liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Designing a decision support system for existing clinical organizational structures: Considerations from a rheumatology clinic2006In: Journal of medical systems, ISSN 0148-5598, E-ISSN 1573-689X, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 325-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify the social and organizational requirements for a decision support system (DSS) to be implemented in a clinical rheumatology setting, utilizing data-mining techniques. Field observations and focus group interviews were used for data collection. The decision-making was found to be situated, patient-focused, and long-term in nature. At the same time, the main part of peer-to-peer communication was informal. Patient records were involved in almost every decision. The conclusion is that the main challenges, when introducing a DSS at a rheumatology unit, are adapting the system to informal communication structures and integrating it with patient records. Considering incentive structures, understanding workflow and incorporating awareness are relevant issues when addressing these issues in future studies.

  • 2.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A simple method for heuristic modeling of expert knowledge in chronic disease: identification of prognostic subgroups in rheumatology2008In: eHealth Beyond the Horizon – Get IT There, IOS Press, 2008, Vol. 136, p. 157-162Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of prognostic subgroups is of key clinical interest at the early stages of chronic disease. The aim of this study is to examine whether representation of physicians' expert knowledge in a simple heuristic model can improve data mining methods in prognostic assessments of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five rheumatology consultants' experiences of clinical data patterns among RA patients, as distinguished from healthy reference populations, were formally represented in a simple heuristic model. The model was used in K-mean-clustering to determine prognostic subgroups. Cross-sectional validation using physician's global assessment scores indicated that the simple heuristic model performed better than crude data made in identification of prognostic subgroups of RA patients. A simple heuristic model of experts' knowledge was found useful for semi-automatic data mining in the chronic disease setting. Further studies using categorical baseline data and prospective outcome variables are warranted and will be examined in the Swedish TIRA-program.

  • 3.
    Hallert, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Rheumatology in Östergötland.
    Comparison between women and men with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis of disease activity and functional ability over two years (the TIRA project)2003In: Annals of the rheumatic diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, Vol. 62, p. 667-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the course of recent onset rheumatoidarthritis (RA) and to compare consequences of the disease inmen and women.

    Methods: 284 patients with recent onset RA were followed upprospectively for two years from the time of diagnosis. Measuresof disease activity (for example, 28 joint disease activityscore (DAS28), C reactive protein, morning stiffness, physician’sglobal assessment) and function outcome (for example, rangeof movement, hand function, walking time) were determined. Thepatients’ self reported assessment of functional capacity(Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)) and grading of wellbeingand pain (visual analogue scale) were registered. Changes overtime and differences between men and women were evaluated.

    Results: Improvements were seen for all variables within thefirst three months. Disease activity then remained unchanged.Function variables followed the same pattern during the firstyear, but then tended to worsen. HAQ scores were similar atbaseline, but significantly worse in women than in men at theone and two year follow ups.

    Conclusions: Disease activity was well managed and had improvedsubstantially after two years, whereas function seemed slowlyto deteriorate. Although disease variables were similar formen and women, functional ability (HAQ) had a less favourablecourse in women.

  • 4.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Assessment of assistive technology: outcomes, costs and quality1996Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology assessment aims at providing information about costs and effects, in order to support decision making and resource allocation. The purpose of this thesis is to, through empirical studies on assistive technologies, investigate the contribution of various kinds of outcome measures, and provide knowledge about outcomes, costs and quality of services.

    Welfare losses were found for disability groups compared to the general population. High health care utilization and needs for a better social life was also expressed by disabled people in the study.

    For stroke patients assistive devices amounted to about 1.3 per cent of the total costs for health care and services during the first year after stroke. Functional ability by admission to hospital was found to be an important predictor of the total cost. Those with assistive devices, although having achieved a high functional ability one year after the stroke, perceived and rated their life situation considerably more impaired than those without assistive devices. It was found that utilizers of assistive devices had low influence on the selection process.

    A new program, based on improved user participation, for the selection process of assistive devices was found to yield increased user participation, user satisfaction, increased number of devices, and consequently also higher costs for assistive technology. The outcome measures, indicating functional ability and health related quality of life, showed more vague improvements. Women below 64 years rated improved health related quality of life at a follow-up. No improvement in functional ability was found at this follow-up.

