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  • 1. Aifa, Sami
    et al.
    Johansen, Knut
    Nilsson, Ulrica K
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Interactions between the juxtamembrane domain of the EGFR and calmodulin measured by surface plasmon resonance2002In: Cellular Signalling, ISSN 0898-6568, E-ISSN 1873-3913, Vol. 14, no 12, p. 1005-1013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One early response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is an increase in intracellular calcium. We have used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to study real-time interactions between the intracellular juxtamembrane (JM) region of EGFR and calmodulin. The EGFR-JM (Met644-Phe688) was expressed as a GST fusion protein and immobilised on a sensor chip surface. Calmodulin specifically interacts with EGFR-JM in a calcium-dependent manner with a high on and high off rate. Chemical modification of EGFR-JM by using arginine-selective phenylglyoxal or deletion of the basic segment Arg645-Arg657 inhibits the interaction. Phosphorylation of EGFR-JM by protein kinase C (PKC) or glutamate substitution of Thr654 inhibits the interaction, suggesting that PKC phosphorylation electrostatically interferes with calmodulin binding to basic arginine residues. Calmodulin binding was also inhibited by suramin. Our results suggest that EGFR-JM is essential for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated calcium-calmodulin signalling and for signal integration between other signalling pathways.

  • 2.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 576, Uppsala UniVersity, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assembly of Polypeptide-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles through a Heteroassociation- and Folding-Dependent Bridging2008In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 2473-2478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with a synthetic polypeptide, de novo-designed to associate with a charge complementary linker polypeptide in a folding-dependent manner. A heterotrimeric complex that folds into two disulphide-linked four-helix bundles is formed when the linker polypeptide associates with two of the immobilized peptides. The heterotrimer forms in between separate particles and induces a rapid and extensive aggregation with a well-defined interparticle spacing. The aggregated particles are redispersed when the disulphide bridge in the linker polypeptide is reduced.

  • 3.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nesterenko, Irina
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 599, Uppsala University, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Controlled Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles using De Novo Designed Polypeptide Scaffolds2008In: Proceedings SPIE, Vol. 6885, Photonic Biosensing and Microoptics, 2008, p. 688506-1-688506-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heterodimerization between designed helix-loop-helix polypeptides was utilized in order to assemble gold nanoparticles on planar substrates. The peptides were designed to fold into four-helix bundles upon dimerization. A Cys-residue in the loop region was used to immobilize one of the complementary peptides on a maleimide containing SAM on planar gold substrates whereas the second peptide was immobilized directly on gold nanoparticles. Introducing the peptide decorated particles over a peptide functionalized surface resulted in particle assembly. Further, citrate stabilized particles were assembled on amino-silane modified glass and silicon substrates. By subsequently introducing peptides and gold nanoparticles, particle-peptide hybrid multi layers could be formed.

  • 4.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nesterenko, Irina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 599, Uppsala UniVersity, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Folding Induced Assembly of Polypeptide Decorated Gold Nanoparticles2008In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 130, no 17, p. 5780-5788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversible assembly of gold nanoparticles controlled by the homodimerization and folding of an immobilized de novo designed synthetic polypeptide is described. In solution at neutral pH, the polypeptide folds into a helix–loop–helix four-helix bundle in the presence of zinc ions. When immobilized on gold nanoparticles, the addition of zinc ions induces dimerization and folding between peptide monomers located on separate particles, resulting in rapid particle aggregation. The particles can be completely redispersed by removal of the zinc ions from the peptide upon addition of EDTA. Calcium ions, which do not induce folding in solution, have no effect on the stability of the peptide decorated particles. The contribution from folding on particle assembly was further determined utilizing a reference peptide with the same primary sequence but containing both D and L amino acids. Particles functionalized with the reference peptide do not aggregate, as the peptides are unable to fold. The two peptides, linked to the nanoparticle surface via a cysteine residue located in the loop region, form submonolayers on planar gold with comparable properties regarding surface density, orientation, and ability to interact with zinc ions. These results demonstrate that nanoparticle assembly can be induced, controlled, and to some extent tuned, by exploiting specific molecular interactions involved in polypeptide folding.

  • 5.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tai, Feng-I
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Department of Biochemistry andOrganic Chemistry Uppsala University, BMC, Box 576, 75123 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Self-Assembly of Fibers and Nanorings from Disulfide-Linked Helix–Loop–Helix Polypeptides2008In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 47, no 30, p. 5554-5556Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Baltzer, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Synthetic de novo designed polypeptides for control of nanoparticle assembly and biosensing2007In: Bionanotechnology; from self-assembly to cellbiology,2007, London: Biochemical Society Transactions , 2007, p. 532-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         

  • 7.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Baltzer, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Towards novel functional materials and sensors using de novo designed polypeptides on gold nanoparticles2006In: Europtrode VIII,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 8.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aggregation-Induced Folding of a de novo Designed Polypeptide Immobilized on Gold Nanoparticles2006In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 128, no 7, p. 2194 -2195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication reports the first steps in the construction of a novel, nanoparticle-based hybrid material for biomimetic and biosensor applications. Gold nanoparticles were modified with synthetic polypeptides to enable control of the particle aggregation state in a switchable manner, and particle aggregation was, in turn, found to induce folding of the immobilized peptides.

