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  • 1.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    1School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK..
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony C.
    1School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK..
    In situ study of surface exploration by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides) using imaging surface plasmon resonanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) was employed to investigate the interfacial adhesion phenomena that occur during the exploration of immersed surfaces by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides). It was hypothesised that since the footprint material used by cyprids for temporary adhesion has previously been related to a large cuticular glycoprotein (SIPC), the passive deposition of cyprid footprints and the binding of SIPC to surfaces might correlate. Increased surface exploration (and footprint deposition) has also been related to increased likelihood of settlement in barnacle cyprids. If a correlation between footprint deposition and SIPC binding were to exist, therefore, there would be potential for the development of a high‐throughput assay to determine the efficacy of putative antifouling chemistries against cyprids prior to, or instead of, lengthy bio‐assays. Footprints were deposited in large numbers on carboxyl‐terminated self‐assembled monolayers (SAMs) and in very small numbers on ethylene glycol‐containing SAMs and hydrogel coatings. SIPC binding also followed the same trend. An exception to the correlation was an amineterminated SAM that accumulated few cyprid footprints, but bound SIPC strongly. It is concluded that there is great potential for the iSPR technique to be used in the evaluation of putatively non‐fouling surfaces as well as improving our understanding of the nature of the cyprid footprint material and its interactions with surfaces of different chemistry. However, the use of SIPC binding as a predictor of footprint accumulation/likelihood of settlement of cyprids to surfaces would be premature at this stage without first understanding the exceptions highlighted in this study.

  • 2.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University.
    Real-Time Quantification of Microscale Bioadhesion Events In situ Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance (iSPR)2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 2085-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From macro- to nanoscales, adhesion phenomena are all-pervasive in nature yet remain poorly understood. In recent years, studies of biological adhesion mechanisms, terrestrial and marine, have provided inspiration for "biomimetic" adhesion strategies and important insights for the development of fouling-resistant materials. Although the focus of most contemporary bioadhesion research is on large organisms such as marine mussels, insects and geckos, adhesion events on the micro/nanoscale are critical to our understanding of important underlying mechanisms. Observing and quantifying adhesion at this scale is particularly relevant for the development of biomedical implants and in the prevention of marine biofouling. However, such characterization has so far been restricted by insufficient quantities of material for biochemical analysis and the limitations of contemporary imaging techniques. Here, we introduce a recently developed optical method that allows precise determination of adhesive deposition by microscale organisms in situ and in real time; a capability not before demonstrated. In this extended study we used the cypris larvae of barnacles and a combination of conventional and imaging surface plasmon resonance techniques to observe and quantify adhesive deposition onto a range of model surfaces (CH(3)-, COOH-, NH(3)-, and mPEG-terminated SAMs and a PEGMA/HEMA hydrogel). We then correlated this deposition to passive adsorption of a putatively adhesive protein from barnacles. In this way, we were able to rank surfaces in order of effectiveness for preventing barnacle cyprid exploration and demonstrate the importance of observing the natural process of adhesion, rather than predicting surface effects from a model system. As well as contributing fundamentally to the knowledge on the adhesion and adhesives of barnacle larvae, a potential target for future biomimetic glues, this method also provides a versatile technique for laboratory testing of fouling-resistant chemistries.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aldred, Nick
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for in situ studies of the surface exploration of marine organisms2009In: BIOINTERPHASES, ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface interactions of exploring cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides were studied in situ using imaging surface plasmon resonance. It was demonstrated how the deposition of a proteinaceous adhesive could be followed in real time as the cyprids explored and temporarily attached to a surface. Furthermore, the amount of protein left on the surface when the cyprids moved on could be quantified. Clear differences were demonstrated between an oligo(ethyleneglycol) coated surface and a bare gold substrate. It is anticipated that this technique will be a valuable tool in the development of novel surface chemistries that can prevent biofouling.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gradient Hydrogel Matrix for Microarray and Biosensor Applications: An Imaging SPR Study2009In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 142-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A biosensor matrix based on UV-initiated graft copolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate has been studied using imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR). By using a photo mask and a programmable shutter to vary the exposure time laterally, a gradient of matrix spots with physical thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers was generated. To maximize the dynamic range, imaging SPR was employed in wavelength interrogation mode. By finding the minimum in the reflectance spectra from each pixel of an image, SPR wavelength maps were constructed. The shift in SPR wavelength upon biospecific interaction was then measured both as a function of matrix thickness and composition. The performance of the matrix was evaluated in terms of immobilization of human serum albumin, biomolecular interaction with its antibody, and nonspecific binding of human fibrinogen. In addition, a low molecular weight interaction pair based on a synthetic polypeptide and calmodulin was also studied to explore the size selectivity of the hydrogel matrix. Our results show that the gradient matrix exhibits excellent properties for quick evaluation and screening of optimal hydrogel performance. The mixed hydrogel matrices display very low levels of nonspecific binding. It is also evident that the low molecular weight calmodulin is capable of freely diffusing and interacting throughout the entire hydrogel matrix, whereas the much larger albumin and its corresponding antibody, in particular, are partly/completely hindered from penetrating the interior of the matrix. This size-selectivity is attributed to a significant UV-initiated cross-linking or branching of the matrix during fabrication and/or protein mediated multipoint attachment during immobilization.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Imaging surface plasmon resonance studies of hydrogel and gradient surfaces for biosensor and array applications2008In: Europtrode IX,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Swelling of grafted poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels: a neutron re°ectivity studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels are used to enhance biocompatibility and reduce inflammation in biomedical applications, and as area-enlarging matrices in bioanalytical devices. For either of these applications, the structure of the hydrogel is important for the function, and thus structural understanding of hydrogels in their wet state is highly relevant for the use and development of these materials. Also, processing of these materials is frequently made in ambient air, and it is of interest to relate the properties of dry, or humid air-swollen hydrogels, to their wet properties.

