liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 89
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Socialstyrelsen.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    ICF/ICF-CY utbildningsmaterial. Del 1- Introduktion av modell, struktur och innehåll.2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Utbildningsmaterialet om de internationella klassifikationerna ICF och ICF-CY ger information om deras struktur och innehåll samt hur koderna kan användas för att beskriva funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa. Utbildningsmaterialet är gjort för personal i olika verksamheter inom vård och omsorg och kan användas både enskilt och i grupp. Den första delen av materialet beskriver klassifikationens struktur och innehåll samt modellen den bygger på. Den andra delen handlar om hur man kan använda koderna i sitt arbete.

  • 2.
    Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Socialstyrelsen .
    Bolic, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    ICF/ICF-CY utbildningsmaterial. Del 2- Kodning.2011Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Utbildningsmaterialet om de internationella klassifikationerna ICF och ICF-CY ger information om deras struktur och innehåll samt hur koderna kan användas för att beskriva funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa. Utbildningsmaterialet är gjort för personal i olika verksamheter inom vård och omsorg och kan användas både enskilt och i grupp. Den första delen av materialet beskriver klassifikationens struktur och innehåll samt modellen den bygger på. Den andra delen handlar om hur man kan använda koderna i sitt arbete.

  • 3.
    Aslaksen, Maya
    et al.
    Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Scott, Patricia
    Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Swedish Association of Occupational Therapists.
    Ellingham, Brian
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway.
    Bonsaksen, Tore
    Oslo and Akershus University College, Oslo, Norway.
    [Occupational therapy process in a psychiatric hospital]: Using the role checklist version 2: Quality of performance2014In: Ergoterapeuten, ISSN 0800-3475, no 4, p. 38-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For several decades, occupational therapy researchers have collected data about clients’ role performance with the Role Checklist, a widely used assessment tool, which collects self-reported information about clients’ roles. The Role Checklist includes two parts; Part 1 gathers data about role incumbency and Part 2 gathers data about role value. In 2008, Part 3 for the Role Checklist was developed to address occupational role performance, specifically prompting clients to rank the quality of their current role performance compared to their highest prior level. This reflects the client perspective of occupational participation corresponding to the performance capacity component of MOHO; thus establishing the Role Checklist Version Two: Quality of Performance (RC V2: QP).

    This paper illustrates by a case example how a therapist used the recently translated RC V2: QP in a psychiatric hospital setting in Norway in order to determine the extent to which the RC V2: QP supports the goal setting process as well as the therapist-client experience to verify subjective feasibility. It was reported that use of this instrument to guide the clinical interview was a positive experience for both the client and the therapist. The client had an opportunity to reflect upon his roles and how he would like to change them. The occupational therapist experienced that the interdisciplinary team working with this patient gradually developed a more comprehensive understanding of the patient’s challenges and resources. The RC V2: QP provided a basic set of information about the patient’s roles that was useful for setting treatment goals.

     

     

  • 4.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Skogh, Thomas
    Hand function in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis2003In: Rapportklass C eller D samt Impactvärde 0,000 sätts om ISSN inte kan uppges.,2003, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björk, Mathilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skogh, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hand function in women and men with early rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective study over three years (the Swedish TIRA project)2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the course of hand function in women and men during the first 3 years after diagnosis of recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA), to investigate sex differences in hand function, and to study correlations between and within hand function assessments.

    Methods: A total of 276 patients (69% women) with RA of a maximal duration of 12 months were recruited to the study. Hand function was assessed by the Grip Ability Test (GAT) and Signals of Functional Impairment (SOFI). Peak and average grip force over 10 s in the right and left hand was measured by an electronic device.

    Results: Hand function was affected at diagnosis, but had improved significantly at the 3-months' follow-up and then remained stable (but still affected) in both women and men. As assessed by SOFI, hand function was worse in men than in women, whereas women had significantly lower grip force. GAT, grip force, and SOFI correlated weakly. The average and peak values of grip force correlated strongly, as did the grip force in the right and the left hand.

    Conclusion: Hand function was profoundly affected at diagnosis of RA, but improved significantly within 3 months and remained stable (but still affected) over 3 years. As expected, women on average had significantly lower grip force than men.

  • 6.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utilization of an ICF-based assessment from occupational therapists' perspectives2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bonsaksen, Tore
    et al.
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Meidert, Ursula
    Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland.
    Schuman, Deana
    Kvarsnes, Hildegunn
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prior, Susan
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    Yamada, Takashi
    Scott, Patricia
    Does the Role Checklist Measure Occupational Participation?2015In: The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 2168-6408, Vol. 3, no 3, article id 7-1-2015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Among the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) assessments, the Role Checklist is one of the most established. In spite of its widespread use, no studies have examined role examples and their association with the three embedded levels of doing, as established in the MOHO theory.

    Method: A cross-sectional survey of 293 respondents from the US, the UK, Japan, Switzerland, Sweden, and Norway produced 7,182 role examples. The respondents completed Part I of the Role Checklist and provided examples of each internalized role they performed. Responses were classified as occupational skill, occupational performance, or occupational participation.

    Results: Thirty-three percent of the examples were classified as examples of occupational participation, whereas 65% were classified as examples of occupational performance. Four roles linked mostly with occupational participation, another four roles linked mostly with occupational performance, and the two remaining roles were mixed between occupational participation and occupational performance.

    Discussion: The Role Checklist assesses a person’s involvement in internalized roles at the level of both occupational participation and occupational performance. There are differences among countries with regard to how roles are perceived and exemplified, and different roles relate differently to the occupational performance and occupational participation levels of doing. There are related implications for occupational therapists

  • 8. Brintnell, E Sharon
    et al.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Larsson, Åsa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Piergrossi, Julie
    Occupational therapy in mental health today: A survey and some reflections2005In: WFOT bulletin / World Federation of Occupational Therapists, ISSN 1447-3828, Vol. 52Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activity and participation in psychiatric institutional care2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National action plans emphasize the importance of strengthening the role of patients in health and medical care. Patients should feel that they can participate and that they are seen as a resource. In occupational therapy, the client-centred approach has developed, whereby it is key to enable patients to participate in their treatment. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) has inspired this study, in which concepts such as activity and participation are central. The purpose of the study was to describe how patients in psychiatric institutional care conceive their opportunities to be active, and how they participate in their own treatment. Questionnaires were sent to patients who had received care during a six-month period. Ten patients were then selected for interview. The study shows that younger patients and patients who were treated involuntarily were generally more dissatisfied than other patients. The patients' perceptions of their environment were influenced by the values in the ward. Topics such as atmosphere in the ward, reception, continuity, and support were presented. Important factors related to activity and participation were: agreement concerning the treatment plan, discussions about expectations, creating conditions for engagement in activities, and providing the patients with opportunities to take responsibility for themselves.

  • 10.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Occupational performance and affective symptoms for patients withdepression disorder2015In: Advances in Psychiatry, ISSN 2356-685X, E-ISSN 2314-7768, p. 1-6, article id 438149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aimof this study was to describe recovering over time in occupational performance and in affective symptoms for patients with depression disorder by using different assessments and methods for collecting data. A longitudinal design with data collections on repeated occasions was used. The Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale and Occupational Self- Assessment were used formeasuring occupational performance, and for affective symptoms, a Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale Self-Assessment was used. Fourteen patients with depression disorder were included in the study. The result indicates that affective symptoms improve earlier than occupational performance. Furthermore, self-assessment seems to reflect more improvement to the patient than interview-based assessment. Different kinds of assessment and different kinds of data collection methods seem to facilitate the understanding of the patients recovering. In addition habituationwas themost important item for the patients to manage.One implication for practice is that patients may need an extended period of treatment supporting occupational performance.

  • 11.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Values of different assessments when measuring occupational performance in mental healthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to investigate if there was harmony between assessments for medical symptoms and assessments for occupational performance, and if they could replace each other when the occupational therapist collected information for patients with depressive disorders. Another aim was to investigate how the collected information was used in the treatment plan. The study showed that even if the symptoms of the disease have improved at the end of the treatment, the patient still has problems with occupational performance. Using both interview and self-assessments is important, and it is also very urgent to formulate goals based around the patient´s social environment.

