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  • 1.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Feedback and common ground in conversational storytelling involvning people with Alzheimer's disease2012In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 211-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article focuses on feedback in storytelling involving people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and how feedback is related to the ways participants establish a common ground (Clark 1996) in interaction. The establishment of common ground is important in all kinds of interaction and becomes an especially intricate process if participants have AD, since the achievement of common ground requires the ability to draw from knowledge and experiences relating to past as well as present events; an ability that is often hampered by the disease. Analyses show that other aspects than the actual content of the conversation are important for the participants – for instance being together, supporting the positive identities both presented in the story and embodied in the socially rewarding activity that they manage to engage in, implying that the participants create and sustain a common ground not so much about the story-layer as of the storytelling activity.

  • 2.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study2009In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, focus is on how persons with AD use their remaining linguistic and cognitive resources, together with non-verbal aspects of the storytelling event, as resources in communicating and negotiating their identities in everyday encounters. The results of the analysis, focusing on the telling of the stories, indicate that other aspects than the temporal and referential organization of the narratives has become important resources for the teller in establishing and negotiating identity. The telling of temporally discontinuous narratives does not appear to affect or disrupt the teller's experience of some sort of a continuous sense of self and identity but are probably more a problem to persons without this kind of diagnosis. Being afflicted by AD most likely leads persons to try to invent and use alternative communicative recourses in order to sustain factors like their senses of self and identities. For researchers this makes it important to try to base their analysis on the actual organization of the talk and to focus on the functions of various responses and utterances in the interaction.

  • 3.
    Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Österholm, Johannes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Voice: An Analytical Framework for Exploring Citizenship in Dementia Research2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We will present voice as an analytical framework to enhance the problematization and investigation of citizenship for people living with dementia. We will also discuss the strengths and the potential of using such a framework when doing research on citizenship in general, and more specifically, for people living with dementia. The analytical framework that we will propose focuses on the multiple accounts of voice in use. Thus, the framework does not only embrace the issue of "whose voices?", but also the various ways voice has been conceptualised, framed and understood in different theoretical and empirical contexts as well as how these together in different ways have the potential to shed light on the possibility for people with dementia to remain participative actors in their neighbourhood, in society and furthermore, to have the opportunity to claim full citizenship.

  • 4.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Demens: diagnosen som utmanar våra rädslor och fördomar2011In: Diagnos & identitet / [ed] Georg Drakos, Lars-Christer Hydén, Stockholm: Gothia Förlag AB, 2011, p. 100-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Fragile identities, patched-up worlds: Dementia and meaning-making in social interaction2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the identity work and the meaning- or sense-making that continue in the face of evolving dementia diseases, in social interaction, and the challenges for care this involves. The study adopts an actor-oriented approach and addresses the question of how persons with age-related progressive dementia diseases in everyday communication make sense of their situations, their surroundings, and their lives – all within the context of daily life in residential care. Of particular interest is how these persons handle issues of joint action in a shared world and how they establish and maintain an identity in the inte-raction. This is in spite of severe memory problems, disorientation in time and space, dif-fering understandings of the current situation, and difficulties in telling “accurate” and temporally ordered stories about their lives. The thesis also addresses the question of how caregivers may handle the complex interplay between residents in daily care, in maintain-ing and respecting these persons’ dignity.

    The study follows a growing tradition of studying interaction in dementia as mean-ing-based and situated in a context rather than merely as behavior caused by cognitive impairment. Methodologically, this is an ethnographic study based on observations made within a period of six months. The data consist of around 150 hours of video recordings and complementary field notes. This extensive material has made it possible to study the social interaction both in detail and situated in a larger context.

    The findings point to remaining competences and strategies that persons with demen-tia use actively and creatively in the ongoing interaction – and, given the premises, often in a rational way. This is discussed in terms of resources for dementia care, in relation to the great challenge of patching up and putting together a comprehensive socially shared world as well as maintaining continuity with the persons’ previous life histories in a way that preserves a positive self-identity.