    An assessment of computer aided assistive technologies was performed. It was found that the average goal fulfilment was high regarding handling the equipment, functional ability, and activities and roles. No significant changes were found in health related quality of life and utility for the clients. However, clients with speech impairment rated impaired utility at the follow-up, and clients with other communication disabilities rated an improved utility. The average total cost per person (including selection process and device) amounted to SEK 14 800.

    Measures on process and outcome can yield complementary results, and thus, they are important in order to understand the relations between quality of services and outcomes. Outcome measures are usually developed for the health care sector, and have the purpose to reflect the impact of health changes. This is a problem in assessments of assistive technology, since health, and disability or handicap, are not always closely related. The distinction between disability and handicap, as defined by the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH) by WHO 1980, is usually not reflected in outcome measures available.

  • 5.
    Hass, Ursula
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Brodin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Engineering Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Assessment of computer-aided assistive technology: analysis of outcomes and costs1997In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: AAC, ISSN 0743-4618, E-ISSN 1477-3848, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to identify and quantify outcomes related to implementation of computer-aided assistive technologies (CAAT) for individuals with communication disabilities and to analyze CAAT costs comprising the selected devices as well as the selection process. The study was designed as a pre/post, longitudinal study. Intermediate and global measures were used as outcome measures. Costs reflecting the resource consumption for the selected devices as well as the selection process were estimated. Individuals with communication disabilities who were referred to the regional CAAT centers were asked to participate in the study. Eighty-seven individuals were recruited. The study shows that usage of CAAT involves reasonable marginal costs for the selection process and equipment (on average SEK 14,800). Usage of CAAT diminishes disability and increases skills in handling computers. However, the outcomes are not entirely positive regarding handicap, health-related quality of life, and utility.

    Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07434619712331277928

  • 6.
    Hass, Ursula
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation.
    Competence Centre NIMED and it's graduate education - collaboration between university and industry.1999In: Ann Int Conf of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Jonsson, Dick
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    The Cost of the Swedish Handicap Service System: Implications for Technology Assessment1995In: International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, ISSN 0266-4623, E-ISSN 1471-6348, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 269-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The total cost of the Swedish handicap system is estimated at US $ 10.7 billion for 1989. The cost is distributed across different authorities with separate legal and financial responsibility. The concept of technology must be extended to include consideration of both the resources spent and benefits gained in the public sector and the magnitude and distribution of transfer payments from social insurance to fulfill its function in handicap policy decision making.

  • 8.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Transfer of health care technology in university-industry research collaboration environment2001In: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE, 2001, Vol. 4, p. 3938-3941Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional innovation research has focused on the diffusion process and adoption of new technologies. This paper deals with health care technology in the early innovation stages preceding targeted development and marketing. A model of early research processes in the biomedical field and determinants of technology transfer will be presented. The study material is eleven projects in the Competence Center Noninvasive Medical Measurements (NIMED), Linkoping University, which is a collaboration center where academic researchers cooperate with industry and clinical departments. Data collection was made through semi-structured interviews. A qualitative approach has been adopted for data analysis. Research initiatives of the investigated projects do in most cases originate in the academic knowledge base and earlier connections in industry and health care play an important role in the formation of cooperation constellation. A number of internal factors are perceived as positive to project advancement, such as stable economy, proximity to clinical departments, and positive feedback from collaboration partners. Significant negative factors are all related to changes in cooperation structure. Clusters of related projects seem to be beneficial to research work and is an evident external factor which has to be added in a new model of technology transfer.

  • 9.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Strömberg, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A New Fiberoptical Respiratory Rate Monitor for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit2005In: Pediatric Pulmonology, ISSN 8755-6863, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 120-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new technique for respiratory rate measurement in the neonatal intensive care unit, fiberoptic respirometry (FORE), was tested using a specially designed nasal adapter. The aim was to investigate the system's accuracy and compare it to the transthoracic impedance (TTI) method and manual counting (MC). Further, the relationship between accuracy and degree of body movement was investigated. Seventeen neonates of median gestational age 35 weeks were included in the study. Video recordings (synchronized with data recordings) were used for classification of body movement. Breaths per minute data were obtained for 23-32-min periods per child, and a subset of these included MC performed by experienced nurses. A Bland-Altman analysis showed low accuracy of both FORE and TTI. A >20% deviation from MC was found in 22.7% and 23.8% of observations for the two methods, respectively. Both methods had accuracy problems during body movement. FORE tended to underestimate respiratory rate due to probe displacement, while TTI overestimated due to motion artefacts. The accuracy was also strongly subject-dependent. The neonates were undisturbed by the FORE device. In some cases, though, it was difficult to keep the adapter positioned in the airway. Further development should, therefore, focus on FORE adapter improvements to maintain probe position over time.

