liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Smide, B.
    Dept. of Pub. Hlth. and Caring Sci., Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gregeby, E.
    Köping Hospital, Köping, Sweden.
    Fernstrom, L.
    Fernström, L., Diabet. Educ. and Research Centre, Karolinska Hospital, Karolinska, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes2004In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to gain insight into and understand how physicians and nurses view the implementation of empowerment group education (EGE) in diabetes. Prior to the study the physicians and nurses attended a 2-day empowerment workshop. Further, they had implemented the empowerment approach in two groups of patients with type II diabetes. Three to 9 months later they (five physicians and 11 nurses from six family practices) participated in focus group interviews to evaluate the implementation of the EGE. The interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The main result showed a conflict in roles. The physicians and nurses knew their role in the traditional approach but not with respect to the empowerment approach, which they needed to grow into. At the same time as they started a new way of working, their role had changed from being an expert to being a facilitator. As experts they felt secure, as facilitators they needed support in their educational process. To implement EGE they required support both from the family practice and from a supervisor in direct connection with the EGE. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Hedov, G.
    et al.
    Unit of Paediatrics, Department of Woman and Child Health, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Genetics, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Anneren, G.
    Annerén, G., Unit of Clinical Genetics, Department of Genetics, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome: Parental stress and sense of coherence in relation to employment rate and time spent in child care2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming parents of a child with Down's syndrome (DS) challenges the adjustment ability in parenthood. Individuals with higher sense of coherence (SOC) are supposed to manage stressors better than those with lower SOC. The aims of this study were to investigate parental self-perceived stress, SOC, frequency of gainful employment and amount of time spent on child care in Swedish DS parents (165 parents, 86 mothers, 79 fathers) and to compare those with control parents of healthy children (169 parents, 87 mothers, 82 fathers). The mean age of the children was 4.7 years. Parents responded to questionnaires separately including Hymovich's Parent Perception Inventory as stress measurement and Antonovsky's short version of the Orientation to Life. No differences concerning total employment rate were observed, but the DS mothers were more often employed part-time than control mothers. The DS parents did not spend more time on child care than the control parents and they did not differ in mean SOC score, but the DS parents perceived greater stress. The differences in stress, particularly between the DS and control mothers, were related to time-demanding areas. Parents with high SOC scores experienced significantly less self-perceived stress.

  • 3.
    Hedov, G
    et al.
    Uppsala.
    Annerén, G
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Self-perceived health in äSwedish parents of children with Down's syndrome2000In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 9, p. 415-422Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Hedov, G.
    et al.
    Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, University of Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden, Unit of Paediatrics, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Anneren, G.
    Annerén, G., Unit of Clinical Genetics, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sickness absence in Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome: Relation to self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence2006In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 546-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aims of present study were to study sickness absence among Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome (DS) and to compare their rates of absence with those of control parents. Sickness absence data for 165 DS parents were compared with those for 174 control parents, all data were for the period 1997-2000. Sickness absence rates were also related to parental self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence. Methods: The self-administrated measures of parental self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence were compared with the number of days of sickness absence. Results: In about two-thirds of the parents in both the study and the control group, no days of sickness absence were registered. Six of the DS parents had remarkably large numbers of days of sickness absence (more than 100 per year). None of the control parents had such high sickness absence rates. It is speculated that there is a small group (less than 5%) of parents who are more vulnerable to the birth of a child with DS. Apart from these six DS parents, sickness absence was not more frequent among the DS parents than among the control parents. DS parents stayed at home to care for their sick DS child three times more often than control parents did for their non-disabled child. DS fathers took greater responsibility in the care of their temporarily sick child and stayed at home to care for the child even more often than control mothers did. DS parents with sickness periods experienced small deterioration in self-perceived health, significantly higher stress and decreased sense of coherence in comparison with parents without sickness periods. Conclusions: There was a great similarity in sick leave rates due to one's own sickness between DS and control parents, but a small group of DS parents (<5%) may be more vulnerable. DS fathers stayed at home to care for their sick DS child remarkably often. © 2006 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Deptartment of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Teenagers with type 1 diabetes - a phenomenological study of the transition towards autonomy in self-management2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 562-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Becoming autonomous is an important aspect of teenagers’ psychosocial development, and this is especially true of teenagers with type 1 diabetes. Previous studies exploring the everyday problems of teenagers with diabetes have focused on adherence to self-care management, how self-determination affects metabolic control, and the perception of social support.

