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  • 1.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boeryd, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Frånlund, B.
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Håkansson, L.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Occurrence and prognostic importance of micrometastases in regional lymph nodes in Dukes' B colorectal carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study1996In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 162, no 8, p. 637-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence and prognostic importance of micrometastatic disease in regional lymph nodes from Dukes' B colorectal carcinomas.

    DESIGN: Retrospective study.

    SETTING: University hospital, Sweden.

    SUBJECTS: 100 patients operated on for primary colorectal carcinoma, classified as Dukes' B lesions.

    INTERVENTIONS: The regional lymph nodes were re-examined immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence and prognostic importance of micrometastases.

    RESULTS: Micrometastases were found in 39% (39/100) of the patients. The number of positive cells in the lymph nodes examined varied from 1 to over 100. They appeared as single cells or small clusters of cells located within the capsule or in the peripheral sinus of the lymph node. At least three sections from each of three lymph nodes had to be examined to identify 95% of the patients with lymph node micrometastases. The outcome of the patients with micrometastases was not significantly different from that of patients with no epithelial cells in the lymph nodes.

    CONCLUSION: Micrometastases in regional lymph nodes are a interesting phenomenon but clinically seem to be of only weak prognostic value.

  • 2.
    Adell, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stål, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Klintenberg, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nordenskjöld, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    p53 status: an indicator for the effect of preoperative radiotherapy of rectal cancer.1999In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 169-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rectal carcinoma is a common malignancy, with a history of high local recurrence rates following surgery. In recent years. preoperative radiotherapy and refined surgical technique have improved local control rates.

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between expression of nuclear p53 protein and the outcome in rectal carcinoma, with and without short-term preoperative radiotherapy.

    MATERIAL: Specimens from 163 patients from the Southeast Swedish Health Care region included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial between 1987-1990.

    METHOD: New sections from the paraffin blocks of the preoperative biopsy and the surgical specimen were examined immunohistochemically using a p53 antibody (PAb 1801).

    RESULT: Expression of nuclear p53 protein was seen in 41% of the tumours. The p53 negative patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy had a significant reduction of local failure compared with the non-irradiated p53 negative patients (P = 0.0008). In contrast, p53 positive patients showed no benefit from preoperative radiotherapy. The interaction between p53 status and the benefit of radiotherapy was statistically significant (P = 0.018).

    CONCLUSION: Expression of nuclear p53 protein in rectal carcinoma seems to be a significant predictive factor for local treatment failure after preoperative radiotherapy. Further investigations are necessary to select patients for preoperative treatment based on analysis of the preoperative biopsies.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health related quality of life in Crohn's proctocolitis does not differ from a general population when in remission2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  All treatment in Crohn's disease, although palliative, aims at restoring full health. The objective of this study was to compare health-related quality of life and psychosocial conditions in patients with Crohn's proctocolitis with a general population.

    Patients and methods  One hundred and twenty-seven patients with Crohn's proctocolitis (median age 44 years, 44.1% men) were compared with 266 controls (median age 45 years, 50.7% men). A questionnaire consisting of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluating general health as well as questions regarding psychosocial conditions was used. Disease activity was evaluated by Best's modification of the classical Crohn's Disease Activity Index.

    Results  Patients in remission had a health related quality of life similar to controls according to the SF-36 apart from general health where scores were lower (P < 0.01). Patients with active disease scored lower in all aspects of the SF-36 (P < 0.001 or P < 0.0001) as well as the PGWB (P < 0.0001). In a model for multiple regression including age, gender, concomitant small bowel disease, permanent stoma, previous colonic surgery, disease activity, duration, and aggressiveness, disease activity was the only variable negatively predicting all 8 domains of the SF-36 in the patient group (P < 0.001). The mean annual sick-leave for patients and controls were 33.9 and 9.5 days (P < 0.0001), respectively. Sixty-eight percent of the patients and 78.4% of the controls (P = 0.04) were married or cohabited, 67.7% and 78.0% (P = 0.04), respectively, had children.

    Conclusion  The health related quality of life for patients with Crohn's proctocolitis in remission does not differ from the general population. The disease has, however, a negative impact on parenthood, family life and professional performance.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arvidsson, M.
    Dabrosin-Söderholm, J.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Smedh, K.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Low symptomatic load in Crohn's disease with surgery and medicine as complementary treatments1998In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 423-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The treatment of Crohn's disease has changed owing to the recognition of its chronicity. Medical maintenance treatment and limited resections have evolved as major concepts of management, regarded as complementary, and both aim at reducing the symptoms.

    Methods: We investigated the symptomatic load in Crohn's disease as reflected in a cross-sectional study of the symptom index, physicians' assessment, and the patients' perception of health. A cohort of 212 patients from the primary catchment area and 125 referred patients were studied.

    Results: Of catchment area patients, 83% were receiving medication, and the annual rate of abdominal surgery was 5.7%. Corresponding figures for the referred patients were 82% and 10.3%. According to the symptom index, 87% of catchment area patients were in remission or had only mild symptoms; according to the physicians' assessment, 90% were. The patients' median perception of health was 90% of perfect health according to the visual analogue scale. The figures were similar for referred patients, except that referrals were considered more diseased by the physician.

    Conclusion: The great majority of patients with Crohn's disease are able to live in remission or experience only mild symptoms.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bodemar, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Surgery for Crohn colitis over a twenty-eight-year period: fewer stomas and the replacement of total colectomy by segmental resection2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 68-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study describes how surgery for Crohn colitis developed between 1970 and 1997, towards the end of which period limited resection and medical maintenance treatment was introduced.

    Methods: A cohort of 211 patients with Crohn colitis (115 population-based), of which 84 had a primary colonic resection (42 population-based), was investigated regarding indication for surgery, the time from diagnosis to operation, type of primary colonic resection, risk for permanent stoma and medication over four 7-year periods.

    Results: Comparison of the periods 1970-90 and 1991-97 revealed that active disease as an indication for surgery decreased from 64% to 25% ( P < 0.01) while stricture as an indication increased from 9% to 50% ( P < 0.001). Median time from diagnosis to operation increased from 3.5 to 11.5 years ( P < 0.01). Proctocolectomy or colectomy fell from 68.8% to 10% of the primary resections, whereas segmental resection increased from 31.2% to 90%. At the end of the first 7-year period, 26% had medical maintenance treatment, steroids or azathioprine taken by 7%. Corresponding figures for the last period were 70% and 49%. Patients diagnosed during the last two time-periods had less risk for surgery ( P = 0.017), permanent stoma ( P < 0.01) and total colectomy ( P < 0.01). Findings were similar in the population-based cohort.

    Conclusions: Current management of Crohn colitis implies a longer period between diagnosis and surgery, a reduced risk for surgery and permanent stoma, and the replacement of total colectomy by segmental resection.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Boeryd, Bernt
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased anal resting pressure and rectal sensitivity in Crohn's disease2003In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 46, no 12, p. 1685-1689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Anal pathology occurs in 20 to 80 percent of patients with Crohn's disease in which abscesses, fistulas, and fissures account for considerable morbidity. The etiology is not clearly defined, but altered anorectal pressures may play a role. This study was designed to investigate anorectal physiologic conditions in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls.

    METHODS: Twenty patients with Crohn's disease located in the ileum (n = 9) or the colon (n = 11) without macroscopic proctitis or perianal disease were included. All were subjected to rectal examination, anorectal manometry, manovolumetry, and rectoscopy. Comparison was made with a reference group of 173 healthy controls of whom 128 underwent anorectal manometry, 29 manovolumetry, and 16 both examinations.

    RESULTS: Maximum resting pressure and resting pressure area were higher in patients than in controls (P = 0.017 and P = 0.011, respectively), whereas maximum squeeze pressure and squeeze pressure area were similar. Rectal sensitivity was increased in patients expressed as lower values both for volume and pressure for urge (P = 0.013 and P = 0.014, respectively) as well as maximum tolerable pressure (P = 0.025).