  • 12.
    Deshpande, Shilpa
    et al.
    Model of Human Occupation Clearinghouse, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Kielhofner, Gary
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linda
    Rusch University, Chicago, USA.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    Chicago.
    A user's manual for the Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale2002Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The OCAIRS provides a structure for gathering, analyzing, and reporting data on the extent and nature of an individual's occupational participation. It can be used with a wide range of clients, and would be appropriate for any adolescent or adult client who has the cognitive and emotional ability to participate in an interview. The OCAIRS provides a structured and theoretically based means of developing interview skills in evaluation and treatment.

  • 13.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    Arbetsmiljöns betydelse för återgång i arbete vid sjukskrivning - en longitudinell studie över 2 år2007In: AT Forum,2007, Stockholm: Förbundet Sveriges Arbetsterapeuter , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

       

  • 14.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    The Worker Role Interviews: s prediktiva validitet för återgång till arbete2003In: At-Forum,2003, 2003, p. 17-18Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Work Environment Impact Scale, svensk version 3: Användarmanual för WEIS-S2010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Manual för Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS)

    Den här manualen är tänkt att vara ett stöd för användare av WEIS. Bedömningsinstrumentet WEIS består av en semistrukturerad intervju och en fyrgradig skattningsskala. Intervjun är utformad för att erhålla information om hur personer upplever sin arbetsmiljö. Genom WEIS intervjun erhålls information om hur personen uppfattar att psykosociala och fysiska faktorer i personens unika arbetsmiljö påverkar personens känsla av tillfredställelse och välbefinnande vid utförande av arbete. Vid WEIS intervjun efterfrågas information om hur en given arbetsmiljö påverkar den enskilde personen. Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) utgör den teoretiska grunden till WEIS.

    WEIS kan användas för att identifiera arbetslivsinriktade rehabiliteringsbehov och som en del i bedömning av en persons arbetsförmåga.  För att få en så rik och mångsidig bild som möjligt av personen bör WEIS bedömningar kompletteras med andra bedömningar och bedömningsmetoder. Denna tredje svenska upplaga av WEIS kan användas för personer som är sjukskrivna och som har en anställning samt för personer som är i arbete eller utför arbetsliknande uppgifter i någon form av arbetsmiljö.

  • 16.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Worker Role Interview, svensk version 3: Användarmanual WRI-S2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Manual för  the Worker Role Interview (WRI)

    WRI är ett bedömningsinstrument med en semistrukturerad intervju och en fyrgradig skattningsskala. Syftet med intervjun är att identifiera hur psykosociala och miljömässiga faktorer påverkar personers möjligheter att vara kvar i, återgå till eller skaffa ett arbete. Genom WRI intervjun erhålls information om personens tidigare och nuvarande arbetssituation, personens livssituation i relation till att ha en arbetsroll och hur personen ser på sin framtida arbetssituation. Den teoretiska grunden för WRI är Model of Human Occupation. WRI kan användas som en komponent vid bedömning av en persons arbetsförmåga. WRI kan också användas för att identifiera arbetslivsinriktade rehabiliteringsbehov. För att få en så rik och mångsidig bild som möjligt av personen bör WRI bedömningen kompletteras med andra bedömningar och bedömningsmetoder. Det här är den tredje reviderade upplagan av den svenska versionen av WRI.

  • 17.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    The Worker Role Interview: Preliminary data on the predictive validity of return to work of clients after an insurance medicine investigation2004In: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 131-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the predictive validity of the Worker Role Interview (WRI) for return to work at a 2-year follow-up of clients who attended an insurance medicine investigation center. The WRI identifies psychosocial and environmental factors that influence a person's abilities to return to work. Forty-eight of 202 consecutively selected clients constituted the study group. The Mann–Whitney U test was used to test the statistically significant differences in WRI ratings between those who were working (n=6) and those who were not (n=42) 2 years after their investigations. Five of the 17 items in WRI had a tentative predictive validity of return to work. The content area personal causation in WRI, had the best predictive validity. The results emphasize the importance of considering the unique individual's beliefs and expectations of his/her effectiveness at work when assessing clients' work ability and planning for further rehabilitation.

