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  • 1.
    Arlinger, Stig
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Technical Audiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Lyregaard, Poul-Erik
    Billermark, Erica
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, RC - Rekonstruktionscentrum, ÖNH - Öron- Näsa- Halskliniken.
    Fitting hearing aids to first-time users2000In: Scandinavian Audiology, ISSN 0105-0397, E-ISSN 1940-2872, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical experience indicates that first-time hearing aid users prefer less gain and lower maximum output levels than experienced users. This hypothesis was tested on 20 subjects being fitted with their first aids. The study was double blinded by using a programmable hearing aid, set to either the standard setting according to the manufacturer's software or to reduced gain and maximum output. Half of the subjects started with one hearing aid and half with the other, changing to the other hearing aid after 3 days trial with each setting. At the end of the study, subjects stated preference in specified situations and overall. No significant differences in APHAB, sound quality, estimated communication ability or perceived loudness scores were seen for the two settings. Nine subjects preferred the standard setting, seven the reduced setting and four were undecided. No correlation could be found between preference and audiological variables.

  • 2.
    Brännström, Jonas K
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Dept of clinical science, Section of Logopedics, Phoiatrics and audiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N. T.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Denmark.
    The Process of Developing an Internet-Based Support System for Audiologists and First-Time Hearing Aid Clients2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In audiologic practice, complementary information sources and access to the clinician between appointments improve information retention and facilitate adjustment behaviors. An Internet-based support system is a novel way to support information sharing and clinician access. Purpose: This research forum article describes the process of developing an Internet-based support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients. Method: The iterative development process, including revisions by 4 research audiologists and 4 clinical audiologists, is described. The final system is exemplified. Conclusion: An Internet-based support system was successfully developed for audiologic practice.

  • 3.
    Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Clinical Sciences Lund, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ingo, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer N T
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Snekkersten, Oticon A/S, Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients2016In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    et al.
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Rehabiliteringsprogram för vuxna hörapparatanvändare2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Laplante-Levesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Knudsen, Line V
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Preminger, Jill E
    University of Louisville, USA.
    Jones, Lesley
    University of York, UK.
    Nielsen, Claus
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Naylor, Graham
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation: Perspectives of adults with hearing impairment2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study investigated the perspectives of adults with hearing impairment on hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation.

    DESIGN:

    Individual semi-structured interviews were completed.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    In total, 34 adults with hearing impairment in four countries (Australia, Denmark, UK, and USA) participated. Participants had a range of experience with hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation, from never having sought help to being satisfied hearing-aid users.

    RESULTS:

    Qualitative content analysis identified four main categories ('perceiving my hearing impairment', 'seeking hearing help', 'using my hearing aids', and 'perspectives and knowledge') and, at the next level, 25 categories. This article reports on the densest categories: they are described, exemplified with interview quotes, and discussed.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    People largely described hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation in the context of their daily lives. Adults with hearing impairment rarely described clinical encounters towards hearing help-seeking and rehabilitation as a connected process. They portrayed interactions with clinicians as isolated events rather than chronologically-ordered steps relating to a common goal. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • 6.
    Laplante.Lévesque, Ariane
    et al.
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Ingo, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Månsson, Kristoffer
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    An online information transfer support system for audiologists and their first-time hearing aid clients2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Lunner, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The FAS-IT program. From detection to intervention. Reaching and treating persons with hearing disorders using modern technology2012In: AHS 2012 Conference: Book of abstracts, 2012, p. 49-49Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a program grant from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research we are investigating the use of modern information technology in hearing rehabilitation in a broad sense. We use the Internet in this research when we study hearing impaired persons from when the loss is detected to whe  intervention is implemented. In the research we intend to survey online resources, implement selfscreening both in terms of self-assessments and actual hearing screening on the Internet, use online cognitive tests, use the Internet for medical support system aimed to be integrated in health care, test if motivational interviewing methods can be used to facilitate the decision process when seeking treatment, develop and test online counselling for hearing impaired persons, use more open-ended qualitative methods to probe the experiences of acceptance versus experiential avoidance, and finally develop and test web resources for significant others (e.g. parents of children, adult children of older adults without access to the Internet). The program is divided into nine subprojects that are at different stages of their execution. This presentation will give an overview of the activities and outcomes so far in the FAS-IT program.

  • 8.
    Molander, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordqvist, Peter
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Internet-based hearing screening using speech-in-noise: validation and comparisons of self-reported hearing problems, quality of life and phonological representation2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 3223-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives For the last decade a host of different projects have been launched to allow persons who are concerned about their hearing status to quickly and at a low cost test their hearing ability. Most often, this is carried out without collecting complementary information that could be correlated with hearing impairment. In this two-part study we first, present the development and validation of a novel Internet-based hearing test, and second, report on the associations between this test and phonological representation, quality of life and self-reported hearing difficulties.

