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  • 1.
    Economou, Konstantin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kultur och mediegestaltning: Tvärvetenskaplighet och tvärmedialitet inom ett nytt akademiskt "kulturämne"2013In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 15-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Anna Marie Stirr. 2017. Singing Across Divides: Music and Intimate Politics in Nepal, reviewed by Ingemar Grandin2018In: Studies in Nepali History and Society, ISSN 1025-5109, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 485-491Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Art music as transnational practices2010In: 15th Nordic Migration Research Conference Global Challenges - Local Responses. The Book of programme and abstracts / [ed] Povrzanović Frykman, Maja, Malmö: Malmö University Electronic Publishing, www.mah.se/muep , 2010, p. 72-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is common to map culture onto socially bounded entities such as ethnic groups and nation-states. This conception spills over to migrants and diasporas – the Gurungs have Gurung culture, the Greeks have Greek culture, the Kurdish diaspora has Kurdish culture. This paper looks at exactly the opposite. We will analyze art music as a unified transnational practice that, however, is maintained by a group of people that is fragmented both socially and – except for the common allegiance to their musical art – culturally. They speak different languages, have different religions, belong to different nations. The analysis draws upon two different traditions of transnationalism in art music: Western ”classical music” and Southasian shastriya sangit. Both are constituted within multiple fields interconnected by flows of both people and cultural goods, making up translocal opportunity structures. And moreover, these two cases give historical depth to our understanding of transnational practice: they were, so to say, transnational long before the era of the nation-state.

     

  • 4.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society and Media Production - KSM. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A Young Person’s Guide to the Cultural Heritage of the Kathmandu Valley: The Song Kaulā Kachalā and Its Video2015In: Studies in Nepali History and Society, ISSN 1025-5109, Vol. 19 (2014), no 2, p. 231-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no doubt that the Newar culture of the Kathmandu Valley has attracted a lot of scholarly attention. The presentation of Newar culture in focus here, however, is very different from the scholarly literature. It is made for Newars by Newars; it is in the form of a song with a video, not a scholarly text; and it is a presentation for children, not for learned readers. The song is called Kaulā Kachalā. Within its small format, this song video plays up a very rich picture of Newar civilization and is positioned in and illuminates important problem areas and debates such as ethnic politics and cultural heritage, and cultural vulnerability and sustainability. 

  • 5.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Between the market and Comrade Mao: Newar cultural activism and ethnic/political movements2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Newars are prominent in the ethnic and indigenous (janajati/adivasi) movement in Nepal. With their heartland in the country's capital area, the Kathmandu Valley, their position is contradictory: they are part of the economic, political and cultural elite yet dominated in numerous ways. Still in the 1940s, people went to jail for publishing literary works in Newari, and the Newar struggle for recognition, identity, and cultural survival - often linked with leftist, political movements - has taken many forms since then. Cultural activism is prominent among these forms.

    This contribution studies Newar cultural activism as an artistic, aesthetic practice. This practice includes songs, cultural programs, music, dance, theatre, but also media artifacts such as cassettes, cds, video-cds, and recordings and "visualizations" for broadcasting purposes. Not only song texts, but also such things as musical resources and non-verbal statements in dress and dance are meaningful here and important to analyze.

    The contribution builds upon ethnographic research from the mid 1980s and into the present day. This period has seen a transformation in political terms from absolutism to democratic republicanism with Maoism as perhaps the most important base for political ideology. But equally important, economic transformations have come to challenge the very roots of the traditional agro-urban civilization of the Newar heartland. In this light, cultural activism is one way to negotiate a position for the Newars and their heritage between the economic forces of the market and the ideological offensive of Comrade Mao's followers.

