire-based investigation was performed among nurses working with elderly people living in sheltered housing. Overall, 765 (54.6%) responded. Nearly 90% of the nurses considered themselves responsible for nutritional assessment, although only 36% routinely registered energy intake on patients at risk of undernutrition. More than 60% stated that education regarding clinical nutrition was insufficient. Thus, despite a heavy responsibility in the nutrition care process for nurses, a lack of sufficient knowledge and education was evident. Special efforts should be aimed at a clarified organization as well as education.

  • 42.
    Johansson, Ulla M
    et al.
    Centrum för klinisk forskning, Uppsala universitet, Gävle.
    Bosaeus, Ingvar
    Sektionen för klinisk nutrition, Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Larsson, Jörgen
    Enheten för kirurgi, Karolinska institutet.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Sektionen för klinisk nutrition, Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Stene, Christina
    Kir kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritionsbehandling i äldrevård - ett bortglömt perspektiv: Enkätstudie visar tydliga brister i omhändertagandet av äldre2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 40, 2538-2542 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Sjukdomsrelaterad undernäring har beskrivits i Europa under flera decennier.

    Europarådet antog år 2003 en resolution med rekommendationer till medlemsländerna kring nutritionsbehandling på sjukhus.

    En tidigare studie visar att rekommendationerna inte efterlevs inom svensk slutenvård, där flertalet patienter är äldre.

    Den aktuella enkätstudien, riktad till sjuksköterskor inom särskilda boenden, påvisar sjuksköterskornas ansvar för utritionsprocessen men även brister i både kunskap och utbildning.

    Brister har även beskrivits i ansvarsfördelning mellan yrkesgrupper, riktlinjer för nutritionsbehandling och övergripande organisation.

    En förändrad struktur efterlyses inom hälso -och sjukvårdsorganisationen. Såväl läkare, dietister, sjuksköterskor som undersköterskor bör vara aktiva i nutritionsprocessen vid särskilda boenden.

  • 43. Jung, B
    et al.
    O, Lannerstad
    L, Påhlman
    Arodell, Malin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Nilsson, E
    Preoperative mechanical preparation of the colon: The patient's experience2007In: BMC Surgery, ISSN 1471-2482, E-ISSN 1471-2482, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Preoperative mechanical bowel preparation can be questioned as standard procedure in colon surgery, based on the result from several randomised trials. Methods. As part of a large multicenter trial, 105 patients planned for elective colon surgery for cancer, adenoma, or diverticulitis in three hospitals were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding perceived health including experience with bowel preparation. There were 39 questions, each having 3 - 10 answer alternatives, dealing with food intake, pain, discomfort, nausea/vomiting, gas distension, anxiety, tiredness, need of assistance with bowel preparation, and willingness to undergo the procedure again if necessary. Results. 60 patients received mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) and 45 patients did not (No-MBP). In the MBP group 52% needed assistance with bowel preparation and 30% would consider undergoing the same preoperative procedure again. In the No-MBP group 65 % of the patients were positive to no bowel preparation. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to postoperative pain and nausea. On Day 4 (but not on Days 1 and 7 postoperatively) patients in the No-MBP group perceived more discomfort than patients in the MBP group, p = 0.02. Time to intake of fluid and solid food did not differ between the two groups. Bowel emptying occurred significantly earlier in the No-MBP group than in the MBP group, p = 0.03. Conclusion. Mechanical bowel preparation is distressing for the patient and associated with a prolonged time to first bowel emptying. © 2007 Jung et al, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 44.
    Klemetti, Seija
    et al.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Cabrera, Esther
    Health Science School, Tecno Campus, Mataró-Maresme, Spain.
    Copanitsanou, Panagiota
    University of Athens, Greece.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Istomina, Natalja
    Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Papastavrou, Evridiki
    Cyprus University of Technology .
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Difference Between Received and Expected Knowledge of Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement in Seven European Countries.2015In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 24, no 6, 624-643 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to examine received and expected knowledge of patients with knee/hip arthroplasty in seven European countries. The goal was to obtain information for developing empowering patient education. The data were collected (during 2009-2012) from patients (n = 943) with hip/knee arthroplasty prior to scheduled preoperative education and before discharge with the Received Knowledge of hospital patient scale (RKhp) and Expected Knowledge of hospital patient scale (EKhp). Patients' knowledge expectations were high but the level of received knowledge did not correspond to expectations. The difference between received and expected knowledge was higher in Greece and Sweden compared with Finland (p < .0001, p < .0001), Spain (p < .0001, p = .001), and Lithuania (p = .005, p = .003), respectively. Patients' knowledge expectations are important in tailoring patient education. To achieve high standards in the future, scientific research collaboration on empowering patient education is needed between European countries.