    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates how patients with Crohn's disease without macroscopic proctitis have increased anal pressures in conjunction with increased rectal sensitivity. This may contribute to later development of anal pathology, because increased intra-anal pressures may compromise anal circulation, causing fissures, and also discharging of fecal matter into the perirectal tracts, which may have a role in infection and fistula development.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Segmental resection or subtotal colectomy in Crohn's colitis?2002In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 47-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Segmental resection for Crohn's colitis is controversial. Compared with subtotal colectomy, segmental resection is reported to be associated with a higher rate of re-resection. Few studies address this issue, and postoperative functional outcome has not been reported previously. This study compared segmental resection to subtotal colectomy with anastomosis with regard to re-resection, postoperative symptoms, and anorectal function.

    METHODS: Fifty-seven patients operated on between 1970 and 1997 with segmental resection (n = 31) or subtotal colectomy (n = 26) were included. Reoperative procedures were analyzed by a life-table technique. Segmentally resected patients were also compared separately with a subgroup of subtotally colectomized patients (n = 12) with similarly limited colonic involvement. Symptoms were assessed according to Best's modified Crohn's Disease Activity Index and an anorectal function score.

    RESULTS: The re-resection rate did not differ between groups in either the entire study population (P = 0.46) or the subgroup of patients with comparable colonic involvement (P = 0.78). Segmentally resected patients had fewer symptoms (P = 0.039), fewer loose stools (P = 0.002), and better anorectal function (P = 0.027). Multivariate analysis revealed the number of colonic segments removed to be the strongest predictive factor for postoperative symptoms and anorectal function (P = 0.026 and P = 0.013, respectively).

    CONCLUSION: Segmental resection should be considered in limited Crohn's colitis.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Continent Ileostomy2008In: Seminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery, ISSN 1043-1489, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 124-131Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Continent ileostomy reservoir is today still an alternative to a standard (conventional) ileostomy in patients where ileal pouch-anal anastomosis is contraindicated or malfunctioning. It eliminates a protruding stoma, obviates the need for a stoma bag, and permits controlled evacuation of bowel contents. A well-functioning continent ileostomy also is entirely continent for gas and feces in the elderly. The reservoir is emptied three to five times a day. Obvious benefits are improved sexual life and facilitated leisure activities. The main drawbacks are frequent complications requiring reoperations in about 50% of the patients. Slippage of the nipple valve occurs in about one-third but in the majority of patients reoperations are successful in the long run. Other complications are pouchitis, enterocutaneous fistula, and stomal stricture. Modifications of the original Kock pouch have been developed as the Barnett pouch and the T-pouch to reduce complications associated with dysfunction of the nipple valve. Cancer of a continent ileostomy reservoir has been reported only in one patient and there seems to be no risk of high-grade dysplasia even after long-term follow-up. At present there are few indications for creating a continent ileostomy reservoir but it is still recommended in very select patients. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Controversies in surgical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease2001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 10.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Crohn´s Disease2008In: Coloproctology / [ed] Alexander Herold, Paul-Antoine Lehur, Klaus E. Matzel, P. Ronan O'Connell., Berlin: Springer , 2008, 1, p. 145-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    EMM: Coloproctology presents the state-of-the-art in coloproctology. The topics covered include anatomy, physiology, anal disorders, dermatology, functional disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, benign and malignant tumours, endoscopy, emergencies and pain syndromes. All chapters give a comprehensive overview of aetiology, incidence, epidemiology, diagnostics, medical and surgical treatment, complications and individual special considerations. This work presents surgical trainees with a comprehensive and condensed guide to the core knowledge required for the European Board of Surgery Qualification (EBSQ) examination. The manual will also be of assistance to practising coloproctologists across Europe and beyond who have an interest in continued professional development. Written by an international team of experts who have each made noteworthy contributions in their field, the coverage of most aspects of coloproctology in an easy-to-follow format also makes this manual valuable to other specialists.

  • 11. Arber, N
    et al.
    Kuwada, S
    Leshno, M
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hultcrantz, R
    Rex, D
    Sporadic adenomatous polyp regression with exisulind is effective but toxic: A randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, dose-response study2006In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 367-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim: A 12 month, multicentre, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, phase 3, dose-response study was carried out. Exisulind inhibits tumour growth by induction of apoptosis. The aim of our study was to investigate if exisulind induces regression of sporadic colonic adenomas. Patients and methods: A 12 month multicentre randomised double blind placebo controlled phase 3 dose response study was carried out. At baseline colonoscopy, left sided polyps (3-10 mm) were tattooed, measured, and left in place. Subjects received exisulind 200 or 400 mg, or placebo daily. Follow up sigmoidoscopy was performed after six months, and removal of any remaining polyps at the 12 month colonoscopy. The primary efficacy variable was change in polyp size from baseline. Results: A total of 281 patients were enrolled and randomised, 155 (55%) fulfilled the criteria for the intention to treat (ITT) analysis and 114 (41%) fulfilled the criteria for the efficacy evaluation analysis (patients who underwent the 12 month colonoscopy). The decrease in median polyp size was significantly greater (p = 0.03) in patients who received exisulind 400 mg (-10 mm2) compared with those who received placebo (-4 mm2). Complete or partial response was significantly higher in the exisulind 400 mg group (54.6%) compared with the placebo group (30.2%), and disease progression was significantly lower (6.1% v 27.9%) (p = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). Increased liver enzymes (8.4%) and abdominal pain (14.7%) were also reported at a greater frequency in the exisulind 400 mg group. Conclusion: Exisulind caused significant regression of sporadic adenomatous polyps but was associated with more toxicity. This model of polyp regression, short in its term and involving a comparatively small patient sample size, may be the best available tool to assess a therapeutic regimen before launching into large preventive clinical studies.

  • 12. Bohe, Måns
    et al.
    Cedermark, Björn
    Damber, Lena
    Lewin, Freddi
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Nordgren, Svante
    Påhlman, Lars
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Kvalitetsregister etablerat för bättre rektalcancerbehandling.2000In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 97, p. 3587-3591Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Fransson, Annelie
    Druvefors, Pelle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Hellsten, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Håkansson, Annika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Gustafsson, Bertil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Håkansson, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Preoperative interleukin-6 production by mononuclear blood cells predicts survival after radical surgery for colorectal carcinoma2007In: Cancer, ISSN 0008-543X, E-ISSN 1097-0142, Vol. 109, no 9, p. 1742-1749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in the Western world. Staging based on histopathology is currently the most accurate predictor of outcome after surgery. Colorectal cancer is curable if treated at an early stage (stage I-III). However, for tumors in stages II and III there is a great need for tests giving more accurate prognostic information defining the patient population in need of closer follow-up and/or adjuvant therapy. Furthermore, tests that provide prognostic information preoperatively could provide a guide both for preoperative oncologic treatment and the surgical procedure. METHODS. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated preoperatively, within a week before primary surgery, from 39 patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. The PBMCs were cultured in vitro for 24 hours in the presence of autologous serum and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) production was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Staging based on histopathology was performed in all patients. Patients were followed for at least 54 months. RESULTS. A production of >5000 pg/mL of IL-6 identified colorectal cancer patients with a poor prognosis. Eight out of 13 patients with >5000 pg/mL IL-6 died from cancer within the follow-up period, whereas no cancer-related deaths were recorded among 21 patients with 5000 pg/mL IL-6 or less. A multivariate Cox regression analysis, stratified for T- and N-stage, identified IL-6 production as an independent prognostic factor. CONCLUSIONS. IL-6 production in vitro by PBMC can predict survival after radical surgery for colorectal cancer. © 2007 American Cancer Society.

