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  • 1.
    Anderson, Tony
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansson, Therese
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Svensson, Samuel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Frog melanophores cultured on fluorescent microbeads: Biomimic-based biosensing2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanophores are pigmented cells in lower vertebrates capable of quick color changes and thereby suitable as whole cell biosensors. In the frog dermis skin layer, the large and dark pigmented melanophore surrounds a core of other pigmented cells. Upon hormonal stimulation the black-brown pigment organelles will redistribute within the melanophore, and thereby cover or uncover the core, making complex color changes possible in the dermis. Previously, melanophores have only been cultured on flat surfaces. Here we mimic the three dimensional biological geometry in the frog dermis by culturing melanophores on fluorescent plastic microbeads. To demonstrate biosensing we use the hormones melatonin and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) as lightening or darkening stimuli, respectively. Cellular responses were successfully demonstrated on single cell level by fluorescence microscopy, and in cell suspension by a fluorescence microplate reader and a previously demonstrated computer screen photo-assisted technique. The demonstrated principle is the first step towards "single well/multiple read-out" biosensor arrays based on suspensions of different selective-responding melanophores, each cultured on microbeads with distinctive spectral characteristics. By applying small amount of a clinical sample, or a candidate substance in early drug screening, to a single well containing combinations of melanophores on beads, multiple parameter read-outs will be possible. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 2. Comina, German
    et al.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    3D Printed Unibody Lab-on-a-Chip: Features Survey and Check-Valves Integration dagger2015In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 437-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unibody lab-on-a-chip (ULOC) concept entails a fast and affordable micro-prototyping system built around a single monolithic 3D printed element (unibody). A consumer-grade stereo lithography (SL) 3D printer can configure ULOCs with different forms of sample delivery, transport, handling and readout, while minimizing material costs and fabrication time. ULOC centralizes all complex fabrication procedures and replaces the need for clean room resources, delivering prototypes for less than 1 US$, which can be printed in 10 min and ready for testing in less than 30 min. Recent examples of ULOC integration of transport, chemical sensing for optical readout and flow mixing capabilities are discussed, as well as the integration of the first check-valves for ULOC devices. ULOC valves are strictly unidirectional up to 100 psi, show an exponential forward flow behavior up to 70 psi and can be entirely fabricated with the ULOC approach.

  • 3.
    Comina, German
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Autonomous Chemical Sensing Interface for Universal Cell Phone Readout2015In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 54, no 30, p. 8708-8712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exploiting the ubiquity of cell phones for quantitative chemical sensing imposes strong demands on interfacing devices. They should be autonomous, disposable, and integrate all necessary calibration and actuation elements. In addition, a single design should couple universally to a variety of cell phones, and operate in their default configuration. Here, we demonstrate such a concept and its implementation as a quantitative glucose meter that integrates finger pumps, unidirectional valves, calibration references, and focusing optics on a disposable device configured for universal video acquisition.

  • 4.
    Comina, German
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Low cost lab-on-a-chip prototyping with a consumer grade 3D printer2014In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 14, no 16, p. 2978-2982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Versatile prototyping of 3D printed lab-on-a-chip devices, supporting different forms of sample delivery, transport, functionalization and readout, is demonstrated with a consumer grade printer, which centralizes all critical fabrication tasks. Devices cost 0.57US$ and are demonstrated in chemical sensing and micromixing examples, which exploit established principles from reference technologies.

  • 5.
    Comina, German
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    PDMS lab-on-a-chip fabrication using 3D printed templates2014In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fabrication of conventional PDMS on glass lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, using templates printed with a commercial (2299 US$) micro-stereo lithography 3D printer, is demonstrated. Printed templates replace clean room and photolithographic fabrication resources and deliver resolutions of 50 mu m, and up to 10 mu m in localized hindrances, whereas the templates are smooth enough to allow direct transfer and proper sealing to glass substrates. 3D printed templates accommodate multiple thicknesses, from 50 mu m up to several mm within the same template, with no additional processing cost or effort. This capability is exploited to integrate silicone tubing easily, to improve micromixer performance and to produce multilevel fluidics with simple access to independent functional surfaces, which is illustrated by time-resolved glucose detection. The templates are reusable, can be fabricated in under 20 min, with an average cost of 0.48 US$, which promotes broader access to established LOC configurations with minimal fabrication requirements, relieves LOC fabrication from design skills and provides a versatile LOC development platform.

