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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dyrdal Solbrekke, Tone
    Oslo universitet, Norway.
    Karseth, Berit
    Oslo Universitet, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From university to professional practice: Students as journeymen between cultures of education and work2014In: International handbook of research in professional and practice-based learning, Volume 1 / [ed] Stephen Billett, Christian Harteis, Hans Gruber, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2014, 1, p. 461-484Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overarching research problem addressed in this chapter is the relationship between professional/higher education and professional work. The chapter will discuss the relevance of university education for professional practice with a particular focus on professional identity formation and formation of professional responsibility. We deiscuss how different professional programs and their traditions and culturs shape different curricula structures that have an impact on students professional identity formation and transition to work. We will also discuss ecperiences with and learning of professional responsibility in the web of commitments within educational settings and how new multiple expectations emerge and lead to new learning experiencies when entering work life. The argument of the chapter is based on the rationale and findings from an extensive international research program, conducted between 2001-2008.

  • 2.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    Grosjean, Garnet
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Lee, Alison
    University of Technology, Sydney, Australia.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning.
    The Graduate School in the Sky: Emerging pedagogies for an international network for doctoral education and research2011In: Reshaping Doctoral Education: international approaches and pedagogies / [ed] Alison Lee & Susan Danby, London: Routledge , 2011, 1, p. 173-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource.The number of doctorates being awarded around the world has almost doubled over the last ten years, propelling it from a small elite enterprise into a large and ever growing international market. Within the context of increasing numbers of doctoral students this book examines the new doctorate environment and the challenges it is starting to face. Drawing on research from around the world the individual authors contribute to a previously under-represented focus of theorising the emerging practices of doctoral education and the shape of change in this arena. Key aspects, expertly discussed by contributors from the UK, USA, Australia, New Zealand, China, South Africa, Sweden and Denmark include: (1) the changing nature of doctoral education; (2) the need for systematic and principled accounts of doctoral pedagogies; (3) the importance of disciplinary specificity; (4) the relationship between pedagogy and knowledge generation; and (5) issues of transdisciplinarity. "Reshaping Doctoral Education" provides rich accounts of traditional and more innovative pedagogical practices within a range of doctoral systems in different disciplines, professional fields and geographical locations, providing the reader with a trustworthy and scholarly platform from which to design the doctoral experience. It will prove an essential resource for anyone involved in doctorate studies, whether as students, supervisors, researchers, administrators, teachers or mentors. After an introduction, this book is divided into three parts. Part I, Old Basics/New Basics?, contains the following: (2) Framing Doctoral Pedagogy As Design and Action, Susan Danby and Alison Lee; (3) Writing as Craft and Practice in the Doctoral Curriculum (Claire Aitchison and Anthony Pare); (4) Learning from the Literature: Some Pedagogies (David Boote); (5) "Team" Supervision: New Positionings in Doctoral Education Pedagogies (Catherine Manathunga); (6) The Seminar as Enacted Doctoral Pedagogy (Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren and Anna Bjuremark); (7) Taking a Break: Doctoral Summer Schools as Transformative Pedagogies (Miriam Zukas and Linda Lundgaard Andersen); and (8) "What's Going on Here?" The Pedagogy of a Data Analysis Session (Harris, J., Theobald, M., Danby, S., Reynolds, E., Rintel, E.S., and Members The Transcript Analysis Group (Tag)). Part II, Disciplinary and Transdisciplinary Pedagogies, contains the following: (9) Designing (In) the PhD in Architecture: Knowledge, Discipline, Pedagogy (Charles Rice and Linda Matthews); (10) Pedagogies for Creativity in Science Doctorates (Liezel Frick); (11) Creative Tensions: Negotiating the Multiple Dimensions of a Transdisciplinary Doctorate (Juliet Willetts, Cynthia Mitchell, Ku mi Absurdity and Dena Fame; (12) Cognitive Apprenticeship: The Making of a Scientist (Barbara J. Gabey's and Alina Bletch); and (13) Pedagogies of Industry Partnership (Barbara Adkins, Jennifer Summer ville, Susan Dan by and Judy Matthews). Part III, Inter-National and Intercultural Pedagogical Spaces, contains the following: (14) The Graduate School in the Sky: Emerging Pedagogies for An International Network for Doctoral Education and Research (Madeleine Brandt-Walgreen, Sofia Nostrum, Garnet Grossman and Alison Lee); (15) Ignorance and Pedagogies of Generative Equality: Internationalizing Australian Doctoral Education Programs and Pedagogies through Engaging Chinese Theoretical Tools (Michael Sing and Fang Chen); and (16) Expanding Pedagogical Boundaries: Indigenous Students Undertaking Doctoral Education (Liz McKinley and Barbara Grant). [Foreword by Erica McWilliam.]

  • 3.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rystedt, HansDepartment of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.Felländer-Tsai, LiDepartment of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC) Division of Orthopedics and Biotechnology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Nyström, SofiaLinköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Simulation in Health Care: Materiality, Embodiment, Interaction2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Series editors abstract:

    A key goal of this book series is to contribute to discussions about and processes for improving the enactment of occupational capacities through professional practice- based experiences. A related goal is associated with understanding and enhancing the contributions that different kinds of experiences can make to the formation and continuity of those occupational practices. The volumes in this series have contrib- uted a range of perspectives, approaches and outcomes to these discussions. This volume continues that tradition through considerations of how simulation-based activities can contribute to enhancing occupational practices in which working and learning progresses inter- and intra-professionally within healthcare settings. The procedural concern here is to enhance patient safety through improving the quality of collaborative working and learning by healthcare workers. The conceptual concern here is to understand how such working and learning can be understood more fully as a process of interdependence amongst practitioners, and how such co- working and learning progresses, in what ways and for what outcomes. Added here are the ways in which technology comes to mediate and support that process. Perhaps only through such considerations, focused empirical work and detailed analysis will our understanding of human capacities, their enactment and evaluation transcend from either wholly individualised or wholly socialised accounts.

    The sections comprising this book are drawn from a large collaborative study hosted by three institutions that have longer and solid traditions of making contribu- tions to understanding the development of professional capacities through interpro- fessional practices (i.e. Linkoping), dedicated focuses on improving healthcare practices (Karolinska) and the use of technology in working and learning (Gothenburg). These collaborations have been informed and enriched by contribu- tors from other institutions who bring explanatory concepts. The attempt to utilise, accommodate and optimise these different contributions is exercised within the organisation of the sections of the book and chapters within it, highlighted by a process of dual considerations and separate commentaries. Each of these sections provides an overview, statements about procedural matters (e.g. how to conduct inquiries or how to analyse data), proposing and advancing particular explanatory accounts, and also offering perspectives on how educational or work practice might be enhanced. This structuring is particularly helpful as it provides focused consid- erations of particular phenomena (e.g. team-based approaches to simulation, use of video recordings, doing simulations) through description, analysis and commentary.