    Objective: The aim of the study was to elucidate lived experiences, focusing on the transition towards autonomy in diabetes self-management among teenagers with type 1 diabetes.

    Design and method: Data were collected using interviews, and a qualitative phenomenological approach was chosen for the analysis.

    Participants: Thirty-two teenagers (18 females and 14 males) were interviewed about their individual experiences of self-management of diabetes.

    Findings: The lived experiences of the transition towards autonomy in self-management were characterized by the over-riding theme “hovering between individual actions and support of others”. The findings indicate that individual self-reliance and confirmation of others are helpful in the transition process. Growth through individual self-reliance was viewed as a developmental process of making one's own decisions; psychological maturity enabled increased responsibility and freedom; motivation was related to wellbeing and how well the diabetes could be managed. The theme “confirmation of others” showed that parental encouragement increased the certainty of teenagers’ standpoints; peers’ acceptance of diabetes facilitated incorporation of daily self-management activities; support from the diabetes team strengthened teenagers’ self-esteem.

    Conclusion: In striving for autonomy, teenagers needed distance from others, but still to retain the support of others. A stable foundation for self-management includes having the knowledge required to practice diabetes management and handle different situations.

  • 6.
    Leksell, J.K.
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Health and Caring Sciences, Falun, Sweden, Högskolan Dalarna, Health and Caring Sciences, S-791 88 Falun, Sweden.
    Johansson, I.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wibell, L.B.
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Power and self-perceived health in blind diabetic and nondiabetic individuals2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 511-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. The aims of this study were: (1) to explore perceptions of power in blind individuals and relate presence or absence of power to self-perceived health and (2) to compare self-perceived health in blind individuals with that of the general population. Background. The theoretical framework of this study was Barrett's Power theory, which is based on The Rogerian nursing theory. Power is defined as being aware of what one is choosing to do, feeling free to doing it, and do it intentionally. Methods. Thirty-nine blind subjects at three adjacent ophthalmology centres agreed to participate in the study. Of those 23 had become blind because of late complications of diabetes. Power was explored during semi-structured interviews and self-perceived health was measured with the Swedish health-related quality of life questionnaire. Data on socio-economic, rehabilitative and diabetes-related variables were also collected. Findings. Power was experienced by 19 of the 39 respondents and was more frequently found in nondiabetic subjects than in diabetic subjects. Those experiencing power reported a better emotional and general health compared with individuals lacking power. The perception of having power was not significantly related to any other of the studied variables. When compared with age- and gender-matched controls from the general population, nondiabetic blind subjects scored higher in positive feelings and lower in physical functioning. In contrast diabetic subjects experienced poorer general health, less satisfaction with physical health and more negative feelings, but they reported that they did not experience limitation as a result of these emotions. Conclusion. One way of improving health in diabetic blind individuals could be to increase the subject's perception of power.