    We use neutron reflectometry to follow the swelling of hydrogels in air of controlled humidity. Comparing hydrogels prepared on silica and gold substrates { both of relevance to bioanalytical applications { we observe that the swelling is different, reflecting a structural difference between these polymers, but that the water content of the polymer films near saturation is near 33% in both cases. Upon immersion in water, the swelling is estimated to approximately 2 x the dry thickness of the polymer, though a consistent quantitative determination of the polymer profile could not be made. Finally, we observe that the hydrogels are unaffected by either positively and negatively charged proteins.

  • 7.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    D`Souza, Fraddry
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Donnelly, Glen
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Bruin, Anouk
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Willemsen, Peter R
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Su, Xueju J
    University of Dundee.
    Wang, Su
    University of Dundee.
    Zhao, Qi
    University of Dundee.
    Hederos, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resistance of Galactoside-Terminated Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers to Marine Fouling Organisms2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 3890-3901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of omega-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

  • 8.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, J.A.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Interactions of algal spores and diatoms with mixed synthetic peptide SAMs2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Ye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J A
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactions of Zoospores of Ulva linza with Arginine-Rich Oligopeptide Monolayers2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 9375-9383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported oil the strong interactions of zoospores of the green alga, Ulva linza with all arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [Biofouling 2008, 24, 303-312], where the arginine-rich peptide induced not only high spore settlement, but also a form of abnormal settlement, or "pseudo-settlement", whereby it proportion of spores do not go through the normal process of surface exploration, adhesive exocytosis, and loss of flagella. Further. it was demonstrated that both the total number of settled spores and the fraction of pseudosettled spores were related to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. Here we present a further investigation of the interactions of zoospores of ulva with a set of oligomeric, de nom designed, arginine-rich peptides, specifically aimed to test the effect of peptide primary structure on the interaction. Via variations in the peptide length and by permutations in the amino acid sequences, we gain further insight into the spore-surface interactions. The interpretation of the biological assays is supported by physicochemical characterization of the SAMs using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurement. Results confirm the importance of arginine residues for the anomalous pseudosettlement, and we found that settlement is modulated by variations in both the total length and peptide primary structure. To elucidate the Causes of the anomalous settlement and the possible relation to peptide-membrane interactions, we also compared the settlement of the "naked" zoospores of Ulva(which present it lipoprotein membrane to the exterior without a discrete polysaccharide cell wall), with the settlement of diatoms (unicellular algae that are surrounded by it silica cell wall), onto the peptide SAMs. Cationic SAMs do not notably affect settlement (attachment), adhesion strength, or viability of diatom cells, Suggesting that the effect of the peptides on zoospores of Ulva is mediated via specific peptide-membrane interactions.

