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  • 1.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ölvander, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Alcohol use among university students in Sweden measured by an electronic screening instrument2009In: BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electronic-based alcohol screening and brief interventions for university students with problem drinking behaviours forms an important means by which to identify risky drinkers. Methods: In this study an e-SBI project was implemented to assess drinking patterns, and to provide personalised feedback about alcohol consumption and related health problems, to students in a Swedish university. In this study, third semester university students (n = 2858) from all faculties (colleges) at the University were invited to participate in e-SBI screenings. This study employed a randomised controlled trial, with respondents having a equal chance of being assigned to a limited, or full-feedback response. Results: The study shows that high risk drinkers tend to underestimate their own consumption compared to others, and that these high risk drinkers experience more negative consequences after alcohol intake, than other respondents. There was a strong belief, for both high-and low-risk drinkers, that alcohol helped celebrations be more festive. This study also confirms findings from other study locations that while males drank more than females in our study population; females reached the same peak alcohol blood concentrations as males. Conclusion: Obtaining clear and current information on drinking patterns demonstrated by university students can help public health officials, university administration, and local health care providers develop appropriate prevention and treatment strategies.

  • 2.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Theander, Kersti
    Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Ekdahl, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Karolinska Institute KI, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

  • 3.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Norrköping.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Are elderly people with co-morbidities involved adequately in medical decision making when hospitalised?: A cross-sectional survey2011In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 11, no 46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Medical decision making has long been in focus, but little is known of the preferences and conditions for elderly people with co-morbidities to participate in medical decision making. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the preferred and the actual degree of control, i.e. the role elderly people with co-morbidities wish to assume and actually had with regard to information and participation in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital.This study was a cross-sectional survey including three Swedish hospitals with acute admittance. The participants were patients aged 75 years and above with three or more diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and three or more hospitalisations during the last year.

    METHODS:

    We used a questionnaire combined with a telephone interview, using the Control Preference Scale to measure each participant's preferred and actual role in medical decision making during their last stay in hospital. Additional questions were asked about barriers to participation in decision making and preferred information seeking role. The results are presented with descriptive statistics with kappa weights.

    RESULTS:

    Of the 297 elderly patients identified, 52.5% responded (n = 156, 46.5% male). Mean age was 83.1 years. Of the respondents, 42 of 153 patients said that they were not asked for their opinion (i.e. no shared decision making). Among the other 111 patients, 49 had their exact preferred level of participation, 37 had less participation than they would have preferred, and 23 had more responsibility than they would have preferred. Kappa statistics showed a moderate agreement between preferred and actual role (κw = 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45-0.69). Most patients wanted to be given more information without having to ask. There was no correlation between age, gender, or education and preferred role. 35% of the patients agreed that they experienced some of the various barriers to decision making that they were asked about: 1) the severity of their illness, 2) doctors with different treatment strategies, 3) difficulty understanding the medical information, and 4) difficulty understanding doctors who did not speak the patient's own language.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physicians are not fully responsive to patient preferences regarding either the degree of communication or the patient's participation in decision making. Barriers to participation can be a problem, and should be taken into account more often when dealing with hospitalised elderly people.

  • 4.
    Ekdahl, Anne W
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wirehn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Husberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Eckerblad, Jeanette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Milberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Norrköping. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

    DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

    SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

    INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

    RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

  • 5.
    Falk, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hegic, Sabina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilson, Daniel
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Home-sampling as a Tool in the Context of Chlamydia trachomatis Partner Notification: A Randomized Controlled Trial2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 72-74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 7.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Fremner, Eva
    Haglund, S
    Larsson, Lasse
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Persson, L-G
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Point-of-care testing has a limited effect on time to clinical decision in primary health care2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 64, no 6, p. 547-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the clinical logistics of laboratory routines at primary health care centres (PHCs). Design and methods: Prospective registration was carried out for each PHC using questionnaires during 2-week intervals between the end of November 2001 and mid-January 2002. The study included 9 PHCs in the county of Östergötland and 4 in the county of Jönköping, Sweden, with different numbers of blood tests analysed using point-of-care testing (POCT). Data for B-glucose, HbA1c, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), T4, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were collected. Main outcome measures were median time from sampling to available test result (TATa) and median time from sampling to clinical decision (TATd), and the proportion of patients informed of the outcome of the blood test in question during the sampling occasion. Results: A total of 3542 samples were collected. The median TATa showed that B-glucose, ESR and CRP were immediately analysed at all 13 PHCs. For the other tests, TATa varied from immediately to about two days. The median TATd varied from immediately to about a week. When POCT was used, 30% of the patients were informed about the outcome of the test during the sampling occasion. Conclusion: POCT has a limited effect on the clinical logistics in PHCs.

  • 8.
    Heintz, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health-related quality of life profiles of patients with diabetic retinopathyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There are various instruments for estimating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). However, if the results are to be compared with those for other diseases, it is essential to use measures that are applicable to all disease areas. The aim of this study was to explore the HRQoL profiles of patients with DR using two generic multi-attribute instruments, the Health State Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI-3) and the EQ-5D questionnaire, and to investigate these questionnaires’ sensitivity to differences in HRQoL due to DR.

    Methods: The study population comprised 166 Swedish diabetes patients diagnosed with DR at different severities. Patients were interviewed over the telephone using HUI-3 and EQ-5D. The vision-specific National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (NEI VFQ-25) was also included, to give an empirical framework for the results of the generic instruments. Linear and logistic regression models were used to adjust for possible confounders.

    Results: Patients with vision impairment (VI) reported lower scores in Vision, Ambulation, and Pain in HUI-3 and more problems with Usual activities and Anxiety/depression in EQ-5D. However, even though NEI VFQ-25 showed a negative association between DR severity and Mental health and Near activities, neither EQ-5D nor HUI-3 identified a negative relationship between DR severity and HRQoL.

    Conclusion: The generic instruments show lowered HRQoL for patients with VI in various dimensions but were not sensitive to decrements related to the diagnosis of DR alone. The questionnaire of HUI-3 was more sensitive than EQ-5D to differences in HRQoL due to DR-related VI.

  • 9.
    Heintz, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peebo, Bourghardt B.
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, U.
    Motala Hospital.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    QUALITY-ADJUSTED LIFE-YEAR (QALY) WEIGHTS ASSOCIATED WITH DIFFERENT SEVERITY LEVELS OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY in VALUE IN HEALTH, vol 13, issue 7, pp A297-A2972010In: VALUE IN HEALTH, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010, Vol. 13, no 7, p. A297-A297Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Heintz, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bourghardt Peebo, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Ophthalmology in Linköping.
    Rosenqvist, Ulf
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    QALY weights for diabetic retinopathy: a comparison of health state valuations with HUI-3, EQ-5D, EQ-VAS, and TTO.2012In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 475-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate quality-adjusted life-year weights for patients with diabetic retinopathy by using various methods and to investigate the empirical validity of the different measures.

    Methods: The study population comprised 152 patients with diabetes in Östergötland County, Sweden. Participants were interviewed by telephone by using the time trade-off (TTO) method and a visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) (direct valuations) as well as the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and the health utilities index mark 3 (HUI-3) (indirect valuations). The quality-adjusted life-year weights were adjusted for potential confounders by using analysis of covariance. The empirical validity of the measures was examined by testing their ability to detect hypothetical differences between severity levels of diabetic retinopathy and by investigating the correlation between the measures and the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25).

    Results: All measures detected significant differences in scores between patient groups classified according to visual impairment in the better eye (analysis of covariance, P < 0.05), but only HUI-3 and EQ-VAS detected significant differences between patient groups classified according to visual impairment or pathological progression in the worse eye. HUI-3 recorded a difference of 0.43 in values between normal vision and blindness in the better eye, which was more than twice the differences captured by the other measures (0.15–0.20). In addition, HUI-3 showed the highest correlation with NEI VFQ-25 (r = 0.54; P < 0.001).

    Conclusions: In cost-utility analyses, the choice of quality-adjusted life-year measure may affect whether an intervention is considered cost-effective. Furthermore, if decisions are to be based on values from the general public, HUI-3 can be recommended for cost-utility analyses of interventions directed at diabetic retinopathy.

  • 11.
    Heintz, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peebo Bourghardt, Beatrice
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Ophthalmology UHL/MH.
    Rosenqvist, U
    Motala Hospital, Sweden.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Prevalence and healthcare costs of diabetic retinopathy: a population-based register study in Sweden2010In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 53, no 10, p. 2147-2154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence and healthcare costs of diabetic retinopathy (DR).

    Methods

    This population-based study included all residents (n = 251,386) in the catchment area of the eye clinic of Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. Among patients with diabetes (n  = 12,026), those with and without DR were identified through register data from both the Care Data Warehouse in Östergötland, an administrative healthcare register, and the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Healthcare cost data were elicited by record linkage of these two registers to data for the year 2008 in the Cost Per Patient Database developed by Östergötland County Council.

    Results

    The prevalence of any DR was 41.8% (95% CI 38.9–44.6) for patients with type 1 diabetes and 27.9% (27.1–28.7) for patients with type 2 diabetes. Sight-threatening DR was present in 12.1% (10.2–14.0) and 5.0% (4.6–5.4) of the type 1 and type 2 diabetes populations respectively. The annual average healthcare cost of any DR was €72 (€53–91). Stratified into background retinopathy, proliferative DR, maculopathy, and the last two conditions combined, the costs were €26 (€10–42), €257 (€155–359), €216 (€113–318) and €433 (€232–635) respectively. The annual cost for DR was €106 000 per 100,000 inhabitants.

    Conclusions

    This study presents new information on the prevalence and costs of DR. Approximately one-third of patients with diabetes have some form of DR. Average healthcare costs increase considerably with the severity of DR, which suggests that preventing progression of DR may lower healthcare costs.

  • 12.
    Jennersjo, P E
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship between dipper status and early cardiovascular organ damage2009In: in DIABETOLOGIA, vol 52, 2009, Vol. 52, p. S430-S430Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Jennersjö, Pär E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Wijkman, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Circadian blood pressure variation in patients with type 2 diabetes - relationship to macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage2011In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 167-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the association between nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipper status and macro- and microvascular organ damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Methods

    Cross-sectional data from 663 patients with type 2 diabetes, aged 55–66 years, were analysed. Nurses measured office BP and ambulatory BP during 24 h. Individuals with ≥10% difference in nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) relative to daytime values were defined as dippers. Non-dippers were defined as <10% nocturnal decrease in SBP. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated and microalbuminuria was measured by albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry over the carotid and femoral arteries.

    Results

    We identified 433 dippers and 230 subjects with a nocturnal non-dipping pattern. Nocturnal SBP dipping was independently of office SBP associated with decreased PWV (p = 0.008), lower ACR (p = 0.001) and NT-proBNP (p = 0.001) and increased GFR (p < 0.001).

    Conclusions

    We conclude that diurnal BP variation provides further information about early macro- and microvascular subclinical organ damage that goes beyond standardized office BP measurements in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  • 14.
    Johannesson, A.
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Larsson, G.-U.
    Department of Orthopedics Hassleholm-Kristianstad.
    Ramstrand, N.
    Jönköping University.
    Turkiewicz, A.
    Lund University.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Atroshi, I.
    Lund University.
    Incidence of lower-limb amputation in the diabetic and nondiabetic general population: A 10-year population-based cohort study of initial unilateral and contralateral amputations and reamputations2009In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 275-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE -The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of vascular lower- limb amputation (LLA) in the diabetic and nondiabetic general population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS -A population-based cohort study was conducted in a representative Swedish region. All vascular LLAs (at or proximal to the transmetatarsal level) performed from 1997 through 2006 were consecutively registered and classified into initial unilateral amputation, contralateral amputation, or reamputation. The incidence rates were estimated in the diabetic and nondiabetic general population aged =45 years. RESULTS -During the 10-year period, LLA was performed on 62 women and 71 men with diabetes and on 79 women and 78 men without diabetes. The incidence of initial unilateral amputation per 100,000 person-years was 192 (95% CI 145-241) for diabetic women, 197 (152-244) for diabetic men, 22 (17-26) for nondiabetic women, and 24 (19-29) for nondiabetic men. The incidence increased from the age of 75 years. Of all amputations, 74% were transtibial. The incidences of contralateral amputation and of reamputation per 100 amputee- years in diabetic women amputees were 15 (7-27) and 16 (8-28), respectively; in diabetic men amputees 18 (10 -29) and 21 (12-32); in nondiabetic women amputees 14 (7-24) and 18 (10-28); and in nondiabetic men amputees 13 (6-22) and 24 (15-35). CONCLUSIONS -In the general population aged =45 years, the incidence of vascular LLA at or proximal to the transmetatarsal level is eight times higher in diabetic than in nondiabetic individuals. One in four amputees may require contralateral amputation and/or reamputation.

  • 15.
    Josefsson, Ann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Continuation rates of oral hormonal contraceptives in a cohort of first-time users: a population-based registry study, Sweden 2005-20102013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate if continuation rates in first-time users of oral hormonal contraceptives differed between different formulations and to measure if the rates were related to the prescribing categories, that is, physicians and midwives.                                

    Design A longitudinal national population-based registry study.                                

    Setting The Swedish prescribed drug register.                                

    Participants All women born between 1977 and 1994 defined as first-time users of hormonal contraceptives from 2007 to 2009 (n=226 211).                                

    Main outcome measures A tendency to switch the type of hormonal contraceptive within 6 months use and repeated dispensation identical to the first were estimated as percentages and relative risks (RRs). Physicians’ and midwives’ prescription patterns concerning the women's                                    continuation rates of oral hormonal contraceptive type.                                

    Results In Sweden, there were 782 375 women born between 1977 and 1994 at the time of the study. Of these, 226 211 women were identified as first-time users of hormonal contraceptives. Ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel, desogestrel-only and ethinylestradiol+drospirenone were the hormonal contraceptives most commonly dispensed to first-time users at rates of 43.3%, 24.4% and 11.1%, respectively. The overall rate of switching contraceptive types in the first 6 months was 11.3%, which was highest for desogestrel-only (14.3%) and lowest for ethinylestradiol+drospirenone (6.6%). The switching rate for all three products was highest in the 16-year to 19-year age group. Having a repeated dispensation identical to the initial dispensation was highest for users of ethinylestradiol either combined with levonorgestrel or drospirenone, 81.4% and 81.2%, respectively, whereas this rate for the initial desogestrel-only users was 71.5%. The RR of switching of contraceptive type within the first 6 months was 1.35 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.39) for desogestrel-only and 0.63 (0.59 to 0.66) for ethinylestradiol+drospirenone compared with ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel as the reference category. There were no differences in the women's continuation rates depending on the prescriber categories.                                

    Conclusions Desogestrel-only users conferred the highest switcher rate to another hormonal contraceptive within a 6-month period. Users of ethinylestradiol+levonorgestrel were more prone to switch to another product within 6 months than women using ethinylestradiol+drospirenone. These findings may be of clinical importance when tailoring hormonal contraceptives on an individual basis.

  • 16.
    Kärner, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the East of Östergötland, East County Primary Health Care.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Wodlin, Peter
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The effect of problem-based learning in patient education after an event of CORONARY heart disease - a randomised study in PRIMARY health care: design and methodology of the COR-PRIM study2012In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 13, no 110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Even though there is convincing evidence that self-care, such as regular exercise         and/or stopping smoking, alters the outcomes after an event of coronary heart disease         (CHD), risk factors remain. Outcomes can improve if core components of secondary prevention         programmes are structurally and pedagogically applied using adult learning principles         e.g. problem-based learning (PBL). Until now, most education programs for patients         with CHD have not been based on such principles. The basic aim is to discover whether         PBL provided in primary health care (PHC) has long-term effects on empowerment and         self-care after an event of CHD.     

    Methods/Design

    A randomised controlled study is planned for patients with CHD. The primary outcome         is empowerment to reach self-care goals. Data collection will be performed at baseline         at hospital and after one, three and five years in PHC using quantitative and qualitative         methodologies involving questionnaires, medical assessments, interviews, diaries and         observations. Randomisation of 165 patients will take place when they are stable in         their cardiac condition and have optimised cardiac medication that has not substantially         changed during the last month. All patients will receive conventional care from their         general practitioner and other care providers. The intervention consists of a patient         education program in PHC by trained district nurses (tutors) who will apply PBL to         groups of 6–9 patients meeting on 13 occasions for two hours over one year. Patients         in the control group will not attend a PBL group but will receive home-sent patient         information on 11 occasions during the year.     

    Discussion

    We expect that the 1-year PBL-patient education will improve patients’ beliefs, self-efficacy         and empowerment to achieve self-care goals significantly more than one year of standardised         home-sent patient information. The assumption is that PBL will reduce cardiovascular         events in the long-term and will also be cost-effective compared to controls. Further,         the knowledge obtained from this study may contribute to improving patients’ ability         to handle self-care, and furthermore, may reduce the number of patients having subsequent         CHD events in Sweden.

  • 17.
    Kärner, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahl, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Asklund, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    COR-PRIM: Patient education after coronary disease - Long-term evaluation in primary care2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. SICS East Swedish ICT, Linköping, Sweden.
    Carlgren, Gunnar
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Mudra, Jacqueline
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Synnergren, Henrik
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Hilding, Niclas
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Advanced Home Care in Linköping.
    Karlsson, daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Persson, Hans Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Preliminary results of a telemonitoring study: COPD and heart failure patients exhibit great difference in their need of health care2015In: European Respiratory Journal: Official Scientific Journal of ERS / [ed] Marc Humbert, European Respiratory Society , 2015, Vol. 46/suppl 59, p. PA2790-PA2790Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Growing populations of elderly patients with advanced stages of COPD or heart failure (HF) urge the need for specialized health care in the patients' home. A telemonitoring study has been initiated including patients using digital pens. Health care was provided by the specialized home care unit at a university hospital. Through an IT system the staff checked all daily patient reports. We hypothesized that the two groups of patients, advanced COPD or HF, would exhibit differences regarding exacerbations and the need of health care.

    Objective: To study exacerbations of COPD or HF, and patient health care consumption.

    Methods: A tele-monitoring system, the Health diary, which is based on digital pen technology, was employed. Exacerbations were identified using information provided through the telemonitoring system. Consumed health care was assessed as the number of patient contacts (home visits or telephone consultations).

    Results: Presently, 33 patients with advanced disease are enrolled (13 COPD and 20 HF patients) of which 11 patients (6 COPD and 5 HF patients) have completed the 1-yr study period or have died during the study period (2 COPD and 4 HF patients). Exacerbations were 2.8 and 0.8 and patient contacts were 96 and 42 per COPD and HF patient, respectively. While HF patients were significantly older than COPD patients, the two groups demonstrated no difference regarding gender distribution and comorbidity.

    Conclusions: COPD patients exhibit exacerbations more frequently and demand much more home health care than patients with HF do. It seems that this difference of health care consumption is mainly due to disease characteristics.

  • 19.
    Lind, Leili
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lyth, Johan
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Karlsson, Daniel M. G.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Persson, Lennart
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    COPD patients require more health care than heart failure patients2018In: ERS International Congress 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Populations of elderly patients with advanced stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure (HF) are growing, urging the need for specialized health care in the patients’ home. A 4 year (2013-2017) telehealth intervention single-centre clinical study has been completed. We hypothesized that the two groups of patients, advanced COPD or HF, would exhibit differences regarding exacerbations and the need of health care.

    Objective: To study exacerbations of COPD or HF, and patients’ need of health care.

    Methods: A telemonitoring system, the Health Diary, which is based on digital pen technology, was employed. Patients with at least 2 hospital admissions the previous year were included. Responsible nurses and physicians at a specialized home care unit at a university hospital checked all daily patient reports. Physicians identified exacerbations using information provided through the telemonitoring system and patient contacts. Consumed health care was assessed as the number of patient contacts (home visits or telephone consultations).

    Results: Totally, 94 patients with advanced disease were enrolled (36 COPD and 58 HF patients) of which 53 patients (19 COPD and 34 HF patients) completed the 1-yr study period. The major reason for not completing the study was death (13 COPD, 15 HF patients). Average numbers of exacerbations were 3.1 and 0.8 and patient contacts were 94 and 67 per COPD and HF patient, respectively.

    Conclusions: Compared to HF patients, COPD patients exhibit exacerbations more frequently and demand much more home health care. This difference of health care consumption is mainly due to disease characteristics.

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Malou
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Differences in prescription rates and odds ratios of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual hormonal contraceptives: A nationwide population-based study with age-specific analyses2012In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 106-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To examine, among young women, the association of individual hormonal contraceptives, within two broad groupings, with antidepressant therapy. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods In a nationwide register-based study, we examined the prescription rates of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual combined hormonal and progestin-only contraceptives among Swedish women aged 16-31 years (N = 917,993). Drug data were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register for the period 1 July 2005-30 June 2008. Data on the total population of women aged 16-31 in 2008 were obtained from the Total Population Register of Statistics Sweden. The proportion of women using both hormonal contraception and antidepressants, and odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressant use for hormonal contraceptive users versus non-users, were calculated, the latter by logistic regression, for each formulation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The highest antidepressant OR in all age groups, particularly in the 16-19 years age group, related to medroxyprogesterone-only, followed by etonogestrel-only, levonorgestrel-only and ethinylestradiol/norelgestromin formulations. Oral contraceptives containing ethinylestradiol combined with lynestrenol or drospirenone had considerably higher ORs than other pills. ORs significantly lower than 1 were observed when ethinylestradiol was combined with norethisterone, levonorgestrel or desogestrel. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion The association between use of hormonal contraceptives and antidepressant drugs varies considerably within both the combined hormonal contraceptive and the progestin-only groups.

  • 21.
    Lindberg, Malou
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Differences in prescription rates of antidepressant drugs in relation to individual hormonal contraceptives: a nationwide population-based study2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lorefelt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wilhelmsson, Susan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and health care costs for the elderly living in municipal residential homes — An intervention study2011In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim was to study the effect of individualised meals on nutritional status among older people living in municipal residential homes and to compare the results with a control group. An additional aim was to estimate direct health care costs for both groups.

    SETTING:

    Six different municipal residential homes in the south-east of Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Older people living in three residential homes constituted the intervention group n=42 and the rest constituted the control group n=67.

    INTERVENTION:

    A multifaceted intervention design was used. Based on an interview with staff a tailored education programme about nutritional care, including both theoretical and practical issues, was carried through to staff in the intervention group. Nutritional status among the elderly was measured by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), individualised meals were offered to the residents based on the results of the MNA. Staff in the control group only received education on how to measure MNA and the residents followed the usual meal routines.

    MEASUREMENTS:

    Nutritional status was measured by MNA at baseline and after 3 months. Cost data on health care visits during 2007 were collected from the Cost Per Patient database.

    RESULTS:

    Nutritional status improved and body weight increased after 3 months in the intervention group. Thus, primary health care costs constituted about 80% of the total median cost in the intervention group and about 55% in the control group.

    CONCLUSION:

    With improved knowledge the staff could offer the elderly more individualised meals. One of their future challenges is to recognise and assess nutritional status among this group. If malnutrition could be prevented health care costs should be reduced.

  • 23.
    Lyth, Johan
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Lind, Leili
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    The National Board of Health and Welfare, Department for Knowledge-Based Policy of Social Services, eHealth and Structured Information Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart Hans
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Respiratory Medicine.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Research and Development Unit.
    Can a telemonitoring system lead to decreased hospital admissions in elderly patients?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Populations of elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or heart failure (HF) are growing. To prevent exacerbations leading to inpatient care, a 4 year (2013-2017) telehealth intervention non-randomized single-centre clinical study was performed. We hypothesized that the patients, grouped by advanced COPD or HF, would exhibit decreased need of hospital admissions.

    Objective: To study hospital admissions in patients with COPD or HF using a telemonitoring system, the Health Diary.

    Methods: A telemonitoring system, the Health Diary, based on digital pen technology, was employed. Patients with COPD or HF treated at the University Hospital in Linköping were included if they had at least 2 hospital admissions the previous year. Data on hospital admissions was obtained from the administrative healthcare database. Expected number of hospital admissions for the study year was calculated using 5-year data for a group of patients with matching diagnosis and history of hospital admissions and was compared to the actual value in the intervention group using Poisson regression.

    Results: Together with the included patients, 159 HF and 136 COPD non-intervention patients was used to calculate the expected values for hospital admissions. For the 58 included HF patients, the average number of hospital admissions of 0.81 was 32.8 percent (p=0.04) lower than expected. For the 36 included COPD patients, the average number of hospital admissions of 1.44 was 37.0 percent (p=0.02) lower than expected.

    Conclusions: Use of the telemonitoring system, the Health Diary, decreases hospital admissions in elderly with COPD and HF.

  • 24.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Chalmers, J.
    The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction: a nationwide register study2016In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 218-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    To explore the gender- and age-specific risk of developing a first myocardial infarction in people treated with antidiabetic and/or antidepressant drugs compared with people with no pharmaceutical treatment for diabetes or depression.

    Methods

    A cohort of all Swedish residents aged 45–84 years (n = 4 083 719) was followed for a period of 3 years. Data were derived from three nationwide registers. The prescription and dispensing of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs were used as markers of disease. All study subjects were reallocated according to treatment and the treatment categories were updated every year. Data were analysed using a Cox regression model with a time-dependent variable. The outcome of interest was first fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction.

    Results

    During follow-up, 42 840 people had a first myocardial infarction, 3511 of which were fatal. Women aged 45–64 years, receiving both antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs had a hazard ratio for myocardial infarction of 7.4 (95% CI 6.3–8.6) compared with women receiving neither. The corresponding hazard ratio for men was 3.1 (95% CI 2.8–3.6).

    Conclusions

    The combined use of antidiabetic and antidepressant drugs was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction compared with use of either group of drugs alone. The increase in relative risk was greater in middle-aged women than in middle-aged men.

  • 25.
    Rådholm, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Falk, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Myocardial infarction in subjects using anti-diabetic and/or anti-depressant agents compared tonon-users: a nationwide register study in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Restless legs syndrome during and after pregnancy and its relation to snoring2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 7, p. 850-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To study development of restless legs syndrome (RLS) during and after pregnancy, and whether RLS is related to snoring or other pregnancy-related symptoms. Design. Prospective study. Setting. Antenatal care clinics in the catchment area of Linkoping university hospital, Sweden. Population. Five hundred consecutively recruited pregnant women. Methods. Sleep disturbances, including symptoms of RLS and snoring, were assessed with questionnaires in each trimester. A complementary questionnaire was sent three years after delivery to women experiencing symptoms of RLS during pregnancy. Main outcome measures. Symptoms of RLS in relation to snoring in each trimester. Results. Symptoms of RLS were reported by 17.0% of the women in the first trimester, by 27.1% in the second trimester and by 29.6% in the third trimester. Snoring in the first trimester was correlated to increased prevalence of RLS in all three trimesters (p= 0.003, 0.017 and 0.044 in the first, second and third trimester, respectively). No correlation was found between RLS and anemia, parity or body mass index. Among the women who experienced RLS, 31% still had symptoms three years after delivery. Fifty-eight per cent of those whose symptoms had disappeared stated that this happened within one month after delivery. Conclusions. Symptoms of RLS progressed most between the first and second trimester. Women who snored in the first or second trimester of pregnancy had a higher prevalence of RLS in the third trimester, which indicates that snoring in early pregnancy might predict RLS later. Symptoms of RLS disappear quite soon after delivery, but about one-third of women with RLS during pregnancy may still have symptoms three years after childbirth.

  • 27.
    Sarberg, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Snoring during pregnancy and its relation to sleepiness and pregnancy outcome - a prospective study2014In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 14, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The incidence of snoring and sleepiness is known to increase during pregnancy, and this might impact maternal health and obstetric outcome. However, the association between snoring and sleepiness during pregnancy is not fully understood. This study was aimed at investigating the development of snoring during pregnancy and prospectively assessing if there is an association between snoring and sleepiness or adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preeclampsia, mode of delivery, and fetal complications. Methods: Consecutively recruited pregnant women (n = 500) received a questionnaire concerning snoring and sleep at the 1st and 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The women who had rated their frequency of snoring at both occasions (n = 340) were divided into subgroups according to the development of snoring they reported and included in the subsequent analyses. Additional medical data were collected from the medical records. Results: The frequency of snoring was 7.9% in the 1st trimester and increased to 21.2% in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The women who snored already in early pregnancy had significantly higher baseline BMI (p = 0.001) than the women who never snored, but snoring was not associated with the magnitude of weight gain during pregnancy. Snoring women were more likely to experience edema in late pregnancy than the non-snorers. Women who started to snore during pregnancy had higher Epworth Sleepiness Scores than the non snorers in both early and late pregnancy. No significant association between obstetric outcome and snoring was found. Conclusion: Snoring does increase during pregnancy, and this increase is associated with sleepiness, higher BMI at the start of pregnancy and higher prevalence of edema, but not with weight gain.

  • 28.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Data-Rich World: Population‐based registers in healthcare research2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advances and integration of information and communication technologies into healthcare systems offer new opportunities to improve public health worldwide. In Sweden, there are already unique possibilities for epidemiological research from registers because of a long tradition of centralized data collection into population-based registers and their allowance for linkage. The growing efficiency of automated digital storage provides growing volumes of archived data that increases the potential of analyses further.

    The purpose of this thesis can be divided into two parallel themes: illustrations and discussions of the use and usefulness of population-based registers on the one hand, and specific research questions in epidemiology and healthcare research on the other. The research questions are addressed in separate papers.

    From the Swedish Cancer Registry, 25 years of incidence data on testicular cancer was extracted for a large cohort. Record linkage to survey data on serum cholesterol showed a highly significant positive association, suggesting that elevated serum cholesterol concentration is a risk factor for testicular cancer. Since the finding is the first of its kind and because of wide confidence intervals further studies are needed to confirm the association.

    Östergötland County council’s administra-tive database (the Care Data Warehouse in Östergötland (CDWÖ)) provided data for preva-lence estimations of four common chronic diseases.

    The prevalence rate agreed very well with previous estimates for diabetes and fairly well with those for asthma. For hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the observed rates were lower than previous prevalence estimates. Data on several consecutive years covering all healthcare levels are needed to achieve valid prevalence estimates.

    CDWÖ data was also used to analyse the impact of diabetes on the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. Women had higher diabetes/non-diabetes prevalence rate ratios across all ages. The relative gender difference remained up to the age of 65 years and thereafter decreased considerably.

    The age-specific direct healthcare cost of diabetes was explored using data from the CDWÖ, the county council’s Cost Per Patient database and the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. The cost per patient and the relative magnitude of different cost components varied considerably by age, which is important to consider in the future planning of diabetes management.

    The Cancer Registry was established mainly as a basis for epidemiological surveillance and research, exemplified in this thesis by a study on testicular cancer. In contrast, the newly established and planned healthcare databases in different Swedish counties are mainly for managerial purposes. As is shown in this thesis, these new databases may also be used to address problems in epidemiology and healthcare research.

    List of papers
    1. Serum cholesterol and testicular cancer incidence in 45 000 men followed for 25 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serum cholesterol and testicular cancer incidence in 45 000 men followed for 25 years
    2005 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, Vol. 92, no 9, p. 1785-1786Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In a 25-year follow-up study of 44 864 men with measured serum cholesterol levels, the testicular cancer hazard ratios for the serum cholesterol categories 5.7–6.9 and ≥7.0 mmol l-1 vs the reference category (<5.7 mmol l-1) were 1.3 and 4.5, respectively; P-value for trend=0.005. This highly significant association suggests that high-serum cholesterol is a risk factor for testicular cancer.

    Keywords
    epidemiology, testicular neoplasm, cholesterol
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12757 (URN)10.1038/sj.bjc.6602539 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-06 Created: 2007-11-06 Last updated: 2011-02-03
    2. Estimating disease prevalence using a population-based administrative healthcare database
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating disease prevalence using a population-based administrative healthcare database
    2007 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: In Östergötland County, Sweden, all data on hospital care and primary healthcare (PHC) have been entered in a diagnosis-related administrative database since 1999. This database was used to estimate the prevalence of four chronic diseases and to examine the capture of data in PHC, outpatient hospital care, and inpatient hospital care, considered in different time frames.

    Methods: A case-finding algorithm identified patients with at least one healthcare contact involving a diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 1999—2003. Prevalence rates were calculated as the ratio of the number of identified patients alive to the total number of inhabitants on 31 December 2003 (n~415,000).

    Results: Prevalence rates were 4.4% for diabetes, 10.3% for hypertension, 4.5% for asthma, and 1.2% for COPD. For all four diagnoses, the proportions of patients identified on only one healthcare level were greatest for PHC, reaching rates of 23%, 68%, 53%, and 48%, respectively. The cases identified solely in PHC comprised larger proportions of women and patients over the age of 65 years. Considering the proportion of patients identified in 2003 in relation to the total five-year period gave values of 71%, 50%, 38%, and 58%, respectively, for the four diagnoses.

    Conclusions: The administrative healthcare databases in Sweden today can be important tools in epidemiological research. However, data on several consecutive years and both PHC and hospital data are needed to achieve valid prevalence estimates.

    Keywords
    Asthma, COPD, diabetes mellitus, epidemiology, healthcare, hypertension, inpatients, prevalence, primary outpatients, registries
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12758 (URN)10.1080/14034940701195230 (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-06 Created: 2007-11-06 Last updated: 2009-05-19
    3. Age and Gender Differences in the Impact of Diabetes on the Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease: a Population-Based Register Study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age and Gender Differences in the Impact of Diabetes on the Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease: a Population-Based Register Study
    2008 (English)In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 497-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore age and gender differences in the impact of diabetes on the prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a defined population.

    Methods: Data were obtained from an administrative health care register covering a population of about 415 000. The study included all patients aged 45-74 years diagnosed between 1999-2003 with IHD (n=11 311) and diabetes (n=10 364) by physicians at all primary health care centres (PHCs) and out- and inpatient clinics at all hospitals in the county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Results: In the 45-54 year-old age group, diabetes was associated with an increase in IHD prevalence equivalent to ageing about 20 years in women and 10 years in men. The diabetes/nondiabetes IHD prevalence rate ratio (IPR) decreased with age in both men and women (trend p-values < 0.001). The IPR was higher among women than men in each age group, though the female relative excess decreased from 75% higher in the 45-54 year-old age group to 33% higher in the 65-74 year-old age group (trend p-value = 0.018).

    Conclusions: The relative gender difference in the impact of diabetes on IHD in younger middle-aged patients remained up to the age of 65 years, decreasing considerably thereafter.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, 2008
    Keywords
    aging, coronary disease, diabetes mellitus, prevalence, sex differences
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11241 (URN)10.1016/j.diabres.2007.10.009 (DOI)
    Note
    Original publication: Ann-Britt E. Wiréhn, Carl Johan Östgren and John M. Carstensen, Age and Gender Differences in the Impact of Diabetes on the Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease: a Population-Based Register Study, 2008, Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, (79), 3, 497-502. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2007.10.009. Copyright: Elsevier B.V., http://www.elsevier.com/Available from: 2008-03-12 Created: 2008-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Age-specific direct health care costs attributable to diabetesin a Swedish population: a register-based analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-specific direct health care costs attributable to diabetesin a Swedish population: a register-based analysis
    2008 (English)In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this population-based study was to explore the age-specific additional direct healthcare cost for patients with diabetes compared with the non-diabetic population.

    Methods: In 1999-2005, patients with diabetes in the Swedish county of Östergötland (n = 20 876) were identified from an administrative database. Cost data on the healthcare expenditure in primary healthcare, out-patient hospital care and in-patient care for the entire county population (n = ∼415 000) in 2005 were extracted from a cost per patient (CPP) database, which includes information on all utilized healthcare resources in the county. Data on drug sales were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Results: The cost per person was 1.8 times higher in patients with diabetes than in the non-diabetic population, 7.7 times higher in children and 1.3 times higher in subjects aged > 75 years. The additional cost per person for diabetes was €1971; €3930 and €1367, respectively, for children and subjects aged > 75 years. The proportion of total additional diabetes costs attributable to in-patient care increased with age from 25 to 50%; in-patient care was the most expensive component at all ages except in children, for whom visiting a specialist was most expensive. The diabetes-related segment of the total healthcare cost was 6.6%, increasing from 2.0% in children to 10.3% in the age group 65-74 years, declining to 6.2% in the oldest age group.

    Conclusions: The direct medical cost of diabetes varies considerably by age. Knowledge about the influence of age on healthcare costs to society will be important in future planning of diabetes management.

    Keywords
    Diabetes, Economics, Healthcare delivery, Prevalence, Registers
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12760 (URN)10.1111/j.1464-5491.2008.02444.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-06 Created: 2007-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-14
  • 29.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Age-specific direct health care costs attributable to diabetesin a Swedish population: a register-based analysis2008In: Diabetic Medicine, ISSN 0742-3071, E-ISSN 1464-5491, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 732-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this population-based study was to explore the age-specific additional direct healthcare cost for patients with diabetes compared with the non-diabetic population.

    Methods: In 1999-2005, patients with diabetes in the Swedish county of Östergötland (n = 20 876) were identified from an administrative database. Cost data on the healthcare expenditure in primary healthcare, out-patient hospital care and in-patient care for the entire county population (n = ∼415 000) in 2005 were extracted from a cost per patient (CPP) database, which includes information on all utilized healthcare resources in the county. Data on drug sales were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register.

    Results: The cost per person was 1.8 times higher in patients with diabetes than in the non-diabetic population, 7.7 times higher in children and 1.3 times higher in subjects aged > 75 years. The additional cost per person for diabetes was €1971; €3930 and €1367, respectively, for children and subjects aged > 75 years. The proportion of total additional diabetes costs attributable to in-patient care increased with age from 25 to 50%; in-patient care was the most expensive component at all ages except in children, for whom visiting a specialist was most expensive. The diabetes-related segment of the total healthcare cost was 6.6%, increasing from 2.0% in children to 10.3% in the age group 65-74 years, declining to 6.2% in the oldest age group.

    Conclusions: The direct medical cost of diabetes varies considerably by age. Knowledge about the influence of age on healthcare costs to society will be important in future planning of diabetes management.

  • 30.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Primary Health Care Centres.
    Carstensen, John M.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Age and Gender Differences in the Impact of Diabetes on the Prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease: a Population-Based Register Study2008In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 497-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore age and gender differences in the impact of diabetes on the prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a defined population.

    Methods: Data were obtained from an administrative health care register covering a population of about 415 000. The study included all patients aged 45-74 years diagnosed between 1999-2003 with IHD (n=11 311) and diabetes (n=10 364) by physicians at all primary health care centres (PHCs) and out- and inpatient clinics at all hospitals in the county of Östergötland, Sweden.

    Results: In the 45-54 year-old age group, diabetes was associated with an increase in IHD prevalence equivalent to ageing about 20 years in women and 10 years in men. The diabetes/nondiabetes IHD prevalence rate ratio (IPR) decreased with age in both men and women (trend p-values < 0.001). The IPR was higher among women than men in each age group, though the female relative excess decreased from 75% higher in the 45-54 year-old age group to 33% higher in the 65-74 year-old age group (trend p-value = 0.018).

    Conclusions: The relative gender difference in the impact of diabetes on IHD in younger middle-aged patients remained up to the age of 65 years, decreasing considerably thereafter.

  • 31.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Malou
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Use of hormonal contraceptives in relation to antidepressant therapy: A nationwide population-based study2010In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The relation between the use of different hormonal contraceptives and antidepressant therapy was investigated. METHODS: In a nationwide cross-sectional study among all women in Sweden aged 16-31, drug expenditure data on hormonal contraceptives and antidepressants were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressant use were calculated by logistic regression for progestin-only users versus non-users as well as for combined hormonal contraceptive (CHC) users versus non-users. RESULTS: In the study population (N = 917,993), 58.9% were hormonal contraceptive users, and 8.5% were antidepressant users. The age-pattern for antidepressant ORs differed between the two types of users of contraceptives; progestin-only users had significant ORs above 1 in all age groups whereas among CHC users the OR was above 1 solely in those aged 16-19. The largest difference between types of users was seen in the age group 16-19 in which women resorting to a progestin-only contraceptive had a 67% (95% confidence interval: 57- 78%) higher antidepressant use than women treated with a CHC. CONCLUSION: Progestin-only contraceptive users resorted to antidepressants more than users of CHCs. This phenomenon is particularly pronounced among teenagers. Therefore, special attention should be given to young women's mental history when prescribing hormonal contraceptives and vice versa: the contraceptive history should be taken into account when prescribing antidepressants.

  • 32.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Karlsson, H. Mikael
    Östergötland County Council, Sweden.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Estimating disease prevalence using a population-based administrative healthcare database2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 424-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: In Östergötland County, Sweden, all data on hospital care and primary healthcare (PHC) have been entered in a diagnosis-related administrative database since 1999. This database was used to estimate the prevalence of four chronic diseases and to examine the capture of data in PHC, outpatient hospital care, and inpatient hospital care, considered in different time frames.

    Methods: A case-finding algorithm identified patients with at least one healthcare contact involving a diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, asthma, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 1999—2003. Prevalence rates were calculated as the ratio of the number of identified patients alive to the total number of inhabitants on 31 December 2003 (n~415,000).

    Results: Prevalence rates were 4.4% for diabetes, 10.3% for hypertension, 4.5% for asthma, and 1.2% for COPD. For all four diagnoses, the proportions of patients identified on only one healthcare level were greatest for PHC, reaching rates of 23%, 68%, 53%, and 48%, respectively. The cases identified solely in PHC comprised larger proportions of women and patients over the age of 65 years. Considering the proportion of patients identified in 2003 in relation to the total five-year period gave values of 71%, 50%, 38%, and 58%, respectively, for the four diagnoses.

    Conclusions: The administrative healthcare databases in Sweden today can be important tools in epidemiological research. However, data on several consecutive years and both PHC and hospital data are needed to achieve valid prevalence estimates.

  • 33.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Karlsson, M
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    Estimating disease prevalence using an administrative population-based health care database2006In: Ninth international congress of behavioral medicine,2006, 2006, p. 206-206Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Cancer Screening Unit, Oncologic Centre, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Serum cholesterol and testicular cancer incidence in 45 000 men followed for 25 years2005In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, Vol. 92, no 9, p. 1785-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a 25-year follow-up study of 44 864 men with measured serum cholesterol levels, the testicular cancer hazard ratios for the serum cholesterol categories 5.7–6.9 and ≥7.0 mmol l-1 vs the reference category (<5.7 mmol l-1) were 1.3 and 4.5, respectively; P-value for trend=0.005. This highly significant association suggests that high-serum cholesterol is a risk factor for testicular cancer.

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