    Design Cross-sectional study.

    Setting An opportunity sample of participants was recruited at the Stockholm central station for the first study. All parts of the second study were conducted via the Internet, with testing and self-report forms adapted for online use.

    Participants The first part of the study was carried out in direct contact with the participants, and participants from the second study were recruited by means of advertisements in newspapers and on webpages. The only exclusion criterion was that participants had to be over 18 years old. Most participants were between 60 and 69 years old. There were almost an equal number of men and women (total n=316).

    Outcome measures 48 participants failed the Internet-based hearing screening test. The group failing the test reported more problems on the Amsterdam Inventory of Auditory Disability. In addition, they were found to have diminished phonological representational skills. However, no difference in quality of life was found.

    Conclusions Almost one in five participants was in need of contacting their local hearing clinic. This group had more complaints regarding tinnitus and hyperacusis, rated their own hearing as worse than those who passed, and had a poorer capability of generating accurate phonological representations. This study suggests that it is feasible to screen for hearing status online, and obtain valid data.

  • 9.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    A randomized controlled trial of professional online rehabilitation for adult hearing-aid users2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring narrative effects in hearing aid fitting2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploring narrative effects

    The clinical meeting is a narrative (‘story’) in itself. To be able to study narrative effects in isolation, the narrative must be separated from the outcome of the hearing-aid fitting. In this study the test persons were given two hearing aids. These were accompanied by different narratives, but had identical amplification/acoustic signal processing.

     

     

    Testing narrative effects

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the power of the narrative in affecting the client’s perception of the dispensing process. The experimental approach was to implement alternative dispensing processes with divergent narratives but identical acoustical results. Then, in a balanced crossover design, to carry out fittings with these processes on a group of hearing-aid clients. The two carefully rehearsed dispensing processes were: a ‘Diagnostic’ process and an ‘Interactive’ process.

     

     

     

     

     

     Narrative 1: ‘Diagnostic’ process. The client is inactive and the dispenser makes a number of adjustments based on hearing assessments, during which the client is passive. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Narrative 2: ‘Interactive’ process. The client is led to believe that they have adjusted the HA settings to their own preferences. Fitting is based on hearing thresholds only (hearing-aid settings identical for Narratives 1 and 2.)

     

     

     

     

     Results

    20 of the 24 subjects had a clear fitting preference. This is surprising, since the two fittings were acoustically identical. We must suppose that it is the subjects’ perception of the fitting process which determined their preferences. However, all subjects except one gave exclusively sound-related reasons for their preferences (“Sounds more clear” etc.). Thus it seems that clinicians may not always hear the ‘true’ reasons for preferences from their clients.

  • 11.
    Naylor, Graham
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Exploring the Effects of the Narrative Embodied in the Hearing Aid Fitting Process on Treatment Outcomes2015In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: There is strong evidence from other fields of health, and growing evidence in audiology, that characteristics of the process of intervention as perceived by the client (embodied narratives) can have significant effects on treatment outcomes, independent of the technical properties of the intervention itself. This phenomenon deserves examination because studies of technical interventions that fail to take account of it may reach erroneous conclusions and because clinical practice can put such effects to therapeutic use. The aim of this study was to test the idea that embodied narratives might affect outcomes in hearing aid fitting. This was achieved by carrying out experiments in which technical (acoustic) differences between alternative hearing aid fittings were absent, while providing test subjects with a strong contrast between the processes apparently applied to derive the fittings being compared. Thus, any effects of contrasting narratives could be observed, free of acoustical confounds. The hypothesis was that narrative effects would be observed. Design: A balanced crossover design was used, in which subjects received and evaluated two bilateral hearing aid fittings in succession. Subjects were deceived as to the true identical content of the hearing aid fittings being compared, but encouraged to believe that one fitting process was interactive and the other was diagnostic in character. Two almost identical experiments were undertaken: one with 24 experienced adult hearing aid users and another with 16 adult first-time users. Each hearing aid fitting was worn at home for 2 weeks, after which self-report outcome measures (Hearing Aid Performance Questionnaire, Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids) were administered. After the second test period, a short preference questionnaire was also completed. Results: Twenty of the 24 experienced users showed a clear preference for one or the other fitting, and their self-report scores reflected these preferences. Effect sizes were comparable with those typically observed for true acoustical contrasts. No order effect was seen in this group. In contrast, 13 of the 16 first-time users preferred the second fitting. Trends in the self-report measures were similar for this group but weaker than for the experienced users. In both groups, the reasons given for subjects preference were predominantly related to sound, despite there being no acoustical differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that the narrative embodied in a given fitting process can have a substantial effect on the perceived benefit of the treatment, independent of any acoustical differences, at least for experienced users. For first-time users, acclimatization seems to overshadow the purely narrative effect of any fitting process. In the future, research study designs should include steps to avoid narrative effects when technical parameters of hearing aids are the intended object of study. In clinical practice, the narrative is part of the therapeutic context, and one may design it for maximum beneficial effect.

