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  • 1.
    Alwin, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    ResearchTriangle Institute (RTI) Health Solutions, Lund.
    Could the choice of patient versus proxy ratings for assessing quality of life in dementia affect resource allocation in health care?2012In: Farmeconomia: Health economics and therapeutic pathways, ISSN 1721-6915, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the choice of patient versus proxy ratings of patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in dementia, for use in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), could potentially affect resource allocation in health care.

    METHODS:A model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) based on cognitive ability was used to assess the consequences of using HRQoL ratings from either patients themselves or proxies if a new treatment was to be introduced. The model was based on previously published data on costs related to AD stages as well as HRQoL ratings from AD patients and from their caregivers as proxy raters.

    RESULTS:The results show that there can be large differences in the results of the CEAs depending on whether the ratings of patients’ HRQoL were made by the patients themselves or by the proxy. When patient self-ratings of HRQoL were used, the cost/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained was much higher as compared to the scenario when proxy ratings were used for the same analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: The choice of patient self-ratings compared to proxy ratings of patients’ HRQoL can have a substantial effect on the results of CEAs. These differences in results may have an important impact on decision making and, ultimately, on resource allocation. In order to critically appraise the results of CEA studies in dementia we advise that both patient and proxy ratings are used in the CEA. To decide on methodology it is of great importance that focus is directed towards determining the most valid way to measure HRQoL in AD.

  • 2.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    DESCRIBING AND COMPARING HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE DERIVED FROM EQ-5D AND SF-6D IN A SWEDISH GENERAL POPULATION in VALUE IN HEALTH, vol 13, issue 7, pp A240-A2402010In: VALUE IN HEALTH, Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2010, Vol. 13, no 7, p. A240-A240Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Bartha, Erzsebet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, CLINTEC, Div of Anaesthesiology.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalman, Sigridur
    Karolinska Institute, CLINTEC, Div of Anasthesiology.
    Optimization of circulation by fluid treatment of elderly patients with hip fracture (oral presentation): Cost-effectiveness and value of information analysis2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Brodtkorb, Thor- Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Kogler, Géza F.
    Dept of Rehabilitation School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Arndt, Anton
    Karolinska Institute.
    The influence of metatarsal support height and longitudinal axis position on plantar foot loading2008In: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 640-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 5.
    Brodtkorb, Thor- Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Center for Medical Technology Assessment.
    Decision Modeling for Cost-Effectiveness When Introducing New Technologies - the Case of Positron Emission Tomography2006In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering,2006, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cost-effectiveness analysis of health technologies when evidence is scarce2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the increasing pressures on health care budgets, economic evaluation is used in many countries to assist decision-making regarding the optimal use of competing health care technologies. Although the standard methods of estimating cost-effectiveness underpinning these decisions have gained widespread acceptance, concerns have been raised that many technologies would not be considered for funding, due to scarcity of evidence. However, as long as the amount and quality of evidence used for the analysis are properly characterized, scarce evidence per se should not be seen as a hindrance to perform cost-effectiveness analyses. Characterizing uncertainty appropriately, though, may pose a challenge even when there is a large body of evidence available, and even more so when evidence is scarce. The aims of this thesis are to apply a methodological framework of cost-effectiveness analysis and explore methods for characterising uncertainty when evidence is scarce. Three case studies associated with limited evidence provide economic evaluations on current decision problems, investigate the feasibility of using the framework, and explore methods for characterizing uncertainty when evidence is scarce.

    The results of the case studies showed that, given current information, providing transfemoral amputees with C-Leg and Airsonett Airshower to patients with perennial allergic asthma could be considered cost-effective whereas screening for hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy among young athletes is unlikely to be cost-effective. In the cases of C-Leg and Airsonett Airshower conducting further research is likely to be cost-effective. The case studies indicate that it is feasible to apply methods of cost-effectiveness in health care for technologies not commonly evaluated due to lack of evidence. The analysis showed that failing to account for individual experts’ might have a substantial effect on the interpretation of the results of cost-effectiveness analysis. Formal expert elicitation is a promising method of characterizing uncertainty when evidence is missing, and thus enable cost-effectiveness and value of further research to be appropriately estimated in such situations.

    In conclusion, this thesis shows that scarcity of evidence should not preclude the use of cost-effectiveness analysis. On the contrary, in such cases it is probably more important than ever to use a framework that enable us to define key parameters for a decision problem and identify available evidence in order to determine cost-effectiveness given current information and provide guidance on further data collection.

