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  • 1.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Swedish E Science Research Centre SeRC, Sweden.
    Correction: Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation: Impact of Virtual Interventions (vol 6, pg 281, 2015)2015In: Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1869-408X, E-ISSN 1869-4098, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 577-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where the pre-stenotic hypoplastic segment may limit the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotem-poral maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the post-stenotic jet, showing a versatile response between the CoA dilatations. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre-and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Multidirectional WSS disturbances in stenotic turbulent flows: A pre- and post-intervention study in an aortic coarctation2017In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wall shear stress (WSS) disturbances are commonly expressed at sites of abnormal flow obstructions and may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In laminar flows these disturbances have recently been assessed by the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which accounts for the WSS multidirectionality. Site-specific estimations of WSS disturbances in pulsatile transitional and turbulent type of flows are more challenging due to continuous and unpredictable changes in WSS behavior. In these complex flow settings, the transWSS may serve as a more comprehensive descriptor for assessing WSS disturbances of general nature compared to commonly used parameters. In this study large eddy simulations (LES) were used to investigate the transWSS properties in flows subjected to different pathological turbulent flow conditions, governed by a patient-specific model of an aortic coarctation pre and post balloon angioplasty. Results showed that regions of strong near-wall turbulence were collocated with regions of elevated transWSS and turbulent WSS, while in more transitional-like near-wall flow regions a closer resemblance was found between transWSS and low, and oscillatory WSS. Within the frame of this study, the transWSS parameter demonstrated a more multi-featured picture of WSS disturbances when exposed to different types of flow regimes, characteristics which were not depicted by the other parameters alone. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Quantitative Assessment of Turbulence and Flow Eccentricity in an Aortic Coarctation - Impact of Virtual Interventions2015In: Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1869-408X, E-ISSN 1869-4098, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 281-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulence and flow eccentricity can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we propose quantitative techniques to assess turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and flow eccentricity that could assist in the evaluation and treatment of stenotic severities. These hemodynamic parameters were studied in a pre-treated aortic coarctation (CoA) and after several virtual interventions using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to demonstrate the effect of different dilatation options on the flow field. Patient-specific geometry and flow conditions were derived from MRI data. The unsteady pulsatile flow was resolved by large eddy simulation (LES) including non-Newtonian blood rheology. Results showed an inverse asymptotic relationship between the total amount of TKE and degree of dilatation of the stenosis, where turbulent flow proximal the constriction limits the possible improvement by treating the CoA alone. Spatiotemporal maps of TKE and flow eccentricity could be linked to the characteristics of the jet, where improved flow conditions were favored by an eccentric dilatation of the CoA. By including these flow markers into a combined MRI-CFD intervention framework, CoA therapy has not only the possibility to produce predictions via simulation, but can also be validated pre- and immediate post treatment, as well as during follow-up studies.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Modeling of Subject Arterial Segments Using 3D Fluid Structure Interaction and 1D-0D Arterial Tree Network Boundary Condition2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling of Subject Specific Arterial Segments Using 3D Fluid Structure Interaction and a 1D-0D Arterial Tree Network Boundary Condition

     

    Magnus Andersson, Jonas Lantz , Matts Karlsson

     

    Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden

     

    Introduction

    In recent years it has been possible to simulate 3D blood flow through CFD including the dilatation effect in elastic arteries using Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) to better match in vivo data. Patient specific imposed boundary condition (BC) is often used as the velocity profiles at the inlets. However, for the outlet BC a time-resolved pressure is required and often lacking as it is obtained by an invasive procedure. Numerous models have been developed for capturing the main effects of the vascular bed at these sites, which have been shown crucial and difficult to implement accurately. This work focus on a full scaled FSI simulation at an arterial section including the abdominal aorta, renal arteries and iliac bifurcations, obtained from MRI of an healthy individual. The outlet BC at the iliac arteries is connected with a 1D systemic arterial tree which is truncated with a 0D lumped model. This 3D-(0D-1D) connection can provide the essential features of the peripheral flow and, in contrast to the imposed BC, the 1D-0D coupling allow for investigation of cardiovascular diseases including stenoses and/or hypertension.

     

    Methods

    The MRI images were segmented using an in-house software to obtain a 3D surface of the vessel lumen, Figure 1. The surfaces were meshed with high quality hexahedral element using ANSYS ICEM CFD 12.0 (ANSYS Inc, Canonsburg, PA, USA). A PC-MRI time-resolved massflow at the descending aorta were used as inlet BC, where 22% of the flow was forced into the renal bifurcations assuming negligible pressure wave reflection. The wall was modelled with an isotropic elastic model with addition of an elastic support mimicking the damping effect of the surrounding tissue. The 1D model is based on transmission-line theory which involves an impedance model for the pressure-flow relationship. The arterial topology was extracted from literature and only the central arteries after the iliacs was considered. At the truncation sites a 3-element Windkessel model (known as RRC) was implemented and is the most common model of choice for describing the main effects of all the distal vessels.  The 1D system solves the Fourier frequency impedance coefficients over one heart cycle accounting for wave reflection by using the 15 first harmonics to obtain the corresponding pressure. The 3D-1D connection is done offline, which allows for an independent and more stable 3D simulation. This step is iteratively repeated until convergence is reach between the present 3D outlet flow and previous implemented 1D outlet flow. The simulation was utilized in ANSYS CFX, ANSYS Mechanical, and coupled by ANSYS Multi-Field.