  • 12.
    Sundewall Thoren, Elisabet
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Öberg, Marie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the two studies presented in this research forum article was to develop audiological rehabilitation programs for experienced hearing aid users and evaluate them in online versions. In this research forum article, the differences between the two studies are discussed. Method: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed evaluating the efficacy of online rehabilitation, including professional guidance by an audiologist. In each RCT, the effects of the online programs were compared with the effects measured in a control group. Results: The results from the first RCT showed a significant increase in activity and participation for both groups with participants in the intervention group improving more than those in the control group. At the 6-month follow-up, after the study, the significant increase was maintained; however, amounts of increase in the two groups were no longer significantly different. The results from the second RCT showed significant increase in activity and participation for the intervention group, although the control group did not improve. Conclusions: The results from the RCTs provide evidence that the Internet can be used to deliver rehabilitation to hearing-aid users and that their problems are reduced by the intervention; however, the content of the online rehabilitation program requires further investigation.

  • 13.
    Sundewall Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Professional online rehabilitation of hearing-impaired adults2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    A randomized controlled trial evaluating the effects of online rehabilitative intervention for adult hearing-aid users2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 452-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Previous research shows that the internet can be used in the rehabilitation of hearing aid users. By further developing the online program, it might be possible to foster behavioral changes that will positively affect hearing aid users.

    Design: A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. The intervention group underwent a five-week online intervention while the control group was referred to a waiting-list. Questionnaires were used as outcome measures.

    Study Sample: Seventy-six experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 26 to 81 years (mean 69.3 years).

    Results: The findings showed significant improvements in the intervention group after the intervention, measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly. The effects were maintained and improved at the follow-up. Furthermore, the results indicated that the participants in the intervention group improved at two items of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, and the effects were partly maintained at the followup. Finally, significant improvements in the domain of psychosocial wellbeing were found at the follow-up.

    Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that the internet can be used to deliver intervention of rehabilitation to hearing aid users.

  • 15.
    Thorén, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Internet Access and Use in Adults With Hearing Loss2013In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 15, no 5, p. e91-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The future rehabilitation of adults with hearing loss is likely to involve online tools used by individuals at home. Online tools could also be useful for people who are not seeking professional help for their hearing problems. Hearing impairment is a disability that increases with age, and increased age is still associated with reduced use of the Internet. Therefore, to continue the research on online audiological rehabilitative tools for people with hearing loss, it is important to determine if and to what extent adults with hearing loss use the Internet.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To evaluate the use of the Internet and email in a group of adults with hearing loss and to investigate if their use of Internet and email differed between genders, among different age groups, and how it compared with the general population in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    Questionnaires containing multiple-choice questions about Internet access, email use, and educational level were mailed to individuals with hearing loss, who were registered as patients at a hearing aid clinic. Out of the 269 invited participants, 158 returned a completed questionnaire, which was a response rate of 58.7%.

    RESULTS:

    The results showed that 60% (94/158) of the participants with hearing loss used computers and the Internet. The degree of hearing loss in the group of participants did not explain the level of Internet usage, while factors of age, gender, and education did (P<.001). More men than women used the Internet (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.32-4.91, P<.001). Use of the Internet was higher in the youngest age group (25-64 years) compared to the oldest age group (75-96 years, P=.001). A higher usage of the Internet was observed in the participants with hearing loss, especially the elderly, when compared with the general population of Sweden (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.23-3.17, P=.04).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    We conclude that the use of computers and the Internet overall is at least at the same level for people with hearing loss as for the general age-matched population in Sweden, but that this use is even higher in specific age groups. These results are important for the future work in developing and evaluating rehabilitative educational online tools for adults with hearing loss.

  • 16.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Rydberg, Emelie
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, School of Health and Medical Science, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro University.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    The psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment2014In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study explored the psychological process from avoidance to acceptance in adults with acquired hearing impairment. Study design: A descriptive qualitative interview study was conducted in Sweden in 2010. Participants were 18 adults with an acquired sensorineural hearing impairment aged 50-70 years, who had recently obtained hearing aids at the Audiology Clinic of the Örebro University Hospital. The sample included both first-time hearing aid users (n = 10) and experienced hearing aid users (n = 8). Each participant took part in one semi-structured interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the manifest content of the interview transcripts. Results: Participants described the process from avoidance to acceptance as a slow and gradual process rooted in the awareness of the frequency and severity of hearing disability and of its psychological consequences. Facilitators included adaptive coping mechanisms, other peoples comments and positive experiences, accessibility of help-seeking and routine health assessments. In contrast, barriers included maladaptive coping mechanisms and stigma. Conclusions: Participants described the process of acceptance as a personal process that involved, to some extent, their social network of family, friends and colleagues. It was also a trade-off between the consequences of untreated hearing impairment and the threat to normal identity that, through stigma, hearing impairment carries. Further studies are needed to fully investigate the role of access to information on hearing impairment acceptance. How professionals and society can facilitate the process of acceptance should also be a focus of future research efforts. 

