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  • 1.
    Brege, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brehmer, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    De nya affärsrelationerna - en överlevnadsfråga2008In: Marknadsorientering - Myter och möjligheter / [ed] Lars-Gunnar Mattsson, Malmö: Liber AB , 2008, 1, p. 97-114Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenska industriföretag rustar idag för en ständigt ökad konkurrens, vanligtvis genom att pressa kostnaderna och anpassa sig till lägre internationella prisnivåer. Samtidigt arbetar man på att knyta kunderna närmare till sig, med ett djupare engagemang i kundernas verksamheter. Om man lyckas inträffar det paradoxala att istället för att bli utkonkurrerad av företag från lågkostnadsländer, så förstärks positionerna hos kunder och mera generellt på marknaden. En fördjupad relation uppnås genom att erbjuda en mer heltäckande lösning, ett helhetserbjudande som integreras som en viktig del i kundens verksamhet. Företagets affärsmodell styrs in mot att tjäna pengar på en redan installerad kundbas, genom att under hela erbjudandets livscykel tillföra kompletterande erbjudanden som utgår från att effektivisera kundens affärs- och produktionsprocesser. Dessa utvecklade affärsrelationer kräver en väsentligt bredare coh djupare interaktion med kunderna. Det blir viktigt för företaget att på djupet förstå kundens verksamhet och affär. Detta blir en nödvändighet för att kunna skapa och utveckla attraktiva kunderbjudanden.   

  • 2.
    Brehmer, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics .
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Organizing for Enhanced Service Offerings - The Role of Central and Local Entities in Service Development and Production2007In: EGOS Colloquium,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service modularity as an enabler of value co-creationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The concept of service modularity often excludes the important link between the provider and the customer. By recognizing the role of the customer’s competences and activities in service modularity, this study investigates how value co-creation can be understood in terms of service modularity and offers implications regarding how firms choose their modular strategies.

    Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative study of three Swedish manufacturing firms moving toward an increased service focus (service infusion) relied on data collected through interviews and focus groups. This gathered information supported a conceptualization of modular services that reflects provider and customer information, activities, and competences.

    Findings: Services can be co-created, so service modules should include  customer elements. This inclusion increases the complexity of the modules, as well as the potential value for customers and providers. The observation of customer-specific and supplier-specific sections of modules is an important finding that should lead to further developments of modularity in a service context.

    Originality/Value: This article contributes to the emerging research field of service modularity by providing empirical insights into how service modularity can help achieve more efficient services. In particular, this study notes the need to recognize customer-specific activities and competences as pivotal parts of modular services. Such insights are particularly relevant given the established view of service modules as functions of intra-firm activities.

  • 4.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service process modularization and modular strategies2014In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 313-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the role of service modularity in developing and deploying efficient services, while at the same time meeting diverse customer needs. The analysis distinguishes between different service types and sets forth key issues for service modularization, identifying supporting resources (both internal and customer) and associated modular strategies for the different types. Design/methodology/approach - The study design used an exploratory case study approach, focusing on three Swedish manufacturing firms that are moving toward an increased service focus (service infusion). Data were collected through interviews and focus groups, and the collected data were analyzed independently, before being merged and synthesized in a cross-case analysis. Themes and patterns were extracted and linked to the theoretical framework following a systematic combining process. Findings - This study contributes insights to the emerging field of service modularity by investigating process modularization and modular strategies. A framework is put forward outlining modular strategies for four different service types covering both a passive and an active role for a customer. From a theoretical point of view, the role of the customer is added to the discussion to advocate for the necessity of a co-creative perspective in service modularity. Originality/value - This article contributes to the emerging research field of service modularity by providing empirical insights into how modularization and modular strategies can enable more efficient services. Depending on service type, different modular strategies are set forth. This study also highlights the need to recognize customer-specific activities, resources and competencies as pivotal parts of the modular service processes. Such insights are particularly relevant given the established view of service modules as functions of intra-firm activities.

