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  • 1.
    Crafoord, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjølhede, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pelvic floor neuropathy in relation to symptoms, anatomy and outcome of vaginal prolapse surgery: a neurophysiologic studyManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to analyze whether neurophysiologic findings of pelvic floor muscles could predict preoperative symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction and the extent and degree of pelvic organ prolapse and to investigate associations between neurophysiologic findings and the anatomic and subjective outcome of surgery. Forty two women with prolapse stage 2-3 were preoperatively examined with pudendal nerve neurography and concentric needle electromyography of the pubococcygeus and the external anal sphincter muscles. Posterior colporrhaphy was part of the prolapse surgery in all women. Anatomical and subjective outcomes were evaluated median six years postoperatively. The electromyographic findings of the pelvic muscles showed some associations with symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction but none with degree of prolapse; no discriminatory values were obtained. EMG findings could not predict the outcome of pelvic organ prolapse surgery in terms of changes in symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction or anatomical outcome.

  • 2.
    Engman, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Surface electromyography diagnostics in women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis and in asymptomatic women2004In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology, ISSN 0167-482X, Vol. 25, no 3/4, p. 281-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent women with superficial dyspareunia can be diagnosed for both partial vaginismus (PaV) and vulvar vestibulitis (VVS) and to discover to what extent surface electromyography (sEMG) of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) can distinguish between women with PaV solely, PaV + VVS, and asymptomatic women. A total of 224 consecutive women with superficial dyspareunia were examined clinically for both PaV and VVS diagnoses. We examined 47 women with PaV ± VVS and 27 asymptomatic women with sEMG of the PFM. The results showed that 102/224 women with superficial dyspareunia and 33/47 women with PaV in the sEMG part of the study had both PaV and VVS. All women with VVS had vaginismus, while 42/224 had PaV but not VVS. sEMG measurements revealed no significant differences between the three groups of women (PaV solely, PaV + VVS, and asymptomatic). Almost half of the women with superficial dyspareunia referred to our clinic have both the diagnosis PaV and VVS. sEMG was not a method of any value to distinguish between women with PaV solely, PaV + VVS, or asymptomatic women. The increased tone found clinically in the PFM of women with PaV ± VVS may be of other origin than electrogenic contractions.

  • 3.
    Gati, Istvan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Danielsson, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vrethem, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Lindvall, B
    University Örebro, Örebro, Sweden .
    Häggqvist, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Bengt-Arne
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    SENSORY ATAXIC NEUROPATHY WITH DYSARTHRIA/DYSPHAGIA AND OPHTHALMOPLEGIA (SANDO) - CASE HISTORIES in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, vol 18, issue SI, pp 282-2822011In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Wiley-Blackwell , 2011, Vol. 18, no SI, p. 282-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Huang-Link, Yu-Min
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Al-Hawasi, Abbas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Acute optic neuritis: retinal ganglion cell loss precedes retinal nerve fiber thinning.2015In: Neurological Sciences, ISSN 1590-1874, E-ISSN 1590-3478, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 617-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optic neuritis (ON) causes axonal loss as reflected by thinning of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and can be tracked by optical coherence tomography (OCT) about 6 months after ON onset, when swelling of optic nerve head (ONH) has vanished. Changes of macular ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness provide another window to track the disease process in ON. GCL thinning over time in relation to RNFL change after ON remains elusive. Using OCT, we followed 4 patients with acute unilateral isolated ON for more than 9 months. A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) was established in all 4 patients. First follow-up was 2-3 weeks after ON onset, and thereafter every 2-3 months. RNFL swelling peaked during first month after acute ON, followed by rapidly reduced swelling (pseudoatrophy) during following 2 months, and thereafter successively vanished 6 months after ON onset. GCL thinning was observed 1-3 months after ON onset, i.e. already during optic disk swelling and before real RNFL thinning. The results imply that quantifying GCL thickness provides opportunities to monitor early axonal loss and ON-to-MS progression, and facilitates distinguishing real atrophy from pseudoatrophy of RNFL after acute ON.