  • 9.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Alpha helix-inducing dimerization of synthetic polypeptide scaffolds on gold - a model system for receptor mimicking and biosensing2004In: 8th World Congress on Biosensors,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Folding-induced aggregation of polypeptide-decorated gold nanoparticles - an nano-scale Lego for the construction of complex hybrid materials2004In: 5th International Conference on Biological Physics,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rydberg, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Immobilization and heterodimerisation of helix-loop-helix polypeptides on gold surfaces - a model system for peptide-surface interactions2003In: 1st World congress on Synthetic Receptors,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    Gryko, Piotr
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    Sepulveda, Borja
    Research Centre Nanosci and Nanotechnol CIN2 CSIC.
    Dick, John A. G.
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    Kirby, Nigel
    Australian Synchrotron.
    Heenan, Richard
    Rutherford Appleton Lab.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ryan, Mary P.
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    Stevens, Molly M.
    University of London Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine.
    Polypeptide Folding-Mediated Tuning of the Optical and Structural Properties of Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies2011In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 5564-5573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responsive hybrid nanomaterials with well-defined properties are of significant interest for the development of biosensors with additional applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery. Here, we present a detailed characterization using UV-vis spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering of a hybrid material comprised of polypeptide-decorated gold nanoparticles with highly controllable assembly properties. The assembly is triggered by a folding-dependent bridging of the particles mediated by the heteroassociation of immobilized helix-loop-helix polypeptides and a complementary nonlinear polypeptide present in solution. The polypeptides are de novo designed to associate and fold into a heterotrimeric complex comprised of two disulfide-linked four-helix bundles. The particles form structured assemblies with a highly defined interparticle gap (4.8 +/- 0.4 nm) that correlates to the size of the folded polypeptides. Transitions in particle aggregation dynamics, mass-fractal dimensions and ordering, as a function of particle size and the concentration of the bridging polypeptide, are observed; these have significant effects on the optical properties of the assemblies. The assembly and ordering of the particles are highly complex processes that are affected by a large number of variables including the number of polypeptides bridging the particles and the particle mobility within the aggregates. A fundamental understanding of these processes is of paramount interest for the development of novel hybrid nanomaterials with tunable structural and optical properties and for the optimization of nanoparticle-based colorimetric biodetection strategies.

  • 13.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry, BMC, Box 576, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Colorimetric Protein Sensing by Controlled Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Functionalized with Synthetic Receptors2009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, Vol. 5, no 21, p. 2445-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strategy for colorimetric sensing of proteins, based on the induced assembly of polypeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles, is described. Recognition was accomplished using a polypeptide sensor scaffold designed to specifically bind the model analyte, human carbonic anhydrase II (HCAII). The extent of particle aggregation, induced by the Zn2+-triggered dimerization and folding of a second polypeptide also present on the surface of the gold nanoparticle, gave a readily detectable colorimetric shift that was dependent on the concentration of the target protein. In the absence of HCAII, particle aggregation resulted in a major redshift of the plasmon peak whereas analyte binding prevented formation of dense aggregates, significantly reducing the magnitude of the redshift. The limit of detection of HCAII was estimated to be around 15 nM. The versatility of the technique was demonstrated using a second model system based on the recognition of a peptide sequence from the tobacco mosaic virus coat protein (TMVP by a recombinant antibody fragment. This strategy is proposed as a generic platform for robust and specific protein analysis that can be further developed for monitoring a wide range of target proteins.

  • 14.
    Aili, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Selegård, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Baltzer, Lars
    Uppsala University .
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Colorimetric sensing: Small 21/20092009In: Small, ISSN 1613-6810, E-ISSN 1613-6829, Vol. 5, no 21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The cover picture illustrates a novel concept for colorimetric protein sensing based on the controllable assembly of polypeptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles. Recognition of the analyte is accomplished by polypeptide-based synthetic receptors immobilized on gold nanoparticles. Also present on the particle surface is a de novo-designed helix-loop-helix polypeptide that homodimerizes and folds into four-helix bundles in the presence of Zn2+, resulting in particle aggregation. Analyte binding interferes with the folding-induced aggregation, giving rise to a clearly detectable colorimetric response.

  • 15.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    1School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK..
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony C.
    1School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK..
    In situ study of surface exploration by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides) using imaging surface plasmon resonanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) was employed to investigate the interfacial adhesion phenomena that occur during the exploration of immersed surfaces by barnacle cyprids (Semibalanus balanoides). It was hypothesised that since the footprint material used by cyprids for temporary adhesion has previously been related to a large cuticular glycoprotein (SIPC), the passive deposition of cyprid footprints and the binding of SIPC to surfaces might correlate. Increased surface exploration (and footprint deposition) has also been related to increased likelihood of settlement in barnacle cyprids. If a correlation between footprint deposition and SIPC binding were to exist, therefore, there would be potential for the development of a high‐throughput assay to determine the efficacy of putative antifouling chemistries against cyprids prior to, or instead of, lengthy bio‐assays. Footprints were deposited in large numbers on carboxyl‐terminated self‐assembled monolayers (SAMs) and in very small numbers on ethylene glycol‐containing SAMs and hydrogel coatings. SIPC binding also followed the same trend. An exception to the correlation was an amineterminated SAM that accumulated few cyprid footprints, but bound SIPC strongly. It is concluded that there is great potential for the iSPR technique to be used in the evaluation of putatively non‐fouling surfaces as well as improving our understanding of the nature of the cyprid footprint material and its interactions with surfaces of different chemistry. However, the use of SIPC binding as a predictor of footprint accumulation/likelihood of settlement of cyprids to surfaces would be premature at this stage without first understanding the exceptions highlighted in this study.

  • 16.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University.
    Real-Time Quantification of Microscale Bioadhesion Events In situ Using Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance (iSPR)2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 2085-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From macro- to nanoscales, adhesion phenomena are all-pervasive in nature yet remain poorly understood. In recent years, studies of biological adhesion mechanisms, terrestrial and marine, have provided inspiration for "biomimetic" adhesion strategies and important insights for the development of fouling-resistant materials. Although the focus of most contemporary bioadhesion research is on large organisms such as marine mussels, insects and geckos, adhesion events on the micro/nanoscale are critical to our understanding of important underlying mechanisms. Observing and quantifying adhesion at this scale is particularly relevant for the development of biomedical implants and in the prevention of marine biofouling. However, such characterization has so far been restricted by insufficient quantities of material for biochemical analysis and the limitations of contemporary imaging techniques. Here, we introduce a recently developed optical method that allows precise determination of adhesive deposition by microscale organisms in situ and in real time; a capability not before demonstrated. In this extended study we used the cypris larvae of barnacles and a combination of conventional and imaging surface plasmon resonance techniques to observe and quantify adhesive deposition onto a range of model surfaces (CH(3)-, COOH-, NH(3)-, and mPEG-terminated SAMs and a PEGMA/HEMA hydrogel). We then correlated this deposition to passive adsorption of a putatively adhesive protein from barnacles. In this way, we were able to rank surfaces in order of effectiveness for preventing barnacle cyprid exploration and demonstrate the importance of observing the natural process of adhesion, rather than predicting surface effects from a model system. As well as contributing fundamentally to the knowledge on the adhesion and adhesives of barnacle larvae, a potential target for future biomimetic glues, this method also provides a versatile technique for laboratory testing of fouling-resistant chemistries.

  • 17.
    Aldred, Nick
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Gohad, Neeraj V.
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Orihuela, Beatriz
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mount, Andrew
    Clemson University, SC USA .
    Rittschof, Dan
    Duke University, NC USA .
    Clare, Anthony S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Confocal microscopy-based goniometry of barnacle cyprid permanent adhesive2013In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 216, no 11, p. 1969-1972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological adhesives are materials of particular interest in the fields of bio-inspired technology and antifouling research. The adhesive of adult barnacles has received much attention over the years; however, the permanent adhesive of the cyprid - the colonisation stage of barnacles - is a material about which very little is presently known. We applied confocal laser-scanning microscopy to the measurement of contact angles between the permanent adhesive of barnacle cyprid larvae and self-assembled monolayers of OH- and CH3-terminated thiols. Measurement of contact angles between actual bioadhesives and surfaces has never previously been achieved and the data may provide insight into the physicochemical properties and mechanism of action of these functional materials. The adhesive is a dual-phase system post-secretion, with the behaviour of the components governed separately by the surface chemistry. The findings imply that the cyprid permanent adhesion process is more complex than previously thought, necessitating broad re-evaluation of the system. Improved understanding will have significant implications for the production of barnacle-resistant coatings as well as development of bio-inspired glues for niche applications.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ulrich, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Characterization of Surface Modifications using Voltammetry and Imaging SPR2006In: Europtrode VIII, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aldred, Nick
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Novel application of imaging surface plasmon resonance for in situ studies of the surface exploration of marine organisms2009In: BIOINTERPHASES, ISSN 1559-4106, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The surface interactions of exploring cyprids of the barnacle Semibalanus balanoides were studied in situ using imaging surface plasmon resonance. It was demonstrated how the deposition of a proteinaceous adhesive could be followed in real time as the cyprids explored and temporarily attached to a surface. Furthermore, the amount of protein left on the surface when the cyprids moved on could be quantified. Clear differences were demonstrated between an oligo(ethyleneglycol) coated surface and a bare gold substrate. It is anticipated that this technique will be a valuable tool in the development of novel surface chemistries that can prevent biofouling.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gradient Hydrogel Matrix for Microarray and Biosensor Applications: An Imaging SPR Study2009In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 142-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A biosensor matrix based on UV-initiated graft copolymerized poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate has been studied using imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR). By using a photo mask and a programmable shutter to vary the exposure time laterally, a gradient of matrix spots with physical thicknesses ranging from a few to tens of nanometers was generated. To maximize the dynamic range, imaging SPR was employed in wavelength interrogation mode. By finding the minimum in the reflectance spectra from each pixel of an image, SPR wavelength maps were constructed. The shift in SPR wavelength upon biospecific interaction was then measured both as a function of matrix thickness and composition. The performance of the matrix was evaluated in terms of immobilization of human serum albumin, biomolecular interaction with its antibody, and nonspecific binding of human fibrinogen. In addition, a low molecular weight interaction pair based on a synthetic polypeptide and calmodulin was also studied to explore the size selectivity of the hydrogel matrix. Our results show that the gradient matrix exhibits excellent properties for quick evaluation and screening of optimal hydrogel performance. The mixed hydrogel matrices display very low levels of nonspecific binding. It is also evident that the low molecular weight calmodulin is capable of freely diffusing and interacting throughout the entire hydrogel matrix, whereas the much larger albumin and its corresponding antibody, in particular, are partly/completely hindered from penetrating the interior of the matrix. This size-selectivity is attributed to a significant UV-initiated cross-linking or branching of the matrix during fabrication and/or protein mediated multipoint attachment during immobilization.