  • 17.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aktiv kommunikation - 5 års erfarenhet av Aktiv kommunikation2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Öberg, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Aktiv kommunikation-en rehabiliteringskurs för personer med hörselnedsättning2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Approaches to Audiological Rehabilitation with Hearing Aids: studies on pre-fitting strategies and assessment of outcomes2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fourteen percent of the Swedish population report subjective hearing loss. The number of persons suffering from hearing loss is expected to increase in accordance with the increased length of the average life span, causing an associated increase in the demand for hearing health care services as new patient groups who expect a higher quality of life begin to request hearing care. The main goal of this thesis was to develop new approaches in audiological rehabilitation to meet these demands and achieve user satisfaction.

    Two randomized controlled trials including 39 and 38 subjects, respectively were performed that evaluated two interventions, user-controlled adjustment and sound awareness training, which were performed prior to a hearing aid fitting. The new approaches focused on increasing user participation and activity. To evaluate the goals of audiological rehabilitation, e.g., reducing auditory impairment, optimizing auditory activities and minimizing participation restrictions, several standardized self-reporting instruments were used to assess activity limitations, participation restriction, satisfaction and psychosocial well-being. Several of the instruments were validated for a Swedish population in a postal survey including 162 subjects. Furthermore, an interview instrument that was appropriate for telephone interviews and a categorization rating scale were developed for assessing the global clinical impression of the audiological rehabilitation.

    Few significant differences in outcomes were found between the treatment and control groups in the short term, and the interventions did not achieve additional or more successful hearing aid users in the long term. Thus, it was concluded that the hearing aid rehabilitation was effective in and of itself, as both the treatment and control groups showed significant improvements in psychosocial well-being and reduced activity limitation and participation restriction. The self-report instruments were found to be valid, and a factor analysis indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced with a recommendation for further clinical use. The telephone interviews evaluating the clinical global impression of the audiological rehabilitation were found to be effective and showed success in a vast majority of the users. Advantages such as simpler administration and less time consumption warrant their continued use in additional audiological settings.

    The pre-interventions in these studies need to be further investigated before they could be recommended for clinical use also in a Swedish context. The international standardized self reports, however, can already be recommended for clinical use. A first attempt to evaluate global clinical impression by telephone interviews was found to be effective and further validations are suggested.

    List of papers
    1. Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables
    2007 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to collect descriptive data and to evaluate the psychometric properties of a range of self-report questionnaires in a Swedish population. Other aims were to investigate the correlations between these measures and the higher order factorial structure of the included questionnaires. One hundred and sixty-two first-time hearing aid users completed four standardized hearing specific questionnaires: the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE); the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL); the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS); and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). In addition, two psychosocial questionnaires were completed: the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC); and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All measures were administered at one year post hearing aid fitting. Mean scores for the questionnaires were in agreement with previous studies. The questionnaires were found to be reliable and acceptable for further clinical use. Correlations were seen across different hearing specific questionnaires, and between hearing aid use and satisfaction. Psychosocial variables were more strongly associated with participation restriction and satisfaction than with the demographic variables, confirming the importance of subjective measures. The factor analysis extracted four factors: psychosocial well-being, hearing aid satisfaction, adaptive communications strategies, and residual participation restriction, and indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced. It is concluded that psychosocial factors are important to consider in hearing aid rehabilitation and their possible role should be further investigated in future studies.

    Keywords
    Hearing aids, satisfaction, participation restriction, sense of coherence
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12456 (URN)10.1080/16513860701560214 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-05 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14
    2. The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial
    2009 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 211-215Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-nine first time hearing aid users with mild to moderate hearing losses were randomly assigned to a pre-fitting intervention group (N=19) or a control group (N=20). The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three weekly visits, where the user adjusted the amplification of an experimental hearing aid to preferred settings, and wore the aid between the visits. After the pre-fitting intervention phase, both groups received conventional hearing aid fitting. Standardized questionnaires (IOI-HA, HHIE, ECHO, SADL, HADS) were administered before and after pre-fitting intervention, after conventional hearing aid fitting, and at one-year follow-up. Hearing aid success was evaluated by an independent audiologist at the one- year follow-up appointment. The pre-fitting intervention phase showed positive effects for the intervention group but not for the control group on activity limitation and participation restriction, and expectations. However, the intervention in its current version had no lasting effects beyond the control group after conventional hearing aid fitting or after a year. Furthermore, both groups showed mostly successful hearing aid fittings, improved psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and reduced participation restriction.