    In these ways, this volume offers contributions to discussions about the goals for, processes of and outcomes of professional and practice-based learning in a manner that is highly consistent with the ambitions of this book series.

  • 4.
    Ahn, Song Ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Sociomateriella perspektiv på vuxen pedagogik2013In: Lärandets mångfald: Om vuxenpedagogik och folkbildning / [ed] Andreas Fejes, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2013, p. 299-316Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Ahn, Song-ee
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nya former för yrkeslärande: simulatorstödd undervisning2018In: Yrkesutbildning: Mellan skola och arbetsliv / [ed] Maria Gustavssion & Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 85-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skonhoft Johannesen, Hedvig
    OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Editorial: Spring 20182018In: Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 2242-458X, E-ISSN 2242-458X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. iii-vArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Welcome to a new volume of the Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training. In this first issue of 2018 we are proud to present a new associate editor of our journal. Associate professor Hedvig Skonhoft Johannesen from OsloMet - Oslo Metropolitan University in Norway has joined the editorial group, and we look forward to fruitful cooperation with the journal. In this issue of NJVET we have seven contributions ᅵ six peer-reviewed research articles and one magazine article ᅵ from Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. The topics of the articles address assessment in empirical and analytical approaches, VET studentsᅵ as well as teachersᅵ boundary learning, digital storytelling as an approach to vocational didactics, drop out from vocational education, and finally the quality of vocational education.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Skonhoft Johannesen, Hedvig
    OsloMet – Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Editorial: Autumn 20182018In: Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training, ISSN 2242-458X, E-ISSN 2242-458X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. iii-vArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Boud, David
    et al.
    Deakin University, Geelong, Australia / University of Technology, Sydney, Australia / Middlesex University, London, UK.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kelly, Michelle
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    O’Keeffe, Dara
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
    Learning through observation2019In: Interprofessional Simulation in Health Care: Materiality, Embodiment, Interaction / [ed] Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Hans Rystedt, Li Felländer-Tsai & Sofia Nyström, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 115-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter has a particular focus on the observers’ role in simulation-based learning activities. Simulation-based learning is often organised so that participants rotates between active participation in the scenario and participation as observers. The research examples provided show that the conditions for learning are related to the locations where and the ways the observers are situated, and to how the instructions to the observers are formulated. Arguments are put forward that the observers’ role in simulation has unexploited potential for developing skills of noticing.

  • 9.
    Escher, Cecilia
    et al.
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rystedt, Hans
    Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Creutzfeldt, Johan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meurling, Lisbet
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nordahl Amorøe, Torben
    Simulator Centre West, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Felländer-Tsai, Li
    CLINTEC-Department of Clinical Science Interventions and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; CAMST-Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Method matters: impact of in-scenario instruction on simulation-based teamwork training2017In: Advances in Simulation, E-ISSN 2059-0628, Vol. 2, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The rationale for introducing full-scale patient simulators in training to improve patient safety is to recreate clinical situations in a realistic setting. Although high-fidelity simulators mimic a wide range of human features, simulators differ from the body of a sick patient. The gap between the simulator and the human body implies a need for facilitators to provide information to help participants understand scenarios. The authors aimed at describing different methods that facilitators in our dataset used to provide such extra scenario information and how the different methods to convey information affected how scenarios played out.

    Methods

    A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to examine the variation of methods to deliver extra scenario information to participants. A multistage approach was employed. The authors selected film clips from a shared database of 31 scenarios from three participating simulation centers. A multidisciplinary research team performed a collaborative analysis of representative film clips focusing on the interplay between participants, facilitators, and the physical environment. After that, the entire material was revisited to further examine and elaborate the initial findings.

    Results

    The material displayed four distinct methods for facilitators to convey information to participants in simulation-based teamwork training. The choice of method had impact on the participating teams regarding flow of work, pace, and team communication. Facilitators’ close access to the teams’ activities when present in the simulation suite, either embodied or disembodied in the simulation, facilitated the timing for providing information, which was critical for maintaining the flow of activities in the scenario. The mediation of information by a loudspeaker or an earpiece from the adjacent operator room could be disturbing for team communication.

    Conclusions

    In-scenario instruction is an essential component of simulation-based teamwork training that has been largely overlooked in previous research. The ways in which facilitators convey information about the simulated patient have the potential to shape the simulation activities and thereby serve different learning goals. Although immediate timing to maintain an adequate pace is necessary for professionals to engage in training of medical emergencies, novices may gain from a slower tempo to train complex clinical team tasks systematically.

  • 10.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Det medvetna valet av traditionella yrkesområden. En enkätundersökning vid Linköpings universitet angående studenters utbildningsval till högre studier2003Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Kvinnor i akademin - forskarkarriär eller? En intervjustudie vid Linköpings universitet2002Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    The deliberate choice of traditional educational programs2004In: NERAs 32:a kongress,2003, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Evertsson, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Utvärdering och inventering av de pedagogiska stegkurserna vid Linköpings universitet2004Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Aman, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gruber, Sabine
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Högberg, Ronny
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Introduktion på svenska: Om språkintroduktion för nyanlända på gymnasieskola och folkhögskola2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I kölvattnet av senaste årens migrationsrörelser har en rad olika initiativ tagits för att möjliggöra nyanländas etablering i det svenska samhället. En sådan insats har varit att på prov erbjuda gymnasieskolans språkintroduktionsprogram (SI) även på folkhögskola. Förhoppningen är att just denna utbildningsform är särskilt väl lämpad för nyanlända ungdomar. I denna forskningsrapport jämförs verksamheten inom SI såsom den bedrivs på två gymnasieskolor och två folkhögskolor. Analysen visar att folkhögskolans organisering av SI-verksamheten är mer flexibel och integrerad i övrig verksamhet, vilket också ger potential till en mer inkluderande undervisning.

    Studien är del av forskningsprogrammet Migration, lärande och social inkludering, som genom en longitudinell forskningsdesign söker svar på frågan om hur olika sammanhang för (unga) vuxnas språkliga lärande bidrar till deras sociala inkludering. Programmet är ett samarbete mellan forskningsmiljöerna Vuxenpedagogik och folkbildning och Socialt arbete vid Linköpings universitet.

  • 15.
    Fejes, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Mešić, Nedžad
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Svenska(r) från dag ett: En studie av ABFs verksamhet med asylsökande2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Svenska(r) från dag ett är den andra forskningsrapporten i ABFs skriftserie folkbildning och forskning.

    Rapporten beskriver folkbildningen och specifikt ABFs verksamhet för asylsökande i satsningen ”Svenska från dag ett”. Den tar upp hur verksamheten bidrar till migranters sociala inkludering, hur lärandet organiseras och den speciella ovissa situation som deltagaren befinner sig i samt hur det påverkar ledare och lärandet.