  • 6.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Burma: musik1990Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Cambodja: Musik1990Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Det musikaliska deltagandet och den musikaliska medborgaren1999In: Demokratins estetik / [ed] Erik Amnå och Lena Johannesson, Stockholm: Fakta info direkt , 1999, p. 107-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Dundrande trummor och politiska psalmer. En musikalisk dokumentär kring revolutionen i Nepal 19901994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 10.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ethnic Activism and Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed) AND Varieties of Activist Experience: Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed). REVIEW2011In: European Bulletin of Himalayan Research, ISSN 0943-8254, Vol. 38, no Spring-Summer, p. 175-178Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production.
    Expression of political and ethnic identity in bhajan singing1997In: Change and Continuity: Studies in the Nepalese Culture of the Kathmandu Valley, Alessandria: Edizioni dell¿Orso , 1997, p. 483-492Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 12.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Filippinerna: Musik1991Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

      

  • 13.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Fria tungor. Musikens vandringar Peking-Paris-Cincinnati t o r. (Den vandrande musiken, 11996Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Gamelan1992Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Ghazal1989Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Hyllning till våren med raga Basanta1989Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Populärvetenskaplig framställning av artikeln Raga Basanta and the Spring songs of the Kathmandu Valley. A musical Great Tradition among Himalayan farmers? (Grandin 1997)

  • 17.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    IMER’s world. Social scientific universalism and /post/colonial hegemonies2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMER’s world. Social scientific universalism and /post/colonial hegemonies

    IMER studies in Sweden have been vocal in unearthing data, proposing analytical frameworks and seeking out theoretical perspectives that counter racism and Swedish ethnocentrism. In this contribution, the discussion of post-colonial theory, universalism and hegemony will be grounded in an examination of IMER research and of how it relates to social science as an international field.

     

    Contemporary social science works within Western hegemony. Heuristically, I think of three hegemonic layers here, each with its intrinsic forms of racism. First, the US hegemony of the post-colonial era. Second, the British hegemony that has lived on from the colonial era to be surprisingly strong today. And finally, a third hegemonic layer centering upon Western Europe.

     

    So one central question motivating my contribution is, how does IMER position itself vis-à-vis these layers of world hegemony?

     

    This means turning the searchlight 180 degrees, to fall upon ourselves as practitioners. The examination does not so much dwell upon what we say (describe, analyze, theorize) as upon what we do: which authors we cite, whom we invite as keynote speakers to our conferences, where we go for empirical research or for guest scholarships, the international networks we build and so on.

     

    Social science operates on the premise of universalism. I don’t think here of the grand universalism – universal truths, science as supreme knowledge, and so on – that post-modernist and social constructionists have done so much to dismantle. But rather of the mundane universalism of everyday social scientific practice. We assume that social scientific theories, methods, textbooks, foundational canons and so on do not stop at linguistic, cultural or national borders. (We do not map out theoretically in which countries discourse analysis is an appropriate methodology, and where not.) And no geographical limitations are articulated when such terms as supply, demand, identity, gender, social capital, ethnicity, social structure or society are used to delineate research fields (”international migration and ethnic relations”), bring people together for conferences, give name to journals (”Ethnic and Racial Studies”), and serve as keywords for scientific articles.

     

    So we will look at the way this universalism operates in social scientific practice and go on to ask, what role has social scientific universalism in maintaining the three layers of Western world hegemony?

     

    The research presented in my contribution is based on the examination of IMER events, IMER publications, and the trajectories of scholars. This is mapped upon centers and peripheries of the three layered world hegemony as outlined above. For instance, from the citations in key IMER publications I map out the geographical areas where cited authors have their professional affiliation, and more specifically from which places empirical parallels are drawn, and where we find theory. If the subaltern speaks, do we listen?

     

    In the concluding discussion, I use the results of this research to address the workshop’s defining question about post-colonial theory and racism.

  • 18.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Indien: Musik1992Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Indonesien: Musik1992Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Interpreting Newar musical life2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Iran: Musik1992Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Jhalakman Gandharwa, folksångare och yrkesmusiker1987Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Kathmandu, a Valley fertile for music1993In: Himal, ISSN 1012-9804, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 23-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 24.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Kirtipur - musik och miljöer i en Nevarstad1987Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Kons fest vid dödsrikets portar1992In: Sju sjungande folk: musik i fest och rit, Stockholm: SMS Musikmuseet , 1992, p. 28-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 26.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Konst, folkrörelser, amatörer2004In: Konsten, kulturpolitiken, forskningen: konstens resurser,2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies – Tema Q. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Kultursällskapet regnbågen, k. Mao och kulturarvsvärnets (bakvända) dialektik2012In: Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012 / [ed] Beckman S, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 150-153Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Lite självrannsakan vore på sin plats2004In: Universitetsläraren, ISSN 0282-4973, no 17, p. 16-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Local cultural activism and the production of public meaning: a Kirtipur case study2011In: / [ed] Michael Hutt (SOAS, London), Pratyoush Onta (Martin Chautari, Kathmandu), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local cultural activism and the production of public meaning: a Kirtipur case study

    Ingemar Grandin, Linköpings universitet, Sweden

    This contribution studies Nepal’s democratic transition as it is articulated and interpreted in local cultural production. The town of Kirtipur is a good case of this. Cultural activism voicing both political and ethnic issues is a longstanding tradition here, and is tied in with other ways of creating public history. To give an example, the names of the four Kirtipur martyrs (shahid) of the Jana Andolan of 1990 are perpetuated not only in memorialising cultural programs but also in the very name of a successful local school.

    Kirtipur cultural activists have navigated through the sometimes turbulent years of post-pancayat Nepal, actively relating to events such as the Jana Andolans and their aftermaths, the Gyanendra era with its curfews, and the advent of the Maovadis. Commenting, arguing, and reflecting upon such events but also upon more general social and cultural conditions, they have performed from makeshift local stages such as a water tank or a crossroads as well as on more formal stages in Kathmandu. As they go by, they forge links and make alliances with people (songwriters, dance directors, in theatre) and organisations (cultural, educational, political) who operate on a translocal or national level. But still the Kirtipur scene remains very much a locally situated practice.

    Beside the ”live” cultural programs, the output of this practice includes media artifacts such as cassettes, cds, video-cds, and recordings and visualisations for broadcasting purposes. In both media artifacts and live programs, songs are the single most important component. New songs are continuously devised, but the Kirtipur cultural activists also draw upon an accumulated, large repertory from which items can be mobilised when the situation so calls for. 

    Grounded in in both historical and local/national contexts, my analysis of this cultural practice and these cultural products aim for the stories they tell about, and the meanings they give to, the sociopolitical conditions, developments and events of the recent decades. My contribution builds upon familiarity with cultural activism, in Kirtipur and on a more national (i.e. Kathmandu) level, and the empirical material has been collected in 2010 as well as intermittently throughout the transition period (and back into the late days of the pancayat era). The data include song texts as copied in notebooks, printed or the like; songs as sung at programs or demonstrated at home (and recorded by me) but also as preserved on local recordings or brought out on commercially available cassettes, cds and videos; programs as observed live and as seen on local recordings. In my study of the local production of public meaning here, not only texts, but also musical resources such as melodies and instruments and the non-verbal statements in dress and dance will be ”decoded”. And finally, not only the artifacts but also the practice of cultural activism itself (as observed and as inferred from interview data) will be ”read” as a running commentary on Nepal’s democratic transition. The very decision to stage a program or write a song at a particular moment can be understood as a statement on how that transition is seen to proceed. 

  • 30.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Malaysia: Musik1994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Manjul Nepal, poet och sångare1987Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Medialization and music practice in Nepal1991In: British-Swedish conference on musicology: ethnomusicology,1989, Stockholm: Musikmuseet , 1991, p. 319-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 33.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Modernisation and revival in a Newar tradition: the songs of Ram Krishna Duwal1995In: Sauhrdyamangalam. Studies in Honour of Siegfried Lienhard on his 70th Birthday / [ed] Mirja Juntunen, William L. Smith, Carl Suneson, Stockholm: The Association of Oriental Studies , 1995, p. 117-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

         

  • 34.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production.
    Music and civilization in the Kathmandu Valley2002In: Ethnomusicological Vistas. Society for Ethnomusicology 2002 Annual Meeting,2002, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Music and media in local life: music practice in a Newar neighbourhood in Nepal2011 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This books presents the musical life of the Newar town of Kirtipur, Nepal. Newar musical traditions are prominent in the local musical life, and this heritage is presented in some detail in the book. Between the vivacious peaks of musical activity from the traditional ensembles, however, modern music from radios and cassette-players take over much of the town’s soundscape. So the role of the media in local musical life is the book’s second major theme. A third major theme is how the vibrant ethnic and political movements help shape the town’s musical activity.With their rich and complex civilization, the Newars have given the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal much of its unique culture and cultural heritage. Music and media in local life was first published in 1989, and is still today the only study of Newar musical life in a full book format. This is the second, updated edition of the book.

  • 36.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Music and media in local life: Music practice in a Newar neighbourhood in Nepal1989Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study concerns the medialization of local music practice, where music practice is taken to mean in what ways music resources- repertoires, instruments, ensembles, and so on-are used in performance and listening, and medialization the permeation by media and their contentsof life at large.

    The study is based upon 16 months' ethnomusicological fieldwork in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, in 1985-86, 1987 and 1988. The material includes notes from observations and conversations, tape recordings of interviews and music, photographs and videotapes. The fieldwork comprised a study of a local community, a neighbourhood in the town ofKirtipur, and interviews with about 40 artist and policymakers in the capital.

    In a prelude, the key terms are clarified and an introduction to the setting is given.

    In chapter 1, the music practice of the area under study is presented as it is encountered in music situations.

    In chapter 2, the Newar music heritage is outlined briefly. Those particular Newar music subtraditions that are prominent in the music life of the neighbourhood are presented in greater detail. They include percussion ensembles, hymn-singing ensembles, folk and seasonal songs, and wedding ensembles performing on Western band instruments. These subtraditions are traced historically, and their present standing in the neighbourhood is described.

    In chapter 3, the developments of media and of media-related music genres in Nepal aredescribed, and then stage programs as an increasingly important way of conducting musicactivity are focused upon. The performance of media-related music genres in the local settingis described.

    Chapter 4 presents the inhabitants of the neighbourhood in terms of occupations, outcomes, education, music abilities and musical preferences.

    Summing up the four descriptive chapters, Chapter 5 gives analyses of continuity and change and of medialization.

    In attempting at an explanation, Chapter 6 argues, first, that musical compatibility had prepared the ground for the assimilation of certain media-transmitted music genres: related music forms had been incorporated long before. Second, the use of music resources is considered from the perspective of actors' concerns. These concerns are discussed under two conceptual hats: ethnic awareness and social awareness. It is concluded that the ways in which neighbourhood people use music resources - traditional and modern, in performance and listening - belong to systems of action which articulate ultimately an intricate and changing matrix of group boundaries. It is argued that the changing shape of this matrix is connected to profound social change that has occurred since 1951.

  • 37.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Music as message1993In: Himal, ISSN 1012-9804, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 24-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 38.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Music in Newar culture: yesterday, today, tomorrow2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Music of Afghanistan. Professional Musicians in the City of Herat, by John Baily AND The Hidden Musicians. Music-making in an English Town, by Ruth Finnegan. REVIEW1991In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 56, no 1-2, p. 109-111Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Music under development: children’s songs, artists, and the (pancayat) state2005In: Studies in Nepali History and Society, ISSN 1025-5109, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 255-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 1993, Gopal Yonjan (an important personality in the field of Nepali music) released a book-plus-cassette set with songs for children. The cover of the book shows children in dresses typical of different Nepali regions, and these children hold up musical symbols from both East and West: the note-syllables of sa, re, ga, ma, and pa together with a treble clef and an eighth note. On top of this, the name of the book, Git Manjari, is inscribed into the five lines of Western staff notation. In the book – beside the lyrics and saragam notation of the songs – there are instructive comments. These comments are obviously there to educate the music teacher as much as the students. It is suggested how each song can be performed (group, solo singers, with dance, from stage, etc.), illustrations show where the various notes are on the keyboard, and there are comparisons into Western ways of putting music on paper (D major scale, tone-names, etc.). As to the lyrics, we meet in one of these songs a greedy cat, and in another song we are treated with one didactic proverb for each of the ten fingers of the two hands. All the songs – which are targeted at children between four and ten years old – are also found on the accompanying cassette.

    Of course, it was not his songs for children that elevated the late Gopal Yonjan (1943-1997) to be seen as one of Nepal’s (and Darjeeling’s) absolute top musical artists. He is remembered as a composer, as a songwriter, as a part of the legendary Mitjyu constellation with Narayan Gopal, as a flutist, and maybe as a studio-owner and college teacher (of music, at the Padmakanya Campus). Among his works, one might mention songs such as Birsera pheri malai nahera (sung by Narayan Gopal, lyrics Nagendra Thapa), Makhamali colo cahidaina (the radio hit sung by Mira Rana), or Kalakala salasala (the hit from the film Kanchi where Aruna Lama sang Chetan Karki’s lyrics).

    In the context of Gopal Yonjan’s oeuvre, the songs for children in Git Manjari appear marginal.

    In a similar way children have been assessed as marginal in Nepali studies (Gellner 2004). One of the most striking developments during Nepal’s last half century is certainly the explosive growth in schools (see, for instance, Liechty 2003: 57–8, 212–14, 264). The implications of this explosion for youth culture are thoroughly investigated in for instance Mark Liechty’s (2003) study of the rising middle class, and in the studies on various new forms of Nepali music by Paul Greene (2001, 2002/03; Greene & Henderson 2000; Greene & Rajkarnikar 2000). Children’s songs, on the other hand, remain unmentioned here as well as in the research at large – as the overviews of Nepal’s musical scenes in the leading music encyclopedias (Moisala 2000; Wegner et. al. 2005) testify.

    Indeed, marginality seems to be characteristic of children’s songs, whatever the context in which we consider them. They are – as the Gopal Yonjan case illustrates – on the fringe of the modern musical developments in Nepal, where the central genres have been those of modern songs and (folklorized) folk songs. And in the educational context, children’s songs appear as similarly marginal. Compared to the compulsory, comprehensive teaching – with centrally approved textbooks – in Nepali and social studies, singing was an activity on the periphery of school practice and music was not even an explicit part of the curriculum (Ragsdale 1989: 118; see further below).

    Yet this marginality may well be deceptive. As I hope will be clear in course of this article, studying children’s songs, as cultural artifacts and as artistic and educational practices, lands one on important, contested and central ground.

  • 41.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production.
    Musikern - en evig migrant2003In: I & M : invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 40-42Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Möten i Delhi. Sultanen, kejsaren och den vandrande musiken. (Den vandrande musiken, 2).1996Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Nepal: Musik1994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nepalese urbanism: A musical exploration1994In: Anthropology of Nepal: People, problems and processes / [ed] Michael Allen, New York: State Mutual Book & Periodical Service , 1994, p. 160-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    När en musiktradition medialiserar. Nepal i förändringarnas tidevarv1990In: Medier och kulturer / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Stockholm: Carlssons , 1990, p. 171-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    One song, five continents, and a thousand years of musical migration1995In: Saragam Musical Quarterly, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1986, the senior Nepali composer Amber Gurung invited some musical friends to his home to record a few of his songs. There were Tarabirsingh Tuladhar, the sitarist; Prakash Gurung played the tabla, and Madanji the guitar. From Amber Gurung’s own family of gifted musicians, Kishor Gurung played the keyboard while Amber Gurung himself sang and played the harmonium. I was there to do the tape recordings. Among the songs we recorded at that time was Aankhaale malaai (which later was re-recorded in the Saanga studio and issued on the cassette Kaile lahar, kaile tarang). This is a typical Nepalese modern song. But the song itself, the arrangement, and the instruments with which it was performed altogether show traces of musical processes, flows and movements that encompass five continents. And to unravel all this will take us through more than a thousand years of musical migration.

  • 47.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production.
    "Our pale-eyed guests". Notes on a Westerner Diaspora and its Hosts2002In: Staden och staten. Etnicitet, migration och medborgarskap. IMER-konferensen 2002.,2002, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Pakistan: Musik1994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Papua Nya Guinea: Musik och dans1994Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Grandin, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Culture, Society, Media Production. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Patronage and subistence in the economy of popular music2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

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