  • 21.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Larsson (Kaiser), Andréas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Imaging surface plasmon resonance studies of hydrogel and gradient surfaces for biosensor and array applications2008In: Europtrode IX,2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ulrich, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Imaging SPR for detection of local electrochemical processes on patterned surfaces2008In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 545-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) was used in conjunction with voltammetry to investigate the possibility of detecting local electrochemical processes in situ on chemically modified electrodes. More specifically, a pattern of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiocholesterol and 1-hexadecanethiol was microcontact printed on gold substrates, and the blocking characteristics on different parts of the pattern were investigated. The SPR images reflected the changes in the refractive index over the working electrode due to electrochemical processes, which in the present case showed the ability of the SAMs to impede faradaic reactions. The results show that differences in packing densities or porosity of SAMs in different regions of a patterned surface can be visualized as electrochemical images using iSPR. The strength of utilizing an optical detection method for electrochemical characterization lies in the ability to achieve lateral resolution in real-time. Electrochemical reactions can also be used to enhance the contrast in SPR images of thin layers of components with similar thicknesses and refractive indices.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Ulrich, Christian
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics.
    Characterization Of Surface Modifications Using Voltammetry Combined With Imaging SPR2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Andrésen, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jalal, Shah
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wang, Yi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Islam, Sohidul
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Jarl, Anngelica
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular genetics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wretlind, Bengt
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mårtensson, Lars-Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biochemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sunnerhagen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Critical biophysical properties in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux gene regulator MexR are targeted by mutations conferring multidrug resistance2010In: Protein Science, ISSN 0961-8368, E-ISSN 1469-896X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 680-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The self-assembling MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump system, encoded by the mexO operon, contributes to facile resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by actively extruding multiple antimicrobials. MexR negatively regulates the mexO operon, comprising two adjacent MexR binding sites, and is as such highly targeted by mutations that confer multidrug resistance (MDR). To understand how MDR mutations impair MexR function, we studied MexR-wt as well as a selected set of MDR single mutants distant from the proposed DNA-binding helix. Although DNA affinity and MexA-MexB-OprM repression were both drastically impaired in the selected MexR-MDR mutants, MexR-wt bound its two binding sites in the mexO with high affinity as a dimer. In the MexR-MDR mutants, secondary structure content and oligomerization properties were very similar to MexR-wt despite their lack of DNA binding. Despite this, the MexR-MDR mutants showed highly varying stabilities compared with MexR-wt, suggesting disturbed critical interdomain contacts, because mutations in the DNA-binding domains affected the stability of the dimer region and vice versa. Furthermore, significant ANS binding to MexR-wt in both free and DNA-bound states, together with increased ANS binding in all studied mutants, suggest that a hydrophobic cavity in the dimer region already shown to be involved in regulatory binding is enlarged by MDR mutations. Taken together, we propose that the biophysical MexR properties that are targeted by MDR mutations stability, domain interactions, and internal hydrophobic surfaces are also critical for the regulation of MexR DNA binding.

  • 25.
    Arslan Yildiz, Ahu
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute Polymer Research, Germany .
    Hakan Yildiz, Umit
    Nanyang Technology University, Singapore .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin
    Max Planck Institute Polymer Research, Germany .
    Biomimetic membrane platform: Fabrication, characterization and applications2013In: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, ISSN 0927-7765, E-ISSN 1873-4367, Vol. 103, p. 510-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A facile method for assembly of biomimetic membranes serving as a platform for expression and insertion of membrane proteins is described. The membrane architecture was constructed in three steps: (i) assembly/printing of alpha-laminin peptide (P19) spacer on gold to separate solid support from the membrane architecture; (ii) covalent coupling of different lipid anchors to the P19 layer to serve as stabilizers of the inner leaflet during bilayer formation; (iii) lipid vesicle spreading to form a complete bilayer. Two different lipid membrane systems were examined and two different P19 architectures prepared by either self-assembly or mu-contact printing were tested and characterized using contact angle (CA) goniometry, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR). It is shown that surface coverage of cushion layer is significantly improved by mu-contact printing thereby facilitating bilayer formation as compared to self-assembly. To validate applicability of proposed methodology, incorporation of Cytochrome bo(3) ubiquinol oxidase (Cyt-bo(3)) into biomimetic membrane was performed by in vitro expression technique which was further monitored by surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The results showed that solid supported planar membranes, tethered by alpha-laminin peptide cushion layer, provide an attractive environment for membrane protein insertion and characterization.

