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  • 1.
    Aamand Grabau, Dorthe
    et al.
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden .
    The prevalence of immunohistochemically determined oestrogen receptor positivity in primary breast cancer is dependent on the choice of antibody and method of heat-induced epitope retrieval - prognostic implications?2013In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 52, no 8, 1657-1666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Oestrogen receptor (ER) status is important for the choice of systemic treatment of breast cancer patients. However, most data from randomised trials on the effect of adjuvant endocrine therapy according to ER status are based on the cytosol methods. Comparisons with immunohistochemical methods have given similar results. The aim of the present study was to examine whether different ER antibodies and heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) methods influence the prevalence of ER-positivity in primary breast cancer. Material and methods. This study is based on patients included in a clinical trial designed to compare the effect of two years of adjuvant tamoxifen versus no adjuvant systemic treatment in premenopausal women. From 1986 to 1991, 564 patients from two study centres in Sweden were enrolled and randomised. Patients were randomised independently of ER status. In the present study, ER status was assessed on tissue microarrays with the three different ER antibody/HIER combinations: 1D5 in citrate pH 6 (n = 390), SP1 in Tris pH 9 (n = 390) and PharmDx in citrate pH 6 (n = 361). Results. At cut-offs of 1% and 10%, respectively, the prevalence of ER-positivity was higher with SP1 (75% and 72%) compared with 1D5 (68% and 66%) and PharmDx (66% and 62%). At these cut-offs, patients in the discordant groups (SP1-positive and 1D5-negative) seem to have a prognosis intermediate between those of the double-positive and double-negative groups. Comparison with the ER status determined by the cytosol-based methods in the discordant group also showed an intermediate pattern. The repeatability was good for all antibodies and cut-offs, with overall agreement andgt;= 93%. Conclusion. The present study shows that the choice of antibody and HIER method influences the prevalence of ER-positivity. We suggest that this be taken into consideration when choosing a cut-off for clinical decision making.

  • 2.
    Adell, Gunnar C. E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Apoptosis in rectal carcinoma: Prognosis and recurrence after preoperative radiotherapy2001In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 91, no 10, 1870-1875 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal carcinoma is common, with considerable local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical techniques can improve local control. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between apoptosis and the outcome of rectal carcinoma, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.

    METHODS: Specimens were from 162 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region included in the Swedish Rectal Cancer Trial between 1987-1990. New sections from the paraffin blocks of the preoperative biopsies and the surgical specimens were examined for apoptosis using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method.

    RESULTS: The mean percentage of apoptotic cells was 0.3% (0-4%) and 1.1% (0-14.5%) for the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen, respectively. The authors analyzed the surgical specimens from nonirradiated patients and divided them into three groups by apoptotic index (AI) as follows: 0%, 0-1%, and > 1%. A high AI was associated with a decreased local recurrence rate compared with an intermediate or a low AI (P = 0.024). There was no significant relation between AI and survival. There was a significant reduction in the local recurrence rate for irradiated patients compared with the nonirradiated in the low (P = 0.015) and intermediate (P = 0.038) AI groups. In the high AI group, there were few recurrences and no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated patients. The relative risk of death from rectal carcinoma in Dukes A-C patients was not significantly decreased by radiotherapy, but, in the intermediate AI group, there was a trend (P = 0.08) in favor of the irradiated patients.

    CONCLUSION: A high AI in rectal carcinoma indicated a decreased local recurrence rate.

  • 3.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Klintenberg, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 status: an indicator for the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.1999In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 51, no 2, 169-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal carcinoma is a common malignancy, with a history of high local recurrence rates following surgery. In recent years. preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique have improved local control rates.

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between expression of nuclear p53 protein and the outcome in rectal carcinoma, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.

    MATERIAL: Specimens from 163 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial between 1987-1990.

    METHOD: New sections from the paraffin blocks of the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen were examined immunohistochemically using a p53 antibody (PAb 1801).

    RESULT: Expression of nuclear p53 protein was seen in 41% of the tumours. The p53 negative patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significant reduction of local failure compared with the non-irradiated p53 negative patients (P = 0.0008). In contrast, p53 positive patients showed no benefit from preoperative radiotherapy. The interaction between p53 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was statistically significant (P = 0.018).

    CONCLUSION: Expression of nuclear p53 protein in rectal carcinoma seems to be a significant predictive factor for local treatment failure after preoperative radiotherapy. Further investigations are necessary to select patients for preoperative treatment based on analysis of the preoperative biopsies.

  • 4.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Hong
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Decreased tumor cell proliferation as an indicator of the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer2001In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, ISSN 0360-3016, E-ISSN 1879-355X, Vol. 50, no 3, 659-663 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy, with significant local recurrence and death rates. Preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique can improve local control rates and disease-free survival.

    PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between the tumor growth fraction in rectal cancer measured with Ki-67 and the outcome, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.Method: Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry was used to measure tumor cell proliferation in the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen.

    MATERIALS: Specimens from 152 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region were included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial 1987-1990.

    RESULTS: Tumors with low proliferation treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significantly reduced recurrence rate. The influence on death from rectal cancer was shown only in the univariate analysis. Preoperative radiotherapy of tumors with high proliferation did not significantly improve local control and disease-free survival. The interaction between Ki-67 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was significant for the reduced recurrence rate (p = 0.03), with a trend toward improved disease-free survival (p = 0.08). In the surgery-alone group, Ki-67 staining did not significantly correlate with local recurrence or survival rates.

    CONCLUSION: Many Ki-67 stained tumor cells in the preoperative biopsy predicts an increased treatment failure rate after preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.

  • 5.
    Agrup, Måns
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsen, Karen
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Forensic Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wingren, Sten
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    C-erbB-2 overexpression and survival in early onset breast cancer2000In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 63, no 1, 23-29 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young breast cancer patients have a decreased survival rate and it has been demonstrated that young age is an independent predictor of adverse prognosis. Overexpression of c-erbB-2 protein (also known as HER-2/neu) has been shown to be a prognostic indicator in breast cancer in general and especially among patients with axillary nodal metastases. The present study was initiated to determine the prognostic significance of c-erbB-2 protein overexpression in early onset breast cancer.

    A population consisting of 110 young breast cancer patients, ≤ 36-year-old at diagnosis, was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining for c-erbB-2 protein.

    Thirty patients (27%) were found to overexpress the c-erbB-2 protein. C-erbB-2 positivity was significantly associated with poor survival when all patients were included in the analysis (P = 0.002) and for patients with axillary nodal metastases (P = 0.0007). No such association was found for node-negative patients. Furthermore, the difference in prognosis in relation to c-erbB-2 among node-positive patients was maintained, when these were stratified in groups treated or not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.

    The study indicates that overexpression of c-erbB-2 protein is a strong prognostic factor in young breast cancer patients with axillary nodal metastases. Moreover, the adverse prognosis associated with c-erbB-2 overexpression in node-positive patients was observed whether or not the patients had received adjuvant chemotherapy.

  • 6.
    Aguilar, Helena
    et al.
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Urruticoechea, Ander
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Halonen, Pasi
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Kiyotani, Kazuma
    Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Yokohama, Japan.
    Mushiroda, Taisei
    Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Yokohama, Japan.
    Barril, Xavier
    University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Serra-Musach, Jordi
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Islam, Abul
    University of Dhaka, Bangladesh.
    Caizzi, Livia
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Di Croce, Luciano
    Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Zwart, Wilbert
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.
    Bostner, Josefine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm South General Hospital, Sweden.
    Sgroi, Dennis C
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
    Garcia-Mata, Rafael
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.
    Jansen, Maurice Phm
    Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    García, Nadia
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Bonifaci, Núria
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Climent, Fina
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Soler, María Teresa
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Vida, Alejo
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Gil, Miguel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Brunet, Joan
    Hospital Josep Trueta, Girona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Martrat, Griselda
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Gómez-Baldó, Laia
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Extremera, Ana I
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Figueras, Agnes
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Balart, Josep
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Clarke, Robert
    Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
    Burnstein, Kerry L
    University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.
    Carlson, Kathryn E
    University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Katzenellenbogen, John A
    University of Illinois, Urbana, USA.
    Vizoso, Miguel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Esteller, Manel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain .
    Villanueva, Alberto
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B
    CSIC-University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Bustelo, Xosé R
    CSIC-University of Salamanca, Spain.
    Nakamura, Yusuke
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Zembutsu, Hitoshi
    University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Beijersbergen, Roderick L
    The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam .
    Pujana, Miguel Angel
    L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.
    VAV3 mediates resistance to breast cancer endocrine therapy2014In: Breast Cancer Research, ISSN 1465-5411, E-ISSN 1465-542X, Vol. 16, no 3, R53- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Endocrine therapies targeting cell proliferation and survival mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) are among the most effective systemic treatments for ERalpha-positive breast cancer. However, most tumors initially responsive to these therapies acquire resistance through mechanisms that involve ERalpha transcriptional regulatory plasticity. Here, we identify VAV3 as a critical component in this process.

    METHODS: A cell-based chemical compound screen was carried out to identify therapeutic strategies against resistance to endocrine therapy. Binding to ERalpha was evaluated by molecular docking analyses, an agonist fluoligand assay, and short-hairpin (sh) RNA-mediated protein depletion. Microarray analyses were performed to identify altered gene expression. Western blot of signaling and proliferation markers and shRNA-mediated protein depletion in viability and clonogenic assays were performed to delineate the role of VAV3. Genetic variation in VAV3 was assessed for association with the response to tamoxifen. Immunohistochemical analyses of VAV3 were carried out to determine the association with therapy response and different tumor markers. An analysis of gene expression association with drug sensitivity was carried out to identify a potential therapeutic approach based on differential VAV3 expression.