  • 5.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A lean approach for service productivityimprovements: Synergy or oxymoron?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Service productivity has received increasing attention as service continues to cover greater parts of the economy. And as the competition increases, the need to look at service productivity becomes increasingly important. However, there is scant research on developing services that are both efficient and with high customer satisfaction. The present study aims to address this topic by conceptualizing the applicability of lean principles to service.

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents a conceptual analysis of the six most commonly used lean principles in manufacturing and their applicability in a service context for different types of services.

    Findings: The study suggests promising synergies, as well as important obstacles, for applying lean principles in services. Standardizing services and increasing reliability in service processes through lean principles can increase efficiency. However, the active role of the customer in certain services along with simultaneously high diversity makes it increasingly difficult to apply lean principles. Also, customer satisfaction must be considered when improving service productivity, otherwise the positive long-term effects of a lean approach in service will be absent.

    Practical implications: The findings are useful for organizations aiming to improve their service productivity. Particularly, lean principles are invaluable to increase the efficiency for services with low diversity and low customer participation. This paper suggests a direction for the proper use of lean  principles for different service types, and how efficiency and customer satisfaction is affected through a lean approach.

    Originality/Value: The study contributes to the research on service productivity. The study also contributes to continuing discussions on prototypic characteristics of service and manufacturing orientations.

  • 6.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    A lean approach to service productivity improvements: Synergy or oxymoron?2013In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, E-ISSN 1758-8030, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 291-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Service productivity continues to receive ever-greater amounts of attention as service covers a greater portion of the economy. As competition increases, service productivity becomes increasingly important. This study aims to explore the applicability of lean principles in a service context and to conceptualize how these principles impact service productivity.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the six most commonly used lean principles in manufacturing and their applicability to a service context for different types of services. Using this analysis, six propositions are developed to examine the influence of lean on service productivity.

    Findings – This study suggests promising synergies, as well as important obstacles, for applying lean principles in services. Standardizing services and increasing reliability in service processes through lean principles can increase efficiency. However, the customer's active role in certain services and, simultaneously, high diversity make the application of lean principles increasingly difficult. Also, customer satisfaction must be considered when improving service productivity, otherwise the positive long-term effects of a lean approach in service will be absent.

    Practical implications – These findings are useful for organizations aiming to improve their service productivity. Particularly, lean principles are invaluable to increase efficiency and customer satisfaction for services with low diversity and low customer participation. This paper suggests a direction for the proper use of lean principles for different service types, and how efficiency and customer satisfaction are affected through a lean approach.

    Originality/value – This study contributes to the research on service productivity and continues the discussion on prototypic characteristics of service and manufacturing orientations.

  • 7.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lean principles in business-to-business services: Synergy or oxymoron?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    Service innovation and new service development: An analysis of research 1986-20122013In: Proceedings of the QUIS13 International Research Symposium onService Excellence in Management, Karlstad, Sweden, 2013, p. 480-482Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service modularity as an enabler for value co-creation2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Department of Marketing, CERS – Centre for Relationship Marketing and Service Management, Hanken School of Economics, Finland.
    The evolution of service innovation research: A critical review and synthesis2014In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 373-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of service innovation articles has increased dramatically in the past 25 years. By reviewing 128 articles published between 1986 and 2010, primarily in leading marketing and innovation journals, this study analyzes the progression of service innovation research according to topicality and perspective. The authors summarize prior research by clustering it into three evolutional phases and drawing parallels with the evolution of the wider services marketing field. Overall, the view of service innovation has evolved, from a complement of traditional product innovation to a multidimensional, all-encompassing notion that entails several functions, both within and outside the firm.