    Keywords
    Pre-fitting intervention, user-controlled adjustment, randomized clinical trial, independent evaluation, hearing aid benefit, hearing aid use, satisfaction, activity limitation, participation restriction, psychosocial well-being, counselling
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12457 (URN)10.3109/16513860903309790 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-05 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial
    2008 (English)In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of an individual pre-fitting intervention for first-time hearing aid users. Thirty-eight hearing impaired adults were randomly assigned to a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention (n=19) or to a control group (n=19). The purpose of the sound awareness training was to facilitate the users' acclimatization to amplified sound. The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three visits and was followed by conventional hearing aid fitting that was identical for both groups. Standardized questionnaires were administered before and after the pre-fitting intervention, after the conventional hearing aid fitting, and at a one-year follow-up. The follow-up also included a clinical assessment by means of a telephone interview performed by an independent audiologist. The pre-intervention did not result in any major improvement over and above the control group. However, improvements were found for both groups following hearing aid fitting. In addition, most participants were considered as successful users in the interview. Future research should target individuals in need of extended hearing aid rehabilitation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2008
    Keywords
    Hearing aids, participation restrictions, one-year follow-up
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12455 (URN)10.1080/16513860802042062 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-11 Created: 2008-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Development and initial validation of the “Clinical Global Impression” to measure outcomes for audiological rehabilitation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and initial validation of the “Clinical Global Impression” to measure outcomes for audiological rehabilitation
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 17, p. 1409-1417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an interview instrument for assessing outcome following hearing aid fitting based on clinical global impressions.

    Method: The Audiological Rehabilitation Clinical Global Impression (AR-CGI) was developed and used in a telephone interview in two separate samples. The first sample (N=69) consisted of hearing aid owners who had participated in two intervention studies and the second sample consisted of hearing aid owners receiving regular services from a hearing clinic (N=21). Following the structured telephone interview, participants were categorized into three categories: Successful, Successful with some limitations, or Unsuccessful.

    Results: A vast majority were categorized as Successful (80% of the intervention sample and 71% of the clinical sample). Those categorized as successful were found to differ from those categorized as less successful in terms of age and self-reported hearing aid use, depressed mood, and residual participation restriction, but they did not differ in terms of degree of hearing loss.

    Conclusion: It is suggested that the brevity and usefulness of the AR-CGI makes it a potential tool for further use in audiological settings.

    Keywords
    Validation, clinical global impression, telephone interview, audiological rehabilitation
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12527 (URN)10.1080/09638280802621408 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-09-11 Created: 2008-09-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11
  • 20.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    ELSA 85: En kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändande2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85:: En kartläggning av  85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändning2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    ELSA 85: En kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörappsratanvändning2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
     Ger självjustering och ljudmedvetenhetsträning som grund en nöjdare hörapparatkund?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing Care for Older Adults: Beyond the Audiology Clinic2015In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 104-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of hearing health care beyond the clinic for older people with impaired hearing. Method: This article emphasizes factors affecting the success of audiologic rehabilitation for older people and describes practical clinical and community-based strategies for promoting successful hearing health care. Results: Older people are not always aware of the extent of their hearing loss, may not always expect to benefit from using a hearing aid, and often have low self-efficacy for managing to learn to use hearing aids. Increased knowledge and support from other health professionals, family caregivers, and significant others could optimize older peoples participation in everyday activities. Conclusion: Further work is needed to develop new interventions for older people with impaired hearing and to increase collaboration with general practitioners as well as other health care professionals.

  • 25.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic2014In: Hearing care of older adults beyond the audiology clinic, 2014, p. 117-118Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether or not older adults are actively seeking hearing health care, they may be unaware of the extent of their audiometric hearing loss, they may not expect to benefit from using hearing aids, they may  hold  ageist  self-stereotypes, and/or  have  low  self-efficacy  for  managing  hearing-related problems. According to the Health Belief Model, such conditions are not conducive to action-taking or positive sustained rehabilitative outcomes. In addition to more traditional clinic-based audiology rehabilitation services, a community-based health-promoting approach to increasing information and providing a more positive outlook about hearing health care options could be useful in predisposing older adults to seek help and achieve better rehabilitative outcomes. Community-based strategies to promote successful hearing health may also be crucial in reinforcing the maintenance of hearing aid use  and  hearing-related  behavior  changes  after  rehabilitation  has  been  provided.  A  community-based  approach  would  involve  new  partnerships  between  audiologists  and  other  health professionals and service providers working with older adults in the community, including primary care  physicians  and  geriatricians.  Such  partners  could  help  to  promote  earlier  identification  and awareness of hearing-related problems, and reduce the stigma of hearing loss and wearing hearing aids.  For  older  people affected  by  multiple  physical  and/or  mental  health  issues  it  is  even  more important to determine the most appropriate rehabilitation options for each person. Decision-making and  rehabilitation  planning,  delivery  and  monitoring  for  these  cases  demands  increased collaboration  with  other  health  professionals,  family  caregivers  and  significant  others  so  that participation in everyday activities and quality of life can be optimized. This presentation will discuss different approaches based on the Health Belief Model that could be augment more traditional clinic-based hearing health care for the older in short and long-term.