    RESULTS: The compound YC-1 was found to comparatively reduce the viability of cell models of acquired resistance. This effect was probably not due to activation of its canonical target (soluble guanylyl cyclase) but instead a result of binding to ERalpha. VAV3 was selectively reduced upon exposure to YC-1 or ERalpha depletion and, accordingly, VAV3 depletion comparatively reduced the viability of cell models of acquired resistance. In the clinical scenario, germline variation in VAV3 was associated with response to tamoxifen in Japanese breast cancer patients (rs10494071 combined P value = 8.4 x 10-4). The allele association combined with gene expression analyses indicated that low VAV3 expression predicts better clinical outcome. Conversely, high nuclear VAV3 expression in tumor cells was associated with poorer endocrine therapy response. Based on VAV3 expression levels and the response to erlotinib in cancer cell lines, targeting EGFR signaling may be a promising therapeutic strategy.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study proposes VAV3 as a biomarker and rationale signaling target to prevent and/or overcome resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

  • 7.
    Ahnström, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Askmalm Stenmark, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Altered expression of cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein influences the effect of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer2009In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 34, no 2, 441-448 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin E and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) are both important regulators of the G(1) phase in the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin E and lost expression of Rb has previously been observed in breast tumours at frequencies of 10-50% and 20-30%, respectively. We explored the prognostic role of cyclin E and Rb in breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen (TAM), CMF (cyclophosphamide, metotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) and how their expression affects the patients response to treatment. Protein expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry. We found overexpression of cyclin E in 32.1% (71/221) of the tumours and loss of Rb expression in 25.0% (59/236). Increased expression of cyclin E correlated to dysfunctional p53 (P=0.003) while loss of Rb correlated to normal p53 status (P=0.001). Our results suggest that patients with high cyclin E tumours have less benefit from tamoxifen (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR=0.97; 95% CI, 0.36-2.60) than patients whose tumours show low expression (ER+, TAM vs. no TAM; RR =0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.72). Cyclin E also tended to predict the benefit from radiotherapy with a local recurrence rate of 0.31 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.12-0.93) for patients with low expression and 0.68 (RT vs. CMF; 95% CI, 0.2-2.32) for patients with high expression of cyclin E. When the p53 status was taken in consideration the results showed that patients with both normal p53 and normal Rb expression had considerably lower locoregional recurrence rate when treated with radiotherapy instead of CMF (RR=0.17; 95% CI, 0.052-0.58) as compared to patients with either altered Rb or p53 or both (RR=0.70; 95% CI, 0.28-1.73).

  • 8.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-104 01 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    miR-206 expression is downregulated in cyclin D1 amplified breast tumoursManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amplification in the 11q13 region has been found in around 15% of all breast cancers and is strongly correlated with oestrogen receptor (ER) positive tumours. We have previously found that amplification of at least one of the genes PAK1 or CCND1 is associated with decreased recurrencefree survival among ER+ patients. Other genes in the amplicon might also contribute to this effect and situated close to CCND1 are the FGF-3, -4 and - 19 genes. The FGF-4 protein has been shown to inhibit the expression of the ERα regulator miR-206 in chicken embryo. In this study we analysed 23 tumours with and 27 tumours without previously detected 11q13 amplification to explore if 11q13 amplification is associated with decreased levels of miR-206 and if miR-206 is associated with ER expression. Using real-time PCR, we found that miR-206 expression was inversely correlated to CCND1 and 11q13 amplification (P=0.016 and P=0.022 respectively). Tumours with low miR-206 expression had higher levels of ERα than tumours with intermediate and high expression (P=0.043). We conclude that miR-206 might be an important regulator of the ERα. Our finding that low mir-206 is associated with CCND1 amplification and thereby also FGF-4 amplification points towards the possibility of a miR-206 regulator, FGF-4 or another FGF, present in the amplicon.

  • 9.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Haematology UHL.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Department of Oncology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Role of cyclin D1 in ErbB2-positive breast cancer and tamoxifen resistance.2005In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 91, no 2, 145-151 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the regulation of the G1 phase in the cell cycle. In mammary epithelial cells the expression of cyclin D1 is regulated through the oestrogen receptor and via ErbB2 signalling. Here we investigated the prognostic significance of cyclin D1 among 230 breast cancer patients randomised for tamoxifen, CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The importance of combined cyclin D1 and ErbB2 overexpression was also analysed. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cyclin D1 expression resulted in 69 (29.8%) weakly positive, 107 (46.5%) moderately positive and 54 (23.7%) strongly positive cases. The prognostic importance of ErbB2 was significantly greater for patients whose tumours overexpressed cyclin D1 than for other patients (p = 0.026). In the former group, ErbB2 overexpression was strongly associated with increased risk of recurrence (RR = 4.7; 95% CI, 2.1-10.4) and breast cancer death (RR = 5.4; 95% CI, 2.3-12.6). This result is in accordance with experimental studies demonstrating a link between cyclin D1 and ErbB2 in oncogenesis. Among oestrogen receptor positive patients, those with moderate cyclin D1 expression significantly did benefit from tamoxifen treatment (RR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) whereas those with weak or strong expression did not. Therefore cyclin D1 might be a predictive marker for tamoxifen resistance.

  • 10.
    Alkner, S
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Bendahl, P-O
    Lund University.
    Grabau, D
    Lund University.
    Lovgren, K
    Lund University.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ryden, L
    Lund University.
    Ferno, M
    Lund University.
    AIB1 is a predictive factor for tamoxifen response in premenopausal women2010In: ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, ISSN 0923-7534, Vol. 21, no 2, 238-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical trials implicate the estrogen receptor ( ER) coactivator amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) to be a prognostic and a treatment-predictive factor, although results are not unanimous. We have further investigated this using a controlled randomised trial of tamoxifen versus control. Materials and methods: A total of 564 premenopausal women were entered into a randomised study independent of ER status. Using a tissue microarray, AIB1 and ER were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Results: AIB1 scores were obtained from 349 women. High AIB1 correlated to factors of worse prognosis (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Nottingham histological grade 3, and lymph node metastases) and to ER negativity. In the control arm, high AIB1 was a negative prognostic factor for recurrence- free survival (RFS) (P = 0.02). However, ER-positive patients with high AIB1 responded significantly to tamoxifen treatment (P = 0.002), increasing RFS to the same level as for systemically untreated patients with low AIB1. Although ER-positive patients with low AIB1 had a better RFS from the beginning, this was not further improved by tamoxifen (P = 0.8). Conclusions: In the control group, high AIB1 was a negative prognostic factor. However, ER-positive patients with high AIB1 responded significantly to tamoxifen. This implicates high AIB1 to be an independent predictive factor of improved response to tamoxifen and not, as has previously been discussed, a factor predicting tamoxifen resistance.

  • 11. Bagwell, CB
    et al.
    Clark, GM
    Chassevent, A
    Bendahl, PO
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Killander, D
    Jourdan, ML
    Romain, S
    Hunsberger, B
    Wright, S
    Baldetorp, B
    DNA and cell cycle analysis as prognostic indicators in breast tumors revisited2001In: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 0272-2712, E-ISSN 1557-9832, Vol. 21, no 4, 875-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both DNA ploidy and S-phase ploidy are promising prognostic factors for node-negative breast cancer patients. Based largely on the analysis of one large study, much of the reported problems with these factors have been caused by some unappreciated complexities in categorizing DNA ploidy into low- and high-risk groups and the lack of some necessary adjustments to eliminate unwanted correlations between DNA S-phase and ploidy. When both DNA ploidy and S-phase are compensated properly, they become independent prognostic markers, forming a powerful prognostic model.

  • 12.
    Bagwell, CB
    et al.
    Verity Software House Inc., Topsham, Maine.
    Clark, GM
    Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
    Spyratos, F
    Centre René Huguenin, St.-Cloud, France.
    Chassevent, A
    Centre Paul Papin, Angers, France.
    Bendahl, PO
    The Jubileum Institute, Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Killander, D
    The Jubileum Institute, Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jourdan, ML
    Hôpital Bretonneau, Tours, France.
    Romain, S
    Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, France.
    Hunsberger, B
    Verity Software House Inc., Topsham, Maine.
    Baldetorp, B
    The Jubileum Institute, Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Optimizing flow cytometric DNA ploidy and S-phase fraction as independent prognostic markers for node-negative breast cancer specimens2001In: Cytometry, ISSN 0196-4763, E-ISSN 1097-0320, Vol. 46, no 3, 121-135 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing a reliable and quantitative assessment of the potential virulence of a malignancy has been a long-standing goal in clinical cytometry. DNA histogram analysis provides valuable information on the cycling activity of a tumor population through S-phase estimates; it also identifies nondiploid populations, a possible indicator of genetic instability and subsequent predisposition to metastasis. Because of conflicting studies in the literature, the clinical relevance of both of these potential prognostic markers has been questioned for the management of breast cancer patients. The purposes of this study are to present a set of 10 adjustments derived from a single large study that optimizes the prognostic strength of both DNA ploidy and S-phase and to test the validity of this approach on two other large multicenter studies. Ten adjustments to both DNA ploidy and S-phase were developed from a single node-negative breast cancer database from Baylor College (n = 961 cases). Seven of the adjustments were used to reclassify histograms into low-risk and high-risk ploidy patterns based on aneuploid fraction and DNA index optimum thresholds resulting in prognostic P values changing from little (P < 0.02) or no significance to P < 0.000005. Other databases from Sweden (n = 210 cases) and France (n = 220 cases) demonstrated similar improvement of DNA ploidy prognostic significance, P < 0.02 to P < 0.0009 and P < 0.12 to P < 0.002, respectively. Three other adjustments were applied to diploid and aneuploid S-phases. These adjustments eliminated a spurious correlation between DNA ploidy and S-phase and enabled them to combine independently into a powerful prognostic model capable of stratifying patients into low, intermediate, and high-risk groups (P < 0.000005). When the Baylor prognostic model was applied to the Sweden and French databases, similar significant patient stratifications were observed (P < 0.0003 and P < 0.00001, respectively). The successful transference of the Baylor prognostic model to other studies suggests that the proposed adjustments may play an important role in standardizing this test and provide valuable prognostic information to those involved in the management of breast cancer patients.