  • 11.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The service innovation concept: A literature review2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Carlborg, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Value in Service Systems: Extending the Service Innovation Concept2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Creating Business out of Industrial Offerings: Findings From Market Leading B2B Companies2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Integrating E-business into Mature and Established Companies - Business Development Potential and Benefits2006In: The International Conference on Information Technology in Business ITIB,2006, Warsawa: Warsaw Agricultura University , 2006, p. 185-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mature and established companies, so-called Bricks-and Mortars, are now beginning to integrate e-business into all aspects of both their operational and market environments. E-business is also becoming a pivotal part in many aspects of their business development efforts. Traditionally, focus has been on the B2C area, or e-commerce. With e-B2B making inroads into more and more companies and also considering the fact that B2B are significantly larger in terms of e.g. investments and transaction volumes it is imperative that the knowledge and understanding of the B2B arena, and aspecially in reference to so called bricks-and-mortars, increase. This paper looks at the benefits, and potential, or integrating e-business into mature and established companies and especially from a business development perspective.

  • 15.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Moving towards Market Orientation - A Case for E-business2007In: ISOneWorld Conference,2007, Washington: The Information Institute , 2007, p. 44-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rearranging a business model towards market orientation: strategic and operational dimensions and the impact of E-commerce2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall purpose of this thesis is to explore and describe the rearrangements of a company (changes), from a business model perspective, as it attempts to strategically reorient itself towards market orientation. E-commerce, and more specifically, the impact of e-commerce in this process will be explored. The empirical base of this thesis is a case study of Tetra Pak Business Support AB (TP BuS).

    This reorientation is a multi-year project that has implications on many aspects and areas within the company. Using the business model as an analytical tool help understanding of both how companies change in general and what happens as they move towards market orientation.

    Inherent in my view of the business model are two dimensions, a strategic and an operational. These two are represented by the concepts of strategic positions and operative platforms. I am arguing that it is beneficial to consider both these dimensions in a more iterative (and dynamic) manner when discussing and analysing a company. This can be compared to eg the RBV and the positioning perspective that can be perceived as somewhat one-dimensional in the operational and strategic dimension respectively.

    What we can see, from a business model point of view, is that this reorientation has quantum characteristics, ie concurrent changes in many different areas. Hence it seems as if a reorientation towards market orientation ought to be approached in a holistic manner. There are a few things, or changes, that stand out. First, the offering concept is perhaps the most interesting aspect as it virtually drives (or pulls) many of the other changes and is the foundation for the rearrangement of the business model. In addition to the offering, the notion of bundling (how to arrange products and services) becomes an important factor to consider. The offering and bundling concept work in unison and they must be developed jointly, in an interaction, if the full potential of the concepts are to be leveraged.

    Secondly the introduction of the e-marketplace opens up new ways to use the offering and to approach customers (new market channel). The e-marketplace seems to present new ways to gather and analyse information, and also to contact customers, hence having substantial influence during the process towards market orientation. It appears as if these two issues are the most interesting and pioneering, and have had great impact on the move towards market orientation.

    Furthermore it is worth to notice the iterative manner in that initial changes often spawned new needs for change in other areas in order to realign the business model and to achieve fit. There seems as if a company going through such a comprehensive change, as TP BuS, must pay sufficient attention to the realignment issue and be aware of the fact that, in order to take full advantage of one change, other changes need to be implemented in other areas as well.

    As we look at the reorientation that TP BuS has gone, and still is going, though we can see that they, in fact, have improved both in reference to typical production orientation characteristics as well as market orientation ones. Hinted in some literature, it might not be a question of being either or but rather both or, at least, improving with regards to both these dimensions.

    Finally, the business model framework is extended to include three more aspects, drivers, enablers and outcomes. The drivers are supposed to tie the business model to the objectives or business idea. Enablers can be said to be the methods or actions that are implemented and used to rearrange the business model. Finally the outcomes eg make it possible to compare business models with each other (of the old and the new) by recognizing characteristics or traits of a business model.