  • 5.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Karlsson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics UHL.
    Craig, A D (Bud)
    Barrow Neurol Institute.
    Insular cortex activation in a patient with "sensed presence"/ecstatic seizures2011In: EPILEPSY and BEHAVIOR, ISSN 1525-5050, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 714-718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Seizures with an aura of a "sensed presence," a religious emotion, or feelings of euphoria (ecstatic seizures) are characterized by heightened self-awareness. A previous case report on a patient with epilepsy and "sensed presence" as an aura described hypoperfusion in both temporal lobes and a local ictal increase in the left frontoparietal area. A reexamination of the data was suggested by a recent study of patients with ecstatic seizures, which proposed that hyperactivation of the left anterior insula might be a potential cause. Methods: We reanalyzed the laboratory data on the case with "sensed presence" aura using a fusion of SPECT and MR images of the brain, which had not previously been available, and a close examination of the subdural ictal EEG registrations. Results: Examination of the ictal EEG recordings from subdural strip electrodes implanted subtemporally and temporally on both sides showed that seizure activity occurred first at the most medial subtemporal electrode on the left side. From an anatomical point of view, this electrode position is close to the ventral aspect of the left anterior insula, and it is possible that the seizure activity was initiated there. Reexamination of the SPECT data after fusion with contemporary MR images clearly indicated that the region of strong hyperactivation overlies the left anterior insula. Hyperactive regions also appear on the midinsula bilaterally. Together with the neurophysiological ictal EEG, this evidence supports a reinterpretation that this aura of "sensed presence" can be attributed to hyperactivation of the left anterior insula. Conclusion: The present findings support the proposal that ecstatic seizures or "sensed presence" auras can originate from the left anterior insula, a region that has been suggested to engender self-awareness associated with positive feelings.

  • 6.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Hand strength in juvenile chronic arthritis: a two-year follow-up2003In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0001-656X, Vol. 92, no 11, p. 1291-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe changes in muscle strength in the hands of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and to examine the relationship between muscle strength, presence of local arthritis and disease subtype.

    METHODS: Twenty children (10 girls and 10 boys) with JCA aged 7 to 18 y were followed for two years. Isometric muscle strength in wrist dorsiflexors and handgrip strength were measured repeatedly. The results were compared with reference values for the same methods. Arthritis severity in the hand was scored every third month. Nerve conduction velocities were measured twice.

    RESULTS: Seven out of 20 patients had initially low or decreasing strength in one or both of the two tests. Five out of 20 children had reduced strength (more than two standard deviations below the mean of the reference group) in at least one test. Four children showed a significant reduction in muscle strength in at least one test during the observation time. The greatest reduction in strength was measured in four children with polyarticular disease. These children also had local arthritis in the hand. A greater proportion of children with polyarthritis had low or decreasing strength compared with children with oligoarthritis. The same was true for children with active arthritis in the hand. Nerve conduction velocities were normal in all cases and did not change.

    CONCLUSION: The majority of children with JCA have normal strength in the hand. Some children, especially those with polyarthritis and hand arthritis, have reduced muscle strength in the hand. Risk factors for low or decreasing strength are polyarthritis and/or active arthritis in the hand.

  • 7.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Muscle function in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A two-year follow-up2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a study of muscle function in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that primarily affects the synovial membrane of joints. Muscle weakness, atrophy and pain occur in adult RA. This may be a consequence of joint pain, stiffness and immobility. Muscle inflammation and neuropathy occur as complications in adults. Muscle function in JIA has been much less studied.

    The aim of the study was to examine whether muscle weakness and atrophy also occur in children with JIA.

    This was a longitudinal study over a two-year period, where muscle strength and thickness were measured repeatedly in a group of 20 children and teenagers with JIA. Muscle strength was measured using different methods and in several muscle groups. Muscle biopsies were obtained and nerve conduction velocity studies performed.

    The study concludes that, compared to healthy people, children and teenagers with JIA have as a group reduced muscle strength and muscle thickness. For most of these children and teenagers, muscle strength is only slightly lower than expected, but a few have marked muscle weakness. This is most apparent in patients with severe polyarthritis where the weakness seems to be widespread. Patients with isolated arthritis may also have greatly reduced strength and thickness of muscles near the inflamed joint.

    There is a risk of decreasing strength in patients with polyarthritis and in muscles near an active arthritis.

    Minor changes are common in muscle biopsies, and findings may indicate immunological activity in the muscles.

    Atrophy of type II fibres, as in adult RA, was not found in JIA.

    No patient had signs of neuropathy.

    List of papers
    1. Muscle function in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle function in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis
    1995 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 1159-1165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. Muscle strength and thickness were studied in children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) to evaluate their muscle function. METHODS. We studied voluntary isometric, isokinetic, and nonvoluntary isometric muscle strength, as well as muscle thickness, in 20 children with JCA. Thickness of the quadriceps muscle was measured by ultrasound. Results were compared with reference values for healthy children and a matched control group. RESULTS. Isometric muscle strength in knee extensors, elbow flexors, and wrist dorsiflexors was reduced in children with JCA. In muscles near an inflamed joint, the strength was 45-65% of expected value. In muscles without adjacent arthritis, the strength was slightly decreased (80-90% of expected value). Isometric and isokinetic strength in ankle dorsiflexors was reduced only in children with ankle arthritis. Nonvoluntary muscle strength in thumb adductors during electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve was reduced in children with arthritis in the hand. Thickness of the quadriceps muscle was reduced both in children with and without knee arthritis (75 and 90% of expected). CONCLUSION. Children with JCA have reduced muscle strength and thickness, which is most pronounced in muscles near an inflamed joint.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13644 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-27 Created: 2004-05-27 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    2. Measurement of Quadriceps Muscle Strength and Bulk in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis: A Prospective, Longitudinal, 2 Year Survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of Quadriceps Muscle Strength and Bulk in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis: A Prospective, Longitudinal, 2 Year Survey
    1998 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 2240-2248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In a prospective survey over a 2-year period we studied strength and bulk of the quadriceps muscle in the thighs of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). METHODS: Every third month for 2 years we measured isometric muscle strength in knee extensors with a hand-held dynamometer in 20 children with JCA. Ultrasound equipment was used to measure thigh muscle bulk. A joint evaluation was made using a standard severity score. The children had their ordinary medical treatment and physiotherapy during the observation period. RESULTS: Children with high severity scores in the knee or hip had least strength and muscle bulk. In the 4 children with the highest severity scores muscle strength was reduced to half of that expected. In 10 of the children there were clear variations in severity scores during the study period, for either better or worse. In these children an increase in the severity score correlated significantly with reduction in muscle strength and bulk (p < 0.05). The muscle strength and bulk changed in parallel in these children. Other factors, although not independent, such as polyarticular JCA, long duration of disease, and steroid treatment, also reduced muscle strength. CONCLUSION: The presence and intensity of local arthritis is one important factor affecting muscle function in JCA. Normal muscle strength and bulk is rapidly lost near an inflamed joint. It is difficult to maintain or achieve normal muscle function in the presence of active arthritis despite medical and physical treatment. We assume that the muscle weakness is in part caused by atrophy of the muscle, which is influenced by local arthritis.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13645 (URN)
    Available from: 2004-05-27 Created: 2004-05-27 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    3. Hand strength in juvenile chronic arthritis: a two-year follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hand strength in juvenile chronic arthritis: a two-year follow-up
    2003 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0001-656X, Vol. 92, no 11, p. 1291-1296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe changes in muscle strength in the hands of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) and to examine the relationship between muscle strength, presence of local arthritis and disease subtype.

    METHODS: Twenty children (10 girls and 10 boys) with JCA aged 7 to 18 y were followed for two years. Isometric muscle strength in wrist dorsiflexors and handgrip strength were measured repeatedly. The results were compared with reference values for the same methods. Arthritis severity in the hand was scored every third month. Nerve conduction velocities were measured twice.

    RESULTS: Seven out of 20 patients had initially low or decreasing strength in one or both of the two tests. Five out of 20 children had reduced strength (more than two standard deviations below the mean of the reference group) in at least one test. Four children showed a significant reduction in muscle strength in at least one test during the observation time. The greatest reduction in strength was measured in four children with polyarticular disease. These children also had local arthritis in the hand. A greater proportion of children with polyarthritis had low or decreasing strength compared with children with oligoarthritis. The same was true for children with active arthritis in the hand. Nerve conduction velocities were normal in all cases and did not change.

    CONCLUSION: The majority of children with JCA have normal strength in the hand. Some children, especially those with polyarthritis and hand arthritis, have reduced muscle strength in the hand. Risk factors for low or decreasing strength are polyarthritis and/or active arthritis in the hand.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13646 (URN)10.1080/08035250310006340 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-27 Created: 2004-05-27 Last updated: 2009-08-19
    4. Muscle involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Muscle involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis
    2004 (English)In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 1546-1554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: An observational study of changes in muscle structure and the relation to muscle strength in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    METHODS: Fifteen children and teenagers (eight girls and seven boys) with JIA, aged 9-19 yr (mean age 16.1), were studied. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the anterior tibial muscle and were examined using histopathological and immunohistochemical methods. Muscle fibre types were classified and fibre areas measured. As markers of inflammation, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were analysed. Results were compared with biopsies from the gastrocnemius muscle in 33 young (19-23 yr) healthy controls. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strengths were measured in ankle dorsiflexion. Strength was compared with reference values for healthy age-matched controls. Nerve conduction velocities were recorded in the peroneal and sural nerves.

    RESULTS: Four of the 15 muscle biopsies were morphologically normal. Eleven biopsies showed minor unspecific changes. Two of these also showed minor signs of inflammation. MHC class II expression was found in 4/15 patients, which was significantly more than in the healthy controls (P = 0.0143). The expression of MHC class I and MAC did not differ from that in the controls. The mean area of type I fibres was lower than that of type IIA fibres in 12/13 biopsies. Muscle strength was significantly reduced in the patient group. There was a significant positive correlation between muscle fibre area and muscle strength. Nerve conduction studies were normal in all cases.

    CONCLUSIONS: Changes in leg muscle biopsies appear to be common in children and teenagers with JIA. The presence of inflammatory cells in the muscle and expression of MHC class II on muscle fibres may be a sign of inflammatory myopathy. There are no findings of type II muscle fibre hypotrophy or neuropathy, as in adults with RA.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13647 (URN)10.1093/rheumatology/keh381 (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-05-27 Created: 2004-05-27 Last updated: 2009-08-19
  • 8.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Bäckman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Muscle function in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis1995In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 1159-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. Muscle strength and thickness were studied in children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) to evaluate their muscle function. METHODS. We studied voluntary isometric, isokinetic, and nonvoluntary isometric muscle strength, as well as muscle thickness, in 20 children with JCA. Thickness of the quadriceps muscle was measured by ultrasound. Results were compared with reference values for healthy children and a matched control group. RESULTS. Isometric muscle strength in knee extensors, elbow flexors, and wrist dorsiflexors was reduced in children with JCA. In muscles near an inflamed joint, the strength was 45-65% of expected value. In muscles without adjacent arthritis, the strength was slightly decreased (80-90% of expected value). Isometric and isokinetic strength in ankle dorsiflexors was reduced only in children with ankle arthritis. Nonvoluntary muscle strength in thumb adductors during electrical stimulation of the ulnar nerve was reduced in children with arthritis in the hand. Thickness of the quadriceps muscle was reduced both in children with and without knee arthritis (75 and 90% of expected). CONCLUSION. Children with JCA have reduced muscle strength and thickness, which is most pronounced in muscles near an inflamed joint.

  • 9.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Lindvall, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Muscle involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis2004In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 1546-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: An observational study of changes in muscle structure and the relation to muscle strength in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

    METHODS: Fifteen children and teenagers (eight girls and seven boys) with JIA, aged 9-19 yr (mean age 16.1), were studied. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the anterior tibial muscle and were examined using histopathological and immunohistochemical methods. Muscle fibre types were classified and fibre areas measured. As markers of inflammation, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were analysed. Results were compared with biopsies from the gastrocnemius muscle in 33 young (19-23 yr) healthy controls. Isometric and isokinetic muscle strengths were measured in ankle dorsiflexion. Strength was compared with reference values for healthy age-matched controls. Nerve conduction velocities were recorded in the peroneal and sural nerves.

    RESULTS: Four of the 15 muscle biopsies were morphologically normal. Eleven biopsies showed minor unspecific changes. Two of these also showed minor signs of inflammation. MHC class II expression was found in 4/15 patients, which was significantly more than in the healthy controls (P = 0.0143). The expression of MHC class I and MAC did not differ from that in the controls. The mean area of type I fibres was lower than that of type IIA fibres in 12/13 biopsies. Muscle strength was significantly reduced in the patient group. There was a significant positive correlation between muscle fibre area and muscle strength. Nerve conduction studies were normal in all cases.

    CONCLUSIONS: Changes in leg muscle biopsies appear to be common in children and teenagers with JIA. The presence of inflammatory cells in the muscle and expression of MHC class II on muscle fibres may be a sign of inflammatory myopathy. There are no findings of type II muscle fibre hypotrophy or neuropathy, as in adults with RA.

  • 10.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Sandstedt, P.
    Measurement of Quadriceps Muscle Strength and Bulk in Juvenile Chronic Arthritis: A Prospective, Longitudinal, 2 Year Survey1998In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 2240-2248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In a prospective survey over a 2-year period we studied strength and bulk of the quadriceps muscle in the thighs of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). METHODS: Every third month for 2 years we measured isometric muscle strength in knee extensors with a hand-held dynamometer in 20 children with JCA. Ultrasound equipment was used to measure thigh muscle bulk. A joint evaluation was made using a standard severity score. The children had their ordinary medical treatment and physiotherapy during the observation period. RESULTS: Children with high severity scores in the knee or hip had least strength and muscle bulk. In the 4 children with the highest severity scores muscle strength was reduced to half of that expected. In 10 of the children there were clear variations in severity scores during the study period, for either better or worse. In these children an increase in the severity score correlated significantly with reduction in muscle strength and bulk (p < 0.05). The muscle strength and bulk changed in parallel in these children. Other factors, although not independent, such as polyarticular JCA, long duration of disease, and steroid treatment, also reduced muscle strength. CONCLUSION: The presence and intensity of local arthritis is one important factor affecting muscle function in JCA. Normal muscle strength and bulk is rapidly lost near an inflamed joint. It is difficult to maintain or achieve normal muscle function in the presence of active arthritis despite medical and physical treatment. We assume that the muscle weakness is in part caused by atrophy of the muscle, which is influenced by local arthritis.

  • 11.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of the sacroanal motor pathway by magnetic and electric stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence2001In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this controlled study was to examine whether it was feasible to use magnetic stimulation as a new diagnostic tool to evaluate the motor function of the sacral roots and the pudendal nerves in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients (17 females) with a median age of 67 (range, 36-78) years referred for fecal incontinence and 14 healthy volunteers (six females) with a median age of 42 (range, 23-69) years were examined. Latency times of the motor response of the external anal sphincter were measured after electric transrectal stimulation of the pudendal nerve and magnetic stimulation of the sacral roots.

    RESULTS: The success rates of pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements were 100 and 85 percent, respectively, in the control group and 94 and 81 percent, respectively, in the fecal incontinence group. Median left pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.88 (range, 1.4-2.9) milliseconds in the control group and 2.3 (range, 1.8-4) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.006). Median right pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.7 (range, 1.3-3.4) milliseconds in the control group and 2.5 (range, 1.7-6) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.003). Median left sacral root terminal motor latency was 3.3 (range, 2.1-6) milliseconds in the control group and 3.7 (range, 2.8-4.8) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <3 0.03). Median right sacral root terminal motor latency was 3 (range, 2.6-5.8) milliseconds in the control group and 3.9 (range, 2.5-7.2) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P =0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Combined pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements may allow us to study both proximal and distal pudendal nerve motor function in patients with fecal incontinence. Values of sacral root terminal motor latency have to be interpreted cautiously because of the uncertainty about the exact site of magnetic stimulation and the limited magnetic field strength.

  • 12.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Latency of compound muscle action potentials of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation2001In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1232-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to present the failure rate and normal values for motor latency of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation (LMSS) using a modified recording technique. A bipolar sponge electrode was placed in the anal canal for recording. A ground electrode was placed in the rectum to reduce stimulus artifact. Magnetic stimulation was induced through a twin coil energized by a Maglite-r25 generator. Two groups were examined: 14 healthy volunteers and 14 patients with a spinal cord injury (SCI) above the conus. Nine of 56 studies (16%) failed. There were no significant differences in latency between right- and left-sided stimulation or between the healthy group and the SCI patients. As described, LMSS measurements are minimally invasive and have a low failure rate. They may be used to test the integrity of the distal motor pathway in patients with bladder or bowel dysfunction who may benefit from continuous electrical sacral root stimulation.

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