  • 6.
    Comina, German
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Not Found:Linkoping Univ, Opt Devices Lab, Dept Phys Chem and Biol IFM, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing2016In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 77, p. 1153-1167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 7.
    Filippini, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Customized illumination strategies in computer screen photo-assisted experiments2005Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Poster Konferens Eurosensors XIX, Barcelona, Spanien

  • 8.
    Filippini, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Natural nanosystems2007In: International Symposium on Biomolecular Nanoscale Assemblies,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Garvin, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    SALIVARY ALPHA-AMYLASE IN A POPULATION BASED SAMPLE. ASSOCIATIONS WITH PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, SELF RATED HEALTH AND INFLAMMATORY MARKERS2010In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 17, no 1 Supplement, p. S181-S181Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In recent years, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has beenproposed as a reliable proxy for sympathetic activity. This study aimed at testing the association between sAA to a broad range of psychosocial factors, self rated health, cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory markers in a normal population sample.

    Methods: 30 participants, all men between 50 and 54 years old, were randomly selected from a normal population based study. Saliva samples were collected at awakening, 30 minutes after awakening and just before going to bed. sAA was measured by a calorimetric method using Phadebas amylase test. Linear regression models were used to test associations between sAA levels and a broad spectrum of psychosocial factors (e.g. depressive symptamology, vital exhaustion, mastery and sense of coherence) self rated health and inflammatory markers (e.g. C-reactive protein). Adjustments were made for physical exercise, smoking, blood  lipids and  time point  when  sample was collected.

    Results: sAA levels at awakening were positively associated with depressive symptamology (p = 0.046), vital exhaustion (p = 0.025) and negatively associated with sense of coherence (p = 0.034). It was further associated positively associated with levels of C-reactive protein (p = 0.024)  and  negatively associated with  self  reported general health (p = 0.010). Samples taken just before going to bed were showing similar results, whereas samples taken 30 minutes after awakening only showed a few significant associations.

    Conclusions: The associations found give further support for the use of salivary alpha amylase as a psychoneuroendocrinological bio- marker. Assessment just after awakening or just before going to bed seems to be more reliable than samples 30 minutes after awakening.

  • 10.
    Petoral, Rodrigo M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Klasson, Anna
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fortin, Marc-André
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Abrikossova, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Selegard, Linnea
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engström, Maria
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Synthesis and Characterization of Tb3+-Doped Gd2O3 Nanocrystals: A Bifunctional Material with Combined Fluorescent Labeling and MRI Contrast Agent Properties2009In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 113, no 17, p. 6913-6920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasmall gadolinium oxide nanoparticles doped with terbium ions were synthesized by the polyol route and characterized as a potentially bifunctional material with both fluorescent and magnetic contrast agent properties. The structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the organic-acid-capped and PEGylated Gd2O3:Tb3+ nanocrystals were studied by HR-TEM, XPS, EDX, IR, PL, and SQUID. The luminescent/fluorescent property of the particles is attributable to the Tb3+ ion located on the crystal lattice of the Gd2O3 host. The paramagnetic behavior of the particles is discussed. Pilot studies investigating the capability of the nanoparticles for fluorescent labeling of living cells and as a MRI contrast agent were also performed. Cells of two cell lines (THP-1 cells and fibroblasts) were incubated with the particles, and intracellular particle distribution was visualized by confocal microscopy. The MRI relaxivity of the PEGylated nanoparticles in water at low Gd concentration was assessed showing a higher T-1 relaxation rate compared to conventional Gd-DTPA chelates and comparable to that of undoped Gd2O3 nanoparticles.