  • 45.
    Klemetti, Seija
    et al.
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Turku University Hospital, Finland.
    Charalambous, Andreas
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland.
    Copanitsanou, Panagiota
    General Hospital of Piraeus Tzaneio, Department of Orthopaedics, Piraeus, Greece.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Department of Surgery, Landspitali-the National University Hospital of Iceland; Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Istomina, Natalja
    Department of Nursing, Klaipeda University, Lithuania.
    Katajisto, Jouko
    Department of Statistics, University of Turku, Finland.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zabalegui, Adelaida
    Nursing, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Spain.
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland; Faculty of Social and Health Care, Lahti University of Applied Sciences, Finland.
    Information and Control Preferences and Their Relationship With the Knowledge Received Among European Joint Arthroplasty Patients.2016In: Orthopedic Nursing, ISSN 0744-6020, E-ISSN 1542-538X, Vol. 35, no 3, 174-182 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of joint arthroplasties is increasing internationally, putting increased emphasis on patient education. PURPOSE: This study describes information and controlpreferences of patients with joint arthroplasty in seven European countries, and explores their relationships with patients' received knowledge. METHODS: The data (n = 1,446) were collected during 2009-2012 with the Krantz Health Opinion Survey and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient scale. RESULTS: European patients with joint arthroplasty had low preferences. Older patients had less information preferences than younger patients (p = .0001). In control preferences there were significant relationships with age (p = .021), employment in healthcare/social services (p = .033), chronic illness (p = .002), and country (p = .0001). Received knowledge of the patients did not have any relationships with information preferences. Instead, higher control preferences were associated with less received knowledge. CONCLUSION: The relationship between European joint arthroplasty patients' preferences and the knowledge they have received requires further research. 

  • 46.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Riskfactors for pressure sore among newly operated patients, a prospective study1999In: 8th Annual Meeting of th European Tissue Repair Society,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 47.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Risk factors associated with pressure sore development among hospitalized patients2004In: 12th Biennial Conference of the Workgroup of European Nurse Researchers,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pressure sore prevalence within a public health services area2000In: International Journal of Nursing Practice, ISSN 1322-7114, E-ISSN 1440-172X, Vol. 6, no 6, 333-337 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pressure sores are a great problem for patients, staff and society. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence, treatment and prevention of pressure sores in a public health service area in Sweden. Criteria used for pressure sore assessment were persistent discoloration, epithelial damage and damage to the full thickness of the skin, without or with a cavity. The data were collected during 2 weeks in April 1995 from 1173 inpatients. The pressure-sore prevalence rate was 3.75%; 44 patients had a total of 68 sores. Men were as prone to developing pressure sores as women. The most frequently reported preventive measures were antidecubitus mattresses and turning schedules. Relief from pressure and occlusive dressings were the most common treatment measures. There was no statistical difference in pressure-sore prevalence when compared with a similar study from 1980. Patients were, however, older in 1995.

  • 49.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Immobility – a major risk factor for development of pressure ulcers among adult hospitalized patients: a prospective study2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 18, no 1, 57-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : To identify risk factors associated with pressure ulcer development among adult hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    Design : A prospective comparative study including 530 adult patients from medical and surgical wards. Registered Nurses made the data collection on admission and once a week for up to 12 weeks. The risk assessment scale used was the Risk Assessment Pressure Sore (RAPS) scale, including the following variables; general physical condition, activity, mobility, moisture, food intake, fluid intake, sensory perception, friction and shear, body temperature and serum albumin.

    Results : Sixty-two (11.7%) patients developed 85 pressure ulcers. The most common pressure ulcer was that of nonblanchable erythema. Patients who developed pressure ulcers were significantly older, hospitalized for a longer time, had lower scores on the total RAPS scale, had lower weight and lower diastolic blood pressure than nonpressure ulcer patients did. In the multiple logistic regression analyses using variables included in the RAPS scale immobility emerged as a strong risk factor. When adding remaining significant variables in the analyses, mobility, time of hospitalization, age, surgical treatment and weight were found to be risk factors for pressure ulcer development.

    Conclusion : It is confirmed that immobility is a risk factor of major importance for pressure ulcer development among adult hospitalized patients. The results also indicate that the RAPS scale may be useful for prediction of pressure ulcer development in clinical practice.

  • 50.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Krantz, Ann-Margret
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A risk assessment scale for the prediction of pressure sore development: reliability and validity2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 38, no 2, 190-199 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The ability to assess the risk of a patient developing pressure sores is a major issue in pressure sore prevention. Risk assessment scales should be valid, reliable and easy to use in clinical practice.

    Aim.  To develop further a risk assessment scale, for predicting pressure sore development and, in addition, to present the validity and reliability of this scale.

    Methods. The risk assessment pressure sore (RAPS) scale, includes 12 variables, five from the re-modified Norton scale, three from the Braden scale and three from other research results. Five hundred and thirty patients without pressure sores on admission were included in the study and assessed over a maximum period of 12 weeks. Internal consistency was examined by item analysis and equivalence by interrater reliability. To estimate equivalence, 10 pairs of nurses assessed a total of 116 patients. The underlying dimensions of the scale were examined by factor analysis. The predictive validity was examined by determination of sensitivity, specificity and predictive value.

    Results.  Two variables were excluded as a result of low item–item and item–total correlations. The average percentage of agreement and the intraclass correlation between raters were 70% and 0·83, respectively. The factor analysis gave three factors, with a total variance explained of 65·1%. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive value were high among patients at medical and infection wards.

    Conclusions.  The RAPS scale is a reliable scale for predicting pressure sore development. The validity is especially good for patients undergoing treatment in medical wards and wards for infectious diseases. This indicates that the RAPS scale may be useful in clinical practice for these groups of patients. For patients undergoing surgical treatment, further analysis will be performed.

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