    List of papers
    1. Cost-effectiveness of clean air administered to the breathing zone in allergic asthma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness of clean air administered to the breathing zone in allergic asthma
    2010 (English)In: CLINICAL RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, ISSN 1752-6981, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Airsonett Airshower (AA) is a novel non-pharmaceutical treatment for patients with perennial allergic asthma that uses a laminar airflow directed to the breathing zone of patients during sleep. It has been shown that AA treatment in addition to optimized standard therapy significantly increases asthma-related quality of life among adolescent asthmatics. However, the cost-effectiveness of AA treatment has not yet been assessed. As reimbursement decisions are increasingly guided by results from the cost-effectiveness analysis, such information is valuable for health-care policy-makers. Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of adding AA treatment with allergen-free air during night sleep to optimized standard therapy for adolescents with perennial allergic asthma compared with placebo. Materials and Methods: A probabilistic Markov model was developed to estimate costs and health outcomes over a 5-year period. Costs and effects are presented from a Swedish health-care perspective (QALYs). The main outcome of interest was cost per QALY gained. Results: The Airshower strategy resulted in a mean gain of 0.25 QALYs per patient, thus yielding a cost per QALY gained of under 35 000 as long as the cost of Airshower is below 8200. Conclusions: Adding AA treatment to optimized standard therapy for adolescents with perennial allergic asthma compared with placebo is generating additional QALYs at a reasonable cost. However, further studies taking more detailed resource use and events such as exacerbations into account would be needed to fully evaluate the cost-effectiveness of AA treatment. Please cite this paper as: Brodtkorb T-H, Zetterstrom O and Tinghog G. Cost-effectiveness of clean air administered to the breathing zone in allergic asthma.

    Keywords
    asthma, cost-effectiveness, decision modeling, quality of life
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54712 (URN)10.1111/j.1752-699X.2009.00156.x (DOI)000275766600007 ()
    Available from: 2010-04-06 Created: 2010-04-06 Last updated: 2015-09-22
    2. Cost-effectiveness of C-Leg compared to non microprocessor controlled knees: a modeling approach
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness of C-Leg compared to non microprocessor controlled knees: a modeling approach
    2008 (English)In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the costs and health outcomes of C-Leg and non–microprocessor-controlled (NMC) knees using a decision-analytic model.

    Design: Data on costs, rates and duration of problems, knee survival, and health-related quality of life were obtained from interviews with patients and prosthetists with experience of both C-Leg and NMC knees. Interview data were assessed in a decision-analytic Markov model to estimate cost-effectiveness from a health care perspective.

    Setting: Outpatient.

    Participants: A population sample of 20 patients currently using the C-Leg and prior experience of nonmicroprocessor knees, and 5 prosthetists.

    Interventions: Not applicable.

    Main Outcome Measure: Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY).

    Results: The mean incremental cost (in 2006 Euros) and QALYs for the C-Leg was €7657 and 2.38, respectively, yielding a cost per QALY gained of €3218.

    Conclusions: It is important to provide decision-makers with relevant information on costs and health outcomes of different treatment strategies on actual decision problems despite limited evidence. The results of the study, taking into account both costs and a broadly defined health outcome in terms of QALY, show that given existing albeit limited evidence the C-Leg appears to yield positive health outcomes at an acceptable cost.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, 2008
    Keywords
    Artificial limbs, Costs and cost analysis, Decision support techniques, Quality of life, Rehabilitation
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11142 (URN)10.1016/j.apmr.2007.07.049 (DOI)
    Note
    Original publication: Thor-Henrik Brodtkorb, Martin Henriksson, Kasper Johannesen-Munk, Fredrik Thidell, Cost-effectiveness of C-Leg compared to non microprocessor controlled knees: a modelling approach, 2008, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, (89), 1, 24-30. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2007.07.049. Copyright: Elsevier B.V., http://www.elsevier.com/Available from: 2008-02-27 Created: 2008-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    3. Eliciting priors to characterize uncertainties in decision analytic models
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eliciting priors to characterize uncertainties in decision analytic models
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Expert opinions are often used in decision models when evidence is scarce. This study describes the details of a formal elicitation exercise to estimate parameter values and their associated uncertainty and compares the results in term of cost-effectiveness and value of information with results from only eliciting mean values from experts.

    Methods: Elicited distributions for 11 unknown parameters where incorporated into a previously developed cost-effectiveness model for prosthetic knees for amputees. The original model included elicited mean values for the missing values, thus ignoring any uncertainty across experts’ beliefs.