  • 17.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The integration of e-business into mature and established companies: a business model approach2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose ofthis dissertation is to explore and analyse the implications of the integration of e-business into mature and established companies and how e-business can contribute to business development. Changes in general and e-business in particular have the potential to penetrate different areas of a company and thus we ought to analyse how e-business is integrated into the entire company (both strategically and operationally) if we aim to understand how this happens. By using a holistic business model framework it is argued that we get a more complete picture and understanding of the integrating e-business.

    The study is based on three case studies of mature and established, so-called bricks-and-mortar, companies that use e-business in various ways and to various extents.

    Traditionally e-bus iness has primarily been used for cost reduction purposes especially regarding transaction costs. These relatively simple solutions, "low-hanging fruits", have all but been exhausted and thus companies turn their attention to more complex and value-adding solutions and ideas. As e-business becomes more complex it also becomes more integrated into the companies and the day-to-day activities. This also demands more interaction and integration with business processes as well as external actors such as customers. E-business has the potential to intluence companies in all dimensions of the business model framework forwarded here; in the Operative platforms, in the Offering. and regarding the Market positions. Furthermore. it is argued that much of companies' contemporary business development has a clear e-business ingredient.

  • 18.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Towards a service-based business model - Key aspects for future competitive advantage2010In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 479-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many product-based companies are seeking to increase their competiveness by moving towards a service-based business model This research is based on a multiple case study of seven manufacturing companies and by using the business model concept it links managerial activities to a service innovation framework to emphasise how companies can best take advantage of a new service based business model Findings indicate that corn panies need to focus on all areas of their business models in a holistic fashion, and not just change isolated elements Among other challenges, companies must develop their abilities to build relationships with customers, to visualize the intangible value of their service offerings, and to advance a dynamic service offering portfolio that is adaptive to changing customer needs

  • 19.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brege, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The next step for e-business among mature and established companies: a focus on revenue and differentiation instead of costs2008In: International Journal of Electronic Business, ISSN 1470-6067, E-ISSN 1741-5063, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 462-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: For brick and mortar companies, e-business has primarily been used to lower transaction costs. Reasons for this are the relatively low risks involved, the rather unsophisticated understanding of the technology among top management, and that cost reductions provide an easy and measurable return on investment. Today, however, there is a clear trend that shows that brick and mortar companies are using e-business not only to enable growth through extended and refined offerings but also to expand their markets. Based on a study of two industrial brick and mortar companies this paper explores possible avenues for companies to extend their offerings and market by using e-business.

  • 20.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlborg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Stockholm University.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service selling in industrial organizations: An exploratory study of challenges and opportunities2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Development of Industrial Service Offerings - A Processual Framework2008In: AMA ServSIG International Research Conference,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Development of industrial service offerings: a process framework2009In: JOURNAL OF SERVICE MANAGEMENT, ISSN 1757-5818, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 156-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to propose a service development process that is adapted to manufacturing companies and to discuss its implications for companies with a traditional focus on product development and product sales. Design/methodology/approach - The paper looks at new service development (NSD) literature and argues for a rationale to study NSD processes in a manufacturing context. Next, a generic NSD framework for manufacturing companies is presented. Examples are given based on an explorative multiple case study (ten companies) with in-depth interviews and focus groups. The analysis reveals organizational requirements and other critical factors related to each stage of the NSD process. Findings - A four-stage service offering development framework is presented. Critical aspects of NSD in a manufacturing context are highlighted. The importance of considering both NSD and new product development (NPD) together is also emphasized. Research limitations/implications - The limitations are based primarily on methodology; the case studies focused only on the service organizations of the manufacturing companies studied. Practical implications - Managers need to be aware of the inter-relationship that exists between NSD and NPD and on the specificities of service development in companies where an industrial logic dominates. A number of managerial implications are proposed and discussed. Originality/value - The paper emphasizes the importance of latter stages in NSD, something that has not previously been extensively studied or addressed. In addition, to explicitly discuss NSD in a manufacturing context is novel.