  • 26.
    Arvidsson, A.
    et al.
    Dept. of Biomaterials/Handicap Res., Institute for Surgical Sciences, Göteborg University, 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Moller, K.
    Möller, K., Dept. of Chem. and Mat. Technology, Swed. Natl. Test. and Res. Institute, Borås, Sweden.
    Lyven, B.
    Lyvén, B., Dept. of Chem. and Mat. Technology, Swed. Natl. Test. and Res. Institute, Borås, Sweden.
    Sellen, A.
    Sellén, A., MediTeam Dental AB, Sävedalen, Sweden.
    Wennerberg, A.
    Prosthet. Dent. and Dent. Mat. Sci., Faculty of Odontology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Chemical and topographical analyses of dentine surfaces after Carisolv™ treatment2002In: Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0300-5712, E-ISSN 1879-176X, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to characterise the surface chemistry of cavities after chemomechanical caries excavation, and also to measure the surface topography after caries removal with Carisolv™ or burs, followed by acid etching. Methods. Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the relative amounts of organic material and minerals of sound enamel, dentine, and cavities, after caries excavation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were used for detection of Carisolv™ substances (i.e. mainly sodium hypochlorite, amino acids, and the gelling agent carboxymethyl cellulose). In total, 19 carious and 11 sound extracted teeth were used for the chemical analyses. Topographic examination of 30 carious extracted teeth was performed with a contact profilometer. Results. The relative amounts of organic material and minerals did not significantly differ between sound dentine and the cavities after caries removal with burs or Carisolv™. The FTIR analyses indicated extremely small amounts of Carisolv™ substances at the cavity surface, but the LA-ICP-MS analyses did not confirm those findings. Furthermore, the topographical parameters did not significantly differ between etched cavities after caries removal using burs or Carisolv™. Conclusions. The chemical and topographical analyses in the present study imply that any differences between the cavities after caries excavation with burs or with Carisolv™ are insignificant. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 27. Augulis, R
    et al.
    Valiokas, Ramunas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Rotomskis, R
    Atomic force microscopy of self-assembled nanostructures of TPPS4 on SAM substrates2004In: Solid State Phenomena, ISSN 1012-0394, E-ISSN 1662-9779, Vol. 97-98, p. 195-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of organic molecules on solid surfaces is one of the fundamental processes for the development of molecular-based nanodevices. Here we focus on the adsorption and ordering of the TPPS4-based J-aggregates on silicon and gold as well as on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. The SAMs used for the experiments were based on the chemisorption of thiol containing compounds onto gold. Long omega-substituted alkanethiols are spontaneously assembled on gold to form highly ordered and densely packed layers with controllable chemical and physical properties. TPPS4 J-aggregates were dispersed on SAM surfaces, and on plain gold and silicon substrates for comparison. The dimensions of aggregates, measured by means of atomic force microscopy, varied depending on the type of substrate. Long stripe-like aggregates were flattened on the substrate surface, and the height and width of aggregates highly correlated with the polarity of surface groups. For example, the J-aggregates were narrower on hydrophobic substrates (with non-polar groups) and wider on hydrophilic substrates (with polar groups). These observations support the hypothesis, that TPPS4 forms,soft" cylindrical aggregates, that appear flattened on the substrate.

  • 28.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    CTAB promoted synthesis of Au nanorods - Temperature effects and stability consideration2010In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 343, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic study is performed of the influence of surfactant and temperature on the aspect ratio and monodispersity of Au nanorods, synthesized by a seed-mediated growth technique in water using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The changes in aspect ratio with temperature show an "anomalous" behaviour, where the aspect ratio first decreases with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum at about 55oC, and after that increases again reaching a maximum at about 80oC. A physical explanation of the observed behaviour is proposed. It has also been studied how the CTAB concentration in the cleansing water used in the post-synthesis treatment of the samples affected the stability of the gold suspension. It was found that without the presence of a surfactant such as CTAB in the washing medium, only very few centrifugations can be carried out without considerable loss of product. Characterization of prepared samples was performed with UV-Vis and TEM.

  • 29.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis of silver nanowires in aqueous solutions2010In: Materials letters (General ed.), ISSN 0167-577X, E-ISSN 1873-4979, Vol. 64, no 8, p. 956-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver nanowires with a diameter of 30 nm and typical lengths of 5–10 μm have been synthesized in an aqueous medium. To initiate the reaction, citrate ions were used, and during the reaction the aromatic organicmolecules polymerize forming “straight” chain surfactants which support the formation of nanowires. Characterization by TEM and HRETM revealed the nanowires to be highly crystalline with a growth along the [110] direction.

  • 30.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Svedhem, S.
    Svensson, Stefan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Valiokas, Ramunas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Protein adsorption to oligo(ethylene glycol) self-assembled monolayers: Experiments with fibrinogen, heparinized plasma, and serum2001In: Journal of Biomaterials Science. Polymer Edition, ISSN 0920-5063, E-ISSN 1568-5624, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 581-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low protein adsorption is believed advantageous for blood-contacting materials and ethylene glycols (EG)-based polymeric compounds are often attached to surfaces for this purpose. In the present study, the adsorption of fibrinogen, serum, and plasma were studied by ellipsometry on a series of well-defined oligo(EG) terminated alkane-thiols self-assembled on gold. The layers were prepared with compounds of the general structure HS-(CH2)15-CONH-EGn, where n = 2, 4, and 6. Methoxy-terminated tri(EG) undecanethiol and hydroxyl-terminated hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as references. The results clearly demonstrate that the adsorption depends on the experimental conditions with small amounts of fibrinogen adsorbing from a single protein solution, but larger amounts of proteins from serum and plasma. The adsorption of fibrinogen and blood plasma decreased with an increasing number of EG repeats and was temperature-dependent. Significantly less serum adsorbed to methoxy tri(EG) than to hexa(EG) and more proteins remained on the latter surface after incubation in a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, indicating a looser protein binding to the methoxy-terminated surface. All surfaces adsorbed complement factor 3(C3) from serum and plasma, although no surface-mediated complement activation was observed. The present study points to the importance of a careful choice of the protein model system before general statements regarding the protein repellant properties of potential surfaces can be made.

  • 31.
    Bertilsson, L
    et al.
    Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Potje-Kamloth, K
    Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Liess, HD
    Universität der Bundeswehr München.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate on self-assembled alkanethiolate monolayers1998In: JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, ISSN 1089-5647, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 1260-1269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a model molecule for sarin, on three different organic interfaces, prepared by solution self-assembly of alkanethiols on gold, was followed by a surface acoustic wave mass sensor and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. The surfaces, characterized by the following tail groups (-OH, -CH3, -COOH), show both quantitative and qualitative differences concerning the interaction with DMMP, the acid surface giving rise to the strongest adsorption. Results obtained in UHV, at low temperatures using infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption, support this observation and give complementary information about the nature of the interaction. The hydrogen-bond-accepting properties of the P=O part of DMMP and its impact on the design of sensing interfaces based on hydrogen bonding, as well as the use of self-assembled monolayers to study molecular interactions, are discussed.

  • 32.
    Bertilsson, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engquist, Isak
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interaction of dimethyl methylphosphonate with alkanethiolate monolayers studied by temperature-programmed desorption and infrared spectroscopy1997In: JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, ISSN 1089-5647, Vol. 101, no 31, p. 6021-6027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adsorption of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) on well-defined organic surfaces consisting of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of omega-substituted alkanethiolates on gold has been studied. Three different surfaces were examined: one terminated with -OH groups (Au/S-(CH2)(16)-OH), one with -CH3 (Au/S-(CH2)(15)-CH3), and one mixed surface with approximately equal amounts of -OH and -CH3 terminated thiols. Detailed information about the nature and strength of the interaction was gathered by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. It is found that the outermost functional groups of the thiol monolayer have a pronounced impact on the interaction with DMMP at low coverage. The -OH surface, allowing for hydrogen bonds with the P=O part of the DMMP molecule, increases the strength of interaction by approximately 3.8 kJ/mol as compared to the -CH3 surface. A preadsorbed layer of D2O leads to stronger interaction on all surfaces. This is explained by additional hydrogen bond formation between free O-D at the ice-vacuum interface and DMMP.

  • 33.
    Bittoun, Eyal
    et al.
    Technion Israel Institute Technology.
    Marmur, Abraham
    Technion Israel Institute Technology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filled Nanoporous Surfaces: Controlled Formation and Wettability2009In: LANGMUIR, ISSN 0743-7463, Vol. 25, no 20, p. 12374-12379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The controlled filling of hydrophobic nanoporous surfaces with hydrophilic molecules and their wetting properties are described and demonstrated by using thiocholesterol (TC) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) as the filling agent. A novel procedure was developed for filling the nanopores in the TC SAMs by immersing them into a "cocktail" solution of TC and MUA, with TC in huge excess. This procedure results in an increasing coverage of MUA with increasing immersion time up to an area fraction of similar to 23%, while the amount of TC remains almost constant. Our findings strongly support earlier observations where linear omega-substituted alkanethiols selectively fill defects (nanopores) in the TC SAM (Yang et al. Langmuir 1997, 12, 1704-1707). They also support the formation of a homogeneously mixed SAM, given by the distribution of TC on the gold surface, rather than of a phase-segregated overlayer structure with domains of varying size, shape, and composition. The wetting properties of the Filled SAMs were investigated by measuring the most stable contact angle as well as contact angle hysteresis. It is shown that the most stable contact angle is very well described by the Cassie equation, since the drops arc much larger than the scale of chemical heterogeneity of the SAM surfaces. In addition, it is demonstrated that contact angle hysteresis is sensitive to the chemical heterogeneity of the surface, even at the nanometric scale.

  • 34.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Ekeroth, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Borgh, Annika
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Electrochemical Analysis of Self-Assembled Monolayers2001In: Analysdagarna,2001, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Characterization of the capacitance and quality of thiol based self-assembled monolayers by impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry2000In: ESEAC2000 European Society for ElectroAnalytical Chemistry,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Björefors, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Stålhandske, Per
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Characterization of the Capacitance and Quality of Thiol Based Self-Assembled Monolayers by Impedance Spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltammetry2000In: ISE 2000 International Society of Electrochemistry,2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37. Blomberg, Eva
    et al.
    Claesson, Per M.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Globotriose- and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated self-assembled monolayers: Surface forces, wetting, and surfactant adsorption2006In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 22, no 24, p. 10038-10046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A set of oligo( ethylene glycol)-terminated and globotriose-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been prepared on gold substrates. Such model surfaces are well defined and have good stability due to the strong binding of thiols and disulfides to the gold substrate. They are thus very suitable for addressing questions related to effects of surface composition on wetting properties, surface interactions, and surfactant adsorption. These issues are addressed in this report. Accurate wetting tension measurements have been performed as a function of temperature using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The results show that the nonpolar character of oligo( ethylene glycol)-terminated SAMs increases slightly but significantly with temperature in the range 20-55 degrees C. On the other hand, globotriose-terminated SAMs are fully wetted by water at room temperature. Surface forces measurements have been performed and demonstrated that the interactions between oligo( ethylene glycol)-terminated SAMs are purely repulsive and similar to those determined between adsorbed surfactant layers with the same terminal headgroup. On the other hand, the interactions between globotriose-terminated SAMs include a short-range attractive force component that is strongly affected by the packing density in the layer. In some cases it is found that the attractive force component increases with contact time. Both these observations are rationalized by an orientation- and conformation-dependent interaction between globotriose headgroups, and it is suggested that hydrogen-bond formation, directly or via bridging water molecules, is the molecular origin of these effects.

  • 38.
    Borgh, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekeroth, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petoral Jr., Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A new route to the formation of biomimetic phosphate assemblies on gold: Synthesis and characterization2006In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 295, no 1, p. 41-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A biomimetic model system based on long-chain alkanethiols tailored with serine, threonine and tyrosine side-chain groups is created as a platform for the study of phosphorylated amino acids. The phosphorylated analogues are synthesized with protective tert-butyl groups that after assembly on thin polycrystalline gold films are removed in an acidic deprotection solution to form the corresponding phosphate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The SAMs are thoroughly characterized with null ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The assembly and the subsequent deprotection process are optimized with respect to molecular orientation and chain conformation by varying the incubation time and the exposure time to the deprotection solution. The high quality of the generated SAMs suggests that the present assembly/deprotection approach is an attractive alternative when traditional synthetic routes become demanding because of solubility problems.

  • 39.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An indirect competitive immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies based on surface plasmon resonance2008In: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 876-881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a sensitive and specific method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detection of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in serum samples from individuals at high risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). When measuring trace molecules in undiluted sera with label-free techniques like SPR, non-specific adsorption of matrix proteins to the sensor surface is often a problem, since it causes a signal that masks the analyte response. The developed method is an indirect competitive immunoassay designed to overcome these problems. Today, IAA is mainly measured in radio immunoassays (RIAs), which are time consuming and require radioactively labeled antigen. With our SPR-based immunoassay the overall assay time is reduced by a factor of >100 (4 days to 50 min), while sensitivity is maintained at a level comparable to that offered by RIA.

  • 40.
    Carlsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gullstrand, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Enander, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Determination of insulin autoantibodies using surface plasmon resonance: A screening study of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients2008Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the screening potential of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based indirectcompetitive immunoassay for quantification of insulin autoantibodies (IAA) in sera from childrennewly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) as reference technique.The two methods agreed well with respect to sample classification of 54 sera from newly diagnosedT1D children and 32 reference sera from non-diabetic children. Interestingly, five samples from newlydiagnosed T1D patients classified as IAA-negative according to RIA were IAA-positive with the SPRbasedassay, suggesting that the SPR-based assay might provide a higher sensitivity than the referenceRIA. However, 14 percent of the analyzed samples (five samples from non-diabetics and seven fromnewly diagnosed T1D patients) gave rise to anomalously high and easily distinguishable responses withthe SPR-based method, precluding IAA-quantification. A considerable part of the paper is devoted to adiscussion of possible causes of these anomalous responses. They were not due to temporary changesin the status of the patients, such as infections at the time of sampling, and also not related tocomplement activation. It is speculated whether a plausible explanation should instead be sought in theexistence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to IAA.

  • 41.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Yin, Zongyou
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Huang, Xiao
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Wu, Shixin
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhang, Hua
    Nanyang Technology University.
    Assembly of Graphene Oxide and Au(0.7)Ag(0.3) Alloy Nanoparticles on SiO(2): A New Raman Substrate with Ultrahigh Signal-to-Background Ratio2011In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 115, no 49, p. 24080-24084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) often suffers from the large fluorescence background which obscures the much weaker Raman scattering. To address this fundamental problem, a novel Raman substrate has been fabricated by adsorption of Au(0.7)Ag(0.3) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) on a graphene oxide (GO) coated SiO(2) surface, which offers both excellent Raman enhancement and fluorescence quenching. Our experimental data reveal that a Raman to fluorescence background intensity ratio of 1.6 can be obtained for a highly fluorescent dye like Alexa fluor 488. Moreover, we demonstrate that the Raman enhancement mainly originates from the Au(0.7)Ag(0.3) alloy NPs and that the fluorescence quenching mainly arises from the underlying functionalized GO (FGO) substrate.

  • 42. Demers, LM
    et al.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Zhang, Hanmin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Jang, NH
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Mirkin, CA
    Thermal desorption behavior and binding properties of DNA bases and nucleosides on gold2002In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 124, no 38, p. 11248-11249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Di Fino, A.
    et al.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Petrone, Luigi
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aldred, N.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Clare, A. S.
    Newcastle University, England .
    Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus)2014In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

  • 44.
    Ederth, T.
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Surface Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stokholm, Sweden, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden, Phys. and Theor. Chem. Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3Q2, United Kingdom.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Influence of wetting properties on the long-range `hydrophobic' interaction between self-assembled alkylthiolate monolayers2000In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 2177-2184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of solid-liquid interfacial energy on the long-range attraction between self-assembled thiolate monolayers in water has been studied by direct force measurements. The solid-liquid interfacial energy was tuned by changing the properties of the solid surface: the thiolate monolayers were prepared by self-assembly of mixtures of methyl- and hydroxyl-functionalized alkylthiols onto thin gold films. The wetting properties were examined by contact angle measurements with the Wilhelmy plate method. Our results show that the shape of the long-ranged attractive force is sensitive to the advancing solid-liquid contact angle: whenever it exceeds 90° the force profiles are discontinuous and contains steps, whereas no attraction beyond the van der Waals force is observed for contact angles lower than 90°. We attribute the steps in the long-range attraction between hydrophobic surfaces to bridging of microscopic bubbles residing on the surfaces, and we conclude that the stability of these bubbles are related to macroscopic contact angles.

  • 45.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pettitt, Michala E
    University of Birmingham.
    Conlan, Sheelagh L
    Newcastle University.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, Maureen E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, James A
    University of Birmingham.
    Mutton, Robert
    Newcastle University.
    Clare, Anthony S
    Newcastle University.
    D`Souza, Fraddry
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Donnelly, Glen
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Bruin, Anouk
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Willemsen, Peter R
    TNO Science and Industry.
    Su, Xueju J
    University of Dundee.
    Wang, Su
    University of Dundee.
    Zhao, Qi
    University of Dundee.
    Hederos, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Resistance of Galactoside-Terminated Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers to Marine Fouling Organisms2011In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 3, no 10, p. 3890-3901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of galactoside-terminated alkanethiols have protein-resistance properties which can be tuned via the degree of methylation [Langmuir 2005, 21, 2971-2980]. Specifically, a partially methylated compound was more resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption than the hydroxylated or fully methylated counterparts. We investigate whether this also holds true for resistance to the attachment and adhesion of a range of marine species, in order to clarify to what extent resistance to protein adsorption correlates with the more complex adhesion of fouling organisms. The partially methylated galactoside-terminated SAM was further compared to a mixed monolayer of omega-substituted methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols with wetting properties and surface ratio of hydroxyl to methyl groups matching that of the galactoside. The settlement (initial attachment) and adhesion strength of four model marine fouling organisms were investigated, representing both micro- and macrofoulers; two bacteria (Cobetia marina and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus), barnacle cypris larvae (Balanus amphitrite), and algal zoospores (Ulva linza). The minimum in protein adsorption onto the partially methylated galactoside surface was partly reproduced in the marine fouling assays, providing some support for a relationship between protein resistance and adhesion of marine fouling organisms. The mixed alkanethiol SAM, which was matched in wettability to the partially methylated galactoside SAM, consistently showed higher settlement (initial attachment) of test organisms than the galactoside, implying that both wettability and surface chemistry are insufficient to explain differences in fouling resistance. We suggest that differences in the structure of interfacial water may explain the variation in adhesion to these SAMs.

  • 46.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Porous nanoparticle assemblies as permeable supports for lipid bilayer membranes (Poster)2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoscale Surface Self-Assembly (EuChem Conference, June 19-23, 2005, Sigtuna, Sweden

  • 47.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, M.E.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Callow, J.A.
    The University of Birmingham, School of Biosciences, Birmingham, UK.
    Interactions of algal spores and diatoms with mixed synthetic peptide SAMs2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M. E.
    University of Birmingham.
    Oumlstblom, M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Broo, Klas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Callow, M. E.
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J.
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Anomalous settlement behavior of Ulva linza zoospores on cationic oligopeptide surfaces2008In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of settlement cues for marine fouling organisms opens up new strategies and methods for biofouling prevention, and enables the development of more effective antifouling materials. To this end, the settlement behaviour of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza onto cationic oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been investigated. The spores interact strongly with lysine- and arginine-rich SAMs, and their settlement appears to be stimulated by these surfaces. Of particular interest is an arginine-rich oligopeptide, which is effective in attracting spores to the surface, but in a way which leaves a large fraction of the settled spores attached to the surface in an anomalous fashion. These 'pseudo-settled' spores are relatively easily detached from the surface and do not undergo the full range of cellular responses associated with normal commitment to settlement. This is a hitherto undocumented mode of settlement, and surface dilution of the arginine-rich peptide with a neutral triglycine peptide demonstrates that both normal and anomalous settlement is proportional to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. The settlement experiments are complemented with physical studies of the oligopeptide SAMs, before and after extended immersion in artificial seawater, using infrared spectroscopy, null ellipsometry and contact angle measurements.

  • 49.
    Ederth, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pettitt, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Nygren, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Du, Chun-Xia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Zhou, Ye
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Callow, M E
    University of Birmingham.
    Callow, J A
    University of Birmingham.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactions of Zoospores of Ulva linza with Arginine-Rich Oligopeptide Monolayers2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 16, p. 9375-9383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently reported oil the strong interactions of zoospores of the green alga, Ulva linza with all arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM) [Biofouling 2008, 24, 303-312], where the arginine-rich peptide induced not only high spore settlement, but also a form of abnormal settlement, or "pseudo-settlement", whereby it proportion of spores do not go through the normal process of surface exploration, adhesive exocytosis, and loss of flagella. Further. it was demonstrated that both the total number of settled spores and the fraction of pseudosettled spores were related to the surface density of the arginine-rich peptide. Here we present a further investigation of the interactions of zoospores of ulva with a set of oligomeric, de nom designed, arginine-rich peptides, specifically aimed to test the effect of peptide primary structure on the interaction. Via variations in the peptide length and by permutations in the amino acid sequences, we gain further insight into the spore-surface interactions. The interpretation of the biological assays is supported by physicochemical characterization of the SAMs using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurement. Results confirm the importance of arginine residues for the anomalous pseudosettlement, and we found that settlement is modulated by variations in both the total length and peptide primary structure. To elucidate the Causes of the anomalous settlement and the possible relation to peptide-membrane interactions, we also compared the settlement of the "naked" zoospores of Ulva(which present it lipoprotein membrane to the exterior without a discrete polysaccharide cell wall), with the settlement of diatoms (unicellular algae that are surrounded by it silica cell wall), onto the peptide SAMs. Cationic SAMs do not notably affect settlement (attachment), adhesion strength, or viability of diatom cells, Suggesting that the effect of the peptides on zoospores of Ulva is mediated via specific peptide-membrane interactions.

  • 50.
    Ekblad, Tobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andersson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tai, Feng-i
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg , Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lateral Control of Protein Adsorption on Charged Polymer Gradients2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 3755-3762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and protein adsorption behavior of charged polymer gradients. The thin gradient films were fabricated by a two-step technique using UV-initiated free-radical polymerization in a reactor with a moving shutter. A homogeneous layer of cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride) was first formed, followed by a layer of oppositely charged poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) with a continuously increasing thickness. Adsorption from protein solutions as well as human blood plasma was investigated by imaging surface plasmon resonance and infrared microscopy. The results showed excessive protein adsorption in the areas where one of the polymers dominated the composition, while there was a clear minimum at an intermediate position of the gradient. The charge of the surface was estimated by direct force measurements and found to correlate well with the protein adsorption, showing the lowest net charge in the same area as the protein adsorption minimum. We therefore hypothesize that a combination of the charged polymers, in the right proportions, can result in a protein-resistant surface due to balanced charges.

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