  • 11.
    Preechaburana, P.
    et al.
    Thammasat University, Prathum-Thani, Thailand.
    Macken, Stephen
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    HDR imaging evaluation of a NT-proBNP test with a mobile phone.2011In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 2107-2113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The determination of NT-proBNP levels is key for the monitoring of patients with diagnosed heart failure and it is a routine measurement typically performed at health care centers, which would benefit from decentralized alternatives. Here we investigate the quantitative evaluation of a well-established NT-proBNP test using a standard mobile phone (Nokia 6720) as measuring platform rather than a dedicated instrument. A Java ME software developed for this application controls the illumination and imaging of the proBNP test under defined time intervals, which enables the composition of multi-exposure sets that are processed as high dynamic range (HDR) images for contrast enhancement. The results show that HDR processing significantly increases the sensitivity and resolution of the technique achieving a performance within the diagnostics range. These results demonstrate the feasibility to exploit a ubiquitous device to decentralize the evaluation of a routine test and identify key processing alternatives to bring the performance of such systems within the diagnostics range.

  • 12.
    Preechaburana, Pakorn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gonzalez, Marcos
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Surface Plasmon Resonance Chemical Sensing on Cell Phones2012In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 51, no 46, p. 11585-11588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemosensing based on angle-resolved surface plasmon resonance is demonstrated on intact cell phones using a disposable optical coupler and software to configure illumination and acquisition. This coupler operates on different cell phones and is applied for classical affinity assays with commercial chips and custom-made tests with embedded calibration. Measured performance (2.14x10−6 refractive index units) is comparable with compact SPR systems.

  • 13.
    Preechaburana, Pakorn
    et al.
    Thammasat University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemical and Optical Sensor Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Biosensing with cell phones2014In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 351-355Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued progress in cell-phone devices has made them powerful mobile computers, equipped with sophisticated, permanent physical sensors embedded as the default configuration. By contrast, the incorporation of permanent biosensors in cell-phone units has been prevented by the multivocal nature of the stimuli and the reactions involved in biosensing and chemical sensing. Biosensing with cell phones entails the complementation of biosensing devices with the physical sensors and communication and processing capabilities of modern cell phones. Biosensing, chemical-sensing, environmental-sensing, and diagnostic capabilities would thus be supported and run on the residual capacity of existing cell-phone infrastructure. The technologies necessary to materialize such a scenario have emerged in different fields and applications. This article addresses the progress on cell-phone biosensing, the specific compromises, and the blend of technologies required to craft biosensing on cell phones.

  • 14.
    Preechaburana, Pakorn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Embedded Adaptive Optics for Ubiquitous Lab-on-a-Chip Readout on Intact Cell Phones2012In: Sensors, ISSN 1424-8220, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 8586-8600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The evaluation of disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices on cell phones is an attractive alternative to migrate the analytical strength of LOC solutions to decentralized sensing applications. Imaging the micrometric detection areas of LOCs in contact with intact phone cameras is central to provide such capability. This work demonstrates a disposable and morphing liquid lens concept that can be integrated in LOC devices and refocuses micrometric features in the range necessary for LOC evaluation using diverse cell phone cameras. During natural evaporation, the lens focus varies adapting to different type of cameras. Standard software in the phone commands a time-lapse acquisition for best focal selection that is sufficient to capture and resolve, under ambient illumination, 50 mu m features in regions larger than 500 x 500 mu m(2). In this way, the present concept introduces a generic solution compatible with the use of diverse and unmodified cell phone cameras to evaluate disposable LOC devices.

  • 15.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Salivary Alpha-Amylase Activity, a New Biomarker in Heart Failure?2012In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Cardiology, ISSN 2155-9880, Vol. S2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary α-amylase activity is an increasingly investigated biomarker for the activation of the autonomic nervous system. Autonomic imbalance is associated to several diseases, one of which is heart failure, and the aim of the present study was to test if salivary α-amylase activity might be a new biomarker in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Methods: In this pilot study, 48 elderly men (range 59-89 years), 24 patients with established chronic heart failure in NYHA class I to III, and 24 controls were included. In all participants, saliva was collected for three consecutive days at three time points (at awakening, 30 minutes later and in the late afternoon), and blood was sampled for analysis of NT-proBNP.

    Results: Within the whole group of participants, a statistically significant positive correlation between morning salivary α-amylase activity levels and serum NT-proBNP could be found, which was strongest for the measurement taken 30 minutes after awakening, as well as a significant negative correlation of awakening α-amylase activity levels with arterial blood pressure.

    Within the control group separately, higher daily salivary α-amylase activity output correlated with increasing levels of NT-proBNP, while within the patients, the strongest association of α-amylase activity measures were found to be a negative correlation with blood pressure.

    Conclusions: Our data supports the idea that sAA activity has the potential as a non-invasive index of adrenergic activity in specific pathological conditions, though for heart failure in particular the results were merely modest, which was likely due to the specific intake of beta-receptor blocking drugs by all patients. Due to the large variability of sAA activity levels, we expect a greater potential for monitoring its changes over time, which could prove a valuable surrogate biomarker for cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure.

  • 16.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Belen Ibanez, Ana
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berghard, Anna
    Umea University, Department Mol Biol, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden .
    G protein-coupled receptor mediated trimethylamine sensing2009In: BIOSENSORS and BIOELECTRONICS, ISSN 0956-5663, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 715-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new approach for the detection of trimethylamine (TMA) using a recombinant cell line of Xenopus laevis melanophores was developed. The cells were genetically modified to express the mouse trace amine-associated receptor 5 (mTAAR5), a G protein-coupled receptor from the mouse olfactory epithelium, which conferred high sensitivity to TMA. Cellular responses to TMA were analyzed by two different techniques, either by absorbance measurements using a microplate reader or by cellular imaging via an inverted microscope. A focused chemical screen allowed the discovery of additional, previously unknown stimuli of mTAAR5. The developed cell-based sensor demonstrated no sensitivity to trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), making it suitable for a straightforward evaluation of TMA levels in fish tissue extracts. For the detection of TMA vapor, the cells were covered with agarose, which allowed for intact cell viability for at least 6 h in air. The developed gas measurement platform was able to detect TMA from I to 100 ppm within 35 min.

  • 17.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Belen Ibanez, Ana
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Preechaburana, Pakorn
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berghard, Anna
    Umeå University.
    G protein-coupled receptor mediated sensing of TMA2009In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE EUROSENSORS XXIII CONFERENCE, ISSN 1876-6196, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 321-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new approach for the detection of trimethylamine (TMA) using recombinant Xenopus laevis melanophores was developed. The cells were genetically modified to express the mouse trace amine-associated receptor 5 (mTAAR5), a G protein-coupled receptor from the olfactory epithelium, which conferred high sensitivity to TMA. A focused chemical screen allowed the discovery of additional, previously unknown stimuli of mTAAR5. The cell-based sensor demonstrated no sensitivity to trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), making it suitable for a convenient evaluation of TMA levels in fish tissue extracts. The developed gas measurement platform was able to detect TMA from 1 to 100 ppm within thirty-five minutes.

  • 18.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Anderson, Tony
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Generation of biochemical response patterns of different substances using a whole cell assay with multiple signaling pathways2005In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 21, p. 727-734Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Ibanez, Ana Belen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Addressing variability in a Xenopus laevis melanophore cell line2008In: Assay and drug development technologies, ISSN 1540-658X, E-ISSN 1557-8127, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 569-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xenopus laevis melanophores can be used in high-throughput screens for guanine nucleotide binding protein coupled receptor ligands and have potential as biosensors. Inherent in this immortal cell line is a substantial variability, which macroscopic evaluations disregard. Here we demonstrate a systematic way to incorporate this natural variability in the evaluations. Clusters of similar cells from a sparsely seeded cell culture are examined by imaging changes in cell appearance, pigment motility, and cumulative displacements. The time evolution of the image intensity distributions of clusters upon a pigment-dispersing stimulus is used as a signature of the cell clusters, and their behaviors are classified by multivariate analysis. Conventional image subtraction procedures are used to highlight cumulative and transitory changes in the pigment dynamics, enabling characterization of multiple aspects of the cell response from a single experiment. Additionally, a simple way to accomplish standard optical density changes at the single-cell group level is shown. The present results also provide evidence that natural cell variability arising from a cell culture can enrich the diversity of responses from pigment-containing cells assays and underscore that in conventional macroscopic evaluations these aspects are overlooked and can lead to spurious results. © 2008 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  • 20.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Malik, Muhammad Ali
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Filippini, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    Flexible cell patterning using magnetic nano-chaperons2007In: ISOEN 2007,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Suska, Anke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Miguel-Aliaga, Irene
    University of Cambridge.
    Thor, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Developmental Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Segment-specific generation of Drosophila Capability neuropeptide neurons by multi-faceted Hox cues2011In: DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, ISSN 0012-1606, Vol. 353, no 1, p. 72-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Drosophila ventral nerve cord, the three pairs of Capability neuropeptide-expressing Va neurons are exclusively found in the second, third and fourth abdominal segments (A2-A4). To address the underlying mechanisms behind such segment-specific cell specification, we followed the developmental specification of these neurons. We find that Va neurons are initially generated in all ventral nerve cord segments and progress along a common differentiation path. However, their terminal differentiation only manifests itself in A2-A4, due to two distinct mechanisms: segment-specific programmed cell death (PCD) in posterior segments, and differentiation to an alternative identity in segments anterior to A2. Genetic analyses reveal that the Hox homeotic genes are involved in the segment-specific appearance of Va neurons. In posterior segments, the Hox gene Abdominal-B exerts a pro-apoptotic role on Va neurons, which involves the function of several RHG genes. Strikingly, this role of Abd-B is completely opposite to its role in the segment-specific apoptosis of other classes of neuropeptide neurons, the dMP2 and MP1 neurons, where Abd-B acts in an anti-apoptotic manner. In segments A2-A4 we find that abdominal A is important for the terminal differentiation of Va cell fate. In the A1 segment, Ultrabithorax acts to specify an alternate Va neuron fate. In contrast, in thoracic segments, Antennapedia suppresses the Va cell fate. Thus. Hox genes act in a multi-faceted manner to control the segment-specific appearance of the Va neuropeptide neurons in the ventral nerve cord.

  • 22.
    Zhang, Xuanjun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ali Ballem, Mohamed
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ahrén, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Suska, Anke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bergman, Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Surface Physics and Nano Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nanoscale Ln(III)-carboxylate coordination polymers (Ln = Gd, Eu, Yb): temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and light harvesting2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 30, p. 10391-10397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the self-assembly of stable nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs), which exhibit temperature-controlled guest encapsulation and release, as well as an efficient light-harvesting property. NCPs are obtained by coordination-directed organization of pi-conjugated dicarboxylate (L1) and lanthanide metal ions Gd(III), Eu(III), and Yb(III) in a DMF system. Guest molecules trans-4-styryl-1-methylpyridiniumiodide (D1) and methylene blue (D2) can be encapsulated into NCPs, and the loading amounts can be controlled by changing reaction temperatures. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD) results reveal that the self-assembled discus-like NCPs exhibit long-range ordered structures, which remain unchanged after guest encapsulations. Experimental results reveal that the negatively charged local environment around the metal connector is the driving force for the encapsulation of cationic guests. The D1 molecules encapsulated in NCPs at 140 degrees C can be released gradually at room temperature in DMF. Guest-loaded NCPs exhibit efficient light harvesting with energy transfer from the framework to the guest D1 molecule, which is studied by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime decays. This coordination-directed encapsulation approach is general and should be extended to the fabrication of a wide range of multifunctional nanomaterials.

1 - 22 of 22
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