  • 23.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Editorial: Service innovation in business-­‐to-­‐business firms2014In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 93-95Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    How World Leading Manufacturers Can Achieve Differentiation Through E-Business: New Services, Enhanced Relationships, and Reduced Costs2007In: 18th Information Resources Management Association International Conference, Vancouver, Canada: Managing Worldwide Operations and Communications with Information Technology, Hershey, New York: IGI Global , 2007, p. 502-506Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    E-business development is today driven by mature and established companies and is becoming an important tool to increase competitive advantage and to sustain profitability. This paper investigates how world-leading manufacturers can achieve differentiation through their use of e-business. Many companies use e-business as vehicles to launch new information-based service, as an important enabler to enhance and deepen customer relationships, and to reduce costs associated with customer management. Using e-business in this way will increase the opportunities for differentiation and create sustainable competitive advantage. Successful employment of e-business creates services that retain current customers and attract new ones as well as justifies premium prices and keeps low-cost competitors in check.

  • 25.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Introduction2009In: Creating Business out of Industrial Offerings: Findings From Market Leading B2B Companies, Solna: MTC , 2009, 1, p. 13-19Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    Service Driven Business Model Innovation: Organizing the Shift from a Product-based to a Service-centric Business Model2015In: Business Model Innovation: The Organizational Dimension / [ed] Nicolai Foss, Tina Saebi, Oxford University Press, 2015, 1, p. 191-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    • Features contributions by leading international authors on the topics of business model and business model innovation
    • The first sustained and focused inquiry into the organizational dimension of business model innovation
    • Covers areas of business strategy, innovation and organizational change

    Business model innovation is an important source of competitive advantage and corporate renewal. An increasing number of companies have to innovate their business models, not just because of competitive forces but also because of the ongoing change from product-based to service-based business models. Yet, business model innovation also involves organizational change process that challenges existing processes, structures and modes of control.This volume features thirteen chapters written by authorities on business model innovation. The specific angle, and the novel feature of this book, is to thoroughly examine the organizational dimension of business model innovation. Drawing on organizational theory and empirical observation, the contributors specifically highlight organizational design aspects of business model innovation, focusing on how reward systems, power distributions, routines and standard operating procedures, the allocation of authority, and other aspects of organizational structure and control should be designed to support the business model the firm chooses. Also discussed is how existing organizational structures, capabilities, beliefs, cultures and so on influence the firm's ability to flexibly change to new business models.

    Readership: Researchers and academics in business and management interested in business strategy, innovation and organizational change; Practitioners, consultants and executives involved with implementation of new business models

  • 27.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Service innovation in product-centric firms: a multidimensional business model perspective2014In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This article aims to investigate the nature and characteristics of business model elements required for successful service innovation. The authors examine which unique resources and capabilities product-centric firms should develop and deploy to pursue service innovation.

    Design/methodology/approach – Data collected from several research projects support iterations across empirical data and theory, in an abductive process. Empirical data come from product-centric firms; interviews and focus groups were the main data collection methods.

    Findings – Specific resources and capabilities are needed for the proposed business model elements, as defined by the overarching strategy and structure. Firms can approach the process of service innovation from different starting points and sequences, depending on the context.

    Research limitations/implications – Because it takes a synthesizing approach, this research lacks some detail. By taking a business model approach with a holistic perspective, it forgoes detailed descriptions to provide greater breadth.

    Practical implications – Managers can use business models as tools to visualize changes, which should increase internal transparency, understanding, and awareness of service opportunities and necessary changes. Dependencies exist among elements; a change in one element likely affects the others. This study provides insights into which efforts are necessary and offers managers a guiding framework.

    Originality/value – By providing a multidimensional perspective on service innovation, this study merges various previous research into a synthesized discussion. Combining a resources and capabilities perspective with a business model framework also leads to new insights regarding service innovation and associated activities.