    Results: The incremental cost-effective ratio (ICER) for the analysis based on the current elicited distributions was substantially higher (€13 625) than the ICER in the original analysis (€3 258). Even decision uncertainty, at a €35 000 threshold, increased significantly, increasing the value of further research from €355 100 in the original analysis, to €5 987 444 for the current elicited values.

    Conclusions: Failing to account for the individual expert’s uncertainty might have a considerable impact on the result of cost-effectiveness analyses. Formal expert elicitation offers a plausible method to generate prior distributions representing the experts’ uncertainty and thereby more appropriately account for the true uncertainty of the decision.

    National Category
    Economics and Business
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56593 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-05-26 Created: 2010-05-26 Last updated: 2010-05-26
    4. Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young athletes: A cost-effectiveness analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young athletes: A cost-effectiveness analysis
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening to prevent sudden cardiac death among young athletes has been debated for some time and several countries have already introduced pre-participation cardiovascular screening to identify sports active individuals at risk. Although, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common underlying disease that is documented to be detectable by screening the cost-effectiveness of such a screening strategy is still unclear.

    Methods: A screening program to detect HCM in young athletes was compared to a non screening strategy. Prevalence of HCM, mortality risks and test characteristics were estimated from published sources and formal expert elicitation. These estimates were incorporated in a decision analytic model to estimate costs and health outcomes, expressed in life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs), over a lifetime perspective.

    Results: The screening strategy was associated with a mean incremental cost of €93 and a mean incremental gain of 0.0005 life years, yielding a cost per life year gained of €196 205. Taking quality of life into account, the screening strategy was associated with a loss of 0.034 QALY.

    Conclusions: The study shows that screening young athletes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not likely to yield survival benefits at a cost normally considered to be cost-effective and if quality of life is considered in the analysis screening is associated with higher costs and a loss of QALYs. Thus, based on the present findings a strategy of screening young athletes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is unlikely to be cost effective.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56594 (URN)
    Available from: 2010-05-26 Created: 2010-05-26 Last updated: 2010-05-26Bibliographically approved
  • 7.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heintz, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i hälso- och sjukvården: Erfarenheter från andra länder2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att redovisa förutsättningar för en nationell kommitté eller motsvarande för utvärdering och prioritering vid beslut avseende införande av andra sjukvårdsteknologier än läkemedel i hälso- och sjukvården samt att presentera för- och nackdelar med olika lösningar.

    Huvuddelen av underlaget till studien kommer från intervjuer med ett flertal internationella aktörer - för att fånga ett brett faktaunderlag om hur andra länder har agerat i frågan. De länder som har ingått i studien är Australien, England, Kanada, Nederländerna, Norge, Nya Zeeland och Spanien. Utöver intervjuer med nyckelpersoner i respektive land har vi genomfört två workshops med representanter från Nationella samordningsgruppen för kunskapsstyrning. Statliga myndigheter och företrädare för medicintekniska företag har varit inbjudna att delta.

    Vi bedömer att det är realistiskt och motiverat att överväga införande av ett nationellt system för utvärdering och beslut om införande och utmönstring av icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier. I ett sådant system förutsätts att beslut fattas av någon typ av nationell prioriteringskommitté eller nämnd, fortsättningsvis i rapporten förkortad NPK.

    Vårt uppdrag har varit att presentera och diskutera olika praktiska och principiella komponenter i ett sådant system. Hur organisationen bör utformas i detalj har vi inte tagit ställning till då frågan ligger utanför vårt uppdrag. I genomgången har vi pekat på fördelar och nackdelar med olika lösningar för de tio komponenter som vi menar utgör byggstenarna för en NPK. Baserat på dessa för- och nackdelar, men utan att ta ställning till organisatoriska eller tidsmässiga aspekter, eller omfattningen på verksamheten, så framträder för oss ett huvudalternativ. Detta huvudalternativ bör diskuteras i relation till alternativa lösningar och preciseras ytterligare.

    Med tanke på att utgångspunkten för denna rapport har varit att undersöka förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i hälso- och sjukvården, är det också naturligt att vi haft den nationella nivån som utgångspunkt. Varje land vi har undersökt har ett system som är utformat för att passa in i den sjukvårdsstruktur och finansiering som finns i det enskilda landet. Då ansvaret för Sveriges hälso- och sjukvård delas mellan stat och landsting, förefaller det mest adekvat att staten får ansvar för samordning, tillhandahållande av beslutsstöd och kompetens (via myndigheter och kommittéer) och att en NPK formas och drivs av staten tillsammans med sjukvårdshuvudmännen. De sistnämnda har ansvar för att producera och finansiera hälso- och sjukvården. En sådan organisation vore mest i linje med dagens sjukvårdssystem och hur finansieringsansvaret är uppdelat. Alternativet är att bilda ett nationellt organ med enbart företrädare från regioner och landsting. Mot detta talar att statens expertkompetens utnyttjas i lägre grad och att det finns en risk att regionalpolitiska hänsynstaganden kan spela en alltför stor roll.