  • 14. Costa, M
    et al.
    Glise, H
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    The enteric nervous system in health and disease. Workshop.2000In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 47Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis.
    Lagerfelt, Marie
    Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Woisetschläger, Mischa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Ahlström, Ulla
    Vårdcentralen Kungsgatan Linköping, Sweden Region Östergötland, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Modifierad brittisk modell kortade ledtid till datortomografi av kolon2015In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The British national Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has presented guidelines based on signs and symptoms which should raise a suspicion of colorectal cancer. A slightly modified version of these guidelines, adapted to Swedish conditions, named Swedish NICE (sNICE) criteria, was implemented at eight primary care centres. By following the sNICE criteria, cases with higher degree of suspicion of colorectal cancer were advised for computer tomography (CT) of the colon, whereas cases of low degree of suspicion were advised for the considerably less time and patient demanding CT of the abdomen. For patients with isolated anal symptoms without presence of sNICE criteria, active expectancy for six weeks was recommended, followed by renewed consideration. Results showed that the ratio between CT colon and CT abdomen was reduced from 2.2 to 1.1 after introduction of the sNICE criteria. Also, the proportion of patients undergoing CT colon within two weeks from admittance was increased from 3 to 25 %. We conclude that the sNICE criteria may be a useful supportive tool for the primary care physician.

  • 16.
    Floodeen, H
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rutegard, J
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Matthiessen, P
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Early and late symptomatic anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer: are they different entities?2013In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 334-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection of the rectum (LAR) for cancer diagnosed during the initial hospital stay with those in whom leakage was diagnosed after hospital discharge. Method Forty-five patients undergoing LAR (n=234) entered into a randomized multicentre trial (NCT 00636948), who developed symptomatic anastomotic leakage, were identified. A comparison was made between patients diagnosed during the initial hospital stay on median postoperative day 8 (early leakage, EL; n=27) and patients diagnosed after hospital discharge at median postoperative day 22 (late leakage, LL; n=18). Patient characteristics, operative details, postoperative course and anatomical localization of the leakage were analysed. Results Leakage from the circular stapler line of an end-to-end anastomosis was more common in EL, while leakage from the stapler line of the efferent limb of the J-pouch or side-to-end anastomosis tended to be more frequent in LL (P=0.057). Intra-operative blood loss (P=0.006) and operation time (P=0.071) were increased in EL compared with LL. On postoperative day 5, EL performed worse than LL with regard to temperature (P=0.021), oral intake (P=0.006) and recovery of bowel activity (P=0.054). Anastomotic leakage was diagnosed most often by a rectal contrast study in EL and by CT scan in LL. The median initial hospital stay was 28days for EL and 10days for LL (Pandlt;0.001). Conclusion The present study has demonstrated that symptomatic anastomotic leakage can present before and after hospital discharge and raises the question of whether early and late leakage after LAR may be different entities.

  • 17.
    Gerdin, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Department of Surgery, Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Anders S.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Northern Hospital Zeeland, Denmark.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Swedish Crohn Trial: A Prematurely Terminated Randomized Controlled Trial of Thiopurines or Open Surgery for Primary Treatment of Ileocaecal Crohns Disease2016In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 50-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The importance of efficient and safe treatment of Crohns disease is highlighted by its chronicity. Both medical and surgical treatments have shown good results in the symptomatic control of limited ileocaecal Crohns disease. The aim of this study was to compare medical treatment with surgical treatment of ileocaecal Crohns disease. Methods: Thirty-six patients from seven hospitals with primary ileocaecal Crohns disease were randomized to either medical or surgical treatment. The medical treatment was induction of remission with budesonide and thereafter maintenance treatment with azathioprine. The surgical treatment was open ileocaecal resection. Crohns disease activity index over time, expressed as area under the curve at 1, 3 and 5 years, was the primary endpoint. Subjective health measured with the 36-item Short Form Survey Instrument (SF36) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) were secondary endpoints. Results: There were no differences between the treatment groups in Crohns disease activity index over time. General health, measured as SF36 score, was higher in patients receiving surgical treatment than in those receiving medical treatment at 1 year, but there was no corresponding difference in VAS. Due to the slow inclusion rate and changes in clinical practice, the study was t = erminated prematurely. Conclusion: The study ended up being underpowered and should be interpreted with caution, but there was no clinically significant difference between the two treatment arms. Further studies are needed to address this important clinical question.

  • 18.
    Gerjy, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindhoff-Larson, A.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, P. O.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Randomized clinical trial of stapled haemorrhoidopexy performed under local perianal block versus general anaesthesia2008In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 95, no 11, p. 1344-1351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim was to assess the feasibility of performing stapled haemorrhoidopexy under local anaesthesia.

    Methods: Fifty-eight patients with haemorrhoid prolapse were randomized to receive local or general anaesthesia. The perianal block was applied immediately peripheral to the external sphincter. Submucosal block was added after applying the purse-string suture. Patients reported average and peak pain daily for 14 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS). They also completed anal symptom questionnaires before the operation and at follow-up. The surgeon assessed the restoration of the anal anatomy 3-6 months after surgery.

    Results: The anal block was sufficient in all patients. The mean accumulated VAS score for average pain was 23·1 in the general anaesthesia group and 29·4 in the local anaesthesia group (P = 0·376); mean peak pain scores were 42·1 and 47·9 respectively (P = 0·537). Mean change in symptom load was also similar between the groups, with score differences of 7·0 in the general anaesthesia group and 6·1 in the local anaesthesia group. No patient had a recurrence of prolapse.

    Conclusion: Perianal local block is easy to apply with a high degree of acceptability among patients. Postoperative pain, restoration of anatomy and symptom resolution were similar to that of stapled haemorrhoidopexy performed under general anaesthesia.

  • 19.
    Hallböök, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Matthiessen, P
    Leinsköld, Ted
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Safety of the temporary loop ileostomy2002In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the complications of the temporary loop ileostomy. Method. A retrospective study of 222 consecutive patients with low anterior resection, ileal pouch-anal anastomosis or continent ileostomy and a diverting loop ileostomy routinely fashioned during the primary operation. The loop ileostomy was closed in 213 patients (96%) during the minimum follow-up period of 15 months. Results. Four patients (2%) required preterm closure of the ostomy due to stomal retraction (n = 3) or bowel obstruction (n = 1). Four patients were readmitted due to transient bowel obstruction that resolved without surgery. After closure of the loop ileostomy a total of 27 patients (13%) had complications. In 7 patients emergency re-operation was done due to small bowel obstruction (n = 5) or intra-abdominal abscess (n = 2). Elective re-operation was done in 5 patients for hernia at the site of the previous stoma. Despite the use of a loop ileostomy there was 1 postoperative death after the initial operation in consequence of anastomotic leakage. There was 1 death in consequence of closure of the loop ileostomy after 3 weeks due to intra-abdominal sepsis and heart failure. Conclusion. In this series closure of the ostomy was associated with one death (0.5%) and overall ostomy-related morbidity included the need to re-operate in 6%.

  • 20.
    Hallböök, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Surgical approaches to obtaining optimal bowel function2000In: Seminars in surgical oncology, ISSN 8756-0437, E-ISSN 1098-2388, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 249-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 50% of patients have an unsatisfactory functional result after traditional restorative rectal resection, and an even higher percentage, at least in the early postoperative period, suffers from urgency, frequent bowel movements, and occasional faecal incontinence. The rectal reservoir function is disturbed after restorative surgery. This is related to the size of the rectal remnant, the viscero-elastic properties, and the motility pattern of the neorectal wall, because segments of the remaining colon can only substitute for the rectum to a limited extent. A straight anastomosis is recommended when the rectal remnant (measured from the anal verge) is at least 7 to 8 cm. The side-to-end anastomosis is probably preferable to the end-to-end anastomosis. In contrast, a straight anastomosis at the levator plane cannot be recommended. If straight anastomosis is still considered, the descending colon should be used rather than the sigmoid colon. The colonic pouch was introduced to increase the neorectal volume and eliminate some of the functional disturbance associated with the reduced neorectal volume occurring after a straight colo-anal anastomosis. To obtain optimal functional results soon after surgery, a pouch should be used when the anastomosis is located 3 to 5 cm from the anal verge. The size of the pouch should not be too small. A staple line of 6 to 7 cm is a fair compromise between the low anterior resection syndrome and problems with evacuation. Since the descending colon has a thinner wall and often is healthier than the sigmoid colon, it should be the first choice for the anastomosis.