  • 28.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Shifting from Product Sales to Offerings - Approaching Customers from Two Directions2008In: European Marketing Academy EMAC Conference,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 29.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brashear Alejandro, Thomas
    University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, USA.
    Adding services to product-based portfolios: Adding services to product-based portfolios: An exploration of the implications for the sales function2015In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 372-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The objective of this research is to explore the implications for the sales function of the infusion of services by formerly product-based firms. In particular, it aims at identifying the changes that need to be made at the sales-function level if the services are to be successfully sold.Design/Methodology: This research is an exploratory qualitative case study. Data were collected by focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with relevant managers in three large multinational companies based in Northern Europe, which were pursuing service-led growth. Findings: The effects of service infusion processes on the sales function could be seen with respect to the three parts of the analytical framework: organization, roles, and competences. The results illustrate the need for a changed perspective with respect to all three parts, if a product-based firm is to be successful in the infusing of associated services into its portfolio of offerings. Analysis of the results identifies key operational initiatives that management needs to understand and implement when corporate and marketing strategies increasingly focus on service-led growth.Research limitations:The study was exploratory and vendor centric, which means that it did not quantitatively assess the results or directly involve the customers at whom the services were directed. Also, the choice of business-to-business firms limits the capacity to generalize the findings. Originality/Value:Whereas relationship-based and value-based selling are approaches more geared to the sales-force level, the study reported in this paper set out to understand fundamental differences at the sales-function level when firms pursue service-led growth. The findings suggest that the realignment of corporate strategy towards an increased focus on services may have far-reaching implications for the sales function.

  • 30.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlborg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An increased focus on service selling: Implications for the sales function2011In: QUIS 12, 2011, p. 136-139Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Visualization of service-enhanced offerings - empirical findings from the manufacturing industry2008In: 17 Annual Frontiers in Service Conference, American Marketing Association,2008, 2008, p. 65-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 32.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics .
    Visualization strategies for service offerings: empirical findings from the manufacturing industry2009In: CBIM Academic Workshop,2009, Atlanta: CBIM , 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualizing Industrial Offerings2009In: Creating Business out of Industrial Offerings: Findings From Market Leading B2B Companies, 2009, 1, p. 71-91Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nordin, Fredrik
    Stockholm University.
    Visualizing the value of service-based offerings: Empirical findings from the manufacturing industry2012In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 538-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore strategies for visualizing the value of service-based offerings in a B2B context. By taking a process perspective on the offering life cycle, this paper also aims at distinguishing which visualization strategies are most appropriate using at which life-cycle stages.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study employed a qualitative, multiple-case study research design involving five manufacturing firms.

    Findings – Primary findings are that firms need to make use of several different visualization strategies depending on, among other things, the key stakeholders and also where the firm's offering is currently positioned in the service-based offering life cycle.

    Research limitations/implications – While the empirical data is from only one sector – i.e. manufacturing – managers from other B2B sectors should have an interest in the results and the key aspects identified. Further research could also establish linkages to performance metrics.

    Originality/value – Visualization strategies have been relatively rarely studied from a B2B perspective, and the process dimension, especially, is novel.

  • 35.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Parment, Anders
    Stockholms univeristet.
    Marknadsföring mellan företag2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Marknadsföring handlar om att stödja kunderna i deras värdeskapande processer. I dag sker det genom att presentera innovativa erbjudanden och genom relationsbyggande i komplexa affärsnätverk. Författarna utgår från aktuell forskning och ger konkreta exempel för att visa hur såväl traditionell produktförsäljning som tjänster och avancerade helhetslösningar kan hanteras.

  • 36.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A dynamic capabilities approach to service infusion in manufacturing2009In: QUIS 11 (11th Quality in Services Symposium): Moving Forward with Service Quality, Wolfsburg, Germany: Ingolstadt School of Management , 2009, p. 331-340Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores key dynamic capabilities needed for industrial firms to become more service oriented, i.e. to increase the service content in the offerings. Applying a dynamic capabilities framework in a service context is novel and by doing this, new, valuable insights can be gained into the research on how to address the increasing service infusion in industrial firms. Based on an explorative, multiple case study (10 companies) with in-depth interviews and focus groups, seven dynamic capabilities are identified.