  • 26.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hearing difficulties, uptake and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overall health related to subjective hearing loss and hearing aid uptake in an 85 year old Swedish population2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Öberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Validation of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version) and Evaluation of Its Effect in Hearing Aid Rehabilitation2016In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 20, no 2331216516639234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-reports of subjective hearing difficulties by people with hearing loss may be a useful complement to audiometry in hearing aid rehabilitation. To be useful, such self-reports need to be reliable. This study investigated the reliability and the validity of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version; HHIE-S). Sixty-nine participants completed a questionnaire before hearing aid rehabilitation. Of these individuals, 49 completed hearing aid rehabilitation (aged between 23 and 94 years), and 41 of these 49 participants completed the questionnaire after completing the rehabilitation. The Swedish HHIE-S exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha coefficient of .77). The questionnaire was effective for evaluating hearing aid rehabilitation, and a statistically significant reduction in hearing difficulties was observed. The clinicians found the questionnaire easy to administer and effective in hearing aid rehabilitation. The findings from the study support the use of the HHIE-S in clinical practice.

  • 29.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a pre-fitting intervention on hearing aid benefit:a randomized controlled trial2009In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 211-215Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-nine first time hearing aid users with mild to moderate hearing losses were randomly assigned to a pre-fitting intervention group (N=19) or a control group (N=20). The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three weekly visits, where the user adjusted the amplification of an experimental hearing aid to preferred settings, and wore the aid between the visits. After the pre-fitting intervention phase, both groups received conventional hearing aid fitting. Standardized questionnaires (IOI-HA, HHIE, ECHO, SADL, HADS) were administered before and after pre-fitting intervention, after conventional hearing aid fitting, and at one-year follow-up. Hearing aid success was evaluated by an independent audiologist at the one- year follow-up appointment. The pre-fitting intervention phase showed positive effects for the intervention group but not for the control group on activity limitation and participation restriction, and expectations. However, the intervention in its current version had no lasting effects beyond the control group after conventional hearing aid fitting or after a year. Furthermore, both groups showed mostly successful hearing aid fittings, improved psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and reduced participation restriction.

  • 30.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effects of a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention: A randomized controlled trial2008In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 129-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of an individual pre-fitting intervention for first-time hearing aid users. Thirty-eight hearing impaired adults were randomly assigned to a sound awareness pre-fitting intervention (n=19) or to a control group (n=19). The purpose of the sound awareness training was to facilitate the users' acclimatization to amplified sound. The pre-fitting intervention consisted of three visits and was followed by conventional hearing aid fitting that was identical for both groups. Standardized questionnaires were administered before and after the pre-fitting intervention, after the conventional hearing aid fitting, and at a one-year follow-up. The follow-up also included a clinical assessment by means of a telephone interview performed by an independent audiologist. The pre-intervention did not result in any major improvement over and above the control group. However, improvements were found for both groups following hearing aid fitting. In addition, most participants were considered as successful users in the interview. Future research should target individuals in need of extended hearing aid rehabilitation.

  • 31.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utökad rådgivning före hörapparatanpassning- gör det någon nytta?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Aktiv Kommunikation: En studie om effekterna av en kommunikationskurs för 87-åringar med hörselnedsättning2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    County Council Östergotland, Hearing Clinic, Linköping, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Short- and Long-Term Effects of the Modified Swedish Version of the Active Communication Education (ACE) Program for Adults with Hearing Loss2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 848-858Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Sweden, there is a lack of evidence-based rehabilitation programs for hearing loss. The Active Communication Education program (ACE) has successfully been used in Australia and was translated and evaluated in a Swedish pilot study. The pilot study included 23 participants (age 87 yr). No statistically significant effects were found, but the qualitative assessments indicated that this population found the program to be beneficial. The participants requested more focus on the psychosocial consequences of hearing loss, and the modules in the original ACE program were modified. Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of a modified Swedish version of the ACE program in a population aged 39-82 yr old. Research Design: Design was a between-group and within-group intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the hearing health clinic in Linkoping during 2010 and 2012. A total of 73 participante agreed to undergo the ACE, and 67 (92%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with 6 to 10 participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: The outcomes were measured before initiation of the program, 3 wk after program completion, and 6 mo after program completion and included communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and anxiety and depression. In addition, outcomes were measured after program completion using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions, a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement, and qualitative feedback was obtained about the response to the program and actions taken as a result of participation. The treatment effects were examined using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Results: Statistically significant effects were found for communication strategy use, activity and participation, and psychosocial well-being. Statistically significant effects were found for gender and degree of hearing loss, indicating that women and those with mild hearing loss significantly improved communication strategies. Conclusions: It is suggested that the program be implemented as part of regular audiological rehabilitation and offered in an early stage of rehabilitation.