     

    Results

    The (0D-1D)-3D model showed convergence of pressure/flow at the iliac outlets, Figure 2. The method provides realistic pressure and flow responses based on the input parameters and even capture the relative difference in flow/pressure distribution between the right and left illiac artery due to subject specific geometric variability. Parameters such as velocity profiles and WSS can be extracted in the 3D domain.

     

    Conclusions

    This method allows for a better insight of large scale vascular networks effect of the local 3D flow features and also gives a better representation of the peripheral flow compared to a pure 0D (lumped parameter/Windkessel) model. PC-MRI will provide data for validation of velocity profiles in the 3D model. Future work includes a subject specific 1D vascular topology to be combined with the 3D model.   

  • 5.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    NON-INVASIVE INTERVENTION PLANNING OF STENOTIC FLOWS USING SCALE-RESOLVED IMAGE-BASED COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Turbulence Quantification of Stenotic Blood Flow Using Image-Based CFD: Effect of Different Interventions2014In: WCB 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent blood flow is often associated with some sort of cardiovascular disease, e.g. sharp bends and/or sudden constrictions/expansions of the vessel wall. The energy losses associated with the turbulent flow may increase the heart workload in order to maintain cardiac output (CO). In the present study, the amount of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) developed in the vicinity of an aortic coarctation was estimated pre-intervention and in a variety of post-intervention configurations, using scale-resolved image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD). TKE can be measured using magnet resonance imaging (MRI) and have also been validated with CFD simulations [1], i.e. a parameter that not only can be quantified using simulations but can also be measured by MRI.

    Patient-specific geometry and inlet flow conditions were obtained using contrast-enhanced MR angiography and 2D cine phase-contrast MRI, respectively. The intervention procedure was mimicked using an inflation simulation, where six different geometries were obtained. A scale-resolving turbulence model, large eddy simulation (LES), was utilized to resolve the largest turbulent scales and also to capture the laminar-to-turbulent transition. All cases were simulated using baseline CO and with a 20% CO increase to simulate a possible flow adaption after intervention.

    For this patient, results shows a non-linear decay of the total amount of TKE integrated over the cardiac phase as the stenotic cross-sectional area is increased by the intervention.  Figure 1 shows the original segmented geometry and two dilated coarctation with corresponding volume rendering of the TKE at peak systole. Due to turbulent transition at a kink upstream the stenosis further dilation of the coarctation tends to restrict the TKE to a plateau, and continued vessel expansion may therefore only induce unnecessary stresses onto the arterial wall. 

    This patient-specific non-invasive framework has shown the geometrical impact on the TKE estimates. New insight in turbulence development indicates that the studied coarctation can only be improved to a certain extent, where focus should be on the upstream region, if further TKE reduction is motivated. The possibility of including MRI in a combined framework could have great potential for future intervention planning and follow-up studies.  

    [1] J. Lantz, T. Ebbers, J. Engvall and M. Karlsson, Numerical and Experimental Assessment of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation, Journal of Biomechnics, 2013. 46(11): p. 1851-1858.

  • 7.
    Ask, Per
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Brandberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Assessment of heart valve function with echocardiography1997In: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering,1997, 1997, p. 394-394Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Berntsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Computational Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kozlov, Vladimir
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nazarov, Sergei A.
    St Petersburg State University, Russia; St Petersburg State Polytech University, Russia.
    A Modification to the Kirchhoff Conditions at a Bifurcation and Loss Coefficients2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One dimensional models for fluid flow in tubes are frequently used tomodel complex systems, such as the arterial tree where a large numberof vessels are linked together at bifurcations. At the junctions transmission conditions are needed. One popular option is the classic Kirchhoffconditions which means conservation of mass at the bifurcation andprescribes a continuous pressure at the joint.

    In reality the boundary layer phenomena predicts fast local changesto both velocity and pressure inside the bifurcation. Thus it is not appropriate for a one dimensional model to assume a continuous pressure. In this work we present a modification to the classic Kirchhoff condi-tions, with a symmetric pressure drop matrix, that is more suitable forone dimensional flow models. An asymptotic analysis, that has beencarried out previously shows that the new transmission conditions hasen exponentially small error.

    The modified transmission conditions take the geometry of the bifurcation into account and can treat two outlets differently. The conditions can also be written in a form that is suitable for implementationin a finite difference solver. Also, by appropriate choice of the pressuredrop matrix we show that the new transmission conditions can producehead loss coefficients similar to experimentally obtained ones.

  • 9.
    Berntsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Computational Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kozlov, Vladimir
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nazarov, Sergey A.
    St Petersburg State University, St Petersburg State Polytechnical University, and Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering RAS, Russia..
    A one-dimensional model of a false aneurysm2017In: International Journal of Research in Engineering and Science (IJRES), ISSN 2320-9356, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A false aneurysm is a hematoma, i.e. collection ofblood outside of a blood vessel, that forms due to a hole  in the wall of an artery . This represents a serious medical condition that needs to be monitored and, under certain conditions, treatedurgently. In this work a one-dimensional model of a false aneurysm isproposed. The new model is based on a one-dimensional model of anartery previously presented by the authors and it takes into accountthe interaction between the hematoma  and the surrounding musclematerial. The model equations are derived  using rigorous asymptoticanalysis for the case of a simplified geometry.   Even though the model is simple it still supports a realisticbehavior for the system consisting of the vessel and the  hematoma. Using numerical simulations we illustrate the behavior ofthe model. We also investigate the effect  of changing the size of the hematoma. The simulations show that ourmodel can reproduce realistic solutions. For instance we show thetypical strong pulsation of an aneurysm by blood entering the hematoma during the work phase of the cardiac cycle, and the blood returning tothe vessel during the resting phase. Also we show that the aneurysmgrows  if the pulse rate is increased due to, e.g., a higher work load. 