  • 37.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandberg, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enabling service innovation: A dynamic capabilities approach2013In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 66, no 8, p. 1063-1073Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for this article is the need for product-centric firms to compete in the market by adding services to their portfolio, which requires a greater focus on service innovation if they are to remain competitive. A major challenge associated with the shift from product-centeredness to a product and-service orientation is the management of the essential dynamic capabilities of sensing, seizing, and reconfiguring needed for service innovation. The research study reported identifies key microfoundations forming the basis of successful realignment of a firm's dynamic capabilities so as to achieve a better fit with service innovation activities. Eight qualitative case studies of product-centric firms form the basis of the study. The findings make three primary contributions to the body of knowledge. First, they extend the existing literature on dynamic capabilities by specifically discussing microfoundations related to service innovation. Second, the study extends existing work on service innovation into the manufacturing industries by identifying the key microfoundations in that context. Third, the research provides empirical evidence of dynamic capabilities in practice, especially in product-centric settings in which the service context is novel.

  • 38.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wendelin, Robert
    Get your service ducks in a row2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wendelin, Robert
    Get your service ducks in a row: In search for lost service excellence2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Identifying enabling mechanisms for the implementation of market orientation2016In: Extending Value Through Product, Service and Platform Innovations, 2016, p. 1-27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on market orientation in order to improve firm performance has during the last decades been both well, and widely, accepted as a necessity for remaining competitive. Even though the concept has been the focus of much research, recent studies suggest that practitioners find it difficult to interpret the market orientation concept and, subsequently, find it hard to implement in their organizations. The actual implementation of market orientation is also a relatively unexplored area within marketing. The majority of research around market orientation has instead tended to focus on other issues such as to measure and link performance to the development of the actual concept rather than implementation aspects and processes.This article identifies four enabling mechanisms for the implementation of market orientation. It forwards a framework to advance understanding of the actual implementation and effects of market orientation. The framework – consisting of issues focusing on effects on an internal, a customer, and a market level – aims to increase the understanding of how a successful implementation of market orientation can be achieved.Findings are developed through an in-depth longitudinal case study of a B2B firm implementing market orientation. As such, the findings are well grounded in, and provide insights into, managers’ real challenges, as well as offering opportunities to generate new insights for academia. By studying the market orientation implementation process, four mechanisms that enable the implementation is, among other things, identified; 1) Top management as a change champion, 2) A coordinating ICT platform, 3) The redesign of the offering structure (portfolio), and 4) A multi-layered organizational structure.

  • 41.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Local and regional energy companies offering energy services: Key activities and implications for the business model2016In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 171, p. 491-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy services play a key role in increasing energy efficiency in the industry. The key actors in these services are the local and regional energy companies that are increasingly implementing energy services as part of their market offering and developing service portfolios. Although expectations for energy services have been high, progress has so far been limited, and many companies offering energy services, including energy companies, are experiencing difficulties in implementing energy services and providing them to the market. Overall, this research examines what is needed for local and regional energy companies to successfully implement energy services (and consequently provide them to the market). In doing this, a two-stage process is used: first, we identify key activities for the successful implementation of energy services, and second, we aggregate the findings to the business model level. This research demonstrates that to succeed in implementing energy services, an energy company may need to renew parts or all of its existing product-based business model, formulate a new business model, or develop coexisting multiple business models. By discussing two distinct business model innovation processes, this research demonstrates that there can be different paths to success.

  • 42.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ottosson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Carlborg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Unraveling firm-level activities for shaping markets2018In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 68, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the marketing literature increasingly construes markets as malleable entities, research studies of ‘marketshaping’strategies have gained increasing attention in recent years. Those are proactive, deliberate initiativeswhich a firm takes with the aim of re-shaping an operating environment comprising direct customers, customers'customers, and other actors such as its competitors. Our study derives a theoretical framework for marketshapingfrom the existing literature and an in-depth case study of one market-leading firm in the steel industry,which has been working actively in the shaping of a market. Analysis of the responses of a range of experiencedexecutive staff to unstructured and semi-structured interviews shows, among other things, that in order to shapethe market, the firm performed many individual and aggregated activities at three levels of influence – system,market offer and technology – with various actors in the market in focus. These findings are the basis of aproposed activity framework for the proactive shaping of a market: that is, what firms can do in order to shapean existing market, drive growth and create sustainable competitive advantage.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-09-21 17:00
  • 43.
    Kindström, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics, Industrial marketing.
    Rehme, Jakob
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Economics.
    Value Creation and Pricing in After Sales Services - The impact of ICT2006In: The International Conference on Information Technology in Business ITIB,2006, Warsawa: Warsaw Agricultural University , 2006, p. 201-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brehmer, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Logistics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Managing industrial service offerings: requirements on content and processes2009In: International Journal of Services Technology and Management, ISSN 1460-6720, E-ISSN 1741-525X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 42-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a typology for industrial service offerings, inter-relating service scope (degree of bundling), service focus (level of customer integration), and service process interfaces. Different forms of industrial services and the impact of information and communication technology on the three service dimensions are discussed, and requirements are identified related to the expansion of services. It is suggested that bundled and process-orientated services hold a major potential for manufacturing companies and can facilitate the creation of competitive advantage and long-term relationships with customers. Increased knowledge of the customers’ installed base and business processes enables better customisation of the service offerings. Even if more emphasis is put on standardising and formalising central and local processes, companies need to recognise local differences among subsidiaries.

  • 45.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Reconfiguration of value propositions: Service-based value through transitive triads2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Service innovation in manufacturing: A business model perspective2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Hanken School of Economics.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Servitization in manufacturing firms: A business model perspective2013In: Proceedings of the Spring Servitization Conference (SSC2013) / [ed] Tim Baines, Ben Clegg, David Harrison, 2013, p. 2-7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Three-way value propositions: Going beyond the supplier-customer dyad2009In: QUIS 11 (11th Quality in Services Symposium): Moving Forward with Service Quality, Wolfsburg, Germany: Ingolstadt School of Management , 2009, p. 362-371Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In marketing theory, value propositions tend to be viewed mainly from a dyadic perspective; i.e. value propositions are conceptualized as reciprocal promises of value between customer and supplier. However, there are limitations to the concept of two-way value propositions, especially in multi-party dealings. As a response to existing conceptualizations, we introduce the concept of three-way value propositions and give examples of key aspects of it. The paper contributes to marketing theory and particularly to theory on the service infusion in manufacturing by showing how different dimensions of the value proposition and relationships change as manufacturing companies extend their service portfolios.

  • 49.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Three-way Value Propositions: Service-based Value through Transitive Triads2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kindström, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tjänster och helhetslösningar: Nya affärsmodeller för konkurrenskraft2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att värja sig mot ökad konkurrens och prispress på produktmarknaderna räcker det inte längre att enbart ha det bästa produkterbjudandet. Produktföretag måste i ännu högre grad än i dag förstå kundens verksamhet och vara innovativa, vilket innebär att den strategiska betydelsen av att erbjuda konkurrenskraftiga tjänster och helhetslösningar ökar. Dessa omfattar ett brett spektrum av erbjudanden, från traditionella eftermarknadstjänster till processorienterade funktionslösningar.Boken utgår från aktuell marknadsförings- och managementteori och baseras på studier av företag som är verksamma i många olika branscher och som i olika hög grad arbetar med tjänster. Den vänder sig både till dig som är student inom marknadsföring, affärsutveckling och strategi, och till dig som arbetar med dessa frågor inom näringslivet.

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