    List of papers
    1. Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia
    2006 (English)In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 647-673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the productive aspects of confabulation as it occurs spontaneously in dementia care, in its context, and in interaction with other care recipients. Confabulation is approached as a social and discursive event with distinct narrative features; plots and formerly established genres of plots, storylines, are used by confabulators in order to understand, manage and interact socially in the present situation. Three main functions of confabulation are discerned: 1) making sense of the current situation (sense-making); 2) maintaining a personal identity in interaction with others (self-making); and 3) organizing and legitimizing joint action in the world (world-making). The resources used by confabulating subjects are sparse and not well adjusted to changing conditions, as the number of accessible storylines is limited. This makes it difficult to apply storylines that explain the current situation satisfactorily, provide useful guidelines for how to act, as well as preserve a positive self-identity. Helping with this constitutes a major challenge in dementia care.

    Keywords
    Alzheimer’s disease, communication, confabulation, context, dementiam, ethnography
    National Category
    Communication Studies
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13251 (URN)10.1177/1461445606067333 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2013-09-04
    2. Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia
    2010 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 9, p. 21-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Disorientation as experienced by persons with progressive dementia diseases involves both existential and social dimensions. Based on video observations from a small residential care unit and exploring social interaction on a micro-level, this case study focuses on how a woman with vascular dementia actively tries to make sense of an everyday lunch situation. The analysis addresses strategies used by her to contextualize where she has ended up, and also how the meaning of the place is altered in communication. Findings point to social interaction between residents as an important resource to help maintain continuity with previous social life. However, there also seems to be an impending need for caregivers to help residents patch up their broken life-stories to render everyday situations comprehensible and the setting socially meaningful. Helping them find a way of placing themselves within it — also affording a positive self-identity and continuity with previous life history — is a major challenge in daily care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2010
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13252 (URN)10.1177/1471301210364449 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Narrative and identity in Alzheimer’s disease: a case study
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this case study, focus is on how persons with AD use their remaining linguistic and cognitive resources, together with non-verbal aspects of the storytelling event, as resources in communicating and negotiating their identities in everyday encounters. The results of the analysis, focusing on the telling of the stories, indicate that other aspects than the temporal and referential organization of the narratives has become important resources for the teller in establishing and negotiating identity. The telling of temporally discontinuous narratives does not appear to affect or disrupt the teller's experience of some sort of a continuous sense of self and identity but are probably more a problem to persons without this kind of diagnosis. Being afflicted by AD most likely leads persons to try to invent and use alternative communicative recourses in order to sustain factors like their senses of self and identities. For researchers this makes it important to try to base their analysis on the actual organization of the talk and to focus on the functions of various responses and utterances in the interaction.

    Keywords
    identity, narrative, Alzheimer’s disease, performance, story-telling
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13253 (URN)10.1016/j.jaging.2008.01.001 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    4. Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis
    2007 (English)In: Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, ISSN 1471-3012, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 507-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with issues of dignity in dementia care, in situations where staff members handle potential or actual conflicts and interaction problems between residents. Based on empirical data consisting of observations and video recordings, various coping strategies are identified in regard to whether or not, as well as when and how to interfere. Microethical analysis is used in order to discuss these coping strategies in relation to contextual conditions and ways of understanding, and values or aspects of dignity are highlighted. In dialogue with empirical data, nuances of ethical considerations are approached that are otherwise difficult to access analytically — thereby opening the door to a more reflective way of dealing with problematic situations in dementia care.