  • 10.
    Berntsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Kozlov, Vladimir
    Linköping University, Department of Mathematics, Mathematics and Applied Mathematics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nazarov, Sergey A.
    St Petersburg State University, Russia; St Petersburg State Polytech University, Russia; RAS, Russia.
    A one-dimensional model of viscous blood flow in an elastic vessel2016In: Applied Mathematics and Computation, ISSN 0096-3003, E-ISSN 1873-5649, Vol. 274, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a one-dimensional model of blood flow in a vessel segment with an elastic wall consisting of several anisotropic layers. The model involves two variables: the radial displacement of the vessels wall and the pressure, and consists of two coupled equations of parabolic and hyperbolic type. Numerical simulations on a straight segment of a blood vessel demonstrate that the model can produce realistic flow fields that may appear under normal conditions in healthy blood vessels; as well as flow that could appear during abnormal conditions. In particular we show that weakening of the elastic properties of the wall may provoke a reverse blood flow in the vessel. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Björck, Hanna M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Maleki, Shohreh
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Siv F.E.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Folkersen, Lasse
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Eriksson, Per
    Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery in Östergötland.
    Characterization of Shear-Sensitive Genes in the NormalRat Aorta Identifies Hand2 as a Major Flow-ResponsiveTranscription Factor2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Shear forces play a key role in the maintenance of vessel wall integrity. Current understanding regarding shear-dependent gene expression is mainly based on in vitro or in vivo observations with experimentally deranged shear, hence reflecting acute molecular events in relation to flow. Our objective was to determine wall shear stress (WSS) in the rat aorta and study flow-dependent vessel wall biology under physiological conditions.

    Methods and Results: Animal-specific aortic WSS magnitude and vector direction were estimated using computational fluid dynamic simulation based on aortic geometry and flow information acquired by MRI. Two distinct flow pattern regions were identified in the normal rat aorta; the distal part of the inner curvature being exposed to low WSS and a non-uniform vector direction, and a region along the outer curvature being subjected to markedly higher levels of WSS and a uniform vector direction. Microarray analysis revealed a strong differential expression between the flow regions, particularly associated with transcriptional regulation. In particular, several genes related to Ca2+-signalling, inflammation, proliferation and oxidative stress were among the most highly differentially expressed.

    Conclusions: Microarray analysis validated the CFD-defined WSS regions in the rat aorta, and several novel flow-dependent genes were identified. The importance of these genes in relation to atherosusceptibility needs further investigation.

  • 12.
    Bolger, Ann F
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Transit of blood flow through thehuman left ventricle mapped by cardiovascular magnetic resonance2007In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 741-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The transit of blood through the beating heart is a basic aspect of cardiovascular physiology which remains incompletely studied. Quantification of the components of multidirectional flow in the normal left ventricle (LV) is lacking, making it difficult to put the changes observed with LV dysfunction and cardiac surgery into context.

    METHODS:

    Three dimensional, three directional, time resolved magnetic resonance phase-contrast velocity mapping was performed at 1.5 Tesla in 17 normal subjects, 6 female, aged 44+/-14 years (mean+/-SD). We visualized and measured the relative volumes of LV flow components and the diastolic changes in inflowing kinetic energy (KE). Of total diastolic inflow volume, 44+/-11% followed a direct, albeit curved route to systolic ejection (videos 1 and 2), in contrast to 11% in a subject with mildly dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), who was included for preliminary comparison (video 3). In normals, 16+/-8% of the KE of inflow was conserved to the end of diastole, compared with 5% in the DCM patient. Blood following the direct route lost or transferred less of its KE during diastole than blood that was retained until the next beat (1.6+/-1.0 millijoules vs 8.2+/-1.9 millijoules, p<0.05); whereas, in the DCM patient, the reduction in KE of retained inflow was 18-fold greater than that of the blood tracing the direct route.

    CONCLUSION:

    Multidimensional flow mapping can measure the paths, compartmentalization and kinetic energy changes of blood flowing into the LV, demonstrating differences of KE loss between compartments, and potentially between the flows in normal and dilated left ventricles.