    Med tanke på att budgetansvaret för att bekosta nya teknologier i hälso- och sjukvården i Sverige i huvudsak ligger på landstingen så förfaller det ologiskt att förorda direkt budgetansvar för NPK. Därmed inte sagt att kostnadsmedvetenhet inte är mycket viktigt i en sådan kommitté. Det bör därför vara en kommitté som kan balansera budgethänsyn med kostnadseffektivitet och rättvis fördelning av resurser.

    De flesta länder strävar mot ett system som är inkluderande när det gäller vilka typer av teknologier som ska ingå i utvärderingarna. De flesta typer av teknologier, både gamla och nya, ter sig därför som aktuella även i Sverige. Samtidigt är det tydligt att det inte går att utvärdera alla teknologier med tanke på den stora arbetsmängd detta skulle leda till. Den svenska branschorganisationen Swedish Medtech uppskattar att det idag finns cirka en halv miljon unika medicintekniska produkter och utifrån detta så förstår vi att inflödet av enbart nya medicintekniska produkter är mycket stort. Dessutom innebär många av dessa endast marginella förändringar jämfört med tidigare teknologier. Vi förespråkar ett system som prioriterar vilka teknologier som ska utvärderas baserat på deras konsekvenser (hälsoeffekt, ekonomisk omfattning, etisk kontrovers etc.) snarare än typ av teknologi eller om den är gammal eller ny. På detta sätt undviks att vissa typer av teknologier får ”fribrev” in isystemet.

    Det finns tre huvudalternativ med tanke på vem som tar fram kunskapsunderlag till utvärderingarna: 1. Enbart företagen; 2. Enbart den beslutande kommittén eller motsvarande; 3. Dessa två kombinerat. Baserat på våra erfarenheter från andra länder och även de återkopplingar vi har fått från referensgruppen tror vi att det vore olyckligt att införa ett system som helt utesluter företagen som uppgiftslämnare. Framför allt kommer NPK i sådana fall att gå miste om dataunderlag som ännu inte är publicerat men som kan vara av stor vikt för besluten. Dock behöver företagsbaserade underlag givetvis granskas av någon oberoende instans innan beslutet fattas.

    Det finns behov av tydliga incitament för att lyfta frågor till utvärdering och beslut. Erfarenheter från Västra Götalandsregionen tyder på att den startfinansieringsmodell som tillämpas där har varit ett lyckat sätt för att få in förslag på teknologier som bör utvärderas. Incitament behöver dock inte alltid vara av ekonomisk art utan kan även vara av administrativ karaktär. Registrering av alla nya teknologier (produkter och procedurer) i ett register innan de får användas skulle kunna bidra till att identifiera kandidater för utvärdering.

    Samtliga länder vi har undersökt har valt att ha flera aktörer involverade i processerna för identifiering, utvärdering, prioritering och beslut angående införande. Flera informanter har även framhållit vikten av att separera den organisation som fattar beslutet från den eller de som tar fram beslutsunderlaget för att öka legitimiteten. Det kan vara administrativt mer komplicerat med två separata organisationer men våra intryck från denna studie tyder på att denna nackdel uppvägs av de fördelar som uppnås.

    Det är en fördel om processerna för identifiering, utvärdering och beslut är så öppna som möjligt. Stor öppenhet i alla steg medför dock en stor arbetsbörda och kostnader. Frågan om öppenhet och medverkan från allmänheten förefaller vara en avvägning mellan tillräcklig grad av sekretess och öppenhet rörande både process och beslut för att uppnå legitimitet. Att vid ett eventuellt införande av NPK starta med en relativt sluten process där enbart besluten redovisas men sedan ha en tydlig ambition och plan för att bli mer öppen i hela processen efter hand kan vara en framkomlig väg. Vi bedömer att den värdegrund och det utvecklingsarbete av öppna prioriteringar som redan pågår i Sverige är av hög relevans för NPK. Vi ser därför inget behov av en särskild värdegrund för NPK, utöver den som blir resultatet av de pågående  prioriteringsdiskussionerna. Det är dock angeläget att ett eventuellt bildande av NPK föregås av framtagning av tydliga direktiv till NPK om hur den ska förhålla sig till och tillämpa riksdagens riktlinjer för prioriteringar.

    Med avseende på politisk involvering eller inte i besluten har det i samtliga länder vi har undersökt varit en tydlig politisk koppling till själva beslutet om införande eller inte av teknologin. Detta står i kontrast till hur det för närvarande fungerar i Sverige med t.ex. TLV, där besluten inte involverar politiker. I denna fråga verkar det snarare handla om att skapa ett system som gör att den kommitté eller person som ska fatta införandebeslutet har tillräckligt förtroende och legitimitet att förvalta denna uppgift. Det kan betyda att politiker inkluderas i en kommitté som befolkningsföreträdare eller representanter för den part som ansvarar för finansieringen. Lika väl kan det fungera med personer i kommittén som medverkar på personliga mandat, som har en adekvat kompetens och erfarenhet men också ett förtroende från andra att lösa uppgiften.

    Formen för ”Omprövning” är starkt sammankopplad med valet av andra strukturella komponenter. Vår utgångspunkt är dock att det bör finnas någon typ av omprövningsmekanism under processen samt efter beslut. Skulle det bli en myndighet som fattar bindande beslut på liknande sätt som TLV gör i dag bör det vara möjligt för företag att överklaga beslutet till domstol. I andra fall är det NPK som bör utveckla egna rutiner för omprövning på eget eller andras initiativ.

    Vi har i denna studie undersökt förutsättningar för etablering av en nationell prioriteringskommitté i Sverige för icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier i hälso- och sjukvården. Arbetet har baserats på erfarenheter från länder med existerande system för beslut om införande av sjukvårdsteknologier samt diskussioner i Sverige med en referensgrupp samt styrgrupp för projektet. Vi har i vårt arbete identifierat tio viktiga komponenter för uppbyggnaden av en sådan kommitté och fört en diskussion kring dessa. Vi ser möjligheter och fördelar med att etablera en nationell prioriteringskommitté i Sverige för identifiering, utvärdering och prioritering vid beslut avseende införande av andra sjukvårdsteknologier än läkemedel i hälso- och sjukvården. För- och nackdelar med olika tänkbara lösningar har diskuterats i rapporten, medan de mer exakta formerna för en nationell prioriteringskommitté är en fråga för fortsatt utredning.

  • 8.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bojke, Laura
    Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, United Kingdom.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Health Economics Department, AstraZeneca, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Eliciting priors to characterize uncertainties in decision analytic modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Expert opinions are often used in decision models when evidence is scarce. This study describes the details of a formal elicitation exercise to estimate parameter values and their associated uncertainty and compares the results in term of cost-effectiveness and value of information with results from only eliciting mean values from experts.

    Methods: Elicited distributions for 11 unknown parameters where incorporated into a previously developed cost-effectiveness model for prosthetic knees for amputees. The original model included elicited mean values for the missing values, thus ignoring any uncertainty across experts’ beliefs.

    Results: The incremental cost-effective ratio (ICER) for the analysis based on the current elicited distributions was substantially higher (€13 625) than the ICER in the original analysis (€3 258). Even decision uncertainty, at a €35 000 threshold, increased significantly, increasing the value of further research from €355 100 in the original analysis, to €5 987 444 for the current elicited values.

    Conclusions: Failing to account for the individual expert’s uncertainty might have a considerable impact on the result of cost-effectiveness analyses. Formal expert elicitation offers a plausible method to generate prior distributions representing the experts’ uncertainty and thereby more appropriately account for the true uncertainty of the decision.

  • 9.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Johannesen-Munk, Kasper
    Thidell, Fredrik
    Cost-effectiveness of C-Leg compared to non microprocessor controlled knees: a modeling approach2008In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To estimate the costs and health outcomes of C-Leg and non–microprocessor-controlled (NMC) knees using a decision-analytic model.

    Design: Data on costs, rates and duration of problems, knee survival, and health-related quality of life were obtained from interviews with patients and prosthetists with experience of both C-Leg and NMC knees. Interview data were assessed in a decision-analytic Markov model to estimate cost-effectiveness from a health care perspective.

    Setting: Outpatient.

    Participants: A population sample of 20 patients currently using the C-Leg and prior experience of nonmicroprocessor knees, and 5 prosthetists.

    Interventions: Not applicable.

    Main Outcome Measure: Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY).

    Results: The mean incremental cost (in 2006 Euros) and QALYs for the C-Leg was €7657 and 2.38, respectively, yielding a cost per QALY gained of €3218.

    Conclusions: It is important to provide decision-makers with relevant information on costs and health outcomes of different treatment strategies on actual decision problems despite limited evidence. The results of the study, taking into account both costs and a broadly defined health outcome in terms of QALY, show that given existing albeit limited evidence the C-Leg appears to yield positive health outcomes at an acceptable cost.

  • 10.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Johannesen-Munk, Kasper
    Dept of rehabilitation School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Thidell, Fredrik
    Dept of rehabilitation School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Cost-effectiveness of C-Leg compared to non microprocessor controlled knees: a modelling approach (oral presentation)2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henriksson, Martin
    AstraZeneca.
    Munk Johannesen, Kasper
    CPO, England .
    Letter: Cost-Effectiveness of Microprocessor-Controlled Prosthetic Knees Response2010In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 664-664Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henriksson, Martin
    Health Economics Department, AstraZeneca, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in young athletes: A cost-effectiveness analysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Screening to prevent sudden cardiac death among young athletes has been debated for some time and several countries have already introduced pre-participation cardiovascular screening to identify sports active individuals at risk. Although, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common underlying disease that is documented to be detectable by screening the cost-effectiveness of such a screening strategy is still unclear.

    Methods: A screening program to detect HCM in young athletes was compared to a non screening strategy. Prevalence of HCM, mortality risks and test characteristics were estimated from published sources and formal expert elicitation. These estimates were incorporated in a decision analytic model to estimate costs and health outcomes, expressed in life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs), over a lifetime perspective.

    Results: The screening strategy was associated with a mean incremental cost of €93 and a mean incremental gain of 0.0005 life years, yielding a cost per life year gained of €196 205. Taking quality of life into account, the screening strategy was associated with a loss of 0.034 QALY.

    Conclusions: The study shows that screening young athletes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is not likely to yield survival benefits at a cost normally considered to be cost-effective and if quality of life is considered in the analysis screening is associated with higher costs and a loss of QALYs. Thus, based on the present findings a strategy of screening young athletes for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is unlikely to be cost effective.

  • 13.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Zetterström, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Allergy Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of clean air administered to the breathing zone in allergic asthma2010In: CLINICAL RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, ISSN 1752-6981, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Airsonett Airshower (AA) is a novel non-pharmaceutical treatment for patients with perennial allergic asthma that uses a laminar airflow directed to the breathing zone of patients during sleep. It has been shown that AA treatment in addition to optimized standard therapy significantly increases asthma-related quality of life among adolescent asthmatics. However, the cost-effectiveness of AA treatment has not yet been assessed. As reimbursement decisions are increasingly guided by results from the cost-effectiveness analysis, such information is valuable for health-care policy-makers. Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of adding AA treatment with allergen-free air during night sleep to optimized standard therapy for adolescents with perennial allergic asthma compared with placebo. Materials and Methods: A probabilistic Markov model was developed to estimate costs and health outcomes over a 5-year period. Costs and effects are presented from a Swedish health-care perspective (QALYs). The main outcome of interest was cost per QALY gained. Results: The Airshower strategy resulted in a mean gain of 0.25 QALYs per patient, thus yielding a cost per QALY gained of under 35 000 as long as the cost of Airshower is below 8200. Conclusions: Adding AA treatment to optimized standard therapy for adolescents with perennial allergic asthma compared with placebo is generating additional QALYs at a reasonable cost. However, further studies taking more detailed resource use and events such as exacerbations into account would be needed to fully evaluate the cost-effectiveness of AA treatment. Please cite this paper as: Brodtkorb T-H, Zetterstrom O and Tinghog G. Cost-effectiveness of clean air administered to the breathing zone in allergic asthma.

  • 14.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alwin, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heintz, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Persson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nationellt system för utvärdering, prioritering och införandebeslut av icke-farmakologiska sjukvårdsteknologier: en förstudie2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for a national system to evaluate medical technologies other than pharmaceuticals is being considered. Several proposals advocate establishing a type of “Treatment Benefits Board”. To highlight problems and analyse the conditions for national assessments in this context, the National Board of Health and Welfare, the Medical Products Agency, the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU), and the Dental and Pharmaceutical Benefits Agency (TLV) jointly appointed the Centre for Medical Technology Assessment (CMT) at Linköping University to conduct a preliminary study. The preliminary study should provide a foundation for the agencies to decide whether or not the issue needs to be investigated further.