  • 13. Bagwell, CB
    et al.
    Clark, GM
    Spyratos, F
    Chassevent, A
    Bendahl, PO
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Killander, D
    Jourdan, ML
    Romain, S
    Hunsberger, CB
    Wright, S
    Baldetorp, B
    Multivariate analyses of flow cytometric S-phase and ploidy as node-negative breast cancer prognostic factors: an international and multi-center study2001In: Abstract Issue, 24th Annual San Antonio, Breast Cancer Symposium. December 10-13, 2001 San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter, Texas, USA.: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, Vol 69, Issue 3, 2001, Vol. 69, no 3, 260-260 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently a set of ten adjustments that optimizes the prognostic strength of both DNA ploidy (P) and S-phase (S) was published (Cytometry, 46(3), 2001). Also presented was an optimal method of combining P and S (P+S) that stratifies node-negative patients into highly significant risk groups. The adjustments compensate for many unappreciated complexities in categorizing P into low and high risk groups and eliminate unwanted correlation between P and S. The purpose of this study is to examine P+S in the context of other well-known prognostic factors such as primary size (pT), estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER,PR) and menopausal status (MS). Methods: DNA histograms derived from frozen primary tumors and clinical databases were provided by Baylor College, n=935; Sweden, n=210 (Lund, Linkoping, Stockholm) and France, n=220 (Angers, Marseille, Saint Cloud, Tours). Time to metastasis was the tested clinical outcome. Results: Cox proportional hazards analysis of theBaylor data revealed P+S, p<0.000002, and pT, p<0.003, as independent significant prognostic factors. The Sweden study also showed P+S the mostsignificant prognostic factor, p<0.002, as well as MS, p<0.004 and ER, p<0.007. The French study results were MS, p<0.0005, P+S, p<0.002 and pT, p<0.007.A P+S, MS and pT prognostic model stratified patients in all studies into highly significant categories, Baylor, p<0.000005, Sweden, p<0.00001, and French, p<0.000005, with low and high risk 10-year relapse-free survival fractions of 0.92-0.69, 0.95-0.58 and 0.96-0.60 respectively. Conclusion: A combined P+S, MS and pT prognostic model is a powerful and reliable method of stratifying node-negative breast cancer patients into highly significant prognostic groups.

  • 14.
    Baldetorp, Bo
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Pär-Ola
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Ferno, Mårten
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improved DNA flow cytometric, DNA ploidy, and S-phase reproducibility between 15 laboratories in analysis of breast cancer using generalized guidelines2003In: Cytometry, ISSN 0196-4763, E-ISSN 1097-0320, Vol. 56A, no 1, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Lack of generalized guidelines for DNA flow cytometric analysis (FCM) may be the main reason for its limited use in the clinical management of breast cancer.

    Methods

    After an initial interlaboratory reproducibility study (Round I), we concluded that it was the evaluation of the DNA histograms rather than the technical performance of the analysis that was the main reason for discordant results between laboratories. Guidelines for the interpretation of DNA histograms were therefore drawn up. We present here data from a new reproducibility study (Round II) using these guidelines.

    Results

    For 10 laboratories also participating in Round I, use of the guidelines increased the concordance in DNA ploidy status from 89% to 100% for the 46 samples used in both rounds. The concordance rate for SPF also increased; mean rs-value increased from 0.81 to 0.88, and mean kappa value (lower two-thirds versus upper third versus not reported) increased from 0.55 to 0.71. Five new laboratories, participating only in Round II, also agreed with the 10 original laboratories regarding DNA ploidy status. With the inclusion of all 15 laboratories, we obtained a mean rs-value of 0.81 and a mean kappa value of 0.72 for SPF.

    Conclusions

    Generalized guidelines for DNA FCM increase interlaboratory agreement, which is highly important in clinical routines and in multicenter studies. Furthermore, inexperienced FCM laboratories using generalized guidelines can produce and interpret DNA FCM data equally as well as experienced laboratories.

  • 15.
    Blom, René
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guerrieri, C.
    Department of Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, New York, USA.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malmström, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Simonsen, E.
    Leiomyosarcoma of the uterus: A clinicopathologic, DNA flow cytometric, p53, and mdm-2 analysis of 49 cases1998In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, Vol. 68, no 1, 54-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The authors analyzed in a retrospective manner the prognostic significance of p53 and mdm-2 expression, DNA ploidy, S-phase fraction (SPF), and traditional clinical and pathological prognostic factors in patients with uterine leiomyosarcomas. MATERIAL: Forty-nine patients were diagnosed with uterine leiomyosarcoma (25 stage I, 4 stage II, 8 stage III, and 12 stage IV). DNA flow cytometric analysis and immunohistochemical staining for p53 and mdm-2 were performed on paraffin-embedded archival tissue from the uterine tumors. RESULTS: Of the 49 patients, 35 (71%) died of disease and 2 died of intercurrent disease. The 5-year survival rate was 33%. FIGO surgical stage, DNA ploidy, SPF, mitotic index, cellular atypia, and tumor grade obtained significance (P < 0.05) in a univariate survival analysis of the leiomyosarcomas. In a multivariate analysis with survival as the end point, stage was found to be the most important factor (P = 0.007); DNA ploidy (P = 0. 045) and SPF (P = 0.041) also had independent prognostic significance. For FIGO stage I tumors, DNA ploidy (P = 0.04) and tumor grade (P = 0.01) were statistically significant in a univariate analysis, while only grade had independent prognostic significance (P = 0.01) in a multivariate analysis. In a univariate analysis including only FIGO stage I and II tumors with disease-free survival as the end point, p53 overexpression (P = 0.0016), DNA ploidy (P = 0.042), and tumor grade (P = 0.008) obtained significance. In a multivariate analysis, only p53 had independent statistical significance (P = 0.01). All p53 immunopositive stage I-II tumors recurred within 28 months from diagnosis. CONCLUSION: This study found that stage represents the most important prognostic factor for uterine leiomyosarcomas. DNA ploidy and SPF had independent prognostic value. DNA flow cytometry is useful in gaining additional prognostic information. In stage I patients, tumor grade gives significant information regarding clinical outcome. In addition, p53 overexpression may predict a higher risk of recurrence in early stage leiomyosarcomas.

  • 16.
    Blom, René
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Guerrieri, C.
    Department of Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, New York, New York, USA.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malmström, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Sullivan, S.
    Simonsen, E.
    Malignant mixed Mullerian tumors of the uterus: a clinicopathologic, DNA flow cytometric, p53, and mdm-2 analysis of 44 cases1998In: Gynecologic Oncology, ISSN 0090-8258, Vol. 68, no 1, 18-24 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The authors retrospectively analyzed the prognostic significance of p53, mdm-2, DNA ploidy, S-phase fraction (SPF), and traditional clinical and pathologic factors in patients with malignant mixed Müllerian tumors (MMMT) of the uterus. METHODS: Between 1970 and 1995, 44 uterine tumors were diagnosed as MMMT (21 stage I, 2 stage II, 10 stage III, and 11 stage IV). Thirty-two were homologous type and 12 were heterologous type. DNA flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analysis for p53 and mdm-2 overexpression were performed on paraffin-embedded archival tissue. RESULTS: 68% of the tumors were nondiploid and 61% had an SPF greater than 10%. Sixty-one percent overexpressed p53 and 25% were mdm-2-positive. Furthermore, 91% of the tumors had a mitotic count greater than 10/10 hpf and 95% had high-grade cytologic atypia. Twenty-seven (61%) patients died of tumor and 6 (14%) died of intercurrent disease. Eleven (25%) patients are alive with no evidence of disease. The median follow-up for patients still alive was 59 months (range, 28-178 months). The overall 5-year survival rate was 38%. In a univariate analysis that included stage, histologic type, DNA ploidy, SPF, p53, mdm-2, mitotic index, and age, and with survival as the end point, only stage reached statistically prognostic significance. CONCLUSION: The majority of the tumors had obvious signs of aggressiveness such as high grade, high mitotic count, nondiploid pattern, high SPF, and overexpression of p53. This study found that stage is the most important prognostic factor for survival in MMMTs of the uterus.

  • 17.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellegard, Sander
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Björnsson, Bergthor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    The Role of MicroRNA-200 in Progression of Human Colorectal and Breast Cancer2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, 84815- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer has been studied extensively in vitro, but involvement of the EMT in tumorigenesis in vivo is largely unknown. We investigated the potential of microRNAs as clinical markers and analyzed participation of the EMT-associated microRNA-200 ZEB E-cadherin pathway in cancer progression. Expression of the microRNA-200 family was quantified by real-time RT-PCR analysis of fresh-frozen and microdissected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary colorectal tumors, normal colon mucosa, and matched liver metastases. MicroRNA expression was validated by in situ hybridization and after in vitro culture of the malignant cells. To assess EMT as a predictive marker, factors considered relevant in colorectal cancer were investigated in 98 primary breast tumors from a treatment-randomized study. Associations between the studied EMTmarkers were found in primary breast tumors and in colorectal liver metastases. MicroRNA-200 expression in epithelial cells was lower in malignant mucosa than in normal mucosa, and was also decreased in metastatic compared to non-metastatic colorectal cancer. Low microRNA-200 expression in colorectal liver metastases was associated with bad prognosis. In breast cancer, low levels of microRNA-200 were related to reduced survival and high expression of microRNA-200 was predictive of benefit from radiotheraphy. MicroRNA-200 was associated with ER positive status, and inversely correlated to HER2 and overactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, that was associated with high ZEB1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that the stability of microRNAs makes them suitable as clinical markers and that the EMT-related microRNA-200 - ZEB - E-cadherin signaling pathway is connected to established clinical characteristics and can give useful prognostic and treatment-predictive information in progressive breast and colorectal cancers.

  • 18.
    Bojmar, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Zhang, Haiying
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Costa da Silva, Bruno
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Olsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Vincent, Theresa
    Departments of Physiology and Biophysics and Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA / Department of Medicine, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Lyden, David
    Children’s Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Departments of Pediatrics, and Cell and Developmental Biology, Drukier Institute for Children’s Health, Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    miR-18a is regulated between progressive compartments of cancers, and incorporated in exosomes with the potential of creating premetastatic niches and predict cancer outcome2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimate cause of death for many cancer patients is the spread of the cancer via metastasis. Even so, there are still a lack of knowledge regarding the metastasis process. This study was performed to investigate the role of metastamirs in exosomes and their metastatic patterns. We used the well-established isogeneic murine cancer model of low metastatic 67NR cells, mimicking luminal/basal breast tumors, and highly metastatic 4T1 cells with characteristics of basal breast  tumors. We studied the exosomal properties and pre-metastatic effects in this metastasis model and compared human materials and exosomes of several other tumor types. Our data clearly demonstrated that exosomes from the highly metastatic cells home to the metastatic organs of their parental cells whereas exosomes from cells with low metastatic potential mostly located to lymph nodes. The exosome protein cargos also resembled their parental cells and potentially affects their target organs, and cells, differently. Furthermore, the exosomes from the highly metastatic cells had a more pronounced effect on tumor growth and pre-metastatic changes than the low metastatic exosomes. The microRNA-18a, a predictor of metastasis, was present to a higher extent in metastatic exosomes as compared to low metastatic exosomes, and altered the tumor progressive properties. Our findings support the role of exomirs as important players in the metastatic process, the value as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets.

  • 19.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahnström Waltersson, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, T
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, L
    Department of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Amplification of CCND1 and PAK1 as predictors of recurrence and tamoxifen resistance in postmenopausal breast cancer.2007In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 26, no 49, 6997-7005 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 11q13 region is amplified in approximately 15% of all breast tumors. Situated in this region are the cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) and the p-21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) gene. Both genes encode proteins shown to activate the estrogen receptor (ER), leading to transcription of CCND1 and other ER-responsive genes. Here, we investigate the prognostic and treatment predictive role of CCND1 and PAK1 gene amplification in postmenopausal breast cancer patients randomized to tamoxifen treatment or no adjuvant treatment. Amplification of CCND1 and PAK1, assessed by real-time PCR, was observed in 12.5 and 9.3%, respectively. Amplification of PAK1 was seen in 37% of the CCND1-amplified tumors, indicating coamplification (P<0.001). In ER-positive patients, amplification of at least one of the genes indicated a reduced recurrence-free survival (P=0.025). When response to tamoxifen treatment was analysed, patients with PAK1 amplification showed decreased benefit from the drug (ER+; relative risk ratio (RR)=1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-5.55) compared to patients without amplification (ER+; RR=0.53; 95% CI, 0.32-0.88). This was not evident for CCND1 amplification. We show that PAK1 may be a predictor of tamoxifen resistance and furthermore, we do not discard PAK1 as a potential candidate oncogene in the 11q13 amplicon. In addition, we show that high pak1 protein levels may predict tamoxifen insensitivity.

  • 20.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, T
    Karolinska Instititute.
    Skoog, L
    Karolinska Instititute.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stal, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Estrogen Receptor alpha Phosphorylation on Serine 305, p21-Activated Kinase 1 and Tamoxifen Response in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in CANCER RESEARCH, vol 69, issue 24, pp 596S-596S2009In: CANCER RESEARCH, 2009, Vol. 69, no 24, 596S-596S p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 21.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    S6 kinase signaling and tamoxifen response in breast cancer cells and in two randomized breast cancer cohorts2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Detecting signals in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and the estrogen receptor (ER) pathways for prediction of treatment response may be a future clinical tool in primary breast cancer. Here, we investigated the validity and value of the mTOR targets p70-S6 kinase (S6K) 1 and 2 as biomarkers for tamoxifen sensitivity in vitro and in two independent tamoxifen randomized postmenopausal breast cancer cohorts. In addition, the prognostic value of the S6Ks was evaluated. A simultaneous knockdown of the S6Ks in ER-positive breast cancer cells resulted in G1 arrest, and tamoxifen-induced G1 arrest was in part S6K1+S6K2 dependent, suggesting separate roles in proliferation and in tamoxifen response. We found S6K1 to correlate with HER2 and cytoplasmic Akt activity, whereas S6K2 and phosphorylated S6K were closer connected with ER positivity, low proliferation and nucleic p-Akt. Treatment prediction and prognosis were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Nuclear accumulation of S6K1 was indicative of a reduced tamoxifen treatment effect, compared with a significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment in patients without tumor S6K1 nuclear accumulation. Patients with a combination of S6K1 nuclear accumulation and S6K2 cytoplasmic accumulation in the tumor cells had no tamoxifen benefit. Also, S6K1 and S6K2 activation, indicated by p-S6K-t389 expression, was associated with low benefit from tamoxifen compared with untreated patients. In addition, high protein expression of S6K1, independent of localization, predicted worse prognosis. This was not evident for variations in S6K2 or p-S6K-t389 expression.

    In conclusion, the mTOR targeted kinases S6K1 and S6K2 interfere with proliferation and response to tamoxifen. Monitoring their activity andintracellular localization may provide biomarkers for breast cancer treatment, allowing for identification of a group of patients less likely tobenefit from tamoxifen and thus in need of an alternative or additional treatment.

  • 22.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Konstantinell, Aelita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    S6 kinase signaling: tamoxifen response and prognostic indication in two breast cancer cohorts2015In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 22, no 3, 331-343 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of signals in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) pathways may be a future clinical tool for the prediction of adjuvant treatment response in primary breast cancer. Using immunohistological staining, we investigated the value of the mTOR targets p70-S6 kinase (S6K) 1 and 2 as biomarkers for tamoxifen benefit in two independent clinical trials comparing adjuvant tamoxifen with no tamoxifen or 5 years versus 2 years of tamoxifen treatment. In addition, the prognostic value of the S6Ks was evaluated. We found that S6K1 correlated with proliferation, HER2 status, and cytoplasmic AKT activity, whereas high protein expression levels of S6K2 and phosphorylated (p) S6K were more common in ER-positive, and low-proliferative tumors with pAKT-s473 localized to the nucelus. Nuclear accumulation of S6K1 was indicative of a reduced tamoxifen effect (hazard ratio (HR): 1.07, 95% CI: 0.53-2.81, P=0.84), compared with a significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment in patients without tumor S6K1 nuclear accumulation (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.29-0.62, Pless than0.00001). Also S6K1 and S6K2 activation, indicated by pS6K-t389 expression, was associated with low benefit from tamoxifen (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.50-1.87, P=0.92). In addition, high protein expression of S6K1, independent of localization, predicted worse prognosis in a multivariate analysis, P=0.00041 (cytoplasm), P=0.016 (nucleus). In conclusion, the mTOR-activated kinases S6K1 and S6K2 interfere with proliferation and response to tamoxifen. Monitoring their activity and intracellular localization may provide biomarkers for breast cancer treatment, allowing the identification of a group of patients less likely to benefit from tamoxifen and thus in need of an alternative or additional targeted treatment.

  • 23.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pandiyan, Muneeswaran J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Westman, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Stockholm S Gen Hospital, Sweden .
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Activation of Akt, mTOR, and the estrogen receptor as a signature to predict tamoxifen treatment benefit2013In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 137, no 2, 397-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The frequent alterations of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR-growth signaling pathway are proposed mechanisms for resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer, partly through regulation of estrogen receptor alpha (ER) activity. Reliable biomarkers for treatment prediction are required for improved individualized treatment. We performed a retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of primary tumors from 912 postmenopausal patients with node-negative breast cancer, randomized to either tamoxifen or no adjuvant treatment. Phosphorylated (p) Akt-serine (s) 473, p-mTOR-s2448, and ER phosphorylations-s167 and -s305 were evaluated as potential biomarkers of prognosis and tamoxifen treatment efficacy. High expression of p-mTOR indicated a reduced response to tamoxifen, most pronounced in the ER+/progesterone receptor (PgR) + subgroup (tamoxifen vs. no tamoxifen: hazard ratio (HR), 0.86; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.31-2.38; P = 0.78), whereas low p-mTOR expression predicted tamoxifen benefit (HR, 0.29; 95 % CI, 0.18-0.49; P = 0.000002). In addition, nuclear p-Akt-s473 as well as p-ER at -s167 and/or -s305 showed interaction with tamoxifen efficacy with borderline statistical significance. A combination score of positive pathway markers including p-Akt, p-mTOR, and p-ER showed significant association with tamoxifen benefit (test for interaction; P = 0.029). Cross-talk between growth signaling pathways and ER-signaling has been proposed to affect tamoxifen response in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. The results support this hypothesis, as an overactive pathway was significantly associated with reduced response to tamoxifen. A clinical pre-treatment test for cross-talk markers would be a step toward individualized adjuvant endocrine treatment with or without the addition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors.

  • 24.
    Bostner, Josefine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Estrogen Receptor-alpha Phosphorylation at Serine 305, Nuclear p21-Activated Kinase 1 Expression, and Response to Tamoxifen in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer2010In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 16, no 5, 1624-1633 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In vitro, p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) phosphorylates the serine 305 residue of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) and influences the response of breast cancer cells to tamoxifen. We investigated the influence of Pak1 and pER alpha(ser305) on breast cancer prognosis and results of tamoxifen therapy. Experimental Design: We examined Pak1 and pER alpha(ser305) protein by immunohistochemistry in a series of 912 tumors from node-negative breast cancer patients randomized to tamoxifen or no adjuvant endocrine treatment. Results: Cytoplasmic Pak1 correlated to large tumors and ER negativity, whereas nuclear Pak1 and pER alpha(ser305) correlated to small tumors and ER positivity. Nuclear expression of Pak1 and pER alpha(ser305) predicted reduced response to tamoxifen in patients with ER alpha-positive tumors (tamoxifen versus no tamoxifen: hazard ratio (HR), 1.33; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.42-4.2; P = 0.63), whereas patients lacking this combination benefitted significantly from tamoxifen (HR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.30-0.62; P less than 0.0001). Similar nonsignificant trends were detected in analyses of the proteins separately. Pak1 in the cytoplasm was an independent prognostic marker, indicating increased recurrence rate (HR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.17-2.74; P = 0.0068) and breast cancer mortality (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.14-3.46; P = 0.016) for patients randomized to no adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients with tumors expressing Pak1 and pER alpha(ser305) in combination are a group in which tamoxifen treatment is insufficient. In addition, the pathway may be of interest as a drug target in breast cancer. Furthermore, the findings support previous studies showing that Pak1 has differential roles in the cytoplasm and the nucleus.