  • 13.
    Bradley, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Bird-Like Wing Conguration for Pitch Control of a Tailless Aircraft2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A numerical study of a small bird-like aircraft has been performed. The aim of the study was to investigate how a swing wing (actualized through a constant span morphing wing) can be used for pitch control of a tailless aircraft. The results show that a swing wing can be successfully used, and that the aircraft can be maintained in a trimmed state by only small adjustments of part of the wing. A comparison was also made with a Vortex lattice method, but these results significantly deviated from those obtained with CFD. Copyright © 2012 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  • 14.
    Bradley, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nadali Najafabadi, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wren, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Utriainen, Esa
    Kinell, Mats
    Towards Efficient CFD-Simulations of Engine LikeTurbine Guide Vane Film Cooling2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that the efficiency of a gas turbine can be increased by using higher combustion temperatures and that this demands improved cooling. This study focuses on strategies to decrease the turnaround time for numerical predictions of film cooling while keeping the ability to resolve details of the flow. Simulations have been carried out for a real vane geometry at close to engine-like conditions and results are compared with corresponding experiments. The investigation includes an un-cooled situation for aerodynamic validation and to determine baseline heat transfer coefficent. Simulations and experiments of film effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient and their dependence of blowing ratio are investigated.

  • 15.
    Brandberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Eidenvall, Lars
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Automated calculation of regrgitation from proximal 2D Doppler data1996In: Congress of the European Society of Cardiology,1996, 1996Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Brandberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Integration of proximal velocities (IPROV) - An improvment of the pisa method for estimation of regurgitant flow.1998In: European Soc for Noninvasive Cardiovascular Dynamics,1998, 1998, p. 161-161Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Brandberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Asp, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Non-stationary flow through non-planar circular constrictions: application to mitral valve diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantification of valvular malfunctions by means of noninvasive methods is presently far from perfect. Since valvular regurgitation is common, a simple and reliable method for quantitative assessment is desired. In this paper the proximal isovelocity surface area method, (PISA) was studied. Numerical simulations for non-stationary flow and non-planar circular geometries were compared with ultrasound measurements in an invitro model with the same geometry and similar flow characteristics. Three different valvular geometries were used: planar, reversed cone and funnel. In the numerical simulation special emphasis was given to the influence from the angle of the valvular leaflets on the proximal surface area. We found both numerically and experimentally that there is support to use the hemispherical velocity profile assumption for the geometries investigated except for the funnel case. Here the actual geometry at the funnel inlet should be considered instead of the half-sphere approximation.

  • 18.
    Brandt, Einar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Automatisk flödeskaraktärisering av tredimensionella vektorfält.2001In: In proceedings of Svenska Mekanikdagarna,2001, 2001, p. 61-62Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Carlhall, C.
    et al.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Bolger, A.F.
    Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Reply [2]2006In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 291, no 5Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 20.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Kindberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Daughters, GT
    Miller, DC
    Ingels, NB
    Regional contribution of mitral annular dynamics to LV filling2006In: Experimental Biology,2006, 2006, p. A1194-A1194Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kindberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Daughters, G. T.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Millers, D. C.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ingels Jr, N. B.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Contribution of mitral annular dynamics to LV diastolic filling with alteration in preload and inotropic state2007In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 293, no 3, p. G1473-H1479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitral annular (MA) excursion during diastole encompasses a volume that is part of total left ventricular (LV) filling volume (LVFV). Altered excursion or area variation of the MA due to changes in preload or inotropic state could affect LV filling. We hypothesized that changes in LV preload and inotropic state would not alter the contribution of MA dynamics to LVFV. Six sheep underwent marker implantation in the LV wall and around the MA. After 7–10 days, biplane fluoroscopy was used to obtain three-dimensional marker dynamics from sedated, closed-chest animals during control conditions, inotropic augmentation with calcium (Ca), preload reduction with nitroprusside (N), and vena caval occlusion (VCO). The contribution of MA dynamics to total LVFV was assessed using volume estimates based on multiple tetrahedra defined by the three-dimensional marker positions. Neither the absolute nor the relative contribution of MA dynamics to LVFV changed with Ca or N, although MA area decreased (Ca, P < 0.01; and N, P < 0.05) and excursion increased (Ca, P < 0.01). During VCO, the absolute contribution of MA dynamics to LVFV decreased (P < 0.001), based on a reduction in both area (P < 0.001) and excursion (P < 0.01), but the relative contribution to LVFV increased from 18 ± 4 to 45 ± 13% (P < 0.001). Thus MA dynamics contribute substantially to LV diastolic filling. Although MA excursion and mean area change with moderate preload reduction and inotropic augmentation, the contribution of MA dynamics to total LVFV is constant with sizeable magnitude. With marked preload reduction (VCO), the contribution of MA dynamics to LVFV becomes even more important.

  • 22.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Heiberg, Einar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, A. F.
    Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco, California.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Contribution of mitral annular excursion and shape dynamics to total left ventricular volume change2004In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 287, no 4, p. H1836-H1841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mitral annulus (MA) has a complex shape and motion, and its excursion has been correlated to left ventricular (LV) function. During the cardiac cycle the annulus’ excursion encompasses a volume that is part of the total LV volume change during both filling and emptying. Our objective was to evaluate the contribution of MA excursion and shape variation to total LV volume change. Nine healthy subjects aged 56 ± 11 (means ± SD) years underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). The MA was outlined in all time frames, and a four-dimensional (4-D) Fourier series was fitted to the MA coordinates (3-D+time) and divided into segments. The annular excursion volume (AEV) was calculated based on the temporally integrated product of the segments’ area and their incremental excursion. The 3-D LV volumes were calculated by tracing the endocardial border in six coaxial planes. The AEV (10 ± 2 ml) represented 19 ± 3% of the total LV stroke volume (52 ± 12 ml). The AEV correlated strongly with LV stroke volume (r = 0.73; P < 0.05). Peak MA area occurred during middiastole, and 91 ± 7% of reduction in area from peak to minimum occurred before the onset of LV systole. The excursion of the MA accounts for an important portion of the total LV filling and emptying in humans. These data suggest an atriogenic influence on MA physiology and also a sphincter-like action of the MA that may facilitate ventricular filling and aid competent valve closure. This 4-D TEE method is the first to allow noninvasive measurement of AEV and may be used to investigate the impact of physiological and pathological conditions on this important aspect of LV performance.