  • 10.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hydrogel coatings for biomedical and biofouling applications2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many applications share a substantial and yet unmet need for prediction and control of interactions between surfaces and proteins or living cells. Examples are blood-contacting biomaterials, biosensors, and non-toxic anti-biofouling coatings for ship hulls. The main focus of this thesis work has been the synthesis, characterization and properties of a group of coatings, designed for such applications. Many types of substrates, particularly plastics, were coated directly with ultrathin, hydrophilic polymer coatings, using a newly developed polymerization method initiated by short-wavelength ultraviolet light.

    The thesis contains eight papers and an introduction aimed to provide a context for the research work. The common theme, discussed and analyzed throughout the work, has been the minimization of non-specific binding of proteins to surfaces, thereby limiting the risk of uncontrolled attachment of cells and higher organisms. This has mainly been accomplished through the incorporation of monomer units bearing poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains in the coatings. Such PEG-containing “protein resistant” coatings have been used in this work as matrices for biosensor applications, as blood-contacting inert surfaces and as antibiofouling coatings for marine applications, with excellent results. The properties of the coatings, and their interactions with proteins and cells, have been thoroughly characterized using an array of techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and neutron reflectometry. In addition, other routes to fabricate coatings with high protein resistance have also been utilized. For instance, the versatility of the fabrication method has enabled the design of gradients with varying electrostatic charge, affecting the protein adsorption and leading to protein resistance in areas where the charges are balanced.

    This thesis also describes a novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for the investigation of the surface exploration behavior of marine biofouling organisms, in particular barnacle larvae. This technique allows for real-time assessment of the rate of surface exploration and the deposition of protein-based adhesives onto surfaces, a process which was previously very difficult to investigate experimentally. In this thesis, the method was applied to several model surface chemistries, including the hydrogels described above. The new method promises to provide insights into the interactions between biofouling organisms and a surface during the critical stages prior to permanent settlement, hopefully facilitating the development of antibiofouling coatings for marine applications.

    List of papers
    1. Photografted poly(ethylene glycol) matrix for affinity interaction studies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photografted poly(ethylene glycol) matrix for affinity interaction studies
    2007 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based matrix for studies of affinity interactions is developed and demonstrated. The PEG matrix, less than 0.1 μm thick, is graft copolymerized onto a cycloolefin polymer from a mixture of PEG methacrylates using a free radical reaction initiated by UV light at 254 nm. The grafting process is monitored in real time, and characteristics such as thickness, homogeneity, relative composition, photostability, and performance in terms of protein resistance in complex biofluids and sensor qualities are investigated with null ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance. The matrix is subsequently modified to contain carboxyl groups, thereby making it possible to immobilize ligands in a controlled and functional manner. Human serum albumin and fibrinogen are immobilized and successfully detected by antibody recognition using surface plasmon resonance. The results are encouraging and suggest that the PEG matrix is suitable for biochip and biosensor applications in demanding biofluids.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14606 (URN)10.1021/bm060685g (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-10-12 Created: 2007-10-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    2. Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Surfaces for Antifouling Applications in Marine and Freshwater Environments
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Surfaces for Antifouling Applications in Marine and Freshwater Environments
    Show others...
    2008 (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 2775-2783Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