    Keywords
    coping strategies • conflict solving • ethics • ethnography • microethics
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13254 (URN)10.1177/1471301207084368 (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-05-06 Created: 2008-05-06 Last updated: 2009-03-09Bibliographically approved
  • 6.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Placing the place, and placing oneself within it: (dis)orientation and (dis)continuity in dementia2010In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 9, p. 21-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disorientation as experienced by persons with progressive dementia diseases involves both existential and social dimensions. Based on video observations from a small residential care unit and exploring social interaction on a micro-level, this case study focuses on how a woman with vascular dementia actively tries to make sense of an everyday lunch situation. The analysis addresses strategies used by her to contextualize where she has ended up, and also how the meaning of the place is altered in communication. Findings point to social interaction between residents as an important resource to help maintain continuity with previous social life. However, there also seems to be an impending need for caregivers to help residents patch up their broken life-stories to render everyday situations comprehensible and the setting socially meaningful. Helping them find a way of placing themselves within it — also affording a positive self-identity and continuity with previous life history — is a major challenge in daily care.

  • 7.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Reframing dementia in Swedish self-help group conversations: Constructing citizenship2012In: International journal of self help & self care, ISSN 1091-2851, E-ISSN 1541-4450, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 9-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores on a micro-level the activity of a self-help group for persons with dementia in Swedish municipal care, based on audio-recordings from 18 months' ethnographic fieldwork. The study focuses on the discursive construction of a shared meaning perspective and its inherent possibilities for liberation. Applying a citizenship perspective, the study approaches people with dementia as vulnerable to marginalization while at the same time capable of agency within the boundaries of their condition. The findings paint a complex picture involving opportunities and limitations of experiential knowledge, issues of double stigmatization, and constructs of being interrelated with other people and with the surrounding society. In the center is the overarching struggle of retaining citizenship in the face of the evolving disease.

  • 8.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Självhjälpsgrupper, nätverk och aktivism2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 203-211Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The subjectivity of disorientation: moral stakes and concerns2014In: Beyond Loss: dementia, identity, personhood / [ed] Lars-Christer Hydén, Hilde Lindemann, and Jens Brockmeier, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, p. 191-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of interdisciplinary essays by international researchers tries to see beyond the loss in dementia, exploring it as transformation and change of personhood and identity that typically is embedded in social life. The chapters identify three important themes: persons and personhood, identity and agency, and the social and the communal.

  • 10.
    Örulv, Linda
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Where are we? What's going to happen? Spontaneous narrating and dementia (presentation baserad på artikelarbete tillsammans med Lars-Christer Hydén)2003In: First Interdisciplinary Conference on Communication, Medicine Ethics COMET, 26-28 June 2003,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 11.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Confabulation: sense-making, self-making and world-making in dementia2006In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 647-673Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the productive aspects of confabulation as it occurs spontaneously in dementia care, in its context, and in interaction with other care recipients. Confabulation is approached as a social and discursive event with distinct narrative features; plots and formerly established genres of plots, storylines, are used by confabulators in order to understand, manage and interact socially in the present situation. Three main functions of confabulation are discerned: 1) making sense of the current situation (sense-making); 2) maintaining a personal identity in interaction with others (self-making); and 3) organizing and legitimizing joint action in the world (world-making). The resources used by confabulating subjects are sparse and not well adjusted to changing conditions, as the number of accessible storylines is limited. This makes it difficult to apply storylines that explain the current situation satisfactorily, provide useful guidelines for how to act, as well as preserve a positive self-identity. Helping with this constitutes a major challenge in dementia care.

  • 12.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nikku, Nina
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Sociology . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Dignity work in dementia care: Sketching a microethical analysis2007In: Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, ISSN 1471-3012, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 507-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with issues of dignity in dementia care, in situations where staff members handle potential or actual conflicts and interaction problems between residents. Based on empirical data consisting of observations and video recordings, various coping strategies are identified in regard to whether or not, as well as when and how to interfere. Microethical analysis is used in order to discuss these coping strategies in relation to contextual conditions and ways of understanding, and values or aspects of dignity are highlighted. In dialogue with empirical data, nuances of ethical considerations are approached that are otherwise difficult to access analytically — thereby opening the door to a more reflective way of dealing with problematic situations in dementia care.

  • 13.
    Örulv, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strandroos, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Vardagsdraman på det särskilda boendet2016In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström, Lars-Christer Hydén, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 79-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 13 of 13
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