  • 34.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Australia .
    A Preliminary Evaluation of the Active Communication Education Program in a Sample of 87-Year-Old Hearing Impaired Individuals2014In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, ISSN 1050-0545, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research suggests that audiological rehabilitation for older adults could include group communication programs in addition to hearing aid fitting or as an alternative to hearing aid fitting for those people who do not wish to proceed with hearing aids. This pilot study was a first attempt to evaluate a Swedish version of such a program, Active Communication Education (ACE), which had been developed and previously evaluated in Australia (Hickson et.al, 2007a). Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the use of the ACE program in an older-old population of people aged 87 yr in Sweden. Research Design: A within-subject intervention study. Study Sample: The participants were recruited from the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment (ELSA), a population-based study of the functional abilities of all inhabitants of the city of Linkoping aged 85 yr in 2007. Participants who responded to the hearing related items in the ELSA study were approached for this study; 29 people agreed to undertake ACE, and 23 (79%) completed three or more sessions. Intervention: The ACE program consists of five weekly 2 hr group sessions with six to ten participants per group. Data Collection and Analysis: Self-report measures of communication strategy use, activity and participation, health-related quality of life, and depression were obtained preprogram, 3 wk postprogram, and 6 mo postprogram. Within-group changes and effect sizes were calculated. In addition, outcomes were measured postprogram using the International Outcome Inventory Alternative Interventions (IOI-AI; Noble, 2002) and a modified version of the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement (COSI; Dillon et al, 1997; Hickson et al, 2007b), and qualitative feedback was obtained. Results: The effect size of ACE was small (0.03-0.27), and, in the sample of 23 included in this pilot study, differences in pre- and postprogram assessments were not statistically significant. Results from the IOI-Al and the modified COSI indicated that these elderly participants found the program to be beneficial, and 90% stated that the course had increased their ability to deal with hearing loss and the problems it creates. Conclusions: This preliminary investigation indicates the potential benefits of ACE for older adults, and further research is needed with larger numbers of participants in different age groups to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of the ACE program for a general Swedish population.

  • 35.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD,.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    Communication Disability Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Evaluation of the Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Bohn, Therese
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Larsson, Ulrika
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Hickson, Louise
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane Australia.
    Evaluation of the Active Communication Education program in two Swedish samples2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Brännström, Jonas
    Lunds Universitet, Lund, Sverige.
    Laplante.Lévesque, Ariane
    Eriksholms Research Centre, Denmark.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Hörselrehabilitering och Internet2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Elisabet, Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Reserach Centre, Denmark.
    Hagejärd, Lena
    Avdelningen för logopedi, foniatri och audiologi, Lunds universitet, Lund Sverige.
    Teodorescu, Ina
    Avdelningen för logopedi, foniatri och audiologi, Lunds universitet, Lund Sverige.
    Online Individualized Active Communication Education- a Swedish pilot study2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Psychometric evaluation of hearing specific self-report measures and their associations with psychosocial and demographic variables2007In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to collect descriptive data and to evaluate the psychometric properties of a range of self-report questionnaires in a Swedish population. Other aims were to investigate the correlations between these measures and the higher order factorial structure of the included questionnaires. One hundred and sixty-two first-time hearing aid users completed four standardized hearing specific questionnaires: the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE); the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL); the Communication Strategies Scale (CSS); and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). In addition, two psychosocial questionnaires were completed: the Sense of Coherence scale (SOC); and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). All measures were administered at one year post hearing aid fitting. Mean scores for the questionnaires were in agreement with previous studies. The questionnaires were found to be reliable and acceptable for further clinical use. Correlations were seen across different hearing specific questionnaires, and between hearing aid use and satisfaction. Psychosocial variables were more strongly associated with participation restriction and satisfaction than with the demographic variables, confirming the importance of subjective measures. The factor analysis extracted four factors: psychosocial well-being, hearing aid satisfaction, adaptive communications strategies, and residual participation restriction, and indicated that the number of questionnaires could be reduced. It is concluded that psychosocial factors are important to consider in hearing aid rehabilitation and their possible role should be further investigated in future studies.