  • 23.
    Casas Garcia, Belén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Viola, Frederica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. University of Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Bridging the gap between measurements and modelling: a cardiovascular functional avatar2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 6214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lumped parameter models of the cardiovascular system have the potential to assist researchers and clinicians to better understand cardiovascular function. The value of such models increases when they are subject specific. However, most approaches to personalize lumped parameter models have thus far required invasive measurements or fall short of being subject specific due to a lack of the necessary clinical data. Here, we propose an approach to personalize parameters in a model of the heart and the systemic circulation using exclusively non-invasive measurements. The personalized model is created using flow data from four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging and cuff pressure measurements in the brachial artery. We term this personalized model the cardiovascular avatar. In our proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the capability of the avatar to reproduce pressures and flows in a group of eight healthy subjects. Both quantitatively and qualitatively, the model-based results agreed well with the pressure and flow measurements obtained in vivo for each subject. This non-invasive and personalized approach can synthesize medical data into clinically relevant indicators of cardiovascular function, and estimate hemodynamic variables that cannot be assessed directly from clinical measurements.

  • 24.
    Casas Garcia, Belén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Viola, Frederica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Cedersund, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Univ Calif San Francisco, CA USA.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carljohan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Non-invasive Assessment of Systolic and Diastolic Cardiac Function During Rest and Stress Conditions Using an Integrated Image-Modeling Approach2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The possibility of non-invasively assessing load-independent parameters characterizing cardiac function is of high clinical value. Typically, these parameters are assessed during resting conditions. However, for diagnostic purposes, the parameter behavior across a physiologically relevant range of heart rate and loads is more relevant than the isolated measurements performed at rest. This study sought to evaluate changes in non-invasive estimations of load-independent parameters of left-ventricular contraction and relaxation patterns at rest and during dobutamine stress. Methods: We applied a previously developed approach that combines non-invasive measurements with a physiologically-based, reduced-order model of the cardiovascular system to provide subject-specific estimates of parameters characterizing left ventricular function. In this model, the contractile state of the heart at each time point along the cardiac cycle is modeled using a time-varying elastance curve. Non-invasive data, including four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) measurements, were acquired in nine subjects without a known heart disease at rest and during dobutamine stress. For each of the study subjects, we constructed two personalized models corresponding to the resting and the stress state. Results: Applying the modeling framework, we identified significant increases in the left ventricular contraction rate constant [from 1.5 +/- 0.3 to 2 +/- 0.5 (p = 0.038)] and relaxation constant [from 37.2 +/- 6.9 to 46.1 +/- 12 (p = 0.028)]. In addition, we found a significant decrease in the elastance diastolic time constant from 0.4 +/- 0.04 s to 0.3 +/- 0.03 s = 0.008). Conclusions: The integrated image-modeling approach allows the assessment of cardiovascular function given as model-based parameters. The agreement between the estimated parameter values and previously reported effects of dobutamine demonstrates the potential of the approach to assess advanced metrics of pathophysiology that are otherwise difficult to obtain non-invasively in clinical practice.

  • 25.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tinno
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    MRI Turbulence Quantification2009In: Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med., 2009, p. 1858-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dyverfeldt, Petter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    On MRI turbulence quantification2009In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 913-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent flow, characterized by velocity fluctuations, accompanies many forms of cardiovascular disease and may contribute to their progression and hemodynamic consequences. Several studies have investigated the effects of turbulence on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal. Quantitative MRI turbulence measurements have recently been shown to have great potential for application both in human cardiovascular flow and in engineering flow. In this article, potential pitfalls and sources of error in MRI turbulence measurements are theoretically and numerically investigated. Data acquisition strategies suitable for turbulence quantification are outlined. The results show that the sensitivity of MRI turbulence measurements to intravoxel mean velocity variations is negligible, but that noise may degrade the estimates if the turbulence encoding parameter is set improperly. Different approaches for utilizing a given amount of scan time were shown to influence the dynamic range and the uncertainty in the turbulence estimates due to noise. The findings reported in this work may be valuable for both in vitro and in vivo studies employing MRI methods for turbulence quantification.

  • 27.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Calculation of relative cardiac pressure along streamlines using time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance,1999, 1999, p. 290-291Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann
    Department of Medicine, University of California−San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Estimation of relative cardiovascular pressures using time-resolved three-dimensional phase contrast MRI2001In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 872-879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate, easy-to-use, noninvasive cardiovascular pressure registration would be an important addition to the diagnostic armamentarium for assessment of cardiac function. A novel noninvasive and three-dimensional (3D) technique for estimation of relative cardiovascular pressures is presented. The relative pressure is calculated using the Navier-Stokes equations along user-defined lines placed within a time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI dataset. The lines may be either straight or curved to follow an actual streamline. The technique is validated in an in vitro model and tested on in vivo cases of normal and abnormal transmitral pressure differences and intraaortic flow. The method supplements an intuitive visualization technique for cardiovascular flow, 3D particle trace visualization, with a quantifiable diagnostic parameter estimated from the same dataset.