  • 18.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perceptions of the work environment among people with experience of long term sick leave2010In: WORK-A JOURNAL OF PREVENTION ASSESSMENT and REHABILITATION, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aims were to describe and analyze how people with experience of long term sick leave perceive that factors in their work environment support or interfere with work performance, satisfaction, and well-being. Method: The 53 participants were interviewed with the Work Environment Impact Scale (WEIS). The WEIS ratings and belonging notes were analyzed by descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis respectively. Differences in WEIS ratings between; women and men; participants with somatic and mental diseases; and participants working and on full-time sick leave were tested. Results: The most supportive factors concerned social interactions at work, and the value and meaning of work. The factors perceived as most interfering concerned work demands and rewards. The social relations at work were perceived as more supportive by the working group than by those on full-time sick leave. The participants with somatic diseases perceived physical work factors as more interfering than did participants with mental diseases, who in turn perceived the value and meaning of work as more interfering. Conclusion: Knowledge about the interaction between the worker and the work environment could reveal useful information about the complex phenomenon of reducing sick leave. The WEIS seems useful in providing information about how alterations and accommodations in the work environment could support individual workers.

  • 19.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Return to work: the predictive value of the Worker Role Interview (WRI) over two years2010In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 163-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worker Role Interview (WRI) is an assessment tool designed to identify psychosocial and environmental factors which influence a persons ability to return to work. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the Worker Role Interview (WRI) can predict return to work over a period of two years. Fifty three long-term sick-listed people were interviewed and rated with the WRI. Differences in ratings and the ability of WRI to correctly predict whether these people would fall into the working or non-working groups at 6, 12 and 24 month follow-ups were tested by Mann-Whitney test and logistic regression respectively. Eight of 17 items in WRI were rated differently between the groups at one or more of the follow-ups. The regression models based on the WRI ratings had an overall correct prediction rate ranging from 81% to 96%. Expectation of job success which concerns the persons belief in abilities in relation to return to work emerged as an important predictive factor for return to work in all statistical analyses. The WRI assessment contains items that could predict return to work. This implies that the WRI could be a useful tool in vocational rehabilitation for identifying individual rehabilitation needs.

  • 20.
    Falklöf, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Daily occupations and adaptation to daily life described by women suffering from borderline personally disorder2010In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, ISSN 0164-212X, E-ISSN 1541-3101, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 354-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder have significant impairments in relation to health. Despite this, their occupational status is rarely described. The aim of this study was to examine how women with Borderline Personality Disorder describe their daily occupations and adaptation to daily life. The study included nine participants. The data were collected using a semi-structured interview and were analyzed using content analysis.

    Theme: Having few organized daily activities and poor personal causation prevent changes in adaptation to daily life. Two categories: performance and self-image, and four subcategories: competent or incompetent to perform, positive self-image, and lack of self-image were identified.

  • 21.
    Fisher, Gail
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    Parkinson, Susanne
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Environment in the Model of Human Occupation 5th edition  – Transformation and Practical Tools2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    et al.
    Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Braveman, Brent
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kielhofner, Gary
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fenger, Kristjana
    Occupational Therapy Program, University of Akureyi, Akureyi, Iceland.
    Keller, Jessica
    Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.
    Psychometric properties of the Worker Role Interview2006In: Work, ISSN 1051-9815, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 313-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. This study examined the psychometric properties of the rating scale of the Worker Role Interview (WRI). The study also asked whether the scale's items formed a valid measure of the construct, psychosocial capacity for work, and whether they were targeted to and could effectively discriminate between persons at different levels of psychosocial ability for work.

    Method of study. Data were collected from 21 raters on 440 participants from the United States, Sweden and Iceland. A many-faceted Rasch model was used to analyze the data.

    Results. Most items of the scale worked effectively to measure the underlying construct for which the WRI was designed. In addition, the items were ordered from least to more of the underlying construct as expected. The scale validly measured 90.23% of the participants, who varied by nationality, culture, age and diagnostic status. The scale's items distinguished participants into approximately three different strata and were appropriately targeted to the participants. Seventeen of the 21 raters used scale in a valid manner.

    Conclusions. The WRI scale and items are valid across ages, diagnoses, and culture and effectively measure a wide range of persons.