    Den har tillkommit i samarbetet mellan ABF och Linköpings universitet och är en del av forskningsprogrammet Migration, lärande och social inkludering.

  • 16.
    Harlin, Eva-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bjuremark, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Lärande på vuxnas vis.: Lockbeten oh konsumentupplysning i rekrytering av studenter2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok belyser och jämför flera gemensamma brännpunkter i kommunal vuxenutbildning, folkhögskola och högskola: till vilka utbildningarna riktas, hur de utformas didaktiskt, hur de studerande betygssätts och bedöms. Författarna använder konkreta exempel när de diskuterar bland annat utbildares och studerandes perspektiv på dessa områden. Boken riktar sig till blivande och verksamma personalvetare, yrkes- och studievägledare samt pedagoger.

  • 17.
    Hopwood, Nick
    et al.
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia / University of StellenboschStellenboschSouth Africa.
    Ahn, Song-ee
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rimpiläinen, Sanna
    University of StrathclydeGlasgowScotland.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Johnson, Ericka
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing interprofessional simulation: Bodily enactments in interprofessional simulation2019In: Interprofessional simulation in health care: Materiality, embodiment, interaction / [ed] Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Hans Rystedt, Li Felländer-Tsai and Sofia Nyström, Cham, Schweiz: Springer, 2019, 1, p. 91-113Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter illustrate how the social and material arrangements for interprofessional simulation produces different conditions for learning. The first section focuses on the emerging medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing in the socio-material arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation, i.e. the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room, during the course of events in the scenario. The second section focuses on emerging rhythms of collaboration. Different ways of relating to the manikin as a technical, medical and human body, and the relevance of these findings for simulation pedagogy are described.

  • 18.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Att bli forensiker: Handlendning för professionalisering2011Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Becoming a forensic expert: Supervision for professionalization2011In: Pushing Forward the Agenda: Emerging Issues in Working Life and Learning Research, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The professional knowledge of a forensic expert is highly specialized and a narrow professional area with high quality demands from the judicial system. How do you learn such special professional knowledge? How do you become a forensic expert? In this paper we present the findings from an ethnographical study of the only way to become a forensic expert in Sweden – an internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL). In other countries you learn to be a forensic expert through higher education. Previous research concerning learning forensic science or becoming a forensic expert are scarce. The aim of this paper is to explore the development of professional knowledge for future forensic experts. Specifically, the paper investigates how the forensic expert trainees’ learn through the internal training program within SKL focusing the supervision at work. We have conducted observations and informal/formal interviews with five forensic expert trainees’ and their supervisors. By drawing on a socio culturally perspective on learning it is possible to get an understanding of the forensic expert trainee’s learning trajectory and professional identity formation, as well as the activities of supervision. The findings show that processes of supervision, professional language and the interplay between internal training courses and learning integrated in everyday work are central in order to understand the process of becoming a forensic expert. SKL has an extensive internal training program within a quality assurance system. Despite this, the findings show that the socio cultural knowledge and traditions within the different work practices have a significant impact on how the supervision and thus, the learning processes are being shaped. Furthermore, a large part of the professional knowledge is tacit and this impose high and challenging demands on the quality of supervision since the practice of forensic work is a part of the Swedish judicial system.

  • 20.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Learning in practice: Arrangements for learning and supervision for becoming a forensic expert2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The profession of a forensic expert is a narrow field in which professional knowledge is highly specialised and must meet the judicial system’s demand for high quality. How does one obtain such knowledge? And furthermore, how does one arrange for the necessary education and training to become a forensic expert? In Europe, professional training to become a forensic scientist is available through Forensic Science degree programs in universities (Welsh & Hannis, 2011). In this report, we present findings from an ethnographical study (Köpsén & Nyström, 2011, 2012) of the only formal way to become a forensic expert in Sweden: an internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL).

    This report is based on a study with the overall aim of investigating future forensic experts’ learning of professional knowledge and professional identity formation. In the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL), there is a structured internal training system for forensic expert trainees, which combines general forensic introductory courses for forensic experts with supervised learning in practice. The specific aim of the study was to investigate subject-specific supervision and how it interacts with the more general courses. The results of the study demonstrate that supervision and gradual learning in practice are crucial to the development of future professional forensic experts, and its interplay with the courses in the internal training program is poor. Our findings show there are different ways to understand and realise supervision. Therefore, the preconditions for learning professional forensic knowledge differ. We have presented these variations of learning in a model of supervision arrangements and relationships according to the distinctiveness of the learning and the relationship with the assigned supervisor and other forensic experts. Using examples of supervision, we have shown how various supervision activities relate to different aspects of learning and, thus, direct the learning of different aspects of professional knowledge. We have found that having a professional language is crucial to a skilled forensic expert, though the trainees’ development of such language is not comprehensive. From the findings, we can observe a “transitional movement” in how the supervision is staged, depending on the trainees’ experience, i.e., how long they have been trainees and their educational backgrounds. An additional finding is that the economic and material preconditions are significant as the conditions of supervising and learning.

     

  • 21.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning in practice for becoming a professional forensic expert2012In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 222, no 1-3, p. 208-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study explores the professional development of future forensic experts. Specifically, it investigates how the forensic expert trainees learn through the internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science with a focus on the supervision at work. The findings are drawn from an ethnographical study where five trainees and their supervisors have been observed and interviewed. By drawing on a socio cultural perspective on learning, the results show that supervision is crucial for professional development. Two types of activities and relations define how supervision is implemented. There is a “transitional movement” in how supervision is staged depending on the trainees’ gradual changes in participation in the work practice and increased experience. Forensic experts need skills and know-how to make wise and impartial judgments, i.e. a kind tacit professional practical knowledge, as well as the skill to communicate with other professionals. However, the development of a professional language is somewhat unspoken or planned. Becoming a forensic expert is a learning process in practice where supervision plays a decisive role in maintaining the professional knowledge in the judicial system. Therefore, supervision for supervising might be a valuable support for supervisors.

  • 22.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The practice of supervision for becoming forensic experts: its “sayings”, “doings” and “relatings”2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The practice of supervision for professional learning: the exampel of future forensic specialists2015In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 30-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervision intended to support learning is of great interest in professional knowledge development. No single definition governs the implementation and enactment of supervision because of different conditions, intentions, and pedagogical approaches. Uncertainty exists at a time when knowledge and methods are undergoing constant development. This situation affects professions with high demands on precision and safety, and thus supervision and learning. The aim of this article is to explore the practice of supervision for learning professional knowledge of forensic specialists. The context is the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science internal training program, which focuses on learning in daily work when the forensic trainee is assigned a supervisor. Ethnographic studies of supervisors and trainees in different forensic specialties were conducted. Practice theory is used to understand how supervision is planned and implemented to support professional development. Findings show that supervision by seasoned professional forensic specialists is significant for trainee learning. However, supervision is arranged, and performed differently, indicating various conditions for learning. Furthermore, the material set-ups of the professional practice prefigure the practice of supervision. Supervision is an area of expertise that needs to be cultivated and learned to maintain highly specialized professional knowledge in current time of change and uncertainty.