    The preliminary study aims to develop background information concerning how Sweden and other countries currently assess, prioritise, and implement decisions involving new nonpharmaceutical health technologies. The basic questions addressed are:

    1. How can nonpharmaceutical technologies be defined and categorised for the purpose of setting parameters for an approval process?
    2. How is the current process of assessment, prioritisation, and approval in Sweden structured, focusing on SBU, the Medical Products Agency, the National Board of Health and Welfare, and TLV?
    3. How have other countries organised their systems for assessment, prioritisation, and approval of nonpharmaceutical technologies?

    Within the framework of the project it was not possible to conduct detailed, onsite studies of the healthcare systems in other countries. Hence, we relied on descriptions of other countries’ systems as reported in scientific articles, reports, and official documents available from various organisations and other sources via the Internet. In some instances the information was complemented by interviewing key individuals. The same applies to the descriptions of Swedish agencies. Information concerning the prevalence of various technologies was collected from official reports/reviews and registry data. We present information from six countries where we found sufficient information to preliminarily answer the questions we formulated in advance. The countries are Australia, New Zealand, England, Spain, Italy, Canada, and the USA.

    We draw the following conclusions from the preliminary study: It is relatively complicated to define nonpharmaceutical technologies and delineate the technologies that potentially could be subject to regulation. Our practical attempts to describe the technologies that SBU Alert has assessed show that:

    surgical and medical interventions dominate, but a relatively high number of screening programmes have also been assessed;

    • medical equipment and pharmaceuticals are the predominant input factors. Active implants and biological products are also relatively common. Assistive devices and dental products are seldom considered to be primary input factors;
    • most technologies are used primarily for treatment purposes. Diagnostic technologies are also relatively common.

    By removing pharmaceuticals from the equation and combining interventions and input factors, SBU Alert arrived at 18 different categories of health technologies that it assesses. The predominant combination is surgical intervention and biomedical equipment. This is followed by surgical intervention and insertion of active implants. In the report, we propose a way to define and classify technologies that we found to be appropriate for the purpose. This does not exclude pharmaceuticals. Rather, pharmaceuticals are included as one input factor among others.

    Another aim was to produce background information describing how Sweden and other countries currently assess, prioritise, and approve new nonpharmaceutical technologies. We identified several key components that we believe are worth considering in designing a national system for assessing, prioritising, and approving new nonpharmaceutical health technologies. These components are:

    • Organisational level – At what organisational level should the approval of nonpharmaceutical health technologies take place?
    • Scope – Should an all-inclusive or selective approach be taken towards inclusion/selection of health technologies for assessment?
    • Base package – Should there be a basic list showing what is financed with public funds, or is it sufficient to present only new decisions on the margin?
    • Diversity of actors – Should a single actor, or many actors, be responsible for assessment, prioritisation, and decisions regarding financing?
    • Fact producer – Who would be most appropriate to manage the factual information base?
    • Transparency – How transparent should one be in presenting the decisionmaking process and its results?
    • Political involvement – How politically independent should the decisions be?
    • Budgetary responsibility – Should the unit that recommends or decides on approval have a budgetary responsibility?
    • New and old – Should the decisions apply both to introducing new technology and phasing out old technology?
    • Fundamental values – Should there be an explicit set of fundamental values for prioritisation, and how should it be formulated?
    • Appeals – Should there be a mechanism to appeal decisions?

    To summarise, we see a trend in other countries towards an increasing level of assessment and prioritisation in decisions regarding the introduction of nonpharmaceutical health technologies. Our preliminary impression is that nearly every system that we studied continues to develop and remains “a work in progress”. For instance, in Australia and New Zealand official inquiries are under way to suggest or present proposals for improvement.

    Our studies of systems in different countries, although limited, indicate there is no perfect system to copy directly. The way in which the various systems are organised is somewhat related to how health care is organised in the respective countries and how many resources they have decided to dedicate to this purpose. The results from our preliminary study show, however, that several countries have more experience in “approving” nonpharmaceutical-based technologies than what we have in Sweden. The most interesting countries are England, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia. Spain could also be of interest. Hence, there is good reason to consider what might be the best way to analyse these countries’ systems in detail and complement this information with data from other nations that we were unable to include in the preliminary study, e.g. the Netherlands and Israel.

    To more rigorously analyse other systems, if this project is continued, investigators should probably start from one or more models for a Swedish mechanism. To arrive at one or more tentative models in this context, the county councils should be involved in the project. The format could be a workshop that engages representatives from public agencies, county councils, and professional associations, where they jointly outline conceivable models that could then be analysed and discussed in light of the experiences of other nations.

  • 15.
    Heintz, Emelie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nelson, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Levin, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The long-term cost-effectiveness of fetal monitoring during labour: a comparison of cardiotocography complemented with ST analysis versus cardiotocography alone2008In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 115, p. 1676-1687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the cost-effectivness of the use of cardiotocography (CTG) complemented with fetal electrocardiography and ST analysis compared with the use of CTG alone in term deliveries when a decision has been made to use fetal monitoring with a scarlp electrode. Design: A cost-effectiveness analysis based on a probabilistic decision model incorporating relevant strategies and lifelong outcomes. Setting: Maternity wards in Sweden. Population: Women with term fetuses after a clinical decision had been made to apply a fetal scalp electrode for internal CTG. Methods: A decision model was used to compare the costs and effects of two different treatment strategies. Baseline estimates were derived from the literature. Discounted costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were simulated over a lifetime horizon using a probabilistic model. Main outcome measures: QALYs, incremental costs, and cost per QALY gained expressed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results: The analysis found an incremental effect of 0.005 QALYs for ST analysis compared with CTG; the ST analysis strategy was also moreover associated with a -56 decrease in costs, thus dominating the CTG strategy. The probability that ST analysis is cost-effective in comparison with CTG is high, irrespective of the willingness-to-pay value for a QALY. Conclusions: Compared with CTG alone, ST analysis is cost-effective when used in term high-risk deliveries in which there is a need for internal fetal monitoring.

  • 16.
    Normann, Elna
    et al.
    Jonkoping University.
    Olsson, Anna
    Jonkoping University.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modular socket system versus traditionally laminated socket: a cost analysis2011In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 76-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Using the new modular socket system (MSS) to produce a prosthetic socket directly on the patient has the potential of being easier and quicker to manufacture but also incurring higher costs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjectives: The purpose of the study was to compare the costs of manufacturing a transtibial prosthetic socket using either a MSS or a standard laminated socket (PC). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy design: Concurrent controlled trial. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A total of 20 patients at two orthopaedic facilities were followed with regards to the cost of manufacturing a prosthetic socket using either MSS or PC. Time aspects and material costs were considered in the cost analysis. Other factors studied include delivery time and number of visits. For the cost analysis, only direct costs pertaining to the prosthetic socket were considered. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: The total cost of MSS was found to be significantly higher (p andlt; 0.01) compared to PC. However, the production and time cost was significantly lower. Delivery time to the patient was 1 day for MSS compared to 17 days for PC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Our study shows that the direct prosthetic cost of treating a patient using MSS is significantly higher than treating a patient using PC. However, the MSS prosthesis can be delivered significantly faster and with fewer visits. Further studies taking the full societal costs of MSS into account should therefore be performed.

  • 17.
    Persson, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Roback, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Collaboration between academia, manufacturers and healthcare services for development and adoption of medical devices with regard to costs and effects2009In: IFMBE World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, München: Springer , 2009, p. 138-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The market for new medical devices depends on evidence on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness as well as ethical criteria based on patients needs and severity of disease. HTA is therefore increasingly used to provide appraisals for decision makers. In comparison to pharmaceuticals, medical devices face difficulties in providing studies with high evidence. There are, however, new promising developments in health economics and in the systems for valuing evidence which may improve the possibility of quicker appraisal of medical devices. This development, comprising Bayesian modeling and revision of systems for grading evidence, may be used in an iterative procedure to anticipate the market potential and to contribute to finding an optimal time when the implementation of a new device is worthwhile. In such a system, researches, developers and manufacturers, and healthcare services should gain from strengthened collaboration.

  • 18.
    Ramstrand, Nerrolyn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences Jönköping University.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Jönköping University.
    Considerations for developing an evidenced-based practice in orthotics and prosthetics2008In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence-based practice has become somewhat of a catchphrase over the past ten years. In this paper evidence-based practice is defined and its importance for the development of the prosthetics and orthotics profession is highlighted. The authors suggest that evidence-based practice needs to be prioritized within the profession and that a cultural change needs to be initiated which supports clinicians in incorporating research findings into their daily practice. In addition, the authors highlight the need for prosthetists/orthotists to become more active in generating research rather than relying on other professional groups to contribute to their professional body of knowledge

  • 19.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Early assessment of health technologies (poster): A proposed framework for case studies in a Swedish context2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Roback, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brodtkorb, Thor-Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bernfort, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Home monitoring of heart failure (poster): Early assessment of a Swedish telemonitoring system under development2011Conference paper (Refereed)
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