  • 25.
    Busch, Susann
    et al.
    University of Manchester, England .
    Ryden, Lisa
    University of Lund Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Landberg, Goran
    University of Manchester, England Lund University, Sweden Gothenburg University, Sweden .
    Low ERK Phosphorylation in Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Associated with Tamoxifen Resistance in Pre-Menopausal Breast Cancer2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate ERK phosphorylation as a stromal biomarker for breast cancer prognosis and tamoxifen treatment prediction within a randomized tamoxifen trial. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients and Methods: Tissue microarrays of two breast cancer cohorts including in total 743 invasive breast cancer samples were analyzed for ERK phosphorylation (pERK) and smooth muscle actin-alpha expression (SMA alpha) in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and links to clinico-pathological data and treatment-predictive values were delineated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: By analyzing a unique randomized tamoxifen trial including breast cancer patients receiving no adjuvant treatment we show for the first time that patients low in ERK phosphorylation in CAFs did not respond to tamoxifen treatment despite having estrogen-receptor alpha (ER alpha-positive tumors compared to patients with high pERK levels in CAFs (P = 0.015, multivariate Cox regression interaction analysis). In both clinical materials we further show a significant association between pERK and SMA alpha, a characteristic marker for activated fibroblasts. SMA alpha expression however was not linked to treatment-predictive information but instead had prognostic qualities. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The data suggests that the presence of a subpopulation of CAFs, defined by minimal activated ERK signaling, is linked to an impaired tamoxifen response. Thus, this report illustrates the importance of the stroma for monitoring treatment effects in pre-menopausal breast cancer.

  • 26.
    Busch, Susann
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Sims, Andrew H.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Landberg, Goran
    Gothenburg University, Sweden; University of Manchester, England.
    Loss of TGF beta Receptor Type 2 Expression Impairs Estrogen Response and Confers Tamoxifen Resistance2015In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 75, no 7, 1457-1469 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One third of the patients with estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)-positive breast cancer who are treated with the antiestrogen tamoxifen will either not respond to initial therapy or will develop drug resistance. Endocrine response involves crosstalk between ER alpha and TGF beta signaling, such that tamoxifen non-responsiveness or resistance in breast cancer might involve aberrant TGF beta signaling. In this study, we analyzed TGF beta receptor type 2 (TGFBR2) expression and correlated it with ER alpha status and phosphorylation in a cohort of 564 patients who had been randomized to tamoxifen or no-adjuvant treatment for invasive breast carcinoma. We also evaluated an additional four independent genetic datasets in invasive breast cancer. In all the cohorts we analyzed, we documented an association of low TGFBR2 protein and mRNA expression with tamoxifen resistance. Functional investigations confirmed that cell cycle or apoptosis responses to estrogen or tamoxifen in ER alpha-positive breast cancer cells were impaired by TGFBR2 silencing, as was ER alpha phosphorylation, tamoxifen-induced transcriptional activation of TGF beta, and upregulation of the multidrug resistance protein ABCG2. Acquisition of low TGFBR2 expression as a contributing factor to endocrine resistance was validated prospectively in a tamoxifen-resistant cell line generated by long-term drug treatment. Collectively, our results established a central contribution of TGF beta signaling in endocrine resistance in breast cancer and offered evidence that TGFBR2 can serve as an independent biomarker to predict treatment outcomes in ER alpha-positive forms of this disease.

  • 27.
    Chavez Sanchez, B
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute & University Hospital.
    Sundqvist, M
    Kalmar Hospital.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Linderholm, B
    PROLONGED TAMOXIFEN TREATMENT INCREASES SURVIVAL FOR PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY BREAST CANCERS EXPRESSING HIGH LEVELS OF VEGF2009In: in ANNALS OF ONCOLOGY, vol 20, 2009, Vol. 20, 47-47 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Djerf, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trinks, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Green, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    The pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib promotes apoptosis of malignant melanoma in vitro and displays anti-tumor activity in vivo2011In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 414, no 3, 563-568 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ErbB receptor family has been suggested to constitute a therapeutic target for tumor-specific treatment of malignant melanoma. Here we investigate the effect of the pan-ErbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor canertinib on cell growth and survival in human melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Canertinib significantly inhibited growth of cultured melanoma cells, RaH3 and RaH5, in a dose-dependent manner as determined by cell counting. Half-maximum growth inhibitory dose (IC(50)) was approximately 0.8 mu M and by 5 mu M both cell lines were completely growth-arrested within 72 h of treatment. Incubation of exponentially growing RaH3 and RaH5 with 1 mu M canertinib accumulated the cells in the G(1)-phase of the cell cycle within 24 h of treatment without induction of apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry. Immunoblot analysis showed that 1 mu M canertinib inhibited ErbB1-3 receptor phosphorylation with a concomitant decrease of Akt-, Erk1/2- and Stat3 activity in both cell lines. In contrast to the cytostatic effect observed at doses less than= 5 mu M canertinib, higher concentrations induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the Annexin V method and Western blot analysis of PARP cleavage. Furthermore, canertinib significantly inhibited growth of RaH3 and RaH5 melanoma xenografts in nude mice. Pharmacological targeting of the ErbB receptors may prove successful in the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma.

  • 29.
    Djerf Svenningsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olausson, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Hallbeck, Anna-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Walz, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Resistance to gefitinib in malignant melanoma cells is related to increased expression of Met and the insulin receptor and sustained Akt signaling2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Acquired resistance to cancer therapy, including targeted therapies such as epidermal growth factor receptor (ErbB) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), constitutes a major clinical problem in treating patients with malignant disease. Several drug resistance mechanisms for ErbB1 TKIs involving abnormal activation of growth factor receptors or activation of intracellular signaling pathways have been discovered. ErbB TKIs have recently been shown to inhibit growth in melanoma cells. This study was undertaken to develop a gefitinib-resistant melanoma cell line in order to find any resistance mechanism to gefitinib in melanoma cells lacking activating mutation in BRAF or NRAS.

    Material and methods: A malignant melanoma cell line (RaH5) was made resistant to the ErbB1 TKI gefitinib by continuous culture with stepwise increasing concentrations of the drug up to 10 μM. The phosphorylation status of 42 different human receptor tyrosine kinases was screened in a protein array in resistant (RaH5ZDR) and wild-type RaH5 cells treated with or without gefitinib. The PI3K, MAPK and Stat3 signaling pathways were studied in an analogous way by Western blot analysis; 2-D gel electrophoresis was performed to determine other potential proteins involved in gefitinib resistance in RaH5 cells. In addition, the effect of the pan-ErbB TKI canertinib on gefitinib-resistant cells was investigated.

    Results: Protein array experiments showed that only Met and the insulin receptor (IR) exhibited substantially increased activation in RaH5ZDR cells as compared to their nonresistant counterparts. Interestingly, following gefitinib treatment ErbB2 and ErbB3 receptor signaling in resistant cells were equally well suppressed as in non-resistant cells. However, downstream Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was inhibited to a greater extent in non-resistant RaH5 cells.

    Conclusion: Resistance to gefitinib in RaH5 cells appears to be related to an increased expression of Met and IR and linked to a more persistent signaling through Akt and Erk1/2. However, additional studies are required to further elucidate the resistance to gefitinib in our experimental system.

  • 30.
    Ekholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ryhov County Hospital, Sweden.
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Two Years of Adjuvant Tamoxifen Provides a Survival Benefit Compared With No Systemic Treatment in Premenopausal Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: Long-Term Follow-Up (> 25 years) of the Phase III SBII:2pre Trial2016In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, ISSN 0732-183X, E-ISSN 1527-7755, Vol. 34, no 19, 2232-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effect of 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen compared with no systemic treatment (control) in premenopausal patients with breast cancer over different time periods through long-term (amp;gt; 25 years) follow-up. Patients and Methods Premenopausal patients with primary breast cancer (N = 564) were randomly assigned to 2 years of tamoxifen (n = 276) or no systemic treatment (n = 288). Data regarding date and cause of death were obtained from the Swedish Cause of Death Register. End points were cumulative mortality (CM) and cumulative breast cancer-related mortality (CBCM). The median follow-up for the 250 patients still alive in April 2014 was 26.3 years (range, 22.7 to 29.7 years). Results In patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors (n = 362), tamoxifen was associated with a marginal reduction in CM (hazard ratio [HR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.03; P = .075) and a significant reduction in CBCM (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.99; P = .046). The effect seemed to vary over time (CM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.73; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.91; and after 15 years: HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.42; CBCM years 0 to 5: HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.82; years amp;gt;5 to 15: HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.86; and after 15 years: HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.36 to 1.44). Conclusion Two years of adjuvant tamoxifen resulted in a long-term survival benefit in premenopausal patients with estrogen receptor-positive primary breast cancer. (C) 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology. Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

  • 31.
    Fernö, Mårten
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baldetorp, Bo
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Hatschek, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Källström, Ann-Christine
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment.
    Malmström, Per
    Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Lund.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rydén, Stefan
    Department of Surgery, Ängelholm, Sweden.
    Results of two or five years of adjuvant tamoxifen correlated to steroid receptor and S-phase levels2000In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 59, no 1, 69-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Swedish cooperative trial demonstrated that 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen was more beneficial than 2 years of tamoxifen in the treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER) positive, early stage, invasive breast cancer. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the importance of progesterone receptor (PgR) and ER concentration levels for patients participating in the trial and still distant recurrence free two years after the primary operation. Subgroup analyses revealed that only patients with ER positive and PgR positive breast cancer had improved distant recurrence free survival (DRFS) by prolonged tamoxifen therapy (p=0.0016). Patients with ER negative and PgR negative as well as ER positive and PgR negative tumors showed no significant effect of prolonged tamoxifen (p=0.53 and p=0.80, respectively). The percentage of ER negative and PgR positive breast cancers was too small (2.2%) for any meaningful subgroup analysis. There was a significant positive trend that the concentration level of PgR (high positive vs. low positive vs. negative) decreased the recurrence rate for those with prolonged therapy. No corresponding pattern was found for the ER content. S-phase fraction did not correlate to the recurrence rate of PgR positive breast cancers. Patients recurring during tamoxifen therapy had receptor negative tumors to a greater extent than those recurring after tamoxifen treatment.

    In conclusion, prolonged tamoxifen therapy for 5 years instead of 2 years was found to be beneficial for patients with ER positive and PgR positive breast cancer, whereas three extra years of tamoxifen had little or no effect for patients with ER positive but PgR negative tumors as well as for steroid receptor negative patients.

  • 32.
    Fohlin, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Perez-Tenorio, Gizeh
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Akt2 expression is associated with good long-term prognosis in oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer2013In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 49, no 6, 1196-1204 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Akt is a signalling modulator for many cellular processes, including metabolism, cell proliferation, cell survival and cell growth. Three isoforms of Akt have been identified, but only a few studies have concerned the isoform-specific roles in the prognosis of breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 (Akt1) and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 2 (Akt2) in oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) and oestrogen receptor negative (ER–) breast cancer with long-term follow-up.

    Material and methods

    The expression of Akt in tumour tissue was analysed with immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 272 postmenopausal patients with stage II breast cancer. The median follow-up time was 19 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Cox’s proportional hazards model.

    Results

    The risk of distant recurrence was reduced for patients with ER+ tumours expressing Akt2 compared to patients with no Akt2 expression (HR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.29–0.82, p = 0.007). When adjusting for important clinical tumour characteristics and treatment, Akt2 was still an independent prognostic factor (HR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.21–0.68, p = 0.001) and the association remained long-term. The prognostic value of Akt2 increased with higher oestrogen receptor levels from no effect among patients with ER– tumours to 68% risk reduction for the group with high ER-levels (P for trend = 0.042). Akt1 showed no significant prognostic information.

    Conclusion

    Our results indicate that Akt2 expression is associated with a lower distant recurrence rate for patients with ER+ tumours and that this association remains long-term. The prognostic value of Akt2 increases with higher oestrogen receptor expression, motivating further mechanistic studies on the role of Akt2 in ER+ breast cancer.

  • 33.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Reizer, Edwin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Tina, Elisabet
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Mitochondrial regulation of cell cycle progression through SLC25A432016In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 469, no 4, 1090-1096 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing body of evidence is pointing towards mitochondrial regulation of the cell cycle. In a previous study of HER2-positive tumours we could demonstrate a common loss in the gene encoding for the mitochondrial transporter SLC25A43 and also a significant relation between SLC25A43 protein expression and S-phase fraction. Here, we investigated the consequence of suppressed SLC25A43 expression on cell cycle progression and proliferation in breast epithelial cells. In the present study, we suppressed SLC25A43 using siRNA in immortalised non-cancerous breast epithelial MCF10A cells and HER2-positive breast cancer cells BT-474. Viability, apoptosis, cell proliferation rate, cell cycle phase distribution, and nuclear Ki-67 and p21, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle related gene expressions were analysed using real-time PCR. We found that SLC25A43 knockdown in MCF10A cells significantly inhibited cell cycle progression during G(1)-to-S transition, thus significantly reducing the proliferation rate and fraction of Ki-67 positive MCF10A cells. In contrast, suppressed SLC25A43 expression in BT-474 cells resulted in a significantly increased proliferation rate together with an enhanced G(1)-to-S transition. This was reflected by an increased fraction of Ki-67 positive cells and reduced level of nuclear p21. In line with our previous results, we show a role for SLC25A43 as a regulator of cell cycle progression and proliferation through a putative mitochondrial checkpoint. These novel data further strengthen the connection between mitochondrial function and the cell cycle, both in non-malignant and in cancer cells. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 34.
    Gothlin Eremo, Anna
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Tina, Elisabet
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Wegman, Pia
    Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fransen, Karin
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Regional Cancer Centre Stockholm Gotland, Sweden.
    Wingren, Sten
    University of Örebro, Sweden.
    HER4 tumor expression in breast cancer patients randomized to treatment with or without tamoxifen2015In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 47, no 4, 1311-1320 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 4 is a relative of HER2 and has been associated to endocrine breast cancer and prediction of tamoxifen response. In addition to PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway activation, ligand binding to HER4 triggers proteolytic cleavage and release of an intracellular receptor domain (4ICD) with signaling properties. The aim of the present study was to analyze HER4 protein expression and intracellular localization in breast cancer tissue from patients randomized to treatment with or without adjuvant tamoxifen. To investigate HER4 expression and localization in response to estradiol (E2) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) exposure, we also performed in vitro studies. Cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane expression of HER4 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor tissue from 912 breast cancer patients. Three different breast epithelia cancer cell lines were exposed to E2 and 4-OHT and mRNA expression was analyzed using qPCR. Further, nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were separated and analyzed with western blotting. We found an association between nuclear HER4 protein expression and ER-positivity (P=0.004). Furthermore, significant association was found between cytoplasmic HER4 and ER-negativity (Pless than0.0005), PgR-negativity (Pless than0.0005), tumor size greater than20 mm (P=0.001) and HER2-negativity (P=0.008). However, no overall significance of HER4 on recurrence-free survival was found. After E2 exposure, HER4 mRNA and protein expression had decreased in two cell lines in vitro yet no changes in nuclear or cytoplasmic protein fractions were seen. In conclusion, nuclear HER4 seem to be co-located with ER, however, we did not find support for overall HER4 expression in independently predicting response of tamoxifen treatment. The possible influence of separate isoforms was not tested and future studies may further evaluate HER4 significance.

  • 35.
    Gothlin Eremo, Anna
    et al.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Wegman, Pia
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Stockholm South Gen Hospital, Sweden .
    Wingren, Sten
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Wwox expression may predict benefit from adjuvant tamoxifen in randomized breast cancer patients2013In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 29, no 4, 1467-1474 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced or absent Wwox expression has recently been associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer and has also been proposed as a candidate predictive marker for treatment. We aimed to investigate the correlation of Wwox expression with the outcome of tamoxifen treatment by examining tissues from 912 randomized breast cancer patients. Paraffin-embedded tissues from patient tumors were arranged on tissue microarray, and Wwox protein was stained using immunohistochemistry. After microscopic examination, the results were analyzed with Cox regression, Kaplan-Meier survival curves and the log-rank test. In the group of cases having a tumor absent for Wwox expression, there was no difference in recurrence-free survival between treated and untreated patients (P=0.81). For treated cases with a tumor expressing moderate or strong Wwox protein, recurrence-free survival was improved (P=0.001 and P=0.003, respectively). The test for interaction between Wwox and treatment response demonstrated a decreased risk of recurrence for treated patients with a moderate or strong Wwox expression (HR=0.31, 95% CI 0.10-0.98 and HR=0.28, 95% CI 0.08-0.97, respectively). Our results indicate that patients with high expression of Wwox may gain more benefit from treatment with tamoxifen.

  • 36.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Bachmeier, K
    Central Hospital, Karlstad.
    Bäcklund, L M
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Carlsson, L
    District Hospital, Sundsvall.
    Hansen, J
    Central Hospital, Karlstad.
    Lagerlund, M
    District Hospital, Kalmar.
    Norberg, B
    District Hospital, Jönköping.
    Franzén, A
    MSD Sweden, Stockholm.
    Åleskog, A
    MSD Sweden, Stockholm.
    Malmström, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, LAH Linköping.
    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as first-line monotherapy in elderly women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: Novel treatment predictive factors identified2011In: Cancer Letters, ISSN 0304-3835, E-ISSN 1872-7980, Vol. 313, no 2, 145-153 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of single-agent pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) as first-line treatment for elderly women with advanced breast cancer and evaluated predictive markers for response and toxicity. Twenty-five women ⩾65years received 40mg/m(2) PLD every 28days. Time to treatment failure (TTF), response rate, time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) was calculated. The ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), tumor MRN complex, and TOPOIIα were analyzed. A mean of 7.4 cycles PLD were administered and TTF was 5.5months and OS 20.6months. ABCB1 SNPs were found to correlate to both efficacy and toxicity, while tumor expression of the MRN complex and TOPOIIα correlated to TTP. PLD is a safe and effective treatment for elderly breast cancer patients. Also potential predictive markers were identified.

  • 37.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ahnström, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kirschner, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Department of Oncology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Department of Oncology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Division of Cytology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Amplification of HSD17B1 and ERBB2 in primary breast cancer2003In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 22, no 1, 34-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogens play a crucial role in the development of breast cancer. Estradiol can be produced in the breast tissue in situ, and one of the enzymes involved in this process is 17β-hydroxysteriod dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) type 1 that catalyzes the interconversion of estrone (E1) to the biologically more potent estradiol (E2). The gene coding for 17β-HSD type 1 (HSD17B1) is located at 17q12-21, close to the more studied ERBB2 and BRCA1. The aim of this study was to investigate if HSD17B1 shows an altered gene copy number in breast cancer. We used real-time PCR and examined 221 postmenopausal breast tumors for amplification of HSD17B1 and ERBB2. In all, 32 tumors (14.5%) showed amplification of HSD17B1 and 21% were amplified for ERBB2. Amplification of the two genes was correlated (P = 0.00078) and in 14 tumors (44%) with amplification of HSD17B1, ERBB2 was co amplified. The patients with amplification in at least one of the genes had a significantly worse outcome than patients without (P = 0.0059). For estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients who received adjuvant tamoxifen, amplification of HSD17B1 was related to decreased breast cancer survival (P = 0.017), whereas amplification of ERRB2 was not. Amplification of HSD17B1 might be an indicator of adverse prognosis among ER-positive patients, and possibly a mechanism for decreased benefit from tamoxifen treatment.

  • 38.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hellqvist, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in local oestrogen synthesis have prognostic significance in breast cancer2005In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 92, no 3, 547-552 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) enzymes are involved in the local regulation of sex steroids. The 17HSD type 1 enzyme catalyses the interconversion of the weak oestrone (E1) to the more potent oestradiol (E2), whereas 17HSD type 2 catalyses the oxidation of E2 to E1. The aim of this study was to correlate the expression of these enzymes in the tumour with the recurrence-free survival of tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients. We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to investigate the mRNA expression of 17HSD types 1 and 2 in tumour samples from 230 postmenopausal patients. For the patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between recurrence-free survival and expression of 17HSD type 2 (P = 0.026). We examined the ratio of 17HSD types 2 and 1, and ER-positive patients with low ratios showed a significantly higher rate of recurrence than those with higher ratios (P = 0.0047), ER positive patients with high expression levels of 17HSD type 1 had a significantly higher risk for late relapse (P = 0.0051). The expression of 17HSD types 1 and 2 in breast cancer differs from the expression of these enzymes in normal mammary gland, and this study indicates that the expression has prognostic significance in breast cancer.

  • 39.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmlund, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ferraud, Lilianne
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rutqvist, Lars Erik
    Clinic of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Division of Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expression of COX-2 and steroid converting enzymes in breast cancer2006In: Oncology Reports, ISSN 1021-335X, E-ISSN 1791-2431, Vol. 16, no 2, 219-224 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COX-2 is upregulated in many breast tumors, and one of the products of COX-2 is PGE2 that is suggested to upregulate aromatase through cAMP signaling in breast cancer. Although aromatase can increase the estrogen levels in tumors, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) activity is finally needed for the estrone/estradiol regulation. The aim of this study was to investigate if the protein expression of enzymes involved in estrogen synthesis shows covariation with the expression of COX-2. We also wanted to correlate these results with prognosis. We analyzed the expression of COX-2, aromatase, 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 with immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays composed of 356 primary breast tumors. In the present study COX-2 was correlated to aromatase (P<0.00001), 17HSD1 (P=0.0073), and 17HSD2 (P<0.00001). Patients with ER positive tumors expressing low amounts of 17HSD2 had decreased breast cancer survival (P=0.013). Elevated expression of COX-2 and aromatase was more frequent among larger tumors (P=0.017 and P=0.013). COX-2 expression correlates with the levels of the examined steroid converting enzymes and may contribute to increased estrogen levels in the tumor. In breast cancer cells, the regulatory function of 17HSD2 could be lost, and in the present study patients with low or non-detectable levels of 17HSD2 had worse prognosis than had breast cancer patients with higher levels of the enzyme.

  • 40.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Jerevall, Piiha-Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Karl
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Amplification of HSD17B1 has prognostic significance in postmenopausal breast cancer2008In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 108, no 1, 35-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ synthesis of estrogens is believed to be of great importance for the progression of breast cancer. In postmenopausal women most estrogens are synthesized in peripheral hormone-target tissues from circulating precursor steroids, by the enzymes involved in formation of active estrogens. One of the enzymes involved in this process is 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) type 1. This enzyme catalyzes the interconversion of estrone (E1) to the biologically more potent estradiol (E2). The gene coding for 17β-HSD type 1 (HSD17B1) is located at 17q12-21. The aim of this study was to investigate altered gene copy number of HSD17B1 in breast cancer. We used real-time PCR and examined 387 postmenopausal breast tumors for amplification of HSD17B1, and if an increased mRNA level of this enzyme is associated with amplification of the gene. We also investigated whether amplification of HSD17B1 has a prognostic value. There was a significant correlation between gene copy number of HSD17B1 and mRNA expression level (P = 0.00002). ER-positive patients with amplification of HSD17B1 showed lower breast cancer survival than patients without amplification (P = 0.025). Among ER-negative patients there was no significant correlation between increased gene copy number of HSD17B1 and prognosis. Furthermore, we found that amplification of the gene had prognostic significance in multivariate analysis adjusting for other clinicopathological variables. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 41.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Birgit
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arnesson, Lars-Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abnormal expression of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases in breast cancer predicts late recurrence2001In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 61, no 23, 8448-8451 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) enzymes are involved in the interconversion of biologically active and inactive sex steroids and are considered to play a critical role in the in situ metabolism of estrogen, especially in estrogen-dependent breast cancer. The gene encoding 17β-HSD type 2 is located at 16q24.1-2, and earlier studies have shown that allelic loss in this region is an early and frequent event in breast cancer progression. Recurrence of hormone-dependent breast cancer frequently occurs several years after the primary treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the expression of 17β-HSD types 1 and 2 differs in tumors from patients with late relapses (>5 years) compared with controls without recurrence after long-term follow-up. Using real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the normal mammary gland expressed both 17β-HSD types 1 and 2, whereas the tumors frequently lacked detectable levels of type 2. Only 10% of the estrogen receptor-positive tumors expressed type 2, whereas 31% of the ERnegative tumors did so (P = 0.031). In a case-control series of 84 patients, a high level of 17β-HSD type 1 indicated increased risk to develop late relapse of breast cancer (odds ratio, 3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0–12.6; P = 0.041), whereas retained expression of type 2 indicated decreased risk (odds ratio, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.05–1.2; P = 0.050). In multivariate analysis of the estrogen receptor-positive patients, the absence of 17β-HSD type 2 combined with a high expression of type 1 showed prognostic significance (P = 0.016) in addition to DNA aneuploidy (P = 0.0058), whereas progesterone receptor status did not (P = 0.71). These findings suggest that abnormal expression of 17β-HSD isoforms has prognostic significance in breast cancer and that altered expression of these enzymes may have importance in breast cancer progression.

  • 42.
    Hilborn, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gacic, Jelena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Androgen receptor expression predicts beneficial tamoxifen response in oestrogen receptor-alpha-negative breast cancer2016In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 114, no 3, 248-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed in breast cancer, its relevance in the disease is not fully understood. In addition, the relevance of AR in determining tamoxifen treatment efficiency requires evaluation. Purpose: To investigate the tamoxifen predictive relevance of the AR protein expression in breast cancer. Methods Patients were randomised to tamoxifen 40 mg daily for 2 or 5 years or to no endocrine treatment. Mean follow-up was 15 years. Hazard ratios were calculated with recurrence-free survival as end point. Results: In patients with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumours, expression of AR predicted decreased recurrence rate with tamoxifen (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.14-0.81; P = 0.015), whereas the opposite was seen in the AR- group (HR = 2.92; 95% CI = 1.16-7.31; P = 0.022). Interaction test was significant P &lt; 0.001. Patients with triple-negative and AR+ tumours benefitted from tamoxifen treatment (HR = 0.12; 95% CI = 0.014-0.95 P = 0.044), whereas patients with AR- tumours had worse outcome when treated with tamoxifen (HR = 3.98; 95% CI = 1.32-12.03; P = 0.014). Interaction test was significant P = 0.003. Patients with ER+ tumours showed benefit from tamoxifen treatment regardless of AR expression. Conclusions: AR can predict tamoxifen treatment benefit in patients with ER- tumours and triple-negative breast cancer.

  • 43.
    Hilborn, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sivik, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology.
    Jansson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    C-X-C ligand 10 and C-X-C receptor 3 status can predict tamoxifen treatment response in breast cancer patients2014In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 145, no 1, 73-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the expression levels of CXCL10 and CXCR3 in tumors from breast cancer patients randomized to adjuvant tamoxifen treatment or no endocrine treatment, in order to further study the connection to prognosis and prediction of tamoxifen treatment outcome. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays from 912 breast cancer patients randomized to tamoxifen or no endocrine treatment. CXCR3 status was found to be a prognostic tool in predicting distant recurrence, as well as reduced breast cancer-specific survival. In patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors, tumors with strong CXCL10 levels had improved effect of tamoxifen treatment in terms of local recurrence-free survival [risk ratio (RR) 0.46 (95 % CI 0.25-0.85, P = 0.01)] compared with patients with tumors expressing weak CXCL10 expression. Further, patients with ER-positive tumors with strong CXCR3 expression had an improved effect of tamoxifen in terms of breast cancer-specific survival [RR 0.34 (95 % CI 0.19-0.62, P less than 0.001)] compared with the group with weak CXCR3 levels [RR 1.33 (95 % CI 0.38-4.79, P = 0.65)]. We show here for the first time that CXCL10 and CXCR3 expression are both predictors of favorable outcome in patients treated with tamoxifen.

  • 44.
    Holm, C
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Kok, M
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Michalides, R
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Fles, R
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Koornstra, R H T
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Wesseling, J
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Hauptmann, M
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Neefjes, J
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Peterse, J L
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Landberg, G
    Lund University.
    Linn, S C
    Netherlands Cancer Institute.
    Phosphorylation of the oestrogen receptor alpha at serine 305 and prediction of tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer2009In: JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY, ISSN 0022-3417, Vol. 217, no 3, 372-379 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorylation of oestrogen receptor a at serine 305 (ER alpha S305-P) induces tamoxifen resistance in experimental studies, but does not influence response to other endocrine agents, such as fulvestrant. We evaluated ER alpha S305-P using immunohistochemistry in 377 breast carcinomas from premenopausal participants of a randomized trial (n = 248) and patients with advanced disease (n = 129). Among the premenopausal patients, adjuvant tamoxifen improved recurrence-free survival (RFS) for ER alpha S305-P-negative tumours (multivariate HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.32-0.86, p = 0.010), but not for ER alpha S305-P-positive tumours (multivariate HR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.33-3.05, p = 0.99) (interaction p = 0.131). Notably, ER alpha S305-P was not significantly associated with RFS in patients not treated with tamoxifen (multivariate HR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.30-1.37, p = 0.248), indicating that ER alpha S305-P is a marker for treatment outcome rather than tumour progression. Given the direct experimental link between ER alpha S305-P and tamoxifen resistance and these first clinical data suggesting that premenopausal patients with ER alpha S305-P-positive breast cancer are resistant to adjuvant tamoxifen, further research is encouraged to study whether alternative endocrine treatment should be considered for this subgroup.

  • 45. Holm, Caroline
    et al.
    Rayala, Suresh
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Huoston. TX.
    Jirström, Karin
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kumar, Rakesh
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Huoston. TX.
    Landberg, Göran
    Association between Pak1 expression and subcellular localization and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer patients2006In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 98, no 10, 671-680 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) phosphorylates many proteins in both normal and transformed cells. Its ability to phosphorylate and thereby activate the estrogen receptor α (ERα) potentially limits the effectiveness of antiestrogen treatment in breast cancer. Here we studied associations between Pak1 expression and subcellular localization in tumor cells and tamoxifen resistance.

    Methods: Pak1 protein expression was evaluated in 403 primary breast tumors from premenopausal patients who had been randomly assigned to 2 years of adjuvant tamoxifen or no treatment. Tamoxifen response was evaluated by comparing recurrence-free survival in relation to Pak1 and ERα expression in untreated versus tamoxifen-treated patients. Tamoxifen responsiveness of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells that inducibly expressed constitutively active Pak1 or that transiently overexpressed wild-type Pak1 (Wt-Pak1) or Pak1 that lacked functional nuclear localization signals (Pak1ΔNLS) was evaluated by analyzing cyclin D1 promoter activation and protein levels as markers for ERα activation. The response to tamoxifen in relation to Pak1 expression was analyzed in naturally tamoxifen-resistant Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. All statistical tests were two-sided.

    Results: Among patients who had ERα–positive tumors with low Pak1 expression, those treated with tamoxifen had better recurrence-free survival than those who received no treatment (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.502, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.331 to 0.762; P = .001) whereas there was no difference in recurrence-free survival between treatment groups for patients whose tumors had high cytoplasmic (HR = 0.893, 95% CI = 0.420 to 1.901; P = .769) or any nuclear Pak1 expression (HR = 0.955, 95% CI = 0.405 to 2.250; P = .916). In MCF-7 cells, overexpression of Wt-Pak1, but not of Pak1ΔNLS, compromised tamoxifen response by stimulating cyclin D1 expression. Treatment of Ishikawa cells with tamoxifen led to an increase in the amount of nuclear Pak1 and Pak1 kinase activity, suggesting that tamoxifen, to some extent, regulates Pak1 expression.

    Conclusions: Our data support a role for Pak1, particular Pak1 localized to the nucleus, in ERα signaling and in tamoxifen resistance.

  • 46.
    Holm, Karolina
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Grabau, Dorthe
    Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Lovgren, Kristina
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Aradottir, Steina
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Howlin, Jillian
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Saal, Lao H
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ethier, Stephen P
    Medical University of S Carolina, SC 29425 USA .
    Bendahl, Par-Ola
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Malmstrom, Per
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ferno, Marten
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ryden, Lisa
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hegardt, Cecilia
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Borg, Ake
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Ringner, Markus
    Lund University, Sweden Lund University, Sweden .
    Global H3K27 trimethylation and EZH2 abundance in breast tumor subtypes2012In: Molecular Oncology, ISSN 1574-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0261, Vol. 6, no 5, 494-506 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and its core member enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) mediate the epigenetic gene silencing mark: trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone 3 (H3K27me3). H3K27me3 is characteristic of the chromatin at genes involved in developmental regulation in undifferentiated cells. Overexpression of EZH2 has been found in several cancer types such as breast, prostate, melanoma and bladder cancer. Moreover, overexpression is associated with highly proliferative and aggressive types of breast and prostate tumors. We have analyzed the abundance of EZH2 and H3K27me3 using immunohistochemistry in two large and Well-characterized breast tumor data sets encompassing more than 400 tumors. The results have been analyzed in relation to the molecular subtypes of breast tumors (basal-like, luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched and normal-like), as well as in subtypes defined by clinical markers (triple negative, ER+/HER2-/Ki67low, ER+/HER2-/Ki67high and HER2+), and were validated in representative breast cancer cell lines by western blot. We found significantly different expression of both EZH2 and H3K27me3 across all subtypes with high abundance of EZH2 in basal-like, triple negative and HER2-enriched tumors, and high H3K27me3 in luminal A, HER2-enriched and normal-like tumors. Intriguingly, the two markers show an inverse correlation, particularly for the basal-like and triple negative tumors. Consequently, high expression of EZH2 was associated with poor distant disease-free survival whereas high expression of H3K27me3 was associated with better survival. Additionally, none of 182 breast tumors was found to carry a previously described EZH2 mutation affecting Tyr641. Our observation that increased expression of EZH2 does not necessarily correlate with increased abundance of H3K27me3 supports the idea that EZH2 can have effects beyond epigenetic silencing of target genes in breast cancer.

  • 47. Holmqvist, P
    et al.
    Lundström, M
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Apoptosis and Bcl-2 expression in relation to age, tumor characteristics and prognosis in breast cancer1999In: International Journal of Biological Markers, ISSN 0393-6155, E-ISSN 1724-6008, Vol. 14, no 2, 84-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of apoptosis and the expression of Bcl-2 was investigated in tumor samples from 165 women who underwent surgery for primary breast carcinoma between 1989 and 1990 in South-East Sweden. Apoptosis was assessed by a DNA fragmentation assay for flow cytometry. Bcl-2 protein expression was analyzed with immunocytochemistry. Bcl-2 immunoreactivity correlated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) positivity and was inversely correlated with p53 accumulation. Apoptosis increased with patient age and a high degree of apoptosis was negatively associated with Bcl-2 immunostaining. Apoptosis showed no significant correlation with any of the other variables studied, including prognosis. The group with Bcl-2-positive tumors tended to have a lower risk of distant recurrence than others, but the association of Bcl-2 with recurrence was different in groups divided by ER and PgR status. Whereas Bcl-2 positivity indicated a low recurrence rate among PgR-negative patients, in the PgR-positive group, those with Bcl-2-positive tumors showed a non significantly higher recurrence rate than Bcl-2-negative cases. In the PgR-positive group, Bcl-2-positive tumors also appeared more frequently to be lymph node positive and DNA aneuploid. The results suggest that hormone receptor status is of importance for the prognostic role of Bcl-2. Likewise, patient age merits consideration when apoptosis is studied in human cancer.

  • 48.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olsson, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Storm, Petter
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Margolin, Sara
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital/ Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Genetics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stenmark Askmalm, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Bioinformatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A new polymorphism in the coding region of exon four in HSD17B2 in relation to risk of sporadic and hereditary breast cancer2007In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 106, no 1, 57-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ synthesis of oestrogens is of great importance in the development and progression of breast cancer. 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) type 2 catalyses oxidation from oestradiol to oestrone, and thereby protects the breast epithelial cells from oestradiol. Low expression of 17HSD type 2 has been associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, but no studies have investigated the mechanism behind the low expression. The 17HSD type 2 gene (HSD17B2) was screened for mutations with Single Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP)-DNA sequencing in 59 sporadic breast cancer cases, 19 hereditary breast cancer cases and seven breast cancer cell lines. DNA samples from 226 healthy individuals were used to identify if changes were previously unknown polymorphisms. No mutation was detected and therefore mutations in HSD17B2 do not explain why some breast tumours exhibit low 17HSD type 2 expression. However, a previously unknown polymorphism was found in exon four (Met226Val). Using molecular modelling, we found that the substituted residue is located at the outer part of the steroid binding site, probably causing minor alterations in the substrate binding. We further studied if the polymorphism contributes to breast cancer susceptibility in a larger material, but did not find an increased risk in the group of 317 sporadic breast cancer patients, 188 breast cancer patients with two close relatives with breast cancer or 122 hereditary breast cancer patients, compared to the healthy control group. We suggest that the detected polymorphism does not contribute to a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

  • 49.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Delander, Lovisa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Skoog, Lambert
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oncology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Ratio of 17HSD1 to 17HSD2 protein expression predicts the outcome of tamoxifen treatment in postmenopausal breast cancer patients.2009In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 15, no 10, 3610-3616 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Estrogens have great significance in the development of breast cancer. After menopause, most estrogen biosynthesis is done in peripheral tissue, and the main enzymes involved in balancing the amount of estrone against estradiol are 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSD). The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic and tamoxifen predictive values of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 expression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tumors from low-risk breast cancer patients randomized to adjuvant tamoxifen therapy or no adjuvant treatment were analyzed with immunohistochemistry to investigate protein expression of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 in 912 cases. All patients had lymph node-negative breast cancer and were postmenopausal at the time of diagnosis. RESULTS: Low 17HSD1 expression was associated with significant benefit from tamoxifen treatment among patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors (P < 0.001). For patients with a 17HSD1 score not exceeding that of 17HSD2, tamoxifen increased the rate of distant recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.60) and breast cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.54), whereas no apparent effect was observed when the 17HSD1 score was higher than that of 17HSD2. The interaction was significant for both distant recurrence-free survival (P = 0.036) and breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.014). In the cohort of systemically untreated patients, no prognostic importance was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that clearly distinguishes between the prognostic and predictive importance of 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 in ER-positive breast cancer treated with or without tamoxifen. Our data suggest that the 17HSD1/17HSD2 ratio might be useful as a predictive factor for tamoxifen treatment in ER-positive breast cancer patients.

  • 50.
    Jansson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Cohen, Maja
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sivik, Tove
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 14 affects estradiol levels in breast cancer cells and is a prognostic marker in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer2006In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 66, no 23, 11471-11477 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Estrogens have an important role in the progression of breast cancer. The 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) family has been identified to be of significance in hormone-dependent tissues. 17HSD1 and 17HSD2 are the main 17HSD enzymes involved in breast cancer investigated this far, but it is possible that other hormone-regulating enzymes have a similar role. 17HSD5 and 17HSD12 are associated with sex steroid metabolism, and 17HSD14 is a newly discovered enzyme that may be involved in the estrogen balance. The mRNA expression of 17HSD5, 17HSD12, and 17HSD14 were analyzed in 131 breast cancer specimens by semiquantitative real-time PCR. The results were compared with recurrence-free survival and breast cancer-specific survival of the patients. The breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, and ZR75-1 were transiently transfected with 17HSD14 to investigate any possible effect on estradiol levels. We found that high 17HSD5 was related to significantly higher risk of late relapse in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients remaining recurrence-free later than 5 years after diagnosis (P = 0.02). No relation to 17HSD12 expression was found, indicating that 17HSD12 is of minor importance in breast cancer. Patients with ER-positive tumors with high expression levels of 17HSD14 showed a significantly better prognosis about recurrence-free survival (P = 0.008) as well as breast cancer-specific survival (P = 0.01), confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Transfection of 17HSD14 in the human breast cancer cells MCF7 and SKBR3 significantly decreased the levels of estradiol, presenting an effect of high expression levels of the enzyme. ©2006 American Association for Cancer Research.

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