  • 29.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann
    Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Noninvasive measurement of time-varying three-dimensional relative pressure fields within the human heart2002In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, ISSN 0148-0731, E-ISSN 1528-8951, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 288-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding cardiac blood flow patterns is important in the assessment of cardiovascular function. Three-dimensional flow and relative pressure fields within the human left ventricle are demonstrated by combining velocity measurements with computational fluid mechanics methods. The velocity field throughout the left atrium and ventricle of a normal human heart is measured using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRL. Subsequently, the time-resolved three-dimensional relative pressure is calculated from this velocity field using the pressure Poisson equation. Noninvasive simultaneous assessment of cardiac pressure and flow phenomena is an important new tool for studying cardiac fluid dynamics.

  • 30.
    Ebbers, Tino
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Particle trace visualization of cardiac flow patterns using 3D phase contrast MRI: an in vitro comparison with streamlines created using dye.1999In: Proc Intl Soc Magn Reson Med 7,1999, 1999, p. 2025-2025Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Engvall, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation.
    Ask, Per
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Physiological Measurements.
    Loyd, Dan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Importance of collateral vessels in aortic coarctation: Computer simulation at rest and exercise using transmission line elements1994In: Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing, ISSN 0140-0118, Vol. 32, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigfridsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, A.F.
    University of California, San Fransisco, San Fransisco, USA.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Virtual makers for noninvasive assessment of myocardial dynamics2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

      

     

  • 33.
    Farhanieh, Arman
    et al.
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Mau, Christoph
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Annerfeldt, Mats
    Siemens Ind Turbomachinery AB, Sweden.
    Nadali Najafabadi, Hossein
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    UNSTEADY EFFECTS IN THE HEAT LOAD PREDICTIONS FOR A TWO-STAGE COMPRESSOR TURBINE2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME TURBO EXPO: TURBINE TECHNICAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION, 2016, VOL 5A, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016, no UNSP V05AT13A025Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heat load analysis play an important role in the estimation of hot gas components lifetime. To achieve a high level of accuracy in heat load analysis, predicting the temperature distribution on the vane and blades is one area where further development is needed. Due to strong flow unsteadiness and mixing effects from blade row interactions and cooling injections, accurate heat load predictions have become an engineering challenge. This study uses both steady and time-accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to investigate the unsteady and mixing effects in a two-stage compressor turbine. The commercial code ANSYS CFX-15 is utilized to evaluate the performance of the steady state, mixing plane (MP) method, versus time-accurate, profile transformation (PT) and time transformation (TT) methods. The presence or absence of the rotor-stator cavities from which purge or cooling air is entering the main flowpath can also play an important role in the unsteadiness and mixing properties. Therefore the unsteady effects have been examined for two cases; a simplified model without any cavity and a detailed geometry with all the cavities included. In the simplified case, the cooling has been implemented as local patches. The results are then compared with gas temperature measurements from the real engine tests using thermo-crystals. The measurements include temperature profiles in front of the leading edge of each stator and rotor for both stages. The findings suggest that including cooling cavities may not improve the results in steady state simulations, however their presence in transient simulations can lead to mixing prediction improvements. Moreover, the results indicate that the transient simulations will improve the mixing predictions mainly in the second stage of the turbine. The results also indicate that in transient simulations, number of passages and pitch ratio between the stators of consecutive stages directly affect the results regardless of which transient method is used.

  • 34.
    Folkesson, Maggie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sadowska, Natalia
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Carlhäll, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Wågsäter, Dick
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Lasse
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Differences in cardiovascular toxicities associated with cigarette smoking and snuff use revealed using novel zebrafish models2016In: Biology Open, ISSN 2046-6390, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 970-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tobacco use is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease and the only avoidable risk factor associated with development of aortic aneurysm. While smoking is the most common form of tobacco use, snuff and other oral tobacco products are gaining popularity, but research on potentially toxic effects of oral tobacco use has not kept pace with the increase in its use. Here, we demonstrate that cigarette smoke and snuff extracts are highly toxic to developing zebrafish embryos. Exposure to such extracts led to a palette of toxic effects including early embryonic mortality, developmental delay, cerebral hemorrhages, defects in lymphatics development and ventricular function, and aneurysm development. Both cigarette smoke and snuff were more toxic than pure nicotine, indicating that other compounds in these products are also associated with toxicity. While some toxicities were found following exposure to both types of tobacco product, other toxicities, including developmental delay and aneurysm development, were specifically observed in the snuff extract group, whereas cerebral hemorrhages were only found in the group exposed to cigarette smoke extract. These findings deepen our understanding of the pathogenic effects of cigarette smoking and snuff use on the cardiovascular system and illustrate the benefits of using zebrafish to study mechanisms involved in aneurysm development.