       

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43901 (URN)10.1021/bm800547m (DOI)75058 (Local ID)75058 (Archive number)75058 (OAI)
    Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Lateral Control of Protein Adsorption on Charged Polymer Gradients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lateral Control of Protein Adsorption on Charged Polymer Gradients
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 3755-3762Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and protein adsorption behavior of charged polymer gradients. The thin gradient films were fabricated by a two-step technique using UV-initiated free-radical polymerization in a reactor with a moving shutter. A homogeneous layer of cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) was first formed, followed by a layer of oppositely charged poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) with a continuously increasing thickness. Adsorption from protein solutions as well as human blood plasma was investigated by imaging surface plasmon resonance and infrared microscopy. The results showed excessive protein adsorption in the areas where one of the polymers dominated the composition, while there was a clear minimum at an intermediate position of the gradient. The charge of the surface was estimated by direct force measurements and found to correlate well with the protein adsorption, showing the lowest net charge in the same area as the protein adsorption minimum. We therefore hypothesize that a combination of the charged polymers, in the right proportions, can result in a protein-resistant surface due to balanced charges.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17501 (URN)10.1021/la803443d (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-03-27 Created: 2009-03-27 Last updated: 2019-04-24
    4. Blood compatibility of photografted hydrogel coatings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blood compatibility of photografted hydrogel coatings
    2010 (English)In: ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, ISSN 1742-7061, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 2599-2608Article in journal (Other academic) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we have evaluated the haemocompatibility of different surface modifications, intended for biomaterials and biosensor applications. Polystyrene slides were coated with thin hydrogel films by self-initiated photografting of four different monomers. The hydrogel surface modifications were thoroughly characterized and tested for their protein resistance and ability to facilitate platelet adhesion and activation of the coagulation system. There was very little protein adsorption from human plasma on the hydrogels formed from poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Platelet adhesion tests performed under both static and flow conditions showed that these coatings also demonstrated very high resistance towards platelet adhesion. A small amount of platelets were found to adhere to hydrogels formed from ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (EGMEMA) and 2-carboxyethyl methacrylate (CEA). The polystyrene substrates themselves facilitated large amounts of platelet adhesion under both static and flow conditions. Utilizing a novel setup for imaging of coagulation, it was shown that none of the hydrogel surfaces activated the coagulation system to any great extent. We suggest that this simple fabrication method can be used to produce hydrogel coatings with unusually high blood compatibility, suitable for demanding biomaterials applications.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier Science B.V. Amsterdam, 2010
    Keywords
    Hydrogel; Biomaterial; Protein adsorption; Coagulation; Platelet
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19175 (URN)10.1016/j.actbio.2009.12.046 (DOI)000278868000027 ()
    Available from: 2009-06-12 Created: 2009-06-12 Last updated: 2011-03-23Bibliographically approved
    5. Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma
    Show others...
    2010 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 20, no 15, p. 2396-2403Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the preparation and properties of hydrogel surface chemistries enabling controlled and well-defined cell adhesion. The hydrogels may be prepared directly on plastic substrates, such as polystyrene slides or dishes, using a quick and experimentally simple photopolymerization process, compatible with photolithographic and microfluidic patterning methods. The intended application for these materials is as substrates for diagnostic cell adhesion assays, particularly for the analysis of human platelet function. The adsorption of fibrinogen and other platelet promoting molecules is shown to be completely inhibited by the hydrogel, provided that the film thickness is sufficient (>5 nm). This allows the hydrogel to be used as a matrix for presenting selected bioactive ligands without risking interference from nonspecifically adsorbed platelet adhesion factors, even in undiluted whole blood and blood plasma. This concept is demonstrated by preparing patterns of proteins on hydrogel surfaces, resulting in highly controlled platelet adhesion. Further insights into the protein immobilization and platelet adhesion processes are provided by studies using imaging surface plasmon resonance. The hydrogel surfaces used in this work appear to provide an ideal platform for cell adhesion studies of platelets, and potentially also for other cell types.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2010
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54301 (URN)10.1002/adfm.201000083 (DOI)000281058900003 ()
    Available from: 2010-03-08 Created: 2010-03-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12
    6. Swelling of grafted poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels: a neutron re°ectivity study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swelling of grafted poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels: a neutron re°ectivity study
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels are used to enhance biocompatibility and reduce inflammation in biomedical applications, and as area-enlarging matrices in bioanalytical devices. For either of these applications, the structure of the hydrogel is important for the function, and thus structural understanding of hydrogels in their wet state is highly relevant for the use and development of these materials. Also, processing of these materials is frequently made in ambient air, and it is of interest to relate the properties of dry, or humid air-swollen hydrogels, to their wet properties.

    We use neutron reflectometry to follow the swelling of hydrogels in air of controlled humidity. Comparing hydrogels prepared on silica and gold substrates { both of relevance to bioanalytical applications { we observe that the swelling is different, reflecting a structural difference between these polymers, but that the water content of the polymer films near saturation is near 33% in both cases. Upon immersion in water, the swelling is estimated to approximately 2 x the dry thickness of the polymer, though a consistent quantitative determination of the polymer profile could not be made. Finally, we observe that the hydrogels are unaffected by either positively and negatively charged proteins.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54302 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-08 Created: 2010-03-08 Last updated: 2017-01-11
    7. Novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for in situ studies of the surface exploration of marine organisms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for in situ studies of the surface exploration of marine organisms
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    2009 (English)In: BIOINTERPHASES, ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The surface interactions of exploring cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides were studied in situ using imaging surface plasmon resonance. It was demonstrated how the deposition of a proteinaceous adhesive could be followed in real time as the cyprids explored and temporarily attached to a surface. Furthermore, the amount of protein left on the surface when the cyprids moved on could be quantified. Clear differences were demonstrated between an oligo(ethyleneglycol) coated surface and a bare gold substrate. It is anticipated that this technique will be a valuable tool in the development of novel surface chemistries that can prevent biofouling.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53839 (URN)10.1116/1.3274060 (DOI)000273820500002 ()
    Available from: 2010-02-05 Created: 2010-02-05 Last updated: 2010-03-08
    8. In situ study of surface exploration by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides) using imaging surface plasmon resonance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>In situ study of surface exploration by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides) using imaging surface plasmon resonance
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) was employed to investigate the interfacial adhesion phenomena that occur during the exploration of immersed surfaces by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides). It was hypothesised that since the footprint material used by cyprids for temporary adhesion has previously been related to a large cuticular glycoprotein (SIPC), the passive deposition of cyprid footprints and the binding of SIPC to surfaces might correlate. Increased surface exploration (and footprint deposition) has also been related to increased likelihood of settlement in barnacle cyprids. If a correlation between footprint deposition and SIPC binding were to exist, therefore, there would be potential for the development of a high‐throughput assay to determine the efficacy of putative antifouling chemistries against cyprids prior to, or instead of, lengthy bio‐assays. Footprints were deposited in large numbers on carboxyl‐terminated self‐assembled monolayers (SAMs) and in very small numbers on ethylene glycol‐containing SAMs and hydrogel coatings. SIPC binding also followed the same trend. An exception to the correlation was an amineterminated SAM that accumulated few cyprid footprints, but bound SIPC strongly. It is concluded that there is great potential for the iSPR technique to be used in the evaluation of putatively non‐fouling surfaces as well as improving our understanding of the nature of the cyprid footprint material and its interactions with surfaces of different chemistry. However, the use of SIPC binding as a predictor of footprint accumulation/likelihood of settlement of cyprids to surfaces would be premature at this stage without first understanding the exceptions highlighted in this study.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54303 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-03-08 Created: 2010-03-08 Last updated: 2010-03-08
  • 11.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tai, Feng-i
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg , Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lateral Control of Protein Adsorption on Charged Polymer Gradients2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 3755-3762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and protein adsorption behavior of charged polymer gradients. The thin gradient films were fabricated by a two-step technique using UV-initiated free-radical polymerization in a reactor with a moving shutter. A homogeneous layer of cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) was first formed, followed by a layer of oppositely charged poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) with a continuously increasing thickness. Adsorption from protein solutions as well as human blood plasma was investigated by imaging surface plasmon resonance and infrared microscopy. The results showed excessive protein adsorption in the areas where one of the polymers dominated the composition, while there was a clear minimum at an intermediate position of the gradient. The charge of the surface was estimated by direct force measurements and found to correlate well with the protein adsorption, showing the lowest net charge in the same area as the protein adsorption minimum. We therefore hypothesize that a combination of the charged polymers, in the right proportions, can result in a protein-resistant surface due to balanced charges.

  • 12.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Conlan, Sheelagh L.
    Liu, Yunli
    Zhao, Qi
    DSouza, Fraddry
    Donnelly, GlenT.
    Willemsen, Peter R.
    Pettitt, Michala E.
    Callow, Maureen E.
    Callow, James A.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Poly(ethylene glycol)-Containing Hydrogel Surfaces for Antifouling Applications in Marine and Freshwater Environments2008In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 9, no 10, p. 2775-2783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 13.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Faxälv, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wallmark, Nanny
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Patterned Hydrogels for Controlled Platelet Adhesion from Whole Blood and Plasma2010In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 20, no 15, p. 2396-2403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the preparation and properties of hydrogel surface chemistries enabling controlled and well-defined cell adhesion. The hydrogels may be prepared directly on plastic substrates, such as polystyrene slides or dishes, using a quick and experimentally simple photopolymerization process, compatible with photolithographic and microfluidic patterning methods. The intended application for these materials is as substrates for diagnostic cell adhesion assays, particularly for the analysis of human platelet function. The adsorption of fibrinogen and other platelet promoting molecules is shown to be completely inhibited by the hydrogel, provided that the film thickness is sufficient (>5 nm). This allows the hydrogel to be used as a matrix for presenting selected bioactive ligands without risking interference from nonspecifically adsorbed platelet adhesion factors, even in undiluted whole blood and blood plasma. This concept is demonstrated by preparing patterns of proteins on hydrogel surfaces, resulting in highly controlled platelet adhesion. Further insights into the protein immobilization and platelet adhesion processes are provided by studies using imaging surface plasmon resonance. The hydrogel surfaces used in this work appear to provide an ideal platform for cell adhesion studies of platelets, and potentially also for other cell types.

  • 14.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Protein adsorption and surface patterning2010In: CURRENT OPINION IN COLLOID and INTERFACE SCIENCE, ISSN 1359-0294, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 499-509Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface patterning has become an important discipline of biologically oriented surface science over the past decades Many methods have been developed that allow the formation of patterns on the micro- and nanoscalle This Opinion discusses the role of protein adsorption in patterning technologies highlighting how it can be used as an integrated part of the patterning process how it can be controlled by patterns with appropriate properties and how it may lead to disruption of formed patterns if not properly accounted for Recent examples from literature are used to emphasize some of the most interesting developments in the field such as novel surface chemistries only allowing specific protein adsorption directed self-sorting adsorption of proteins on patterned surfaces and control of protein adsorption through nanopatterning

  • 15.
    Faxälv, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Tomas L.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Blood compatibility of photografted hydrogel coatings2010In: ACTA BIOMATERIALIA, ISSN 1742-7061, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 2599-2608Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we have evaluated the haemocompatibility of different surface modifications, intended for biomaterials and biosensor applications. Polystyrene slides were coated with thin hydrogel films by self-initiated photografting of four different monomers. The hydrogel surface modifications were thoroughly characterized and tested for their protein resistance and ability to facilitate platelet adhesion and activation of the coagulation system. There was very little protein adsorption from human plasma on the hydrogels formed from poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Platelet adhesion tests performed under both static and flow conditions showed that these coatings also demonstrated very high resistance towards platelet adhesion. A small amount of platelets were found to adhere to hydrogels formed from ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (EGMEMA) and 2-carboxyethyl methacrylate (CEA). The polystyrene substrates themselves facilitated large amounts of platelet adhesion under both static and flow conditions. Utilizing a novel setup for imaging of coagulation, it was shown that none of the hydrogel surfaces activated the coagulation system to any great extent. We suggest that this simple fabrication method can be used to produce hydrogel coatings with unusually high blood compatibility, suitable for demanding biomaterials applications.

  • 16.
    Fyrner, Timmy
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mangone, Alberto
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University, UK.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle Universitym, UK.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Saccharide-Functionalized Alkanethiols for Fouling-Resistant Self-Assembled Monolayers: Synthesis, Monolayer Properties, and Antifouling Behavior2011In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 27, no 24, p. 15034-15047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the synthesis of a series of mono-, di-, and trisaccharide-functionalized alkanethiols as well as the formation of fouling-resistant self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) from these. The SAls,,Is were characterized using ellipsometry, wetting measurements, and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (WAS). We show that the structure of the carbohydrate moiety affects the packing density and that this also alters the alkane chain organization. Upon increasing the size of the sugar moieties (from mono- to di- and trisaccharides), the structural qualities of the monolayers deteriorated with increasing disorder, and for the trisaccharide, slow reorganization dynamics in response to changes in the environmental polarity were observed. The antifouling properties of these SAMs were investigated through protein adsorption experiments from buffer solutions as well as settlement (attachment) tests using two common marine fouling species, zoospores of the green macroalga Ulva linza and cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. The SAMs showed overall good resistance to fouling by both the proteins and the tested marine organisms. To improve the packing density of the SAMs with bulky headgroups, we employed mixed SAMs where the saccharide-thiols are diluted with a filler molecule having a small 2-hydroxyethyl headgroup. This method also provides a means by which the steric availability of sugar moieties can be varied, which is of interest for specific interaction studies with surface-bound sugars. The results of the surface dilution study and the low nonspecific adsorption onto the SAMs both indicate the feasibility of this approach.

  • 17.
    Khranovskyy, Volodymyr
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Yakimova, Rositsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Surface morphology effects on the light-controlled wettability of ZnO nanostructures2012In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 258, no 20, p. 8146-8152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ZnO nanostructures of diverse morphology with shapes of corrals and cabbages as well as open and filled hexagons and sheaves prepared by APMOCVD technique, are investigated with water contact angle (CA) analysis. The as-grown ZnO nanostructures exhibit pure hydrophobic behavior, which is enhanced with the increase of the nanostructures surface area. The most hydrophobic structures (CA = 124 degrees) were found to be the complex nanosheaf, containing both the macro-and nanoscale features. It is concluded that the nanoscale roughness contributes significantly to the hydrophobicity increase. The character of wettability was possible to switch from hydrophobic-to-superhydrophilic state upon ultra violet irradiation. Both the rate and amplitude of the contact angle depend on the characteristic size of nanostructure. The observed effect is explained due to the semiconductor properties of zinc oxide enhanced by increased surface chemistry effect in nanostructures.