  • 21.
    Heedman, P. A.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Palliat Educ and Research Centre, Sweden.
    Canslatt, E.
    Lanssjukhuset Kalmar, Sweden.
    Henriks, G.
    Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Variation at presentation among colon cancer patients with metastases: a population-based study2015In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 403-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe study aimed to describe and follow a 2year cohort of colon cancer patients with Stage IV disease from presentation to long-term outcome. MethodThe records of 177 colon cancer patients diagnosed in southeast Sweden during 2009-2010 with disseminated disease at presentation were reviewed retrospectively. ResultsThe patients were heterogeneous with respect to age, performance status and survival. Despite metastatic disease, local symptoms from the primary tumour dominated the initial clinical picture. Forty-one per cent had anaemia. The time from suspicion of colon cancer to established diagnosis of disseminated disease varied from 0 to 231days (emergency cases included, median 12days). The majority (77%) were diagnosed in hospital. In 53% the primary tumour and the metastases were not diagnosed on the same occasion which may increase the risk for misinformation or delays in the care process. The possibility of simultaneous diagnosis was doubled when the patient was investigated as an inpatient. Patients were seen by one to 12 physicians (median three) in the investigation phase, and one to 47 (median 11) from diagnosis until the last record in the hospital notes. The 1-year survival was 46%. ConclusionPatients with metastatic colon cancer at presentation are heterogeneous and warrant an adapted multidisciplinary approach to achieve the goal of individualized treatment for each patient in accordance with the Swedish national cancer strategy.

  • 22. Joelsson, M
    et al.
    Andersson, M
    Bark, T
    Gullberg, K
    Hallgren, T
    Jiborn, H
    Magnusson, I
    Raab, Y
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Öjerskog, B
    Öresland, T
    Allopurinol as prophylaxis against pouchitis following ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for ulcerative colitis.2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 36, no 11, p. 1179-1184Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kald, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Juul, Kristian N.
    Coloplast A/S, Clinical Development Global RD, Humlebaek, Denmark.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Quality of life is impaired in patients with peristomal bulging of a sigmoid colostomy2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 627-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Peristomal bulging caused by hernia or prolapse is common in patients with a sigmoidostomy. It is not known whether and to what extent peristomal bulging influences various daily activities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of bulging by using a general and disease-specific health scale (Short Health Scale, SHS) and a stoma-specific quality of life (Stoma-QoL) questionnaire in patients with and without peristomal bulging. Material and methods. Seventy patients with sigmoidostomies were examined to identify peristomal bulging. The mean (SD) age was 71.7 (13.7) years and the patients had had their sigmoidostomies for a mean of 8.1 (7.9) years. Bulging was noticed in 46 patients (66%) while 24 had no bulging. Results. It was found that patients with bulging were at a disadvantage. In the SHS, patients with bulging reported significantly impaired QoL in 3 out of 4 scales regarding symptom load, worry and general sense of well-being. Also, in the Stoma-QoL questionnaire there was a significant difference between patients with and those without bulging. Conclusions. QoL evaluated with a general and disease-specific instrument (SHS) was significantly impaired in patients with bulging around a sigmoidostomy. The Stoma-QoL questionnaire showed a small but statistically significant difference between patients with and those without bulging but the clinical significance is uncertain. Further studies are required to evaluate the role of some of the individual items in the Stoma-QoL questionnaire. © 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  • 24.
    Kald, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Landin, S.
    Masreliez, C.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Mesh repair of parastomal hernias: New aspects of the Onlay technique2001In: Techniques in Coloproctology, ISSN 1123-6337, E-ISSN 1128-045X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 169-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a hernia becomes symptomatic with pain, obstruction, or mechanical distortion, need for a repair is likely. In this short note are new aspects on the Onlay mesh repair technique of parastomal hernias presented. The satisfactory results achieved in 5 patients are reported. One recurrence required a further successful repair.

  • 25.
    Kressner, Marit
    et al.
    Ersta Hospital.
    Bohe, Mans
    Malmo University Hospital.
    Cedermark, Bjorn
    Karolinska Institute.
    Dahlberg, Michael
    Sunderby Hospital.
    Damber, Lena
    Umea University Hospital.
    Lindmark, Gudrun
    Lund University.
    Ojerskog, Bjorn
    Sahlgrens University Hospital.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Johansson, Robert
    Umea University Hospital.
    Pahlman, Lars
    University Uppsala Hospital.
    The Impact of Hospital Volume on Surgical Outcome in Patients with Rectal Cancer2009In: DISEASES OF THE COLON and RECTUM, ISSN 0012-3706, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 1542-1549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate, in a population-based setting, the surgical outcome in patients with rectal cancer according to the hospital volume. METHODS: Since 1995 all patients with rectal cancer have been registered in the Swedish Rectal Cancer Registry. Hospitals were classified, according to number treated per year, as low-volume, intermediate-volume, or high-volume hospitals (andlt; 11, 11-25, or andgt;25 procedures per year). Postoperative mortality, reoperation rate within 30 days, local recurrence rate, and overall five-year survival were studied. For postoperative morbidity and mortality the whole cohort from 1995 to 2003 (n = 10,425) was used. For cancer-related outcome only, those with five-year follow-ups, from 1995 to 1998, were used (n = 4,355). RESULTS: In this registry setting the postoperative mortality rate was 3.6% in low-volume hospitals, and 2.2% in intermediate- volume and high-volume hospitals (P = 0.002). The reoperation rate was 10%, with no differences according to volume. The overall local recurrence rates were 9.4%, 9.3%, and 7.5%, respectively (P = 0.06). Significant difference was found among the nonirradiated patients (P = 0.004), but not among the irradiated patients (P = 0.45). No differences were found according to volume in the absolute five-year survival. CONCLUSION: Postoperative mortality and local recurrence in nonirradiated patients were lower in high-volume hospitals. No difference was seen between volumes in reoperation rates, overall local recurrence, or absolute five-year survival.

  • 26.
    Lilja, I
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, UNIGEN Ctr Mol Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Clin Res Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Kalmar Univ, Dept Nat Sci, Kalmar, Sweden Univ Lund, MAS, Dept Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Gustafson-Svärd, Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Franze'n, L
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, UNIGEN Ctr Mol Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Clin Res Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Kalmar Univ, Dept Nat Sci, Kalmar, Sweden Univ Lund, MAS, Dept Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Andersen, S
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, UNIGEN Ctr Mol Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Clin Res Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Kalmar Univ, Dept Nat Sci, Kalmar, Sweden Univ Lund, MAS, Dept Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Johansen, B
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Bot, UNIGEN Ctr Mol Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Clin Res Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden Linkoping Univ, Dept Biomed & Surg, Div Surg, Linkoping, Sweden Kalmar Univ, Dept Nat Sci, Kalmar, Sweden Univ Lund, MAS, Dept Pathol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Presence of group IIa secretory phospholipase A(2) in mast cells and macrophages in normal human ileal submucosa and in Crohn's disease2000In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 1231-1236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Secretory group IIa phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)-II) is an important regulator of proinflammatory lipid mediator production and may play a role in ileal inflammation in Crohn's disease. The enzyme has previously only been detected in epithelial Paneth cells. However, one characteristic feature of Crohn's disease is the transmural inflammation. Full thickness ileal sections from nine patients with Crohn's disease, and histologically normal sections from patients with colonic cancer (n=7) and chronic severe constipation (n=1) as controls, were used in this study. PLA(2)-II-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Metachromatic staining and esterase staining were used to identify mast cells and macrophages, respectively. It was shown that mast cells and macrophages in the ileal submucosa in both patients and controls showed positive PLA(2)-II staining. The number of PLA(2)-II-labeled cells that did not react with metachromasia, e.g. macrophages, was significantly greater in inflamed Crohn's disease compared to controls. This is, to our knowledge, the first study that has described the presence in healthy, while presence and upregulation of PLA(2)-II-positive cells in inflamed human ileal submucosa. Our findings suggest a proinflammatory potential for secretory PLA(2)-II in submucosa, while proinflammatory stimulation of mast cells and macrophages in vitro has shown that the enzyme is responsible for delayed prostaglandin formation.

  • 27.
    Lilja, Ingela
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Gustafson-Svärd, Christina
    Franzén, L
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha in ileal mast cells in patients with Crohn's disease2000In: Digestion, ISSN 0012-2823, E-ISSN 1421-9867, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reports that both intestinal and extraintestinal Crohn's disease (CD) had healed successfully after treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a) antibody have strengthened the hypothesis that it has a role in the treatment of CD. The macrophage is one source of TNF-a. Intestinal mast cells are also thought to have a role in CD, but it is not known if human ileal mast cells express TNF-a. Aim: To find out whether TNF-a is expressed by mast cells in the ileal wall in CD patients and controls. Methods: TNF-a was sought immunohistochemically in full thickness specimens of ileal wall from patients with CD (histologically normal, n = 9, inflamed, n = 6) and controls (patients with colonic cancer, n = 8). Mast cells were identified by metachromasia and anti-mast cell tryptase immunoreactivity. Results: In all layers of the ileal wall, and in every specimen investigated, mast cells were the main cell type that expressed TNF-a immunoreactivity out of the TNF-a-labelled cells. The number of TNF-a-labelled mast cells was greater in the muscularis propria in patients compared with controls, both in uninflamed (1.7-fold, p < 0.05) and in inflamed bowel (4.6-fold, p < 0.002), greater in the submucosa in inflamed compared with uninflamed CD (1.6-fold, p < 0.01), and less in the lamina propria in inflamed compared with uninflamed CD (0.4-fold, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Mast cells are an important source of TNF-a in all layers of the ileal wall, and the increased density of TNF-a-positive mast cells in the submucosa and muscularis propria may contribute to the tissue changes and symptoms in CD.

  • 28.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegard, Jorgen
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Does a Defunctioning Stoma Affect Anorectal Function After Low Rectal Resection? Results of a Randomized Multicenter Trial2011In: DISEASES OF THE COLON and RECTUM, ISSN 0012-3706, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 747-752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Anorectal function is often impaired after low anterior resection of the rectum. Many factors affect the functional outcome and not all are known. OBJECTIVE: This trial aimed to assess whether a temporary defunctioning stoma affected anorectal function after the patients had been stoma-free for a year. DESIGN: Multicenter randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-one Swedish hospitals performing surgery for rectal cancer participated. PATIENTS: Patients who had undergone low anterior resection for adenocarcinoma of the rectum were eligible. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomly assigned to receive a defunctioning stoma or no stoma. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anorectal function was evaluated with a questionnaire after patients had been without a stoma for 12 months. Questions pertained to stool frequency, urgency, fragmentation of bowel movements, evacuation difficulties, incontinence, lifestyle alterations, and whether patients would prefer a permanent stoma. RESULTS: After exclusion of patients in whom stomas became permanent, a total of 181 (90%) of 201 patients answered the questionnaire (90 in the stoma group and 91 in the no-stoma group). The median number of stools was 3 during the day and 0 at night in both groups. Inability to defer defecation for 15 minutes was reported in 35% of patients in the stoma group and 25% in the no stoma group (P = .15). Median scores were the same in each group regarding need for medication, evacuation difficulties, fragmentation of bowel movements, incontinence, and effects on well-being. Two patients (2.2%) in the stoma group and 3 patients (3.3%) in the no-stoma group would have preferred a permanent stoma. LIMITATIONS: Because this study was an analysis of secondary end points of a randomized trial, no prestudy power calculation was performed. CONCLUSIONS: A defunctioning stoma after low anterior resection did not affect anorectal function evaluated after 1 year. Many patients experienced impaired anorectal function, but nearly all preferred having impaired anorectal function to a permanent stoma.

  • 29.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    et al.
    Orebro University Hospital.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegard, Jorgen
    Umea University.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Orebro University Hospital.
    What Is the Risk for a Permanent Stoma After Low Anterior Resection of the Rectum for Cancer? A Six-Year Follow-Up of a Multicenter Trial2011In: DISEASES OF THE COLON and RECTUM, ISSN 0012-3706, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 41-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the risk for permanent stoma after low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer. METHODS: In a nationwide multicenter trial 234 patients undergoing low anterior resection of the rectum were randomly assigned to a group with defunctioning stomas (n = 116) or a group with no defunctioning stomas (n = 118). The median age was 68 years, 45% of the patients were women, 79% had preoperative radiotherapy, and 4% had International Union Against Cancer cancer stage IV. The patients were analyzed with regard to the presence of a permanent stoma, the type of stoma, the time point at which the stoma was constructed or considered as permanent, and the reasons for obtaining a permanent stoma. Median follow-up was 72 months (42-108). One patient with a defunctioning stoma who died within 30 days after the rectal resection was excluded from the analysis. RESULTS: During the study period 19% (45/233) of the patients obtained a permanent stoma: 25 received an end sigmoid stoma and 20 received a loop ileostomy. The end sigmoid stomas were constructed at a median of 22 months (1-71) after the low anterior resection of the rectum, and the loop ileostomies were considered as permanent at a median of 12.5 months (1-47) after the initial rectal resection. The reasons for loop ileostomy were metastatic disease (n = 6), unsatisfactory anorectal function (n = 6), deteriorated general medical condition (n = 3), new noncolorectal cancer (n = 2), patient refusal of further surgery (n = 2), and chronic constipation (n = 1). Reasons for end sigmoid stoma were unsatisfactory anorectal function (n = 22) and urgent surgery owing to anastomotic leakage (n = 3). The risk for permanent stomas in patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage was 56% (25/45) compared with 11% (20/188) in those without symptomatic anastomotic leakage (P andlt; .001). CONCLUSION: One patient of 5 ended up with a permanent stoma after low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer, and half of the patients with a permanent stoma had previous symptomatic anastomotic leakage.

  • 30. Machado, Mikael
    et al.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Goldman, Sven
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Järhult, Johannes
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection with colonic pouch for rectal cancer: A comparison between two hospitals with a different policy2002In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 940-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare surgical outcome, after low anterior resection for rectal cancer with colonic J-pouch, at two departments with a different policy regarding the use of a routine diverting stoma. METHODS: A total of 161 consecutive patients with invasive rectal carcinomas operated on between 1990 and 1997 with a total mesorectal excision and a colonic J-pouch were included in the study. Eighty patients were operated on in a surgical unit using routine defunctioning stomas (96 percent), whereas 81 were operated on in a department in which diversion was rarely used (5 percent). Recorded data with respect to surgical outcome were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: There was no difference between the two centers in postoperative mortality in connection with the primary resection and subsequent stoma reversal (3.7 vs. 3.8 percent). No significant difference could be found in the number of patients with pelvic sepsis (anastomotic leaks, 9 vs. 12 percent). Surgical outcome in patients with pelvic sepsis was also similar. The frequency of reoperations associated with the anterior resection and subsequent stoma reversal was identical (14 percent). The total hospital stay (primary operation and stoma reversal) was significantly longer with than without a routine stoma (17 (range, 2-59) vs. 12 (range, 5-55) days, respectively, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the routine use of diversion does not protect the patient from anastomotic complications or pelvic sepsis and its use requires a second admission for closure.

  • 31.
    Matthiessen, P.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegard, J.
    Rutegård, J., Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Simert, G.
    Högland Hospital, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Defunctioning stoma reduces symptomatic anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer: A randomized multicenter trial2008In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 247, no 4, p. 719-720Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 32.
    Matthiessen, P
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Hansson, L
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegard, J
    Umeå University Hospital.
    Anastomotic-vaginal fistula (AVF) after anterior resection of the rectum for cancer - occurrence and risk factors2010In: COLORECTAL DISEASE, ISSN 1462-8910, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of the study was to assess recto-vaginal fistula (RVF) after anterior resection of the rectum for cancer with regard to occurrence and risk factors. Method All female patients [median age 69.5 years, Union Internationale centre le Cancer (UICC) cancer stage IV in 10%] who developed a symptomatic RVF (n = 20) after anterior resection of the rectum for cancer from three separate cohorts of patients were identified and compared with those who developed conventional symptomatic leakage (n = 32), and those who did not leak (n = 338). Patient demography and perioperative data were compared between these three groups. Fourteen patient-related and surgery-related variables thought to be possible risk factors for RVF (anastomotic-vaginal fistula) were analysed. Results Symptomatic anastomotic leakage occurred in 52 (13.3%) of 390 patients. Twenty (5.1%) had an anastomotic-vaginal fistula (AVF) and 32 (8.2%) conventional leakage (CL). Patients with AVF required unscheduled re-operation and defunctioning stoma as often as those with CL. AVF was diagnosed later and more often after discharge from hospital compared with CL. Patients with AVF had lower anastomoses and decreased BMI compared with those with CL. Risk factors for AVF in multivariate analysis were anastomosis andlt; 5 cm above the anal verge (P = 0.001), preoperative radiotherapy (P = 0.004), and UICC cancer stage IV (P = 0.005). Previous hysterectomy was a risk factor neither for AVF nor for CL. Conclusion Anastomotic-vaginal fistula forms a significant part of all symptomatic leakages after low anterior resection for cancer in women. Although diagnosed later, the need for abdominal re-operation and defunctioning stoma was not different from patients with CL. Risk factors for AVF included low anastomosis, preoperative radiotherapy and UICC cancer stage IV.

  • 33.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Andersson, M.
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rutegård, J.
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Risk factors for anastomotic leakage after anterior resection of the rectum2004In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 462-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Surgical technique and peri-operative management of rectal carcinoma have developed substantially in the last decades. Despite this, morbidity and mortality after anterior resection of the rectum are still important problems. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for anastomotic leakage in anterior resection and to assess the role of a temporary stoma and the need for urgent re-operations in relation to anastomotic leakage.

    Patients and methods. In a nine-year period, from 1987 to 1995, a total of 6833 patients underwent elective anterior resection of the rectum in Sweden. A random sample of 432 of these patients was analysed (sample size 6.3%). The associations between death and 10 patient-and surgery-related variables were studied by univariate and multivariate analysis. Data were obtained by review of the hospital files from all patients.

    Results. The incidence of symptomatic clinically evident anastomotic leakage was 12% (53/432). The 30-day mortality was 2.1% (140/6833). The rate of mortality associated with leakage was 7.5%. A temporary stoma was initially fashioned in 17% (72/432) of the patients, and 15% (11/72) with a temporary stoma had a clinical leakage, compared with 12% (42/360) without a temporary stoma, not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that low anastomosis (≤ 6 cm), pre-operative radiation, presence of intra-opcrative adverse events and male gender were independent risk factors for leakage. The risk for permanent stoma after leakage was 25%. Females with stoma leaked in 3% compared to men with stoma who leaked in 29%. The median hospital stay for patients Arithout leakage was 10 days (range 5-61 days) and for patients with leakage 22 days (3-110 days).

    Conclusion. In this population based study, 12% of the patients had symptomatic anastomotic leakage after anterior resection of the rectum. Postoperative 30-day mortality was 2.1%. Low anastomosis, pre-operative radiation, presence of intra-operative adverse events and male gender were independent risk factors for symptomatic anastomotic leakage in the multivariate analysis. There was no difference in the use of temporary stoma in patients with or without anastomotic leakage.

  • 34.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegård, J.
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Intraoperative adverse events and outcome after anterior resection of the rectum2004In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1608-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this population-based study was to analyse the relationship between intraoperative adverse events and outcome after anterior resection.

    Methods: All 140 patients who underwent elective anterior resection in Sweden between 1987 and 1995, and who died within 30 days, were compared with a group of 423 randomly selected patients who underwent the same procedure during the same interval but survived the operation. Intraoperative adverse events and intraoperative measures taken were analysed in relation to outcome of surgery.

    Results: Of those who died, 45.7 per cent had intraoperative adverse events compared with 30.3 per cent in the cohort group. Major bleeding, gross spillage of faeces, and two or more intraoperative adverse events were more common among those who died. When the anastomosis was considered unsatisfactory, it was more frequently reconstructed (restapled or completely resutured), with or without a temporary stoma, in those who survived. The use of a temporary stoma was comparable in the two groups when adverse events were present.

    Conclusion: Intraoperative adverse events were important contributors to morbidity and mortality. Complete reconstruction of an unsatisfactory anastomosis, with or without addition of a temporary stoma, was more frequently performed in the survivors, and may have diminished the risk of postoperative death.

  • 35.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegård, J
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Population-based study of risk factors for postoperative death after anterior resection of the rectum2006In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 498-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this population-based study was to analyse risk factors for death within 30 days after anterior resection of the rectum. Methods: Between 1987 and 1995 a total of 6833 patients underwent elective anterior resection of the rectum in Sweden. One hundred and forty of these patients died within 30 days or during the initial hospital stay. These patients were compared with a randomly chosen cohort of 423 patients who underwent the same operation during the same interval, and were alive after 30 days and discharged from hospital. The association between death and 12 putative risk factors was studied. Results: The mortality rate after elective anterior resection was 2.1 per cent (140 of 6833). The incidence of clinical anastomotic leakage was 42.1 per cent (59 of 140) among those who died and 10.9 per cent (46 of 423) in the cohort group. Multivariate regression analysis identified clinical leakage, increased age, male sex, Dukes' 'D' stage and intraoperative adverse events as independent risk factors for death within 30 days. Conclusion: Clinical anastomotic leakage was a major cause of postoperative death after anterior resection. Copyright © 2006 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.

  • 36.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegård, Jörgen
    Departments of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Simert, Göran
    Höglandssjukhuset, Eksjö, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Defunctioning stoma reduces symptomatic anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer: A randomized multicenter trial2007In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 246, no 2, p. 207-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized multicenter trial was to assess the rate of symptomatic anastomotic leakage in patients operated on with low anterior resection for rectal cancer and who were intraoperatively randomized to a defunctioning stoma or not.

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The introduction of total mesorectal excision surgery as the surgical technique of choice for carcinoma in the lower and mid rectum has led to decreased local recurrence and improved oncological results. Despite these advances, perioperative morbidity remains a major issue, and the most feared complication is symptomatic anastomotic leakage. The role of the defunctioning stoma in regard to anastomotic leakage is controversial and has not been assessed in any randomized trial of sufficient size.

    METHODS: From December 1999 to June 2005, a total of 234 patients were randomized to a defunctioning loop stoma or no loop stoma. Loop ileostomy or loop transverse colostomy was at the choice of the surgeon. Inclusion criteria for randomization were expected survival >6 months, informed consent, anastomosis ≤7 cm above the anal verge, negative air leakage test, intact anastomotic rings, and absence of major intraoperative adverse events.

    RESULTS: The overall rate of symptomatic leakage was 19.2% (45 of 234). Patients randomized to a defunctioning stoma (n = 116) had leakage in 10.3% (12 of 116) and those without stoma (n = 118) in 28.0% (33 of 118) (odds ratio = 3.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.6-6.9, P < 0.001). The need for urgent abdominal reoperation was 8.6% (10 of 116) in those randomized to stoma and 25.4% (30 of 118) in those without (P < 0.001). After a follow-up of median 42 months (range, 6-72 months), 13.8% (16 of 116) of the initially defunctioned patients still had a stoma of any kind, compared with 16.9% (20 of 118) those not defunctioned (not significant). The 30-day mortality after anterior resection was 0.4% (1 of 234) and after elective reversal a defunctioning stoma 0.9% (1 of 111). Median age was 68 years (range, 32-86 years), 45.3% (106 of 234) were females, 79.1% (185 of 234) had preoperative radiotherapy, the level of anastomosis was median 5 cm, and intraoperative blood loss 550 mL, without differences between the groups.

    CONCLUSION: Defunctioning loop stoma decreased the rate of symptomatic anastomotic leakage and is therefore recommended in low anterior resection for rectal cancer.

  • 37.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Lindgren, R.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegård, J.
    Department of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge following low anterior resection for rectal cancer2010In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 12, no 7, p. E82-E87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge. Method Patients (n = 234) undergoing low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer who were included in a prospective multicentre trial (NCT 00636948) and who developed symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge (late leakage, LL; n = 18) were identified. Patient characteristics, operative details, recovery on postoperative day 5, length of hospital stay, and how the leakage was diagnosed were recorded. A comparison with those who did not develop symptomatic leakage (no leakage, NL; n = 189) was made. The minimum follow up was 24 months. Results In the LL patients the median age was 69 years, 61% were female patients, and 6% had stage IV cancer disease. On postoperative day 5, the LL group had a postoperative course similar to the NL group regarding temperature, oral intake and bowel function. The proportion of patients on antibiotic treatment on postoperative day 5, regardless of indication, was 28% in the LL compared with 4% in the NL group (P < 0.001). The median initial hospital stay was 10 days for both groups. When readmission for any reason was added, the hospital stay rose to a median of 21.5 and 13 days in the LL and the NL groups respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion Symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge following low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer is not uncommon and has an immediate clinical postoperative course which may appear uneventful.

  • 38.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baeten, C. G. M. I.
    Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audit of anal-sphincter repair2001In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Structural damage of the anterior part of the anal sphincter is a major cause of faecal incontinence. Sphincter repair is the standard surgical treatment. This study was designed to analyse the results of anal sphincter repair, to identify possible predictors of outcome and to investigate the presence of bowel symptoms other than leakage at follow up.

    Patients and methods

    Fifty-five women (median age 39 years, range 24–73 years) who underwent anal sphincter repair between 1986 and 1997 at the University Hospital of Linköping answered a postal questionnaire. Current bowel function, degree of continence and the patients’ functional result as worse, unchanged, some improvement, good or excellent were assessed. Good or excellent function was regarded as a successful result, the rest as failure. Age, duration of symptoms, type of surgery, morbidity and length of follow up were analysed in relation to outcome. Results of pre- and post-operative anal manometry, endoanal ultrasound, anal sphincter electromyography and pudendal nerve function were also analysed.

    Results

    After a median (range) follow-up period of 40 months (5–137) months, 31 (56%) patients rated the result as either excellent (n=10) or good (n=21). Twenty-one (38%) patients rated the result as some improvement (n=14), unchanged (n=6) or worse (n=1). In three (5%) patients a colostomy was fashioned because of failure. Patients >50 years at surgery (n=18) had a worse outcome (P=0.001). Successful outcome was correlated to increased squeeze pressures post-operatively. The presence of post-operative urgency (P=0.01) and loose stools (P=0.02) was more common in patients with poor outcome. Eight patients became continent to formed and liquid stool.

  • 39.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ryn, A.-K.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kaufman, H. S.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Clinical measurement of pelvic floor movement: Evaluation of a new device2004In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 787-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:: A new device that measures pelvic floor movement clinically was evaluated.

    METHODS:: The device consists of a rectal balloon with a magnet at its exterior end. The magnet moves in an electromagnetic field synchronous with the pelvic floor movements. This movement is measured and displayed on a computer screen in front of the seated patient. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (15 females) were examined. On a separate day, 17 of them were tested a second time by the same investigator and a third time by a different investigator.

    RESULTS:: One volunteer developed a vasovagal reaction. The median (range) pelvic floor lift and descent was 2 (range, 0.6-4.5) cm and 1.8 (range, 0.5-5.6) cm respectively. Day-to-day and interobserver reproducibility was good. Coughing and blowing a party balloon caused pelvic floor descent in the majority of participants. Twenty of 28 volunteers were able to expel the rectal balloon.

    CONCLUSIONS:: The device measures cranial and caudal movements of the pelvic floor with minimal discomfort and good reproducibility. The device may have a large potential as biofeedback device in pelvic floor training.

  • 40.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of magnetic sacral root stimulation on anorectal pressure and volume2001In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 44, no 12, p. 1827-1833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Electrical sacral root stimulation induces defecation in spinal cord injury patients and is currently under examination as a new therapy for fecal incontinence. In contrast to electrical stimulation, magnetic stimulation is noninvasive. To gain more insight into the mechanism of action of sacral root stimulation, we studied the effects of magnetic sacral root stimulation on anorectal pressure and volume in both fecal incontinence and spinal cord injury patients.

    METHODS: Three groups were examined: 14 healthy volunteers, 18 fecal incontinence patients, and 14 spinal cord injury patients. Repetitive magnetic sacral root stimulation was performed bilaterally using bursts of five seconds at 5 Hz. Anal and rectal pressure changes and rectal volume changes were measured.

    RESULTS: An increase in anal pressure was seen in 100 percent of the control subjects, in 86 percent of the spinal cord injury patients, and in 73 percent of the fecal incontinence patients (P=0.03). The overall median pressure rise after right-sided and left-sided stimulation was 12 (interquartile range, 8-18.5) and 13 (interquartile range, 6-18) mmHg at the mid anal level. A decrease in rectal volume was provoked in 72 percent of the control subjects, in 79 percent of the spinal cord injury patients, and in 50 percent of the fecal incontinence patients. Overall median volume changes after right-sided and left-sided stimulation were 10 (range, 5-22) and 9 (range, 5-21) percent from baseline volume. An increase in rectal pressure could be measured in 56 percent of the control subjects, 77 percent of the fecal incontinence patients, and 43 percent of the spinal cord injury patients. Median pressure rises after right-sided and left-sided stimulation were 5 (range, 3-12) and 5 (range, 3-5) mmHg.

    CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic sacral root stimulation produces an increase in anal and rectal pressure and a decrease in rectal volume in healthy subjects and patients with fecal incontinence or a spinal cord injury.

  • 41.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of the sacroanal motor pathway by magnetic and electric stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence2001In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 167-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of this controlled study was to examine whether it was feasible to use magnetic stimulation as a new diagnostic tool to evaluate the motor function of the sacral roots and the pudendal nerves in patients with fecal incontinence.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen consecutive patients (17 females) with a median age of 67 (range, 36-78) years referred for fecal incontinence and 14 healthy volunteers (six females) with a median age of 42 (range, 23-69) years were examined. Latency times of the motor response of the external anal sphincter were measured after electric transrectal stimulation of the pudendal nerve and magnetic stimulation of the sacral roots.

    RESULTS: The success rates of pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements were 100 and 85 percent, respectively, in the control group and 94 and 81 percent, respectively, in the fecal incontinence group. Median left pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.88 (range, 1.4-2.9) milliseconds in the control group and 2.3 (range, 1.8-4) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.006). Median right pudendal nerve terminal motor latency was 1.7 (range, 1.3-3.4) milliseconds in the control group and 2.5 (range, 1.7-6) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <0.003). Median left sacral root terminal motor latency was 3.3 (range, 2.1-6) milliseconds in the control group and 3.7 (range, 2.8-4.8) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P <3 0.03). Median right sacral root terminal motor latency was 3 (range, 2.6-5.8) milliseconds in the control group and 3.9 (range, 2.5-7.2) milliseconds in the fecal incontinence group (P =0.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: Combined pudendal nerve terminal motor latency and sacral root terminal motor latency measurements may allow us to study both proximal and distal pudendal nerve motor function in patients with fecal incontinence. Values of sacral root terminal motor latency have to be interpreted cautiously because of the uncertainty about the exact site of magnetic stimulation and the limited magnetic field strength.

  • 42.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindehammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Latency of compound muscle action potentials of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation2001In: Muscle and Nerve, ISSN 0148-639X, E-ISSN 1097-4598, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1232-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to present the failure rate and normal values for motor latency of the anal sphincter after magnetic sacral stimulation (LMSS) using a modified recording technique. A bipolar sponge electrode was placed in the anal canal for recording. A ground electrode was placed in the rectum to reduce stimulus artifact. Magnetic stimulation was induced through a twin coil energized by a Maglite-r25 generator. Two groups were examined: 14 healthy volunteers and 14 patients with a spinal cord injury (SCI) above the conus. Nine of 56 studies (16%) failed. There were no significant differences in latency between right- and left-sided stimulation or between the healthy group and the SCI patients. As described, LMSS measurements are minimally invasive and have a low failure rate. They may be used to test the integrity of the distal motor pathway in patients with bladder or bowel dysfunction who may benefit from continuous electrical sacral root stimulation.

  • 43.
    Myrelid, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Dufmats, Monika
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Lilja, Ingela
    Grännö, C
    Lannerstad, O
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Atopic manifestations are more common in patients with Crohn disease than in the general population2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 731-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of TNF-α in Crohn disease is now well established and anti-TNF-α is frequently used as a second- or third-line treatment. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is traditionally associated with macrophages but has recently also been found in mast cells of the ileal wall in patients with Crohn disease. As it is well known that mast cells and TNF-α play important roles in atopic manifestations like asthma, allergic rhinitis, and eczema the aim of this study was to investigate whether these are seen more commonly in Crohn patients than in the general population. Methods: Patients with Crohn disease (n = 308), aged 18-50 years, living in the Linköping region in southeast Sweden, were asked to answer a questionnaire regarding the presence of any kind of atopic manifestations. The questionnaire was also sent to 930 controls collected from the Southeastern Region Population Registry. The controls were matched according to age, sex, and place of residence. Results: The response rate among the Crohn patients was 91% (280/308) and among controls 84% (779/930). Eczema was a significantly more frequent manifestation, being almost twice as common in Crohn patients (27%) as in the general population (16%). Adjustment by logistic regression for place of residence, gender, age and coexistence of any other atopic manifestation did not change the odds ratios significantly. Conclusion: Atopic manifestations as a group, and eczema as a single manifestation, are significantly more frequent in Crohn patients than in the general population.

  • 44.
    Myrelid, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Hvidovre University Hospital.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nystrom, Per-Olof
    Karolinska University Hospital .
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Thiopurine Therapy Is Associated with Postoperative Intra-Abdominal Septic Complications in Abdominal Surgery for Crohns Disease2009In: Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, ISSN 0012-3706, E-ISSN 1530-0358, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 1387-1394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Thiopurines are important as maintenance therapy in Crohns disease, but there have been concerns whether thiopurines increase the risk for anastomotic complications. The present study was performed to assess whether thiopurines alone, or together with other possible risk factors, are associated with postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications after abdominal surgery for Crohns disease.

    METHODS: Prospectively registered data regarding perioperative factors were collected at a single tertiary referral center from 1989 to 2002. Data from 343 consecutive abdominal operations on patients with Crohns disease were entered into a multivariate analysis to evaluate risk factors for intra-abdominal septic complications. All operations involved either anastomoses, strictureplasties, or both; no operations, however, involved proximal diversion.

    RESULTS: Intra-abdominal septic complications occurred in 26 of 343 operations (8%). Thiopurine therapy was associated with an increased risk of intra-abdominal septic complications (16% with therapy; 6% without therapy; P = 0.044). Together with established risk factors such as pre-operative intra-abdominal sepsis (18% with sepsis; 6% without sepsis; P = 0.024) and colocolonic anastomosis (16% with such anastomosis; 6% with other types of anastomosis; P = 0.031), thiopurine therapy was associated with intra-abdominal septic complications in 24% if any 2 or all 3 risk factors were present compared with 13% if any 1 factor was present, and only 4% in patients if none of these factors were present (P andlt; 0.0001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Thiopurine therapy is associated with postoperative intra-abdominal septic complications. The risk for intra-abdominal septic complications was related to the number of identified risk factors. This increased risk should be taken into consideration when planning surgery for Crohns disease.

  • 45.
    Myrelid, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Split Stoma in Resectional Surgery of High Risk Patients with Ileocolonic Crohn’s Disease2012In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) is at high risk of anastomotic complications, with severe postoperative morbidity and even mortality. This retrospective study of high risk CD patients compared the outcome of primary anastomosis (PA) with that of split stoma (SS) and delayed anastomosis (DA).

    Methods: We performed 146 operations for ileocolonic CD from 1995-2006. Patient data were obtained from a prospectively registered data base. Patients with ≥2 preoperative risk factors (n=76) constituted high risk patients. Outcomes following PA or SS with DA were assessed.

    Results: The number of risk factors (mean) was 2.4 in the PA group and 3.5 in the SS group at time of resection and 0.2 (p<0.0001) at time of DA after 5.0 (2.3-12.6) months. Anastomotic complications occurred in 19 % (11/57) after PA compared with 0 % (0/19) after DA (p=0.038). The total number of operations and in-hospital time was 1.9 (±1.5) and 20.9 (±35.6) days after PA compared with 2.0 (±0.2) and 17.8 (±10.4) days after DA (p=0.70 and p=0.74).

    Conclusions: SS in high risk ileocolonic resections for CD, reduces the number of risk factors at the time of DA and the risk for anastomotic complications, compared to PA, without adding inhospital time or number of operations.

  • 46.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Borgstedt Risberg, Madeleine
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Montgomery, Agneta
    Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety.
    Schildmeijer, Kristina
    Faculty of Health and Life Sciences,, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Rutberg, Hans
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Patient Safety. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Preventable Adverse Events in Surgical Care in Sweden: A Nationwide Review of Patient Notes2016In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 95, no 11, p. e3047-Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adverse events (AEs) occur in health care and may result in harm to patients especially in the field of surgery. Our objective was to analyze AEs in surgical patient care from a nationwide perspective and to analyze the frequency of AEs that may be preventable. In total 19,141 randomly selected admissions in 63 Swedish hospitals were reviewed each month during 2013 using a 2-stage record review method based on the identification of predefined triggers. The subgroup of 3301 surgical admissions was analyzed. All AEs were categorized according to site, type, level of severity, and degree of preventability. We reviewed 3301 patients records and 507 (15.4%) were associated with AEs. A total of 62.5% of the AEs were considered probably preventable, over half contributed to prolonged hospital care or readmission, and 4.7% to permanent harm or death. Healthcare acquired infections composed of more than one third of AEs. The majority of the most serious AEs composed of healthcare acquired infections and surgical or other invasive AEs. The incidence of AEs was 13% in patients 18 to 64 years old and 17% in &gt;= 65 years. Pressure sores and drug-related AEs were more common in patients being &gt;= 65 years. Urinary retention and pressure sores showed the highest degree of preventability. Patients with probably preventable AEs had in median 7.1 days longer hospital stay. We conclude that AEs are common in surgical care and the majority are probably preventable.

  • 47.
    Nilsson, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre.
    Juhlin, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Krook, H.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care VHN.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutberg, H.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Patient Security.
    Strukturerad journalgranskning kan öka patientsäkerheten2009In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 106, no 35, p. 2125-2128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 48.
    Nordqvist, Pernilla
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development.
    Roberg, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Region Östergötland, Regional Board, Regionledning ledningstab.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Vårdrelaterade infektioner en betydande del av vårdskadorna på sjukhus - Studie i Linköping visar att fler fall borde kunna undvikas2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preventable hospital acquired infections are common A modified GTT (Global trigger tool) was used for 480 patient records from 15 departments at Linköping University Hospital. Sixty-three hospital-acquired infections (HAI) were detected at 59 admissions. Postoperative wound infections were most common (44.4 %). Catheter-related urinary infections occurred in 15.9 %, infections associated with a central venous catheter in 7.9 % and hospital-acquired pneumonia in 6.3 % of all HAI.  Other types of HAI consisting of any abscess or oral Candida infection composed 17.5 %. Some 221 patients were operated (46.0 %). Postoperative wound infections were diagnosed in 28 of them (12.7 %), the majority after discharge from hospital. Most urinary infections were diagnosed in emergency patients (8/10). Prolonged hospital stay or unplanned return to hospital occurred in 54 %. Out of 63 HAI some 76.2 % were judged as probably preventable, and 11.1 % as preventable.

  • 49.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Smedh, Kenneth
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    On-table endoscopy to define strictures and resection margins: Experience from 178 operations for Crohn's disease using intraoperative endoscopy2001In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 3, no SUPPL. 2, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 50.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Runström, Birgitta
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Enterokutana fistlar - krävande tillstånd som kan opereras till läkning. Modern behandling och kirurgisk erfarenhet minskar mortaliteten2005In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 861-865Article in journal (Other academic)
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