  • 35.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Complex directions of pulmonary venous inflow: Intuitive display with 3D MRI phase contrast1998In: J Am Soc Echocardiography,1998, 1998, p. 516-516Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Discrete three-dimensional pathways of right and left pulmonary venous inflow studied with phase contrast MRI1999In: J Am Coll Cardiol,1999, 1999, p. 477-478aConference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Quantification of intra ventricular vortices from 3D phase contrast MRI1999In: American Heart Assocation 72nd Scientific Session,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Janerot-Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Size of the normal mitral annulus as measured by 2D multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography1997In: Echocardiography,1997, 1997Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    14:S61

  • 39.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Öhman, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wranne, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pitfalls in Doppler evaluation of diastolic function: insights from three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging1999In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, ISSN 0894-7317, E-ISSN 1097-6795, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 817-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrasound-Doppler assessment of diastolic function is subject to velocity errors caused by angle sensitivity and a fixed location of the sample volume. We used 3-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate these errors in 10 patients with hypertension and in 10 healthy volunteers. The single (Doppler) and triple (MRI) component velocity was measured at early (E) and late (A) inflow along Doppler-like sample lines or 3-dimensional particle traces generated from the MRI data. Doppler measurements underestimated MRI velocities by 9.4% ± 8.6%; the effect on the E/A ratio was larger and more variable. Measuring early and late diastolic inflows from a single line demonstrated the error caused by their 3-dimensional spatial offset. Both errors were minimized by calculating the E/A ratio from maximal E and A values without constraint to a single line. Alignment and spatial offset are important sources of error in Doppler diastolic parameters. Improved accuracy may be achieved with the use of maximal E and A velocities from wherever they occur in the left ventricle.

  • 40.
    Fyrenius, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wigström, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Bolger, Ann F.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Three-dimensional flow in the human left atrium2001In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abnormal flow patterns in the left atrium in atrial fibrillation or mitral stenosis are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and systemic embolisation; the characteristics of normal atrial flow that avoid stasis have not been well defined.

    OBJECTIVES: To present a three dimensional particle trace visualisation of normal left atrial flow in vivo, constructed from flow velocities in three dimensional space.

    METHODS: Particle trace visualisation of time resolved three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging velocity measurements was used to provide a display of intracardiac flow without the limitations of angle sensitivity or restriction to imaging planes. Global flow patterns of the left atrium were studied in 11 healthy volunteers.

    RESULTS: In all subjects vortical flow was observed in the atrium during systole and diastolic diastasis (mean (SD) duration of systolic vortex, 280 (77) ms; and of diastolic vortex, 256 (118) ms). The volume incorporated and recirculated within the vortices originated predominantly from the left pulmonary veins. Inflow from the right veins passed along the vortex periphery, constrained between the vortex and the atrial wall.

    CONCLUSIONS: Global left atrial flow in the normal human heart comprises consistent patterns specific to the phase of the cardiac cycle. Separate paths of left and right pulmonary venous inflow and vortex formation may have beneficial effects in avoiding left atrial stasis in the normal subject in sinus rhythm.

  • 41.
    Gupta, Vikas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Henriksson, Lilian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Ebbers, Tino
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Automated three-dimensional tracking of the left ventricular myocardium in time-resolved and dose-modulated cardiac CT images using deformable image registration2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, ISSN 1934-5925, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Assessment of myocardial deformation from time-resolved cardiac computed tomography (4D CT) would augment the already available functional information from such an examination without incurring any additional costs. A deformable image registration (DIR) based approach is proposed to allow fast and automatic myocardial tracking in clinical 4D CT images.

    Methods Left ventricular myocardial tissue displacement through a cardiac cycle was tracked using a B-spline transformation based DIR. Gradient of such displacements allowed Lagrangian strain estimation with respect to end-diastole in clinical 4D CT data from ten subjects with suspected coronary artery disease. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), point-to-curve error (PTC), and tracking error were used to assess the tracking accuracy. Wilcoxon signed rank test provided significance of tracking errors. Topology preservation was verified using Jacobian of the deformation. Reliability of estimated strains and torsion (normalized twist angle) was tested in subjects with normal function by comparing them with normal strain in the literature.

    Results Comparison with manual tracking showed high accuracy (DSC: 0.99± 0.05; PTC: 0.56mm± 0.47 mm) and resulted in determinant(Jacobian) > 0 for all subjects, indicating preservation of topology. Average radial (0.13 mm), angular (0.64) and longitudinal (0.10 mm) tracking errors for the entire cohort were not significant (p > 0.9). For patients with normal function, average strain [circumferential, radial, longitudinal] and peak torsion estimates were: [-23.5%, 31.1%, −17.2%] and 7.22°, respectively. These estimates were in conformity with the reported normal ranges in the existing literature.

    Conclusions Accurate wall deformation tracking and subsequent strain estimation are feasible with the proposed method using only routine time-resolved 3D cardiac CT.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-03-22 00:01
  • 42.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    FS Dynamics Sweden AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Large Eddy Simulation of Pulsating Flow Before and After CoA Repair - CFD for Intervention Planning2015In: Advances in Mechanical Engineering, ISSN 1687-8132, E-ISSN 1687-8140, Vol. 7, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large eddy simulation was applied to investigate hemodynamics in a model with coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and post-stenotic dilatation. Special focus was put on the role of hemodynamics for success of CoA repair. Several parameters previously identified as related to cardiovascular disease were studied. Known risk factors were observed both with CoA and after repair, and the restoration of the anatomy seems to be crucial for a successful result.

  • 43.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    ANSYS Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Large Eddy Simulation of Steady and Pulsating Flow in Asymmetric Stenosed Pipe2010In: ASME 2010 Summer Bioengineering Conference: Parts A and B, The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) , 2010, p. 573-574Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local hemodynamics and its impact on the development of cardiovascular disease and the blood itself have gained increasing attention during the last decades. Regions with low and/or oscillatory Wall Shear Stress (WSS) have been correlated with increased risk for development of atherosclerosis [1]; and turbulence in the cardio vascular system is suggested to increase the risk for hemolysis as well as platelet activation and thrombus formation [2, 3]. Furthermore, turbulent flows are inherently oscillatory with large spatial as well as temporal fluctuation, and hence possibly a risk for atherosclerosis development per se.

  • 44.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredric
    FS Dynamics Sweden AB, Gothenburg.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Large Eddy Simulation of Stenotic Flow for Wall Shear Stress Estimation - Validation and Application2011In: WSEAS Transactions on Biology and Biomedicine, ISSN 1109-9518, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 86-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Turbulent flow in the cardiovascular system may increase the risk for severe arterial disease. This workaddresses the feasibility of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using a general purpose code as a tool for assessmentof cardiovascular flow and investigates Wall Shear Stress (WSS) in steady as well as pulsating turbulent pipeflow. Poiseuille flow was specified at the inlet, and with a suitable ammount of perturbations at the inlet it waspossible to predict experimental data. The extent of the recirculation zone was affected by the inlet disturbances,and magnitude as well as direction of the WSS vector varied significantly at the reattachment point. For thepulsating flow, WSS shows a complex pattern with different spatial and temporal variation along the pipe. Thewall shear stress gradient was calculated on the entire post-stenotic surface and each component in the gradientwas investigated. The off-diagonal components in the gradient are usually assumed to be small, but here they werefound to be on the same order of magnitude as the diagonal terms. This work demonstrates the need for a scaleresolving simulation technique to accurately model cardiovascular flows.

  • 45.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    ANSYS Sweden, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Large Eddy Simulation of Flow through a Stenosed Pipe2009In: ASME 2008 Summer Bioengineering Conference, Parts A and B, American Society of Mechanical Engineers , 2009, p. 445-446Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of all deaths in the developed world are related to atherosclerosis, i.e. obstruction of blood vessels caused by growth of the vessel wall. Hemodynamic phenomena, especially wall shear stress, are since several decades thought to influence the risk to develop atherosclerosis; hence simulation of blood flow, either in order to elucidate the relation between the hemodynamic and disease initiation or to study the flow pattern, is an area of intense research [1,2].

  • 46.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    ANSYS Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Quantifying Turbulent Wall Shear Stress in a Stenosed Pipe Using Large Eddy Simulation2010In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, ISSN 0148-0731, E-ISSN 1528-8951, Vol. 132, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large eddy simulation was applied for flow of Re = 2000 in a stenosed pipe in order to undertake a thorough investigation of the wall shear stress (WSS) in turbulent flow. A decomposition of the WSS into time averaged and fluctuating components is proposed. It was concluded that a scale resolving technique is required to completely describe the WSS pattern in a subject specific vessel model, since the poststenotic region was dominated by large axial and circumferential fluctuations. Three poststenotic regions of different WSS characteristics were identified. The recirculation zone was subject to a time averaged WSS in the retrograde direction and large fluctuations. After reattachment there was an ante grade shear and smaller fluctuations than in the recirculation zone. At the reattachment the fluctuations were the largest, but no direction dominated over time. Due to symmetry the circumferential time average was always zero. Thus, in a blood vessel, the axial fluctuations would affect endothelial cells in a stretched state, whereas the circumferential fluctuations would act in a relaxed direction.

  • 47.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lantz, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Carlsson, Fredrik
    ANSYS Sweden.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wall Shear Stress in Turbulent Pipe Flow2009In: Proceedings of the ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference 2009, 2009, p. 963-964Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low and/or oscillatory Wall Shear Stress (WSS) has been correlated with elevated risk for increased intima media thickness and atherosclerosis in several studies during the last decades [1, 2]. Most of the studies have addressed laminar flows, in which the oscillations mainly are due to the pulsating nature of blood flow. Turbulent flows however show significant spatial and temporal fluctuations although the mean flow is steady.

  • 48.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Assessment of Geometrical Influence on WSS Estimation in the Human Aorta2006In: WSEAS Transactions on Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 1790-5087, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on a stenosed human aorta with poststenotic dilatation, in order to estimate wall shear stress (WSS). WSS is important due to its correlation with atherosclerosis. Both steady-state and non-stationary simulations were conducted. Three different models were created from a set of MRI images. Comparison of geometrically different models was accomplished by using geometrical landmarks and a comparison parameter. Geometrical differences had larger influence on WSS magnitude than inflow rotation in steady-state results for the models used. In non-stationary flow the largest differences in WSS are found when the flow velocity near the wall is low e.g. when the inflow is low or in recirculation regions.

  • 49.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD TMMV532006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Gårdhagen, Roland
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Renner, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Applied Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics.
    Karlsson, Matts
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Modelling and Simulation .
    Computational Fluid Dynamics CFD TMMV53 Course Compendium2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12345 1 - 50 of 231
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