  • 18.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Photografted poly(ethylene glycol) matrix for affinity interaction studies2007In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based matrix for studies of affinity interactions is developed and demonstrated. The PEG matrix, less than 0.1 μm thick, is graft copolymerized onto a cycloolefin polymer from a mixture of PEG methacrylates using a free radical reaction initiated by UV light at 254 nm. The grafting process is monitored in real time, and characteristics such as thickness, homogeneity, relative composition, photostability, and performance in terms of protein resistance in complex biofluids and sensor qualities are investigated with null ellipsometry, infrared spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance. The matrix is subsequently modified to contain carboxyl groups, thereby making it possible to immobilize ligands in a controlled and functional manner. Human serum albumin and fibrinogen are immobilized and successfully detected by antibody recognition using surface plasmon resonance. The results are encouraging and suggest that the PEG matrix is suitable for biochip and biosensor applications in demanding biofluids.

  • 19.
    Liedberg, Bo
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Photografted PEG matrix for biosensor applications2006In: Proceedings of the 9th Biosensors Congress,2006, Columbus: American Chemical Society , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Tai, Feng-i
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Kagaku Analys AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sterner, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Susos AG, Dübendorf, Switzerland.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Insplorion AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. MariboHilleshög Research AB, Landskrona, Sweden.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Interaction Forces on Polyampholytic Hydrogel Gradient Surfaces2019In: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 5670-5681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rational design and informed development of nontoxic antifouling coatings requires a thorough understanding of the interactions between surfaces and fouling species. With more complex antifouling materials, such as composites or zwitterionic polymers, there follows also a need for better characterization of the materials as such. To further the understanding of the antifouling properties of charge-balanced polymers, we explore the properties of layered polyelectrolytes and their interactions with charged surfaces. These polymers were prepared via self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP); on top of a uniform bottom layer of anionic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), a cationic poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) thickness gradient was formed. Infrared microscopy and imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize chemical composition and swelling of the combined layer. Direct force measurements by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy were performed to investigate the forces between the polymer gradients and charged probes. The swelling of PMAA and PDMAEMA are very different, with steric and electrostatic forces varying in a nontrivial manner along the gradient. The gradients can be tuned to form a protein-resistant charge-neutral region, and we demonstrate that this region, where both electrostatic and steric forces are small, is highly compressed and the origin of the protein resistance of this region is most likely an effect of strong hydration of charged residues at the surface, rather than swelling or bulk hydration of the polymer. In the highly swollen regions far from charge-neutrality, steric forces dominate the interactions between the probe and the polymer. In these regions, the SIPGP polymer has qualitative similarities with brushes, but we were unable to quantitatively describe the polymer as a brush, supporting previous data suggesting that these polymers are cross-linked.

  • 21.
    Tai, Feng-I
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics.
    Sterner, Olof
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics.
    pH-control of the protein resistance of hydrogel gradient films2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Tai, Feng-i
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sterner, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    pH-control of the protein resistance of thin hydrogel gradient films2014In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, E-ISSN 1744-6848, Vol. 10, no 32, p. 5955-5964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the preparation and characterization of thin polyampholytic hydrogel gradient films permitting pH-controlled protein resistance via the regulation of surface charges. The hydrogel gradients are composed of cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) (PAEMA), and anionic poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) (PCEA) layers, which are fabricated by self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP). Using a two-step UV exposure procedure, a polymer thickness gradient of one component is formed on top of a uniform layer of the oppositely charged polymer. The swelling of the gradient films in water and buffers at different pH were characterized by imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry. The surface charge distribution and steric interactions with the hydrogel gradients were recorded by direct force measurement with colloidal-probe atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that formation of a charged polymer thickness gradient on top of a uniform layer of opposite charge can result in a region of charge-neutrality. This charge-neutral region is highly resistant to non-specific adsorption of proteins, and its location along the gradient can be controlled via the pH of the surrounding buffer. The pH-controlled protein adsorption and desorption was monitored in real-time by imaging surface plasmon resonance, while the corresponding redistribution of surface charge was confirmed by direct force measurements.

1 - 22 of 22
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