  • 7. Leksell, J.K.
    et al.
    Sandberg, G.E.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Dept. of Health and Social Sciences, S-791 88, Falun, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Self-perceived health and self-care among diabetic subjects with defective vision: A comparison between subjects with threat of blindness and blind subjects2005In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare self-perceived health among diabetic patients who experienced threat of blindness with those who had already gone blind. Another aim was to explore different aspects of self-care in relation to self-perceived health among the subjects. Twenty-one diabetic patients under threat of becoming blind and 23 with diabetes-related blindness agreed to participate in the study. The participants were compared with an age- and gender-matched nondiabetic reference group. Self-perceived health was measured using the 63-item Swedish Health-Related Quality of Life Survey (SWED-QUAL) questionnaire. Data on diabetes-related variables were collected from the patient's hospital records. An interview guide was created for measuring dimensions of self-care. Patients with threat of becoming blind showed better self-perceived health than blind patients, but no differences were found in comparison with the Swedish reference group. Blind patients scored lower in 6 of the 13 health domains and they reported more problems with diabetes self-care than patients with threat of becoming blind. One of the 13 health domains, role limitations due to physical health, seemed to be associated with impaired self-care although only a partial understanding could be demonstrated. The results show that blind patients need specific support to cope well with different self-care situations. A great challenge in future research in diabetes is to implement education programs suitable especially for patients who have gone blind because of diabetes. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Lofmark, A.
    et al.
    Löfmark, A., Dept. of Caring Sciences/Sociology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden, Section of Caring Sciences, Dept. of Public Health/Caring Sci., Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, C.
    Department of Education, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Student nurses' ability to perform pain assessment2003In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 133-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate student nurses' ability to handle a pain assessment situation. A systematic way of working based on knowledge within the area is emphasised in nursing education today. The performance of 32 student nurses at a university college in Sweden took place in an arranged assessment situation that closely simulated clinical practice. The conversation between the student and the patient (a voluntary patient) was videotaped and analysed with content analysis according to predetermined components of pain assessment. The results showed that one-third of the students had performed adequately based on the requirements for pain assessment in the curriculum for nursing education. Two-thirds of the group did not handle the situation systematically and also showed a lack of knowledge of pain assessment, and among these was a group of students whose performance was inadequate. The results indicate that during their education it is very important for student nurses to obtain experience and guidance in how to work systematically and to have their knowledge and skills in pain assessment evaluated. © 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Löfmark, A
    et al.
    Gävle.
    Carlsson, M
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Student nurses' perception of independence of supervision during clinical nursing practice.2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, p. 86-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Löfmark, A
    et al.
    Gävle.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Facilitating and obstructing factors for development of learning in clinical practice - a student perspective.2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim of the study. The aim of this study was to provide information on what the student nurses found facilitating and obstructing for their learning during clinical practice. Background. Earlier studies of experiences of learning in clinical practice have shown that factors as the possibilities of variations of experiences, the culture of the workplace, and communication between the educational institution and health care facilities are of importance. Less is known about the opportunities which students are given in order to practise the skills that the), will be expected to perform as new graduate nurses. Methods. The experiences of 47 degree student nurses from two colleges in Sweden were gathered in weekly diaries during their final period of clinical practice. A content analysis technique was used to analyse their diaries. Results. The students emphasized responsibility and independence, opportunities to practise different tasks, and receiving feedback as facilitating factors. Other perceived promoting factors included perceptions of control of the situation and understanding of the 'total picture'. Examples of obstructing factors were the nurses as supervisors not relying on the students, supervision that lacked continuity and lack of opportunities to practise. Perception of their own insufficiency and low self-reliance were drawbacks for some students. Conclusions. Recommended proposals are presented to lecturers and supervising staff concerning organizational and educational changes, and changes of attitudes for elucidating the students' experiences of different facilitating and obstructing factors. Changes may contribute to making easier the students' transition into the nursing profession.

  • 11.
    Paley, J.
    et al.
    Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, United Kingdom.
    Wiman, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Commentary on Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-4292005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 122-125p. 122-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 12.
    Raak, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Raak, Anders
    Health Department at SAAB Aerospace in Linköping.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Health Department at SAAB Aerospace in Linköping.
    Wahren, Lis Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Catastrophizing and health related quality of life: A 6-year follow-up of patients with chronic low back pain2002In: Rehabilitation Nursing, ISSN 0278-4807, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pain rehabilitation model that focused on emotions was implemented to influence catastrophizing by, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) for, persons with chronic low back pain. Twelve individuals, 7 men and 5 women (aged 33 to 57 years), all with long-term pain despite treatment, were included in the study and a single case research experimental design (SCRED) was used to follow the patterns of coping with pain for 6 years. The HRQL was measured before and 6 years after the intervention. Coping strategies and HRQL were evaluated with the Coping Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ) and the SF-36, respectively. The evaluation of pain coping strategies after 3 years found decreased catastrophizing, a decrease that had continued 3 years later. HRQL showed significantly improved mental health and impaired physical capacity at the 6-year follow-up. Changes in catastrophizing or in HRQL did not appear to influence self-scored bodily pain. Altered catastrophizing appeared to be a long-term process. This research indicates the need for rehabilitation programs to assess and evaluate patients' pain and their need for improved quality of life, rather than focusing only on the elimination of pain.