  • 41.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Nägga, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    ELSA-85 en kartläggning av 85-åringars subjektiva hörsel och hörapparatanvändning2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Nägga, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Hearing difficulties, uptake and outcomes of hearing aids in people 85 years of age2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported hearing difficulties, uptake, and hearing-aid outcomes and their relationships to demographic, cognitive, psychosocial, and health variables in 85 year olds. Design and study sample: Three hundred and forty-six elderly adults participated in a survey that included questionnaires and home visits. Fifty-five percent of participants admitted to having hearing difficulties, and 59% of these owned hearing aids. The participants most frequently cited reason for not acquiring hearing aids was that they did not think their hearing problem was perceived as severe enough. Participants with hearing difficulties who did not own hearing aids showed worse general and mental health. Many of the elderly participants were successful in their rehabilitation, and their hearing-aid outcomes were similar to those of a younger group, with the exception of a greater proportion of non-users among the elderly. Conclusion: Many older people with self-reported hearing difficulties do not acquire hearing aids, despite this studys findings that older people are likely to have success with hearing rehabilitation. It is important to make greater efforts to try to increase elderly adults awareness of hearing loss and the benefits of hearing rehabilitation.

  • 43.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, Department of Geriatrics.
    Nägga, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Overall health related to subjective hearing loss and hearing aid uptake in an 85 year old Swedish population2009In: Hearing Care for Adult 2009-The challenge of Aging. Nov 16-18 ,2009 Chicago, USA, Chicago, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Nägga, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Overall health related to subjective hearing loss and hearing uptake in an 85 year old Swedish population2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vestergaard- Knudsen, Line
    Nielsen, Claus
    Naylor, Graham
    Kramer, Sophia
    Factors Influencing Help Seeking, Hearing Aid Uptake, Hearing Aid Use and Satisfaction With Hearing Aids: A Review of the literature2010In: Trends in Amplification, ISSN 1084-7138, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 127-154Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This descriptive summary of the literature provides an overview of the available studies (published between January 1980 and January 2009) on correlates of help-seeking behavior for hearing loss, hearing-aid uptake, hearing-aid use, and satisfaction with the device. Methods: Publications were identified by structured searches in Pubmed and Cinahl and by inspecting the reference lists of relevant articles. The articles covered different stages that a person with hearing impairment may go through: prior to hearing aid fitting, the period covering the fitting and the period post hearing aid fitting. Inclusion of articles occurred according to strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted by two independent researchers. Thirty-nine papers were included that identified 31 factors examined in relation to the four outcome measures. These covered personal factors (e.g., source of motivation, expectation, attitude), demographic factors (e.g., age, gender) and external factors (e.g., cost, counseling). Only two studies covered the actual fitting process. There was only one factor positively affecting all four outcome variables. This was self-reported hearing disability. The vast majority of studies showed no relationship of age and gender with any of the outcome domains. Discussion and conclusion: Whereas research of the last 28 years yielded valuable information regarding relevant and irrelevant factors in hearing aid health care, there are still many relevant issues that have never been investigated in controlled studies. These are discussed.

  • 46.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vestergaard-Knudsen, Line
    Nielsen, Claus
    Naylor, Graham
    Kramer, Sophia
    What are the factors that have an influence on help seeking, hearing aid uptake, use and satsifaction?- a review of the literature2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Wänström, Gunilla
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Denmark.
    Behandlingsprocessens betydelse vid hörapparatanpassning2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Öberg, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Wärnström, Gunnilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hjertman, Heléne
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Lunner, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Technical Audiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Development and initial validation of the “Clinical Global Impression” to measure outcomes for audiological rehabilitation2009In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 17, p. 1409-1417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an interview instrument for assessing outcome following hearing aid fitting based on clinical global impressions.

    Method: The Audiological Rehabilitation Clinical Global Impression (AR-CGI) was developed and used in a telephone interview in two separate samples. The first sample (N=69) consisted of hearing aid owners who had participated in two intervention studies and the second sample consisted of hearing aid owners receiving regular services from a hearing clinic (N=21). Following the structured telephone interview, participants were categorized into three categories: Successful, Successful with some limitations, or Unsuccessful.

    Results: A vast majority were categorized as Successful (80% of the intervention sample and 71% of the clinical sample). Those categorized as successful were found to differ from those categorized as less successful in terms of age and self-reported hearing aid use, depressed mood, and residual participation restriction, but they did not differ in terms of degree of hearing loss.

    Conclusion: It is suggested that the brevity and usefulness of the AR-CGI makes it a potential tool for further use in audiological settings.

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