  • 23.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    et al.
    Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Deshpande, Shilpa
    Kielhofner, Gary
    University of Illinois at Chicago.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olson, Linda
    Rusch University, Chicago.
    Skinner, Sarah
    University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago .
    Kulkarni, Supriya
    The Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale Version 4.0, 20052005Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The OCAIRS provides a structure for gathering, analyzing, and reporting data on the extent and nature of an individual's occupational participation. It can be used with a wide range of clients, and would be appropriate for any adolescent or adult client who has the cognitive and emotional ability to participate in an interview. The OCAIRS provides a structured and theoretically based means of developing interview skills in evaluation and treatment.

  • 24.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arbetsterapeutisk bedömning inom psykiatrisk vård1999Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Assessments in general psychiatric care.2000In: Occupational Therapy in Mental Health, ISSN 0164-212X, E-ISSN 1541-3101, Vol. 15, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Bedömning av kommunikation och interaktionsfärdigheter2003In: At-Forum,2003, 2003, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    ICF o bedömningsinstrument inom arbetsterapi - likheter o olikheter ur ett psykiatriskt perspektiv2007In: Arbetsterapeuten, ISSN 0345-0988, no Nr 8, p. 15-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Haglund, lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Occupational therapists´ agreement in screening patients in general psychiatric care for occupational therapy1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, no 3, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    Occupational therapy assessment and treatment planning2007In: The first regional occupational therapy conference in the middle east,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Occupational therapy assessment in general psychiatric care1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to develop an Instrument to Investigate psychiatric patients' occupational performance In order to identify their need of occupational therapy service. A literature review and analysis of different concepts used to describe the patient's activity resulted In the construction of new concepts which subdivide the activity Into elementary parts; operations, single actions, generated actions, action sequences and simultaneous actions.

    Occupational therapists (n = 38) In general psychiatric care collaborated In a study of the agreement level when deciding whether patients (n = 10) should be Included In, or excluded from, occupational therapy service. The results Indicate the imJ?Orlance of studying In more detail the screening process and the development of screening mstruments.

    One instrument, the Occupational Case Analysis Interview and Rating Scale (OCAIRS), was identified. The instrument, which gives Information about patients' adar.tive occupational functioning, was translated Into Swedish and tested for interrater reliability In two different studies. The result showed that the second version of the instrument had good lnterrater agreement.

    In order to investigate whether a patient's adaptive occupational functioning is related to diagnoses of schizophrenia or mood disorders, a study was made on three groups of inpatients: patients with schizophrenia (n = 18), major depression (n = 20) and bipolar disorders (n = 22). To examine the patient's occupational functioning OCAIRS was used. The result Indicated that the patient's adaptive occupational functioning was related to psychiatric diagnoses. Patients with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorders had great difficulties In adapting to everyday occupation and were In need of intervention from the occupational therapist. Patients with maJor depression, however, do not seem to have the same need of intervention.

    By Interviewing 145 patients, the predictive values of OCAIRS was calculated. OCAIRS seems to predict Inclusion and exclusion Into occupational therapy, seems to select which patients are In immediate need of treatment, and seems to identify those who need a new assessment later on. However, the results Indicate a need to Investigate how the rating of the different components In OCAIRS influence the occupational therapist when judging the patient's need of occupational therapy.

  • 31.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    Occupational therapy in mental health and psychiatry2007In: The first regional occupational therapy conference in the middle east,2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Path guide: a way to include clients in Occupational Therapy educaction2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Slutrapport. Betydelse av aktivitet som behandlingsform för ökad psykisk hälsa. FORSS2008Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Socialstyrelsen2003In: Klassifikation av funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa: svensk version av International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health / [ed] Sverige Socialstyrelsen.; World Health Organization., Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2003, p. -273Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna volym innehåller ICF, Internationell klassifikation av funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa. 1 Det övergripande målet för klassifikationen är att erbjuda ett samlat och standardiserat språk och en struktur för att beskriva hälsa och hälsorelaterade tillstånd. Den definierar hälsokomponenter och några hälsorelaterade komponenter av välbefinnande (såsom utbildning och arbete). ICF:s domäner kan därför ses som

    hälsodomäner och hälsorelaterade domäner. Dessa beskrivs ur kroppsliga, personliga och sociala perspektiv genom två grundläggande förteckningar: (1) kroppsfunktioner och kroppsstrukturer, (2) aktiviteter och delaktighet. 2 Som klassifikation grupperar ICF olika domäner3 för en person med en given hälsobetingelse (dvs. vad en person med en sjukdom eller störning gör eller kan göra).