  • 13.
    Rudberg, L
    et al.
    Falun.
    Nilsson, S
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Health-related qualigy of life in survivors of testicular cancer 3-13 years after treatment2000In: Journal of psychosocial oncology, ISSN 0734-7332, E-ISSN 1540-7586, Vol. 18, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Sandberg, G
    et al.
    Falun.
    Stenberg, T
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ten years of patients' experiences with fixed implant-supported prostheses...2000In: Journal of Dental Hygiene, ISSN 1043-254X, Vol. 74, p. 308-316Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Sandberg, G
    et al.
    Falun.
    Sundberg, H
    Falun.
    Fjellström, C
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Type 2 diabetes and oral health. A comparison between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.2000In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 50, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Sandberg, G
    et al.
    Falun.
    Sundberg, H
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    A controlled study of oral self-care and self-perceived oral health in type 2 diabetic patients.2001In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 59, p. 28-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Sandberg, GE
    et al.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Oral dryness and peripheral neuropathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes2003In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 192-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two common complaints related to diabetes mellitus are oral dryness (xerostomia) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) and there is some evidence of a relationship between them. Therefore, we formulated a hypothesis that type 2 diabetic subjects with xerostomia in our study also exhibited PN. The study included 102 randomly sampled type 2 diabetic patients from a healthcare district in mid-Sweden. Besides clinical and X-ray examinations, patients were asked whether they experienced oral dryness. PN was defined through thorough foot examination and the use of a modified neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and neuropathy disability score (NDS). Other diabetes-related variables were extracted from medical records. More than half of the individuals (53.5%) reported oral dryness and 23.8% were diagnosed with PN. None of the variables in a stepwise regression analysis could explain the variance in oral dryness, besides "pain in the legs," which contributed with 5% to the explanation. Our hypothesis that type 2 diabetic subjects with xerostomia also were affected with PN could not be verified in this study, but the results must be interpreted with caution as relatively few subjects were affected with both oral dryness and PN (13.8%). Further and larger controlled studies are needed before the hypothesis can be definitely rejected. Despite our incomplete understanding about the relation between oral dryness and PN, professionals in oral health as well as in primary health have to strive for increased knowledge in this field. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 18. Sandberg, GE
    et al.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Oral health and health-related quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls2003In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to identify factors in oral health and also diabetes-related and socio-economic components that could be associated with the subject's health-related quality of life (HRQL). One-hundred-and-two randomly sampled type 2 diabetic and 102 age-matched and gender-matched non-diabetic subjects from the same residential area were studied cross-sectionally using the SF-36 questionnaire. Although the HRQL profiles were similar in nature, the control subjects indicated a more favorable health status in their HRQL scores than did type 2 diabetic subjects. Certain oral health factors contributed to deterioration of the patient's HRQL. Multiple regression analyses including both groups were used to determine variables explaining variance in the different HRQL domains. Dissatisfaction with teeth and mouth, feeling of dry mouth and poor financial status contributed to about one-fourth of the explanation of the variance in all health domains. Having diabetes played an important role in the domains Physical Functioning, Role functioning-Physical, General Health, and Social Functioning. Age was important for Physical Functioning and Role functioning-Physical. Our study indicates that different factors may be asociated with impaired HRQL, especially among type 2 diabetic subjects, although only a partial understanding of its relation to oral health could be demonstrated.

  • 19.
    Smide, B
    et al.
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Self-perceived health and metabolic control in Tanzanian diabetic2000In: East African Medical Journal, ISSN 0012-835X, Vol. 77, p. 658-662Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Smide, Bibbi
    et al.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Lukwale, Jane
    Msoka, Agnes
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Smide, B
    Lukwale, J
    Msoka, A
    Self-reported health and glycaemic control in Tanzanian and Swedish diabetic patients2002In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 182-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims of the study. To investigate self-reported health in adult Tanzanian and Swedish diabetic patients in relation to the general population in the two countries and to investigate whether diabetic patients with poor glycaemic control also rated their self-reported health to be impaired. Design/methods. The study design was cross-sectional and comparative. One hundred and fifty Tanzanian patients were age-and gender-matched with Swedish diabetic patients. Self-reported health was measured using the generic SF-36 health questionnaire, measuring eight different health domains. Glycaemic control was measured by testing glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Results. The main results were that Tanzanian diabetic patients had poorer health in comparison with general Tanzanian population living in the same geographical area. In contrast, diabetic patients in Sweden did not markedly differ from the Swedish general population. Furthermore, Tanzanian patients had poorer glycaemic control. In both countries poor glycaemic control did not associate with impaired self-reported health, with one exception. Tanzanian patients with unsatisfactory or poor glycaemic control had significantly poorer reported health in the mental health domain. Conclusions. The results indicated that patients' health should be assessed using a specific health measure in addition to general medical measures.

  • 21.
    Sörensen Duppils, Gill
    et al.
    Dalarna University College, Falun, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
    Acute confusional states in patients undergoing hip surgery: a prospective observation study2000In: Gerontology, ISSN 0304-324X, E-ISSN 1423-0003, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 36-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is general agreement that acute confusional state (ACS) is common among elderly patients admitted to hospital, although exact figures are difficult to obtain. The objective of the current study was to investigate the onset of ACS during hospital stay and to isolate possible predisposing, facilitating and precipitating factors associated with the onset of ACS.

    Methods: Non-confused patients, ≥65 years of age, undergoing orthopedic hip surgery, were consecutively included in the study (n = 225). Of these, 149 patients were operated on because of acute hip fracture and 76 underwent elective hip-replacement surgery. ACS was diagnosed by the DSM-IV criteria for delirium. Structured observations of ACS onset were performed every 2nd to every 4th hour during the patients’ entire hospital stay. A protocol was used to document the observations on sleep, activities, well being and behavior. The Mini-Mental State Examination was used to measure cognitive functioning.

    Results: Of 225 patients 20% were diagnosed with ACS. The incidence of ACS was 24.3% in the group of hip-fractured patients and 11.7% in the hip-replacement surgery patients. The onset of ACS was postoperative (mean 24 ± 21 h after surgery) in all but 8 patients. The duration of ACS among recovered patients was generally less than 48 h (mean 42 ± 43 h). Predisposing factors were older age, cognitive impairment and pre-existing cerebrovascular or other brain diseases. Facilitating factors related to ACS were associated with communication and social isolation, e.g. impaired hearing and sight, reticence and passivity. One precipitating factor, besides surgery, may be the use of psychopharmacological drugs.

    Conclusion: The incidence of ACS was 20% among hip surgery patients. Older age and social isolation were factors associated with ACS. Increased attention and interaction with older patients could be of value in avoiding ACS during hospitalization.

  • 22.
    Sörensen Duppils, Gill
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala and The University College in Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV). Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Delirium: behavioural changes before and during the prodromal phase2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 609-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.  Delirium is an important form of psychopathology in older people and is associated with increased morbidity and functional decline. In the prodromal phase of delirium early symptoms occur, before all criteria have been met.

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to delineate behavioural changes before and during the prodromal phase of delirium. That was considered to include the time from the first behavioural change up to the point when all DSM-IV criteria for delirium were met.

    Design.  Prospective and descriptive observation study.

    Methods.  One hundred and three hip surgery patients (hip fracture and hip replacement) aged ≥ 80 years participated in this study. On admission none of them was delirious or had severe cognitive decline, but 32 patients met the DSM-IV criteria for delirium during the hospital stay. Frequent observations were performed up to delirium onset or 48 hours postoperatively. The observations included 37 items on the patient's state of mind, cognition, activity and behaviour. The first observation on admission was used as a reference and behavioural changes were defined as deviations from this first observation.

    Results.  Twenty-one patients out of the 32 who met the DSM-IV criteria (62%, D group) demonstrated behavioural changes before delirium onset, as did 34 (48%, R group) out of the remaining 71 patients. The D group had different and more numerous behavioural changes than the R group. Anxiety was common in both groups. Disorientation and urgent calls for attention were the most frequent changes in the D group. The D group presented a pattern of behavioural changes and early symptoms of the approaching delirium. Six hours immediately before the onset of delirium, the behavioural changes were more numerous and evident.

    Conclusions and relevance to clinical practice.  It is necessary to pay attention to each behavioural change in the patients and to be aware of the prodromal phase of delirium in order to prevent its onset and to maintain the patient's well-being.

  • 23.
    Wallin, L
    et al.
    Falun.
    Boström, A
    Falun.
    Harvey, G
    Falun.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Ewald, U
    Falun.
    National guidelines for Swedish neonatal nursing care: Evaluation of clinical application.2000In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 12, p. 465-474Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24. Wallin, L
    et al.
    Boström, A M
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Ewald, U
    Sustainability in changing clinical practice promotes evidence-based nursing care2003In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 509-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To examine the relationship between sustained work with quality improvement (QI) and factors related to research utilization in a group of nurses. Design. The study was designed as a comparative survey that included 220 nurses from various health care organizations in Sweden. These nurses had participated in uniformly designed 4-day basic training courses to manage a method for QI. Method. A validated questionnaire covering different aspects of research utilization was employed. The response rate was 70% (154 of 220). Nurses in managerial positions at the departmental level were excluded. Therefore, the final sample consisted of 119 respondents. Four years after the training courses, 39% were still involved in audit-related activities, while 61% reported that they had discontinued the QI work (missing = 1). Results. Most nurses (80-90%) had a positive attitude to research. Those who had continued the QI work over a 4-year period reported more activity in searching research literature compared with those who had discontinued the QI work (P = 0.005). The QI-sustainable nurses also reported more frequent participation in research-related activities, particularly in implementing specific research findings in practice (P = 0.001). Some contextual differences were reported: the QI-sustainable nurses were more likely to obtain support from their chief executive (P = 0.001), consultation from a skilled researcher (P = 0.005) and statistical support (P = 0.001). Within the broader health care organization, the existence of a research committee and a research and development strategy, as well as access to research assistant staff, had a tendency to be more common for nurses who had continued the QI work. Conclusion. Sustainability in QI work was significantly related to supportive leadership, facilitative human resources, increased activity in seeking new research and enhanced implementation of research findings in clinical practice. It appears that these factors constitute a necessary prerequisite for professional development and the establishment of evidence-based practice.

  • 25.
    Wikblad, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Rudberg, L
    Carlsson, M
    Nilsson, S
    Self-perceived physical, psychologic, and general symptoms in survivors of testicular cancer 3 to 13 years after treatment2002In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the large group of patients with advanced testicular cancer now being cured, it is important to identify the men who are at risk of deteriorated health. The purposes of this study were: (1) to delineate and compare frequency of self-perceived physical, psychologic, and general symptoms in men treated for testicular cancer with those of a general population sample and (2) to compare self-perceived physical, psychologic, and general symptoms in relation to secondary Raynaud phenomena, sexual dysfunction, infertility, and self-perceived attractiveness in different treatment modalities. The subjects were 277 survivors of testicular cancer (M = 42.2 years) who had completed a self-reported questionnaire (75.5% response rate). A population survey comprising 392 men was used as a comparison group (M = 45 years). The result demonstrated that although survivors of testicular cancer as a group reported significantly less frequency of backache, leg pain, cough, and eye problems than did the general population sample, they described that they significantly more often felt cold. Men reporting secondary Raynaud phenomena, infertility, and/or feeling less attractive had experienced significantly more self-perceived symptoms. Oncologist nurses could play an important role in psychologic counseling for those men.

  • 26.
    Wikblad, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Smide, B
    Ekman, L
    Diabetes self-care and educational needs in Tanzanian and Swedish diabetic patients: a cross-cultural study.2002In: Tropical doctor, ISSN 0049-4755, E-ISSN 1758-1133, Vol. 32, p. 212-216Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Wiklblad, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Science in Nursing.
    Wallin, L
    Boström, AM
    Harvey, G
    Ewald, U
    Progress of unit based quality improvement: An evaluation of a support strategy2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate a strategy for supporting nurses to work with quality improvement (QI). Design: Post-intervention evaluation. Study participants and intervention: 240 nurses participated in a uniformly designed 4 day basic training course in applying a model for QI. Of these, 156 nurses from over 50 healthcare institutions constituted the generic education (GE) group while 84 nurses from 42 neonatal units took part in a project to develop national guidelines, constituting the targeted intervention (TI) group. Method: Postal questionnaire 4 years after the training courses. Results: The response rate was 80% in the TI group and 64% in the GE group. Nurses in the TI group had a significantly higher rate in completing all phases of the QI cycle (p=O.O002). With no differences between the groups, 39% of ali nurses were still involved in QI work 4 years after the training courses. Three factors were significantly related to nurses continuing their involvement in QI projects: remaining employed on the same unit (OR 11.3), taking courses in nursing science (OR 4.1), and maintenance of the same QI model (OR 3.1). Reported motives for remaining active in QI work were the enhancement of knowledge, influence over clinical practice, and development as a nurse. Reasons for discontinuation were organisational restructuring, a lack of facilitation and knowledge, and change of workplace. Conclusions: Participation in a national guideline project, including a common focus for improvement, facilitation and opportunities for networking, seems to have enhanced the ability to carry out the process of QI, but not to sustain the QI work over a longer period.

  • 28.
    Wiman, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning.
    Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 422-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Caring is a core characteristic of nursing. Nurses' caring behaviour has been explored in several studies. When caring for trauma patients, the most important caring behaviour must be the procedures associated with lifesaving. However, it is important not to forget the patient's psychological needs. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight encounters between injured patients and nurses in the trauma team and to explore whether the theory of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing and health care is applicable in emergency care. Data collection and analysis. Data were collected by videotaping caring episodes between slightly injured patients and nurses in the trauma team. Five episodes involving 10 nurses were studied. The analysis was carried out in four steps. First the videotapes were studied several times and then transcribed into narratives, which were reduced into courses of events. These were subsequently classified according to aspects of caring and uncaring. Results. The nurses' verbal and non-verbal communication was poor, and they adopted a wait-and-see policy. A new uncaring aspect, instrumental behaviour, emerged from this poor communication. One of the caring aspects, being dedicated and having courage to be appropriately involved, could not be identified. Most encounters included several aspects of caring and uncaring, but the uncaring aspects predominated. The dominance of uncaring aspects indicates a lack of affective caring behaviour. Conclusion. The result showed that the theory is partly applicable in emergency care. A new aspect, instrumental behaviour emerged. The nurses' behaviour in the five episodes was labelled as uncaring. Authentic nurse-patient encounters are essential in nursing. Relevance to clinical practice. The importance of meeting patients' psychological needs and nurses' affective caring behaviour should be emphasized in trauma care, trauma courses and nursing education. It is necessary to measure the caring behaviour of trauma nurses.

  • 29.
    Wiman, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Welfare and Care (IVV), Self-Care and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Response: Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-4292005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 124-125p. 124-125Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf