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  • 1.
    Andel, Miroslav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petrovski, Alexander
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactive Collaborative Scene Assembly Using AR on Mobile Phones2006In: Artificial Reality and Telexistence, ICAT, Springer , 2006, p. 1008-1017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and evaluate a platform for interactive collaborative face-to-face Augmented Reality using a distributed scene graph on mobile phones. The results of individual actions are viewed on the screen in real-time on every connected phone. We show how multiple collaborators can use consumer mobile camera phones to furnish a room together in an Augmented Reality environment. We have also presented a user case study to investigate how untrained users adopt this novel technology and to study the collaboration between multiple users. The platform is totally independent of a PC server though it is possible to connect a PC client to be used for high quality visualization on a big screen device such as a projector or a plasma display.

  • 2.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    et al.
    HITLabNZ University of Canterbury.
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Research Directions in Handheld AR2006In: International journal of virtual reality, ISSN 1081-1451, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Gunnarsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Rauhala, Malinda
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Visualization of Sensor Data Using Mobile Phone Augmented Reality2006In: ISMAR 2006,2006, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society , 2006, p. 233-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bringing Augmented Reality to Mobile Phones2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With its mixing of real and virtual, Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that has attracted lots of attention from the science community and is seen as a perfect way to visualize context-related information. Computer generated graphics is presented to the user overlaid and registered with the real world and hence augmenting it. Promising intelligence amplification and higher productivity, AR has been intensively researched over several decades but has yet to reach a broad audience.

    This thesis presents efforts in bringing Augmented Reality to mobile phones and thus to the general public. Implementing technologies on limited devices, such as mobile phones, poses a number of challenges that differ from traditional research directions. These include: limited computational resources with little or no possibility to upgrade or add hardware, limited input and output capabilities for interactive 3D graphics. The research presented in this thesis addresses these challenges and makes contributions in the following areas:

    Mobile Phone Computer Vision-Based Tracking

    The first contribution of thesis has been to migrate computer vision algorithms for tracking the mobile phone camera in a real world reference frame - a key enabling technology for AR. To tackle performance issues, low-level optimized code, using fixed-point algorithms, has been developed.

    Mobile Phone 3D Interaction Techniques

    Another contribution of this thesis has been to research interaction techniques for manipulating virtual content. This is in part realized by exploiting camera tracking for position-controlled interaction where motion of the device is used as input. Gesture input, made possible by a separate front camera, is another approach that is investigated. The obtained results are not unique to AR and could also be applicable to general mobile 3D graphics.

    Novel Single User AR Applications

    With short range communication technologies, mobile phones can exchange data not only with other phones but also with an intelligent environment. Data can be obtained for tracking or visualization; displays can be used to render graphics with the tracked mobile phone acting as an interaction device. Work is presented where a mobile phone harvests a sensor-network to use AR to visualize live data in context.

    Novel Collaboration AR Applications

    One of the most promising areas for mobile phone based AR is enhancing face-to-face computer supported cooperative work. This is because the AR display permits non-verbal cues to be used to a larger extent. In this thesis, face-to-face collaboration has been researched to examine whether AR increases awareness of collaboration partners even on small devices such as mobile phones. User feedback indicates that this is the case, confirming the hypothesis that mobile phones are increasingly able to deliver an AR experience to a large audience.

    List of papers
    1. Face to Face Collaborative AR on Mobile Phones
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Face to Face Collaborative AR on Mobile Phones
    2005 (English)In: Proceedings of the Fourth IEEE and ACM international Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality, 2005, p. 80-89Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones are an ideal platform for augmented reality. In this paper we describe how they also can be used to support face to face collaborative AR applications. We have created a custom port of the ARToolKit library to the Symbian mobile phone operating system and then developed a sample collaborative AR game based on this. We describe the game in detail and user feedback from people who have played it. We also provide general design guidelines that could be useful for others who are developing mobile phone collaborative AR applications.

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12743 (URN)10.1109/ISMAR.2005.32 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2011-01-04
    2. Virtual Object Manipulation using a Mobile Phone
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual Object Manipulation using a Mobile Phone
    2005 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2005 international Conference on Augmented Tele-Existence, 2005, p. 164-171Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented Reality (AR) on mobile phones has reached a level of maturity where it can be used as a tool for 3D object manipulation. In this paper we look at user interface issues where an AR enabled mobile phone acts as an interaction device. We discuss how traditional 3D manipulation techniques apply to this new platform. The high tangibility of the device and its button interface makes it interesting to compare manipulation techniques. We describe AR manipulation techniques we have implemented on a mobile phone and present a small pilot study evaluating these methods.

    Keywords
    augmented reality, manipulation, mobile phone
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12744 (URN)10.1145/1152399.1152430 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2011-01-04
    3. Experiments in 3D Interaction for Mobile Phone AR
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiments in 3D Interaction for Mobile Phone AR
    2007 (English)In: Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Computer graphics and interactive techniques in Australia and Southeast Asia, Perth, Australia, New York: The Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. , 2007, p. 187-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an evaluation of several different techniques for virtual object positioning and rotation on a mobile phone. We compare gesture input captured by the phone's front camera, to tangible input, keypad interaction and phone tilting in increasingly complex positioning and rotation tasks in an AR context. Usability experiments found that tangible input techniques are best for translation tasks, while keypad input is best for rotation tasks. Implications for the design of mobile phone 3D interfaces are presented as well as directions for future research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: The Association for Computing Machinery, Inc., 2007
    Keywords
    3D interaction, augmented reality, mobile graphics
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12745 (URN)10.1145/1321261.1321295 (DOI)978-1-59593-912-8 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. Mobile Phone Based AR Scene Assembly
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile Phone Based AR Scene Assembly
    2005 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th international Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, 2005, p. 95-102Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a mobile phone based Augmented Reality application for 3D scene assembly. Augmented Reality on mobile phones extends the interaction capabilities on such handheld devices. It adds a 6 DOF isomorphic interaction technique for manipulating 3D content. We give details of an application that we believe to be the first where 3D content can be manipulated using both the movement of a camera tracked mobile phone and a traditional button interface as input for transformations. By centering the scene in a tangible marker space in front of the phone we provide a mean for bimanual interaction. We describe the implementation, the interaction techniques we have developed and initial user response to trying the application.

    Keywords
    CAD, augmented reality, mobile phone
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12746 (URN)10.1145/1149488.1149504 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2011-01-04
    5. Using a Mobile Phone for 6DOF Mesh Editing
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using a Mobile Phone for 6DOF Mesh Editing
    2007 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapter's international Conference on Computer-Human interaction: Design Centered HCI., 2007, p. 9-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how a mobile phone can be used as a six degree of freedom interaction device for 3D mesh editing. Using a video see-through Augmented Reality approach, the mobile phone meets several design guidelines for a natural, easy to learn, 3D human computer interaction device. We have developed a system that allows a user to select one or more vertices in an arbitrary sized polygon mesh and freely translate and rotate them by translating and rotating the device itself. The mesh is registered in 3D and viewed through the device and hence the system provides a unified perception-action space. We present the implementation details and discuss the possible advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

    Keywords
    3D interfaces, content creation, mobile computer graphics, mobile phone augmented reality
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12747 (URN)10.1145/1278960.1278962 (DOI)1-59593-473-1 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    6. Interactive Collaborative Scene Assembly Using AR on Mobile Phones
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactive Collaborative Scene Assembly Using AR on Mobile Phones
    2006 (English)In: Artificial Reality and Telexistence, ICAT, Springer , 2006, p. 1008-1017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present and evaluate a platform for interactive collaborative face-to-face Augmented Reality using a distributed scene graph on mobile phones. The results of individual actions are viewed on the screen in real-time on every connected phone. We show how multiple collaborators can use consumer mobile camera phones to furnish a room together in an Augmented Reality environment. We have also presented a user case study to investigate how untrained users adopt this novel technology and to study the collaboration between multiple users. The platform is totally independent of a PC server though it is possible to connect a PC client to be used for high quality visualization on a big screen device such as a projector or a plasma display.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2006
    Series
    Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 1611-3349 ; 4282
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12748 (URN)10.1007/11941354_104 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2009-04-22
    7. A Novel Interface to Sensor Networks using Handheld Augmented Reality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Novel Interface to Sensor Networks using Handheld Augmented Reality
    2006 (English)In: Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, Espoo, Finland, 2006, p. 145-148Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented Reality technology enables a mobile phone to be used as an x-ray tool, visualizing structures and states not visible to the naked eye. In this paper we evaluate a set of techniques used augmenting the world with a visualization of data from a sensor network. Combining virtual and real information introduces challenges as information from the two domains might interfere. We have applied our system to humidity data and present a user study together with feedback from domain experts. The prototype system can be seen as the first step towards a novel tool for inspection of building elements.

    Keywords
    Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Measurement, intelligent environments, mobile phone augmented reality, sensor networks, visualization
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12749 (URN)10.1145/1152215.1152245 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    8. LUMAR: A Hybrid Spatial Display System for 2D and 3D Handheld Augmented Reality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>LUMAR: A Hybrid Spatial Display System for 2D and 3D Handheld Augmented Reality
    2007 (English)In: 17th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2007), Esbjerg, Denmark, 2007, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society Press , 2007, p. 63-70Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LUMAR is a hybrid system for spatial displays, allowing cell phones to be tracked in 2D and 3D through combined egocentric and exocentric techniques based on the Light-Sense and UMAR frameworks. LUMAR differs from most other spatial display systems based on mobile phones with its three-layered information space. The hybrid spatial display system consists of printed matter that is augmented with context-sensitive, dynamic 2D media when the device is on the surface, and with overlaid 3D visualizations when it is held in mid-air.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society Press, 2007
    Keywords
    spatially aware, portable, mobile, handheld, cell, phone, augmented reality, mixed reality, ubiquitous
    National Category
    Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12750 (URN)10.1109/ICAT.2007.13 (DOI)
    Conference
    17th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2007), Esbjerg, Denmark, 2007
    Available from: 2007-11-20 Created: 2007-11-20 Last updated: 2018-03-05
  • 5.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Andel, Miroslav
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Augmented Earth: Towards Ubiquitous AR Messaging2007In: 17th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2007, p. 197-204Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Present augmented reality systems are isolated islands with no or little capability to receive 3D information from the outside world. In this paper we describe how Google Earth can be used to transform the physical world into an AR mailbox. We demonstrate a system where a mobile phone AR environment can be defined and advertised by a portal, using a simple visual/tangible approach. The focus has been on the ease of use. The current limitations are tracking stability and lack of high quality Google Earth content.

  • 6.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Using a Mobile Phone for 6DOF Mesh Editing2007In: Proceedings of the 7th ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapter's international Conference on Computer-Human interaction: Design Centered HCI., 2007, p. 9-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how a mobile phone can be used as a six degree of freedom interaction device for 3D mesh editing. Using a video see-through Augmented Reality approach, the mobile phone meets several design guidelines for a natural, easy to learn, 3D human computer interaction device. We have developed a system that allows a user to select one or more vertices in an arbitrary sized polygon mesh and freely translate and rotate them by translating and rotating the device itself. The mesh is registered in 3D and viewed through the device and hence the system provides a unified perception-action space. We present the implementation details and discuss the possible advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

  • 7.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HITLabNZ University of Canterbury.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    AR Tennis2006In: ACM SIGGRAPH 2006 Sketches,2006, New York, NY, USA: ACM Press , 2006, p. 13-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 8.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HIT Lab NZ, University of Canterbury, NZ.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Face to Face Collaborative AR on Mobile Phones2005In: Proceedings of the Fourth IEEE and ACM international Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality, 2005, p. 80-89Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile phones are an ideal platform for augmented reality. In this paper we describe how they also can be used to support face to face collaborative AR applications. We have created a custom port of the ARToolKit library to the Symbian mobile phone operating system and then developed a sample collaborative AR game based on this. We describe the game in detail and user feedback from people who have played it. We also provide general design guidelines that could be useful for others who are developing mobile phone collaborative AR applications.

  • 9.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HITLAB University of Canterbury in Christchurch, NZ.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Mobile Phone Augmented Reality - Experiments and Applications2005In: SIGRAD Annual Conference,2005, Linköping, Sweden: University of Linköping Press , 2005, p. 35-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HIT Lab NZ, University of Canterbury, NZ.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Virtual Object Manipulation using a Mobile Phone2005In: Proceedings of the 2005 international Conference on Augmented Tele-Existence, 2005, p. 164-171Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented Reality (AR) on mobile phones has reached a level of maturity where it can be used as a tool for 3D object manipulation. In this paper we look at user interface issues where an AR enabled mobile phone acts as an interaction device. We discuss how traditional 3D manipulation techniques apply to this new platform. The high tangibility of the device and its button interface makes it interesting to compare manipulation techniques. We describe AR manipulation techniques we have implemented on a mobile phone and present a small pilot study evaluating these methods.

  • 11.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Marshall, Joe
    University of Nottingham.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Experiments in 3D Interaction for Mobile Phone AR2007In: Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Computer graphics and interactive techniques in Australia and Southeast Asia, Perth, Australia, New York: The Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. , 2007, p. 187-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present an evaluation of several different techniques for virtual object positioning and rotation on a mobile phone. We compare gesture input captured by the phone's front camera, to tangible input, keypad interaction and phone tilting in increasingly complex positioning and rotation tasks in an AR context. Usability experiments found that tangible input techniques are best for translation tasks, while keypad input is best for rotation tasks. Implications for the design of mobile phone 3D interfaces are presented as well as directions for future research.

  • 12.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Augmented Reality on Smartphones2003In: IEEE International Augmented Reality Toolkit Workshop,2003, Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE , 2003, p. 27-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Context aware maps2004In: SIGRAD 2004,2004, 2004, p. 49-50Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    UMAR: Ubiquitous mobile augmented reality2004In: 3rd International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia MUM2004,2004, 2004, p. 41-45Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HIT Lab NZ, University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Mobile Phone Based AR Scene Assembly2005In: Proceedings of the 4th international Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, 2005, p. 95-102Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe a mobile phone based Augmented Reality application for 3D scene assembly. Augmented Reality on mobile phones extends the interaction capabilities on such handheld devices. It adds a 6 DOF isomorphic interaction technique for manipulating 3D content. We give details of an application that we believe to be the first where 3D content can be manipulated using both the movement of a camera tracked mobile phone and a traditional button interface as input for transformations. By centering the scene in a tangible marker space in front of the phone we provide a mean for bimanual interaction. We describe the implementation, the interaction techniques we have developed and initial user response to trying the application.

  • 16.
    Henrysson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ollila, Mark
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Billinghurst, Mark
    HITLabNZ.
    Mobile Phone Based Augmented Reality2006In: Emerging Technologies of Augmented Reality: interfaces and design / [ed] Michael Haller, Mark Billinghurst, and Bruce Thomas, editors, Hershey, PA, USA: Idea Group Publishing , 2006, 1, p. 90-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      Although the field of mixed reality has grown significantly over the last decade, there have been few published books about augmented reality, particularly the interface design aspects. Emerging Technologies of Augmented Reality: Interfaces and Design provides a foundation of the main concepts of augmented reality (AR), with a particular emphasis on user interfaces, design, and practical AR techniques, from tracking algorithms to design principles for AR interfaces. Emerging Technologies of Augmented Reality: Interfaces and Design contains comprehensive information focusing on the following topics: technologies that support AR, development environments, interface design and evaluation of applications, and case studies of AR applications

  • 17. Olwal, Alex
    et al.
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    LUMAR: A Hybrid Spatial Display System for 2D and 3D Handheld Augmented Reality2007In: 17th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2007), Esbjerg, Denmark, 2007, Los Alamitos, CA, USA: IEEE Computer Society Press , 2007, p. 63-70Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LUMAR is a hybrid system for spatial displays, allowing cell phones to be tracked in 2D and 3D through combined egocentric and exocentric techniques based on the Light-Sense and UMAR frameworks. LUMAR differs from most other spatial display systems based on mobile phones with its three-layered information space. The hybrid spatial display system consists of printed matter that is augmented with context-sensitive, dynamic 2D media when the device is on the surface, and with overlaid 3D visualizations when it is held in mid-air.

  • 18.
    Rauhala, Malinda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gunnarsson, Ann-Sofie
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henrysson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ynnerman, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Visual Information Technology and Applications (VITA). Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    A Novel Interface to Sensor Networks using Handheld Augmented Reality2006In: Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, Espoo, Finland, 2006, p. 145-148Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Augmented Reality technology enables a mobile phone to be used as an x-ray tool, visualizing structures and states not visible to the naked eye. In this paper we evaluate a set of techniques used augmenting the world with a visualization of data from a sensor network. Combining virtual and real information introduces challenges as information from the two domains might interfere. We have applied our system to humidity data and present a user study together with feedback from domain experts. The prototype system can be seen as the first step towards a novel tool for inspection of building elements.

1 - 18 of 18
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