    Funktionstillstånd utgör en paraplyterm för alla kroppsfunktioner, kroppsstrukturer, aktiviteter och delaktighet och på motsvarande sätt är Funktionshinder en paraplyterm för funktionsnedsättningar, strukturavvikelser, aktivitetsbegränsningar eller delaktighetsinskränkningar. ICF förtecknar även omgivningsfaktorer som interagerar med alla dessa begrepp. ICF erbjuder därmed en möjlighet att beskriva en profil av personers funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa inom flera domäner. ICF tillhör en ”familj” av

  • 35.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    The ICF vs. occupational therapy instruments - similarities and differences from a mental health perspective2008In: WFOT bulletin / World Federation of Occupational Therapists, ISSN 1447-3828, Vol. 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

        

  • 36.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    The Occupational Therapist´s Role in Mental Health2006In: 14th Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists,2006, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The value of Specialist Training for Occupational Therapists2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Behrbohm Fallsberg, Margareta
    Consultant, Stensudden, SE-585 96 Linköping Sweden.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A Follow-up of an Occupational Therapy Programme based on Problem-Based Learning (PBL)2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A follow-up study explored how graduate occupational therapists valued quality aspects of their undergraduate education on a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) occupational therapy programme. One hundred and fifty of 195 graduates completed a questionnaire. The survey focused on factors such as: specific occupational therapy content combined with practical skills and preparation for future work; problem-solving and critical thinking; ability to communicate and collaborate; personal and professional development; and life-long learning. The respondents rated items after considering them from two aspects: acquired skills and objective importance. The main results show that the respondents rated their skills as above average in the quality aspects of the programme. A discrepancy was evident between the rated acquired skills and the rated importance of key qualities of the curriculum.

    Student –centred learning with PBL is evaluated as having value but is rejected.

  • 39.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bowyer, Patricia
    School of occupational therapy, Houston, USA.
    Scott, Patricia
    Department of occupational therapy, Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA.
    Taylor, Renée
    University of Illinois at Chicago, USA.
    The Model of Huma Occupation, the ICF, and de Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Connections to Support Best Practice around the World2017In: Kielhofner´s Model of Human Occupation: Theory and application / [ed] Taylor, Renée R, Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017, 5, p. 466-485Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Hälsa - utbildning - välfärdsinstitutioner (HUV) .
    Daremo, Åsa
    Psykiatri HU, INR.
    Delaktighet och aktivitet vid psykiatrisk slutenvård2007In: AT Forum,2007, Stockholm: Förbundet Sveriges Arbetsterapeuter , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekbladh, Elin
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorell, Lars-Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Psychiatry . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rahm Hallberg, Ingalill
    Practice models in Swedish psychiatric occupational therapy2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 107-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In clinical settings, occupational therapists need models both from their own field, occupational therapy, and from other fields in order to offer the clients adequate treatment. It is unknown which theoretical approaches and practice models influence Swedish occupational therapists' daily work. In this study a questionnaire (n=334) was used to investigate approaches and models used in Swedish psychiatric care service and in psychiatric occupational therapy service. The results showed that the psychosocial approach influenced both psychiatric care and psychiatric occupational therapy most. The most frequently used practice model was the Model of Human Occupation. However, 75% of the respondents did not identify theoretical thinking based on models from their own field behind their actions. Many practitioners seemed to use knowledge developed by other disciplines more often. Years of clinical experience in the profession or education did not seem to have any impact on the ability to identify the practice models that were used. The results indicate that education in occupational therapy must emphasize knowledge in its own field more than has been done up to now.

  • 42.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scottland, UK.
    The measurement properties of the Occupational Circumstances Interview and Rating Scale - Sweden (OCAIRS-S V2)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 412-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    This paper reports the measurement properties of the Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale - Sweden (OCAIRS-S V2). The OCAIRS is a semi-structured interview and rating scale designed to capture, in detail, a person's occupational participation. The English version 4.0 has been translated into Swedish. The psychometric properties of the Swedish version are unknown.

    METHODS:

    Eleven Swedish occupational therapists working in mental health completed 38 OCAIRS-S (V2) assessments in addition to linking videotapes. A total of 60 clients were, therefore, entered into the analysis. Many-faceted Rasch analysis was used to analyse the data.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

    Results supported internal, construct, and person response validity of the OCAIRS-S (V2). Inter-rater reliability was established. The scale was shown to discriminate between people who were living in the community. In addition, the results indicate a need to explore the skill items.

  • 43.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fältman, Susanne
    Psykiatri Skåne, Lund, Sweden .
    Activity and Participation - self-assessment according to the International Classification of Functioning: a study in mental health2012In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 412-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The aim of this exploratory study was to discover if a fifth qualifier in the domain of Activity and Participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICE) could highlight the experience of satisfaction and enjoyment in the everyday life of people with severe mental illness. It also investigated the correlation between the assessment made by an occupational therapist and nursing staff based on performance, and the assessment made by the clients themselves. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: Twenty-nine clients with schizophrenia or other forms of psychosis participated, using a self-assessment. The performance was investigated by using the first qualifier in the ICF, domain Activity and Participation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: The Major life area was rated with the most dissatisfaction and displeasure by the clients. Communication and General task and demands also had low ratings. Self-care was rated with the most satisfaction and enjoyment. There was a correlation between the assessments made by the occupational therapist and the nursing staff, but their assessments differed from those made by the clients. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The study indicates the importance of using self-assessment when understanding everyday life as presented in the ICE, and the importance of using different assessment methods to gain a broad picture of clients.

  • 44.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activity - From action to activity1995In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 9, p. 227-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy.
    Concepts in occupational therapy in relation to the ICF2003In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 253-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational therapists need an acceptable terminology to describe a client's clinical performance. The language or terminology must be in harmony with common language in the health care system but also reflect occupational therapists' professional responsibility. The aim of this paper is to help clarify similarities and differences between concepts in occupational therapy and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Two studies were completed in which items in the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH-2) were compared with concepts from the Swedish version of the assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) and the Assessment of Communication and Interaction Skills (ACIS-S). An expert panel of occupational therapists served as raters and 33 clients with learning disabilities and mental health problems were assessed. The result showed that 12 (60%) of the skills items from the ACIS-S were found to be equivalent to items in then ICIDH-2. In total, 41% (n = 23) of the items in the AMPS or ACIS-S have a correlation higher then 0.60 with the ICIDH-2. The classification can serve as a useful tool for occupational therapists and supports communication between professions, but is not sufficient as a professional language for occupational therapists. Further research is indicated to examine how the ICF can be applied in occupational therapy and its implications on clinical practice.

  • 46.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Henriksson, Chris
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Testing a Swedish version of OCAIRS on two different patient groups1994In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, p. 223-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Karlsson, Gunilla
    Kielhofner, Gary
    Shea Lai, J
    Validity of the Swedish version of the worker role interview.1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, no 4, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    A critical analysis of the Model of Human Occupation.1999In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, no 2, p. 102-1089Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examination of the applicability of the Model of Human Occupation in Swedish occupational therapy concludes that the environment is a central factor in understanding occupational behavior, but the model does not accurately or adequately depict the relationship between individuals and the environment. Volition is also an important factor in occupational-therapy intervention

  • 49.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linking MOHO-based assessments to ICF2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindh, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    How to apply an Occupation Paradigm in a Problem Based Learning Curriculum2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demands of professions like occupational therapy worldwide require good quality standards of the education. Traditional education has been based on the notion that teachers have knowledge and are responsible for passing on this knowledge to the students. However, in order to make educations attractive and effective new educational methods have developed. One such method is problem-based learning (PBL) which emphasizes that learning must be an active process involving knowledge as well as cognitive and practical skills and attitudes. This article describes PBL as it is applied with the concept of occupation as the core of an occupational therapy educational program. Occupation is a central concept in occupation therapy. Students need to develop a genuine knowledge and understanding of the occupational nature of humans, the meaning of the concept and environmental influences.

12 1 - 50 of 89
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf