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  • 1.
    Appelqvist, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linderoth, Emma
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antonsson, Bruno
    Geneva Research Centre, Switzerland .
    Steinfeld, Robert
    University of Medical Centre Gottingen, Germany .
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosome-Mediated Apoptosis is Associated with Cathepsin D-Specific Processing of Bid at Phe24,Trp48, and Phe1832012In: Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science, ISSN 0091-7370, E-ISSN 1550-8080, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 231-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bax-mediated permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane and release of apoptogenic factors into the cytosol are key events that occur during apoptosis. Likewise, apoptosis is associated with permeabilization of the lysosomal membrane and release of lysosomal cathepsins into the cytosol. This report identifies proteolytically active cathepsin D as an important component of apoptotic signaling following lysosomal membrane permeabilization in fibroblasts. Lysosome-mediated cell death is associated with degradation of Bax sequestering 14-3-3 proteins, cleavage of the Box activator Bid, and translocation of Box to mitochondria, all of which were cathepsin D-dependent. Processing of Bid could be reproduced by enforced lysosomal membrane permeabilization, using the lysosomotropic detergent O-methyl-serine dodecylamine hydrochloride (MSDH). We identified three cathepsin D-specific cleavage sites in Bid, Phe24, Trp48, and Phe183. Cathepsin D-cleaved Bid induced Bax-mediated release of cytochrome c from purified mitochondria, indicating that the fragments generated are functionally active. Moreover, apoptosis was associated with cytosolic acidification, thereby providing a more favorable environment for the cathepsin D-mediated cleavage of Bid. Our study suggests that cytosolic cathepsin D triggers Bax-mediated cytochrome c release by proteolytic activation of Bid.

  • 2.
    Havarinasab, Said
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Pollard, KM
    Hultman, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Gold causes genetically determined autoimmune and immunostimulatory responses in mice2007In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 150, no 1, p. 179-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natrium aurothiomaleate (GSTM) is a useful disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, but causes a variety of immune-mediated adverse effects in many patients. A murine model was used to study further the interaction of GSTM with the immune system, including induction of systemic autoimmunity. Mice were given weekly intramuscular injections of GSTM and controls equimolar amounts of sodium thiomaleate. The effects of gold on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry. Humoral autoimmunity was measured by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and deposition of immunoglobulin and C3 used to assess immunopathology. Gold, in the form of GSTM, stimulated the murine immune system causing strain-dependent lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, including a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted autoantibody response against the nucleolar protein fibrillarin. GSTM did not cause glomerular or vessel wall IgG deposits. However, it did elicit a strong B cell-stimulating effect, including both T helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-dependent isotypes. All these effects on the immune system were dependent on the MHC genotype, emphasizing the clinical observations of a strong genetic linkage for the major adverse immune reactions seen with GSTM treatment. © 2007 British Society for Immunology.

  • 3.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mild, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Antonsson, Bruno
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Cathepsin D-mediated processing of Bid at Phe24, Trp48, and Phe1832008In: International Journal of Experimental PathologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heimlich, Gerd
    Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wang, Nancy S.
    Department of Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
    Jürgensmeier, Juliane M.
    Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization during apoptosis: Involvement of Bax?2005In: International journal of experimental pathology (Print), ISSN 0959-9673, E-ISSN 1365-2613, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 309-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bcl-2 family members have long been known to control permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane during apoptosis, but involvement of these proteins in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) was not considered until recently. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the release of lysosomal proteases to the cytosol seen during apoptosis, with special emphasis on the role of Bax. In human fibroblasts, exposed to the apoptosis-inducing drug staurosporine (STS), the release of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D to the cytosol was observed by immunocytochemistry. In response to STS treatment, there was a shift in Bax immunostaining from a diffuse to a punctate pattern. Confocal microscopy showed co-localization of Bax with both lysosomes and mitochondria in dying cells. Presence of Bax at the lysosomal membrane was confirmed by immuno-electron microscopy. Furthermore, when recombinant Bax was incubated with pure lysosomal fractions, Bax inserted into the lysosomal membrane and induced the release of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, we suggest that Bax is a mediator of LMP, possibly promoting the release of lysosomal enzymes to the cytosol during apoptosis.

  • 5.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress2001In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1592-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

  • 6.
    Larsson (Wäster), Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ultraviolet A and B affect human melanocytes and keratinocytes differently. A study of oxidative alterations and apoptosis2005In: Experimental Dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an etiologic agent for malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer, but the spectral range responsible for tumor induction is still to be elucidated. In this study, we compared effects of UVA and UVB irradiation on normal human melanocytes (MCs) and keratinocytes (KCs) in vitro. We demonstrate that UVA irradiation induces immediate loss of reduced glutathione (GSH) in both MCs and KCs. Exposure to UVA also causes reduced plasma membrane stability, in both cell types, as estimated by fluorescein diacetate retention and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we noted reduction in proliferation and higher apoptosis frequency 24 h after UVA irradiation. UVB irradiation of KCs caused instant reduction of reduced GSH and impaired plasma membrane stability. We also found decline in proliferation and increased apoptosis after 24 h. In MCs, on the other hand, UVB had no effect on GSH level or plasma membrane stability, although increased apoptotic cell death and reduced proliferation was detected. In summary, MCs and KCs showed similar response towards UVA, while UVB had more pronounced effects on KCs as compared to MCs. These results might have implications for the induction of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

  • 7.
    Lundqvist, Helen
    et al.
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine Linköping University.
    Dånmark, Staffan
    Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion Linköping University.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology .
    Gustafsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics .
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Evaluation of electron spin resonance for studies of superoxide anion production by human neutrophils interacting with Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.2008In: Journal of Biochemical and Biophysical Methods, ISSN 0165-022X, E-ISSN 1872-857X, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 1059-1065Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study evaluates electron spin resonance (ESR) and the spin trapper 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) for analysis of superoxide radical production by human neutrophils interacting with viable Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria. To avoid auto-activation due to interaction with glass surfaces, neutrophils were preincubated in plastic tubes until the peak response was reached, and then transferred to a quartz flat cell to record the ESR spectra. The time point for peak response was identified by parallel analysis of the bacteria-neutrophil interaction using luminol amplified chemiluminescence. We found detectable ESR spectra from neutrophils interacting with as few as five bacteria of the weak activating S. epidermidis per neutrophil. Addition of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium totally abolished spectra. Catalase, DMSO or an iron chelator had no impact on the produced spectra and ionomycin, a selective activator of intracellular NADPH oxidase, gave significant ESR spectra. Taken together, our results indicate that DEPMPO is cell permeable and detects NADPH oxidase derived superoxide anions formed in phagosomes or released by human neutrophils phagocytosing viable S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The technique may be used as a sensitive tool to evaluate superoxide anion production in human neutrophils.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ann-Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cytosolic acidification and lysosomal alkalinization during TNF-α induced apoptosis in U937 cells2006In: Apoptosis (London), ISSN 1360-8185, E-ISSN 1573-675X, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 1149-1159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptosis is often associated with acidification of the cytosol and since loss of lysosomal proton gradient and release of lysosomal content are early events during apoptosis, we investigated if the lysosomal compartment could contribute to cytosolic acidification. After exposure of U937 cells to tumor necrosis factor-α, three populations; healthy, pre-apoptotic, and apoptotic cells, were identified by flow cytometry. These populations were investigated regarding intra-cellular pH and apoptosis-associated events. There was a drop in cytosolic pH from 7.2 ± 0.1 in healthy cells to 6.8 ± 0.1 in pre-apoptotic, caspase-negative cells. In apoptotic, caspase-positive cells, the pH was further decreased to 5.7 ± 0.04. The cytosolic acidification was not affected by addition of specific inhibitors towards caspases or the mitochondrial F0F1-ATPase. In parallel to the cytosolic acidification, a rise in lysosomal pH from 4.3 ± 0.3, in the healthy population, to 4.8 ± 0.3 and 5.5 ± 0.3 in the pre-apoptotic- and apoptotic populations, respectively, was detected. In addition, lysosomal membrane permeability increased as detected as release of cathepsin D from lysosomes to the cytosol in pre-apoptotic and apoptotic cells. We, thus, suggest that lysosomal proton release is the cause of the cytosolic acidification of U937 cells exposed to TNF-α.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Cathrine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kågedal, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Analysis of cytosolic and lysosomal pH in apoptotic cells by flow cytometry2004In: Methods in Cell Science, ISSN 1381-5741, Vol. 25, no 3-4, p. 185-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several reports indicate that the cytosol is acidified during apoptosis although the mechanism is not yet fully elucidated. The most acidic organelle found in the cell is the lysosome, raising the possibility that lysosomal proton release may contribute to the cytosolic acidification. We here describe methods for measurement of the cytosolic and lysosomal pH in U937 cells by a dual-emission ratiometric technique suitable for flow cytometry. Cytosolic pH was analysed in cells loaded with the fluorescent probe BCECF, while lysosomal pH was determined after endocytosis of FITC-dextran. Standard curves were obtained by incubating cells in buffers with different pH in the presence of the proton ionophore nigericin. Apoptosis was induced by exposure of cells to 10ng/ml TNF- for 4h, and apoptotic cells were identified using a fluorescent marker for active caspases. By gating of control and apoptotic cells, the cytosolic and lysosomal pH were calculated in each population. The cytosolic pH was found to decrease from 7.2 ± 0.1 to 5.8s±0.1 and the lysosomal increased from 4.3±0.4 to 5.2±0.3. These methods will be useful in future attempts to evaluate the involvement of lysosomes in the acidification of the cytosol during apoptosis.

  • 10.
    Roberg, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lysosomal release of Cathepsin D precedes relocation of Cytochrome C and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential during apoptosis induced by oxidative stress1999In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1228-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apoptosis was induced in human foreskin fibroblasts by the redox-cycling quinone naphthazarin (5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone). Most of the cells displayed ultrastructure typical of apoptosis after 8 h of exposure to naphthazarin. Apoptosis was inhibited in fibroblasts pretreated with the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A. Immunofluorescence analysis of the intracellular distribution of cathepsin D revealed a distinct granular pattern in control cells, whereas cells treated with naphthazarin for 30 min exhibited more diffuse staining that corresponded to release of the enzyme from lysosomes to the cytosol. After 2 h, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol was indicated by immunofluorescence. The membrane-potential–sensitive probe JC-1 and flow cytometry did not detect a permanent decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) until after 5 h of naphthazarin treatment. Our findings show that, during naphthazarin-induced apoptosis, lysosomal destabilization (measured as release of cathepsin D) precedes release of cytochrome c, loss of ΔΨm, and morphologic alterations. Moreover, apoptosis could be inhibited by pretreatment with pepstatin A.

  • 11.
    Stroikin, Yuri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asplund, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased resistance of lipofuscin-loaded prematurely senescent fibroblasts to starvation-induced programmed cell death2007In: Biogerontology (Dordrecht), ISSN 1389-5729, E-ISSN 1573-6768, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations of cellular structures often found in ageing cells is mainly the result of production of reactive oxygen species and a consequence of aerobic life. Both oxidative stress and decreased degradative capacity of lysosomal system cause accumulation of intralysosomal age-related pigment called lipofuscin. To investigate the influence of lipofuscin on cell function, we compared survival of lipofuscin-loaded and control human fibroblasts following complete starvation induced by exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Starving of control fibroblasts resulted in lysosomal alkalinisation, relocation of cathepsin D to the cytosol, caspase-3 activation and, finally, cell death, which became evident 72 h after the start of exposure to PBS. Increase of lysosomal pH was significantly less prominent in lipofuscin-loaded cells than in controls and was accompanied neither by leakage of cathepsin D nor by caspase-3 activation even 96 h after the initiation of starvation. Suppression of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) accelerated cell death, while inhibition of cathepsin D delayed it, implying an important role of autophagy in cell survival during starvation and showing the involvement of lysosomes in starvation-induced cell death. Disturbed apoptotic response found in lipofuscin-loaded cells can be interpreted as an example of hormesis—an adaptation to low doses of otherwise harmful agents, in this case of lipofuscin, which has a protective effect at moderate amounts but becomes toxic at large quantities.

  • 12.
    Stroikin, Yuri
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mild, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Uno
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Lysosome-targeted stress reveals increased stability of lipofuscin-containing lysosomes2008In: Age (Omaha), ISSN 0161-9152, E-ISSN 1574-4647, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellular ageing is associated with accumulation of undegradable intralysosomal material, called lipofuscin. In order to accelerate the lipofuscin-accumulation, confluent, growth arrested human fibroblasts were cultured under hyperoxic conditions. To provide a better insight into the effects of lipofuscin on cellular functions, we compared lysosomal stability in control and lipofuscin-loaded human fibroblasts under conditions of lysosome-targeted stress induced by exposure to either the lysosomotropic detergent MSDH or the redox-cycling quinone naphthazarin. We show that lysosomal damage, assessed by acridine-orange relocation, translocation of cathepsin D to the cytosol, and alkalinization of lysosomes is more pronounced in control than in lipofuscin-loaded fibroblasts. Finding that lysosomal integrity was less affected or even preserved in case of lipofuscin-loaded cells enables us to suggest that lipofuscin exerts lysosome-stabilizing properties.

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