  • 24.
    Lindh Falk, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Does gender matter?: Differences between students at an interprofessional training ward2015In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 616-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on graduates’ transitions from education into clinical work highlight inequalities concerning how women and men experience their professional learning and development. This study explores how female and male students from different programs within the health care education system, i.e. medicine, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy programmes, experience an IPTW as a part of their professional identity formation.

    Students from the medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy programmes collaborate in teams during two weeks at one of three IPTWs at the medical school, Linköping University. They together take the responsibility for diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of the patients, albeit with professional supervisors as support. During 2010 to 2011 454 (93%) of the 488 students who practiced at the IPTWs answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the IPTW. The students stated that the IPTW had positively influenced their professional development. The female and male medical students were significantly less positive than other female and male students, respectively, concerning the value of IPTW. The male students from all programmes were slightly, but significantly, less positive than all the female students. These findings show that students “do gender” as an integral part of the educational practice. It is important to scrutinize the IPTW as an educational practice, influencing students’ preparation for future work. Gender should be discussed during the IPTW rotation but also in general during the curriculum for all healthcare programmes.

     

  • 25.
    Muhrman, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nordmark, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Från individ till verksamhetsutveckling – för att minska skolavhopp: Slutrapport från utvärderingen av #jagmed2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [no]

    Följande slutrapport redovisar resultaten från utvärderingen av mål, resultat och effekter i projektet #jagmed. Vi som har haft i uppdrag att göra utvärderingen är universitetslektor Sofia Nordmark, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, universitetslektor Karolina Muhrman och universitetslektor Sofia Nyström (projektledare), Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, vid Linköpings universitet. Inom ramen för utvärderingsuppdraget har tidigare en uppstartsrapport och en halvtidsrapport presenterat tillvägagångssätt och processer i #jagmed (Nordmark & Nyström, 2017) och en halvtidsrapport (Muhrman, Nordmark & Nyström, 2017).

    Utvärderingsarbetet inleddes 2016 med inläsning av projektdokument, planer och program. Därefter utvecklades designen för utvärderingen genom urval och precisering av frågeställningar. Kontakter etablerades med läns- och delprojekt och en första datainsamling i form interaktiva workshopar på länsnivå, samt en omgång med intervjuer i de fem projekt som valts ut för fördjupningsstudier genomfördes. Under 2017 genomfördes en enkätundersökning för samtliga projektmedarbetare, en andra omgång av interaktiva workshopar på länsnivå samt två omgångar med intervjuer av projektledare och projektmedarbetare, i de fem fördjupningsprojekten. Under våren 2018 genomfördes en andra enkätundersökning, en tredje omgång med workshopar på länsnivå, ytterligare en intervjuomgång med fördjupningsprojekten samt avslutande intervjuer med de regionala projektledarna. I denna rapport presenteras utvärderingens sammantagna resultat.

    Rapporten inleds med en beskrivning av utvärderingsuppdragets syfte och frågeställningar. Därefter följer en bakgrundsöversikt till #jagmed-projektet, samt tidigare forskning och litteratur kring studieavbrott, skolavhopp, organisering av insatser för att motverka studieavbrott och organisering av utvecklingsprojekt. I rapportens tredje del presenteras de metoder och tillvägagångssätt som har använts för utvärderingen samt en tidsaxel över utvärderingens datainsamling. Vi beskriver också hur återkoppling av resultat har skett under utvärderingen samt vilka avstämningspunkter som har skett med uppdragsgivare och lokala projekt. Därefter följer ett avsnitt där resultat och analys av det insamlade materialet presenteras utifrån syftet med utvärderingen. Avslutningsvis diskuteras resultat och effekter av #jagmed och några avslutande slutsatser kring vad som varit framgångsfaktorer och hinder för projektens arbete.

  • 26.
    Muhrman, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nordmark, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Halvtidsrapport: - diskussion kring projektens arbete, resultat och effekter vid halvtid2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Följande halvtidsrapport syftar till att redogöra för hur arbetet går med projekten inom #jagmed, samt att utvärdera och diskutera de mål, resultat och effekter som har uppnåtts i projekten så här långt. Denna rapport bygger till vissa delar på den uppstartsrapport som Nordmark och Nyström levererade i januari 2017. Vi som har i uppdrag att utvärdera projektet #jagmed är universitetslektor Sofia Nordmark, Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, universitetslektor Karolina Muhrman och universitetslektor Sofia Nyström (projektledare), Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, vid Linköpings universitet.

    Under hösten 2016 har utvärderingsarbetet främst bestått av inläsning av projektdokument, planer och program, att utveckla designen för utvärderingen genom urval och preciserade frågeställningar, att etablera kontakter med läns- och delprojekt samt att genomföra en första datainsamling i form av en runda med interaktiva workshopar på länsnivå, samt en omgång med intervjuer i de utvalda fördjupningsprojekten. Under våren 2017 genomfördes en enkätundersökning för samtliga projektmedarbetare, samt en andra omgång med intervjuer av projektledare och projektmedarbetare, i de fem projekt som valts ut för fördjupningsstudier. Under hösten 2017 har utvärderingsarbetet bestått av en andra omgång av interaktiva workshopar på länsnivå, samt en tredje omgång med intervjuer i de fem fördjupningsprojekten.

    Rapporten inleds med en beskrivning av utvärderingsuppdragets syfte och frågeställningar. Därefter följer en kort beskrivning av utvärderarnas arbete med bakgrundsöversikten till #jagmed-projektet, samt tidigare forskning och litteratur kring studieavbrott, skolavhopp, organisering av insatser för att motverka studieavbrott och organisering av utvecklingsprojekt. I rapportens tredje del presenteras val av metoder, tillvägagångssätt och en tidsplan för utvärderingens datainsamling, plan för återkoppling av resultat och avstämningspunkter med uppdragsgivare och lokala projekt. Därefter följer ett avsnitt där resultat presenteras utifrån syftet med utvärderingen. I den sista delen avslutas rapporten ed en diskussion kring resultat och effekter, samt avslutande rekommendationer.

  • 27.
    Mårtensson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A recruiter, a matchmaker, a firefighter: Swedish vocational teachers’ relational work2019In: Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training, E-ISSN 2242-458X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central part of Swedish vocational teachers’ work concerns their students’ work-based learning (WBL). The focus of this article is the character of the relational work carried out by teachers of vocational education and training (VET) concerning WBL. The qualitative study is based on 15 interviews with teachers on the upper-secondary level Child and Recreation, Building and Construction, and Handicraft programmes. The study is based on a situated learning perspective, and uses the concepts of community of practice, broker and boundary crossing. The findings highlight three central aspects of VET teachers’ relational work with WBL: recruiting workplaces for WBL, matchmaking between students and workplaces, and ‘firefighting’ to prevent and deal with problems that occur during WBL periods. The study contributes to the understanding of the work of VET teachers, as they cross the blurred boundaries between school and working life and strive to create a good learning environment for all students during WBL periods.

  • 28.
    Mårtensson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Andersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Handledare på arbetsplatserna2018In: Yrkesutbildning: Mellan skola och arbetsliv / [ed] Maria Gustavsson, Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1, p. 155-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De handledare som yrkeselever möter under det arbetsplatsförlagda lärandet (apl) är viktiga för lärandets kvalitet på arbetsplatsen, och hur samarbetet mellan skolan och arbetsplatsen utvecklas. Kapitlet fokuserar på handledare på arbetsplatser och hur deras handledning stödjer elevers lärande på arbetsplatsen inom ramen för yrkesutbildning. Vi utgår från aktuell forskning kring handledning för att diskutera de didaktiska och pedagogiska överväganden som handledare kan behöva göra för att stödja elevers lärande under apl.

  • 29.
    Nilsson, Staffan
    et al.
    Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Adult learning, education, and the labour market in the employability regime2013In: European Journal for Research on the Education and Learning of Adults, ISSN 2000-7426, E-ISSN 2000-7426, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 171-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to draw on the research and scholarly literature to explore the changing discourses and perspectives concerning adult learning, education, and the labour market in the employability regime. The focus of the nalysis is a Nordic context. The dominant employability regime maintains a technical-rational perspective on learning and employability. Education is predominantly regarded as an instrumental preparation for the labour market. The future demands of the labour market are largely unknown, however, and vocational and professional training may not provide sufficient preparation for the increasing complexities of work. Theoretical discussions have been dominated by an alleged mismatch between individual competence and the qualifications that are required in the world of work. There is no consensus regarding how the gap should be described, explained, or bridged. New demands on educational design have emerged, and ideas related to liberal education and ‘bildung’ have been reinserted into the political agenda, offering general preparation for a wider array of challenges.

  • 30.
    Nordmark, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Kortsiktighet eller varaktighet: En intervjustudie kring deltagares upplevelser av sin medverkan i ”Kompetensväxeln” och deras fortsatta arbete2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under de senaste årtionden har det både i forskning och i praktik varit ett ökat fokus på lärande i arbete (e.g. Boud & Garrick, 1999). Det ökade intresset för lärande i arbetslivet kan bland annat förklaras med stora förändringar på arbetsmarknaden där innovationer, utveckling av ny kunskap och ökad konkurrens ställer ökade krav på organisationer att vara flexibla när det gäller vilken kunskap och kompetens som finns hos de anställda i organisationen (Brown, Hesketh &Williams, 2003; Nilsson & Ellström, 2011). Förändringar på samhällsnivå samspelar med och påverkar organisationers behov av kompetens och lärande i relation till sin verksamhet. Ytterligare en utmaning för organisationer inom offentlig sektor är att allt fler verksamheter blivit eller organiseras som om de vore konkurrensutsatta. Denna utveckling innebär att medarbetarnas kompetens på ett tydligare sätt utgör en av organisationens konkurrensfördelar som behövs för att säkerställa att organisationen är effektiv i relation till dess begränsade resurser och kan möta kunders eller brukares förväntningar på ett bättre sätt än konkurrenterna (Almqvist, 2004). Sveriges kommuner och landsting (SKL) poängterar att kompetensförsörjningsfrågorna har fått stor uppmärksamhet och att många kommuner har svårigheter med att förse sina verksamheter med kompetent arbetskraft (Östlund, 2012). Kompetensväxeln kan ses som ett projekt som tillkommit mot bakgrund av dessa utmaningar som ett sätt att genom olika aktiviteter och samarbetsformer bidra till att kommunerna klarar av att möta generationsväxling av personal och fortsätta att erbjuda högkvalitativa välfärdstjänster av kunniga och motiverade  medarbetare och chefer (Jonsson, 2012).

  • 31.
    Nordmark, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Väntade och oväntade effekter av en kompetensutvecklingssatsning: En intervjustudie kring implementeringen av Kompetensväxeln2015Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Becoming a professional - a meltingpot of experiences?2010In: The 6th European Reserach Conference. Adult Learning in Europe - understanding diverse meanings and contexts, 2010, p. 1-22Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compile four studies focusing graduates’ trajectories towards becoming professionals as they enter working life with a master’s degree in Psychology and Political Science. The result builds on a longitudinal design where graduates’ have been interviewed on three occasions; the last semester before graduation to the third year of professional work. The theoretical framework comprises a situated and social learning theory. The results indicate that becoming a professional is a dynamic learning process between a reflective individual, the interaction with a professional practice as well as a relationship between other spheres of life. This is also a process of professional identity formation influenced by the individuals’ belonging to and participation in other practices and closely related to a gender identity. It is through the negotiations between personal and socially derived imperatives that identity formation progresses throughout working life.

  • 33.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Becoming a professional: A longitudinal study of graduates'  professional trajectories from higher education to working life2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Syftet med avhandlingen är att beskriva akademikers bana mot att bli professionella då de kommer ut i arbetslivet med en magisterexamen i psykologi eller statsvetenskap.

    The study has a longitudinal design where Political Science and Psychology graduates’ have been interviewed on three consecutive occasions; the last semester before graduation, the first year and then, in the third year of professional work. The theoretical frame of reference comprises a situated and social learning theory and a gender perspective. These theories were chosen since they elaborate on concepts such as identity, practice, participation and learning.

    The results indicate that becoming a professional is not an isolated phenomenon merely learned and nurtured in higher education and/or in working life. It is emphasised as a dynamic learning process between a reflective individual, the interaction with a professional practice as well as a relationship between other spheres of life, e.g. the personal and the private. The graduates’ professional trajectories can be characterised by a movement from appropriating new knowledge to a need to change direction, e.g. new work tasks or professional fields. This is also a process of professional identity formation. The graduates’ professional identity is emphasised as being both closely related to a gender identity and influenced by the individuals’ belonging to and participation in other practices. The results thus indicate that professional identity formation is an interplay between different spheres of life that changes over time. By using a longitudinal design, it can be claimed that becoming a professional requires balancing one’s whole life situation.

    List of papers
    1. A winding road - professional trajectories from higher education to working life: a case study of political science and psychology graduates
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A winding road - professional trajectories from higher education to working life: a case study of political science and psychology graduates
    2008 (English)In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 215-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative and longitudinal study focuses on graduate employment and the development of graduate employment paths. The aim of this article is to explore the present professional trajectory from higher education to working life, with particular reference to graduates from two different study programmes at Linko¨ping University in Sweden: Political Science and Psychology. More specifically, the article focuses on how graduates construe their professional trajectories in terms of their envisaged future work as senior students, and later as novice and early-career professionals with 18 and 34 months of work life experience. The results indicate that graduates’ professional identities and vision of their future work change over time. The set of categories, depicting the graduates’ vision and experiences of their professional trajectories, do not seem to follow a specific temporal and logical progression in their career. Rather, they appear in different order and at different points in time after graduation. The results, instead, endorse the discourse of lifelong learning and the need for flexibility and employability on the labour market.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routhledge, Taylor & Francis, 2008
    Keywords
    Longitudinal study, graduate employment, professional trajectory, higher education, work life
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16933 (URN)10.1080/01580370802439896 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    2. The Dynamics of Professional Identity Formation: Graduates’ Transitions from Higher Education to Working Life
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Dynamics of Professional Identity Formation: Graduates’ Transitions from Higher Education to Working Life
    2009 (English)In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the development of professional identity as arelationship between professional and personal aspects of life. The focus is onstudent and novice professional psychologists’ and political scientists’ processes ofprofessional identity formation in their transition from higher education to workinglife. Drawing on Wenger’s theory of nexus of multimembership (1998), the findingsindicate that professional identity is a dynamic relationship between different lifespheres rather than an isolated phenomenon only taking place at the university or inthe work context. The analysis yielded three different forms of professional identity,non-differentiated identity, compartmentalised identity and integrated identity, whichexemplify different negotiated relationships between professional, personal andprivate life spheres. The findings show that these three forms of professionalidentities are sequential, from an individual focus to more relational and integratedways of reasoning about one’s profession. It is through the negotiations betweenpersonal and socially derived imperatives that identity formation progressesthroughout working lives.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Springer, 2009
    Keywords
    Professional identity formation, Higher education, Working life, Longitudinal study
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16810 (URN)10.1007/s12186-008-9014-1 (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-02-19 Created: 2009-02-19 Last updated: 2009-05-11
    3. Graduates 'Doing Gender' as early Career Professionals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Graduates 'Doing Gender' as early Career Professionals
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This qualitative study focuses on how early career professionals ‘do gender’ in their new professional context. The article explores how two different groups of graduates, psychologists and political scientists, ‘do gender’ as early career professionals with particular emphasis on how graduates acquire legitimacy in relation to their colleagues and clients.

    Design/methodology/approach: Graduates from two different Master’s programmes in Sweden, Political Science and Psychology, were interviewed after 30-34 months of professional work. The theoretical approach is based on a ‘doing gender’ perspective with special reference to Acker’s theoretical framework viewing employment and organizations as gendered processes influencing both individuals’ actions and activities.

    Findings: The analysis identified two different ways the early career professionals ‘do gender’ in their professional practice in order to acquire legitimacy, one of a kind or the same as others and construction or selfpossession. The results indicate that female and male early career professionals acquire different kinds of legitimacy, which could be derived from the gendered processes in the organization where behaviour and interaction play a decisive role. When they ‘do gender’ they also produce and reproduce a gendered notion of a professional project that influences their professional practice as well as how they position themselves as a professional person with knowledge and competence.

    Originality/value: The perspective of ‘doing gender’ opens up an interesting approach in exploring graduate employment and the encounter with working life. The perspective makes it possible to capture gender as everyday activities of people in organizations; an approach that has been largely ignored.

    Keywords
    Graduate Employment, Doing Gender, Professionalism, Legitimacy, Qualitative analysis
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16935 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-25 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Beyond Higher ducation: Critical Transformations in Becoming a Professional
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond Higher ducation: Critical Transformations in Becoming a Professional
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on student and novice professional psychologists’ and political scientists’ critical transformations in their transition from higher education to working life. The empirical evidence is derived from a longitudinal study of students’ understanding of learning and work. The findings indicate that the participants’ critical transformations comprise complex and reflective processes involving both an inner reflection and a more overt reflection on the circumstances in which they find themselves. The first component concerns the transformation the participants experience as a development of themselves and how they see that they have changed. The second are the influences the participants have received from the people and communities of practices in which they participate. However, besides the identification of these two orientations, critical transformation is foremost an interplay between these two as a continuous reflected experience that involves both formal and informal learning opportunities.

    Keywords
    Higher education, working life, critical transformation, professional formation
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16936 (URN)
    Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-25 Last updated: 2010-01-14Bibliographically approved
  • 34.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Graduates "doing gender" as early career professionals2010In: Career development international, ISSN 1362-0436, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

     

     

    Purpose

     

    – The purpose of this paper is to explore how early career professionals “do gender” in their

    new professional context. Specifically, it explores how two groups of graduates, psychologists and

    political scientists, “do gender” as early career professionals with a particular emphasis on how they

    acquire legitimacy in relation to their colleagues and clients.

    Design/methodology/approach

     

    – Drawing on a qualitative research methodology, graduates from

    two Master’s programmes in Sweden were interviewed after 30-34 months of professional work.

    Analysis of the interview data is located within a “doing gender” perspective with special reference to

    Acker’s conception of employment and organizations as gendered processes influencing individual

    action.

    Findings

     

    – The paper identifies two different ways in which participants “do gender” in their

    professional practice in order to acquire legitimacy: “self-presentation” and “strategy”. This finding

    suggests that female and male early career professionals acquire different kinds of legitimacy, which

    could, in turn, be derived from the gendered processes that exist in contemporary organizations. The

    paper will also report that when they “do gender” participants also produce and reproduce a gendered

    notion of a professional project that influences their subsequent professional practice as well as how

    they position themselves as knowledgeable and competent.

    Originality/value

     

    – The perspective of “doing gender” contributes an alternative understanding of

    graduate employment and the encounter with working life. It especially enables us to capture gender

    as an important influence on individual action in the organizational context.

  • 35.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Graduates 'Doing Gender' as early Career ProfessionalsManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This qualitative study focuses on how early career professionals ‘do gender’ in their new professional context. The article explores how two different groups of graduates, psychologists and political scientists, ‘do gender’ as early career professionals with particular emphasis on how graduates acquire legitimacy in relation to their colleagues and clients.

    Design/methodology/approach: Graduates from two different Master’s programmes in Sweden, Political Science and Psychology, were interviewed after 30-34 months of professional work. The theoretical approach is based on a ‘doing gender’ perspective with special reference to Acker’s theoretical framework viewing employment and organizations as gendered processes influencing both individuals’ actions and activities.

    Findings: The analysis identified two different ways the early career professionals ‘do gender’ in their professional practice in order to acquire legitimacy, one of a kind or the same as others and construction or selfpossession. The results indicate that female and male early career professionals acquire different kinds of legitimacy, which could be derived from the gendered processes in the organization where behaviour and interaction play a decisive role. When they ‘do gender’ they also produce and reproduce a gendered notion of a professional project that influences their professional practice as well as how they position themselves as a professional person with knowledge and competence.

    Originality/value: The perspective of ‘doing gender’ opens up an interesting approach in exploring graduate employment and the encounter with working life. The perspective makes it possible to capture gender as everyday activities of people in organizations; an approach that has been largely ignored.

  • 36.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Graduates identity formation in the transition from higher education to working life2007In: NERA conference,2007, 2007, p. 45-45Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Graduates notions of their future career2006In: Democrazy, Citizenship and Highre Education: Dialogue between Universities and Community,2006, 2006, p. 23-23Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Dynamics of Professional Identity Formation: Graduates’ Transitions from Higher Education to Working Life2009In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the development of professional identity as arelationship between professional and personal aspects of life. The focus is onstudent and novice professional psychologists’ and political scientists’ processes ofprofessional identity formation in their transition from higher education to workinglife. Drawing on Wenger’s theory of nexus of multimembership (1998), the findingsindicate that professional identity is a dynamic relationship between different lifespheres rather than an isolated phenomenon only taking place at the university or inthe work context. The analysis yielded three different forms of professional identity,non-differentiated identity, compartmentalised identity and integrated identity, whichexemplify different negotiated relationships between professional, personal andprivate life spheres. The findings show that these three forms of professionalidentities are sequential, from an individual focus to more relational and integratedways of reasoning about one’s profession. It is through the negotiations betweenpersonal and socially derived imperatives that identity formation progressesthroughout working lives.

  • 39.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The need for a change and the will to learn: Graduates' vision of their Professional Trajectories.2007In: MEANING, RELEVANCE AND VARIATION. THE SECOND NORDIC CONFERENCE ON ADULT LEARNING.,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Yrkeslärande och handledning i arbete2019In: Lära till yrkeslärare / [ed] Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2019, 2 uppl., p. 193-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Nyström, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Yrkeslärande och handledning i arbete2014In: Lära till yrkeslärare / [ed] Susanne Köpsén, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1, p. 173-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars Owe
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    A winding road - professional trajectories from higher education to working life: a case study of political science and psychology graduates2008In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 215-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative and longitudinal study focuses on graduate employment and the development of graduate employment paths. The aim of this article is to explore the present professional trajectory from higher education to working life, with particular reference to graduates from two different study programmes at Linko¨ping University in Sweden: Political Science and Psychology. More specifically, the article focuses on how graduates construe their professional trajectories in terms of their envisaged future work as senior students, and later as novice and early-career professionals with 18 and 34 months of work life experience. The results indicate that graduates’ professional identities and vision of their future work change over time. The set of categories, depicting the graduates’ vision and experiences of their professional trajectories, do not seem to follow a specific temporal and logical progression in their career. Rather, they appear in different order and at different points in time after graduation. The results, instead, endorse the discourse of lifelong learning and the need for flexibility and employability on the labour market.

  • 43.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Learning the Cultures of a Coming Profession: Dimensions Critical for Students' Identification Processes in Higher Education and in the Transition to working Life2010In: The 5th EARLI SIG14 Learning and Professional Development Conference: Diversity in Vocational and Professional Education and Training, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkan, Hult
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    From 'there' to 'here' to 'elsewhere: Enacting debriefing in interprofessional medical education simulation2014In: Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, ISSN 1559-2332, E-ISSN 1559-713X, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 422-422, article id Board #144Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypothesis:

    Simulation is gaining international interest as a way to arrange a safe environment for practicing clinical, communicative and interprofessional competence in professional education within health care. However, simulation was originally developed to support and train professionals. The application of medical simulation in interprofessional education for students is still underresearched and undertheorised (1). Recent research and theory argue that professional learning in simulation is embodied, relational, and situated in social-material relations (2,3). Research on how instructional design of simulation as an integrated part of professional curricula support student learning is needed (4), as well as research focusing on what the relevant characteristics of debriefing that lead to effective learning are (1). The aim of this study is to explore the enactment of debriefing as a support for learning in interprofessional medical education simulation.

    Methods:

    This paper draw on findings from a large research project conducted by research environments at Linköping University (LiU), Karolinska Institute (KI) and University of Gothenburg (GU), Sweden. The data have been collected by standardised video recordings of all phases in the simulation (briefing, simulation and debriefing phases). Totally 30 simulation sessions were video recorded, 10
 sessions by each research team. Out of these recordings, 13 simulation sessions were professional teams and 17 sessions were nursing and medical students simulating as a compulsory part of their education in the last semester before graduation. The student sessions are around 18 hours of recordings and altogether 106 students, 71 females and 35 males, participated in the simulation either as active participants in the simulation or as observers. 66 were nursing students and 40 were medical students. The research project has been ethically approved by Linköping University, Sweden (Dnr 2012/439-31).

    Results:

    A framework for the analysis of the video recordings was developed on the basis of socio-material theory, with a particular focus on interprofessional collaboration. Sayings, doings and relatings in the debriefing with regard to specific activities or events during the sequence of the scenario were noted through ethnographic field notes and selected segments were transcribed (5). A purposeful constant comparative qualitative analysis (6) was made in three steps comparing sequences of the scenario 1) within a single video recording 2) between different video recordings of the same scenario 3) between video recordings of different scenarios. The findings suggest that interprofessional learning in medical education simulation can become jeopardised in the debriefing. Three interrelated aspects of lacking support for learning were identified, a) debriefing as algorithm or as laisséz-faire, b) neglect of team performance as a topic for reflection, and c) time constraints.

    Conclusion:

    The results raise questions whether debriefing in medical simulation as modelled on training of qualified health professionals provides a useful framework applied in undergraduate education with students learning to become health professionals. The experiences of the simulation ‘there’ are intended to become re-contextualised in the debriefing ‘here’. Our findings indicate that the socio-material arrangements of the debriefing instead risk taking the students ‘elsewhere’.  Structure or lack of structure of the debriefing seem both to jeopardise the support of interprofessional learning or even overlook interprofessional collaboration as a topic for reflection. The time constraints of the complex logistics of arranging interprofessional simulation-based education as a regular curricular activity for large classes can potentially turn debriefing into a superficial exercise with little or no connection to the intended learning outcomes.

    REFERENCES

    1) Issenberg B. Ringsted C. Østergaard D. Dieckmann P. Setting a Research Agenda for Simulation-Based Healthcare Education. A Synthesis of the Outcome From an Utstein Style Meeting. Sim Healthcare 2011; 6:155–167.

    2) Nyström S. Dahlberg J. Hult H. Crossing locations of enacting and observing simulations: Ways of constructing interprofessional learning. Paper to be presented at the Second International ProPEL conference 'Professional Matters: Materialities and Virtualities of Professional Learning', University of Stirling, UK; 2014, 25-27 June.

    3) Schatzki T. The site of the social: A philosophical account of the constitution of social life and change. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press; 2002.

    4) Motola I, Sullivan J, Issenberg S, Devine L, Chung H. Simulation in healthcare education: A best evidence practical guide. AMEE Guide No. 82. Medical Teacher [serial online]. October 1, 2013;35(10):e1511-e1530.

    5) Heath C. Hindmarsh J. Luff P. Video in qualitative research: analysing social interaction in everyday life. Los Angeles: SAGE; 2010.

    6) Boeije H. A Purposeful Approach to the Constant Comparative Method in the Analysis of Qualitative Interviews. Quality & Quantity 2002; 36:391–409.

  • 45.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Campbell, Matthew
    Australian Catholic University.
    Cooperative and Work-Integrated Education in Police Education2011In: International Handbook for Cooperative and Work-Integrated Education: International Perspectives of Theory, Research and Practice / [ed] Richhard K. Coll and Karsten E. Zegwaard, Hamilton: World Association for Cooperative Education , 2011, 2, p. 237-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This handbook brings together authors from around the world to provide a multidimensional perspective on work-integrated learning. It has documented, perhaps for the first time ever, the state of the art in educational programs that incorporate periods of required work which integrate with classroom study. It will be of value to the beginner in the field as a background resource as much to those who have been long involved in cooperative education. The Handbook is presented in four sections.

  • 46.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Continuing professional development: pedagogical practices of interprofessional simulation in health care2017In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity of health care practice makes continuing professional development (CPD) essential for health care professionals. Simulation-based training is a CPD activity that is often applied to improve interprofessional collaboration and the quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore simulation as a pedagogical practice for the CPD of health care professionals. Specifically, the study focuses on how a professional development activity, the simulation, is enacted to support interprofessional collaboration and learning. A practice theory perspective is used as the theoretical framework. In this, the professional practice is conceptualised as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial arrangements. Ten introduction and reflection sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulations with professionals were video-recorded. The recordings were analysed following a stepwise qualitative collaborative approach developed for the purpose. The key findings suggest that the professional competence activity is enacted and interconnected with and governed by historical traditions of institutional teaching practices as well as simulation practices. Despite the intentions of team and interprofessional training, the institutional teaching and simulation practices constrain and hinder the intended outcomes of professional development in interprofessional collaboration.

  • 47.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Debriefing practices in interprofessional simulation with students: A sociomaterial perspective2016In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, no 148, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The debriefing phase is an important feature of simulation activities for learning. This study applies a sociomaterial perspective on debriefing in interprofessional simulation with medical and nursing students. Sociomaterial perspectives are increasingly being used in order to understand professional practice and learning in new ways, conceptualising professional practice as being embodied, relational and situated in sociomaterial relations. The aim of the study is to explore how debriefing is carried out as a practice supporting students’ interprofessional learning.

    Methods: Eighteen debriefing sessions following interprofessional full-scale manikin-based simulation with nursing and medical students from two different universities were video-recorded and analysed collaboratively by a team of researchers, applying a structured scheme for constant comparative analysis.

    Results: The findings show how debriefing is intertwined with, and shaped by social and material relationships. Two patterns of enacting debriefing emerged. Debriefing as algorithm was enacted as a protocol-based, closed inquiry approach. Debriefing as laissez-faire was enacted as a loosely structured collegial conversation with an open inquiry approach.

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that neither an imposed structure of the debriefing, nor the lack of structure assured interprofessional collaboration to emerge as a salient topic for reflection, even though that was an explicit learning objective for the simulation. 

  • 48.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enacting simulation: A sociomaterial perspective on students’ interprofessional collaboration2016In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 441-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Full-scale simulation exercises are becoming more common as an educational feature of the under- graduate training of health professionals. This study explores how interprofessional collaboration is enacted by the participating students. Practice theory is used as the theoretical framework for a field study of two naturalistic educational settings, when medical and nursing students come together to practice in a simulated emergency situation, where a manikin is replacing the patient. Eighteen sessions of simulations were observed, and data were collected through standardised video recordings that were analysed collaboratively. To ensure transparency and scientific rigour, a stepwise constant comparative analysis was conducted, in which individual observations within and across single video recordings were compared, negotiated and eventually merged. The findings show that the student teams relate to the manikin as a technical, medical, and human body, and that interprofessional knowings and enactments emerge as a fluid movement between bodily positioning in synchrony and bodily positioning out of synchrony in relation to the sociomaterial arrangements. The findings are related to contemporary theorisations of practice comprising an integrated view of body and mind, and it is discussed how the findings can be used in simulation exercises to support participants’ learning in new ways. 

  • 49.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Adult Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Dahlberg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hult, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Observing of interprofessional collaboration in simulation: A socio-material approach2016In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 710-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation exercises are becoming more common as an educational feature of the undergraduate training of health professionals. Not all students participate in these activities, but are assigned as observers of the actual simulation. This article presents a study that explored how social-material arrangements for observation of interprofessional collaboration in a simulated situation are enacted and how these observations are thematised and made relevant for learning. The empirical data consisted of 18 standardised video recordings of medical and nursing students observing their peer students simulate. Practice theory is used to show how observation is embodied, relational, and situated in social-material relations. The findings show two emerging ways of enacting observation—proximate observation and distant observation. The enactments are characterised by different socio-material arrangements concerning the location where the simulation took place and its material set-up as well as embodied “doings” and “relatings” between the observing students and instructors. The observing students are participating in a passive, normative position as an audience and as judges of what is correct professional behaviour.

  • 50.
    Nyström, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Köpsén, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    The practice architectures for becoming a forensic expert2012In: ProPEL International Conference. Professions and Professional Learning in Troubling Times: Emergin Practices and Transgressive Knowledge / [ed] Tara Fenwick, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The profession of a forensic expert is a narrow professional area and the professional knowledge is specialized with high quality demands from the judicial system. The common way to become a forensic expert is through higher education. However, to become a professional forensic expert in Sweden the only formal way is the internal training program at the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science (SKL). The aim of this paper is to investigate the professional learning of forensic experts in such conditions, based on the findings from an ethnographical study of five forensic trainees’ and their supervisors’ participations in the program. Specifically, the paper investigates how the internal training program within SKL, i.e. forensic specific introductory courses and learning integrated in everyday work, is arranged in order for forensic expert trainees’ to learn the professional practice and become professional. By drawing on practice theory (Schatzki, 2002; Kemmis, e.g. 2009) we view the internal training program as practice architectures for learning the professional practice in terms of special arrangements of activities and relations within the professional practice of forensics. With this viewpoint it has been possible to explore how the different mediated preconditions, i.e. discursive, economical, material and social arrangements of the specific professional forensic practices prefigure the possibilities and constraints for developing a new professional practitioner, i.e. forensic expert. Thu, a central finding is that despite the institutional intention of common architectures for a training program the culturally and discursive “sayings”, “doings” and “relatings” in the specific professional practices shape different learning practices. This is presented in a model of arrangements for work and social connections for learning.  It is also shown that becoming a forensic expert is fully entangled with a material practice such as technologies, tools and machines.

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