  • 10.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Hass, Ursula
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Spridning och implementering av medicintekniska produkter: Bakgrundsrapport2003Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Thyberg , Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula A. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskiöld, Ulla
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activity limitation in rheumatoid arthritis correlates with reduced grip force regardless of sex: The Swedish TIRA project2005In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 886-896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate activity limitations 3 years after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in relation to grip force and sex.

    Methods: A total of 217 patients, 153 women and 64 men, with recent-onset RA were included. Activity limitations were reported using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and the Evaluation of Daily Activities Questionnaire (EDAQ). The relationships between activity limitations versus grip force (measured by the Grippit), walking speed, functional impairment, grip ability, pain, plasma C-reactive protein, the 28-joint disease activity score and its components, the physician's global assessment of disease activity, and sex were analyzed by partial least squares (PLS).

    Results: Women had significantly lower grip force and more activity limitations (HAQ and EDAQ) than men. The PLS analyses demonstrated that grip force was the strongest regressor of activity limitation, closely followed by walking speed. However, within subgroups based on grip force (group 1 = grip force <114 N, group 2 = 116-206 N, group 3 = 214-321 N, group 4 = grip force >328 N) and including sexes, women and men had corresponding degrees of activity limitation as reported by the HAQ and EDAQ.

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that the more pronounced activity limitations seen in women with RA, as compared with men, may be explained by lower grip force rather than sex.

  • 12.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula A. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskiöld , Ulla
    Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Survey of the use and effect of assistive devices in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: A two-year followup of women and men2004In: Arthritis Care and Research, ISSN 0893-7524, E-ISSN 1529-0123, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 413-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify activity limitation in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to detect patients needing assistive devices. To evaluate the effects of assistive devices.

    Methods: A multicenter cohort of 284 early RA patients was examined using the Evaluation of Daily Activity Questionnaire 12 and 24 months after diagnosis.

    Results: The extent of activity limitation was stable over time for both women and men. Most limitations concerned eating and drinking. Women reported more difficulties than did men. The use of assistive devices was related to subgroups with severe disease and more disability. Use of assistive devices reduced difficulties significantly. For both women and men, assistive devices were mostly used in activities related to eating and drinking.

    Conclusion: Already 1 year after diagnosis, RA patients reported activity limitation that remained stable over time. Use of assistive devices was related to more severe disease and more pronounced disability. Use of devices reduced difficulties significantly.

  • 13.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hass, Ursula A. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis: A 1-year observational study of correlations between health‐related quality of life and clinical/laboratory data2005In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To analyse correlations within and between clinical/laboratory assessments and health-related quality of life variables for recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis at the time of diagnosis and 12 months later.

    Methods: A total of 297 patients with recent-onset (?12 months) rheumatoid arthritis were included at diagnosis and followed up for 12 months. Clinical/laboratory assessment was performed by erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, 28-joint count of tender/swollen joints, physician's global assessment, grip force, grip ability, functional impairment and walking speed. The self-reported health-related quality of life included symptoms (pain, morning stiffness), patients estimated general health, Health Assessment Questionnaire and SF-36.

    Results: All tested variables improved within 6 months of diagnosis and then remained stable but still affected at the 12-month follow-up. Multivariate correlations between clinical/laboratory variables and health-related quality of life were weak. At inclusion, clinical/laboratory assessments explained 18% of health-related quality of life at the same time-point and predicted 7% of the variation in health-related quality of life after 12 months.

    Conclusion: The time-course followed similar patterns for most variables, but only a small part of the variation in health-related quality of life was explained or predicted by the clinical/laboratory variables. This implies that health-related quality of life adds important information to clinical/laboratory assessments in clinical practice and should be considered in goal setting together with clinical/laboratory assessment in order to optimize healthcare and outcome.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf