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  • 1.
    Agebratt, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ström, Edvin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Nyström, Fredrik H.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A Randomized Study of the Effects of Additional Fruit and Nuts Consumption on Hepatic Fat Content, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Basal Metabolic Rate2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. e0147149-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Fruit has since long been advocated as a healthy source of many nutrients, however, the high content of sugars in fruit might be a concern.

    Objectives

    To study effects of an increased fruit intake compared with similar amount of extra calories from nuts in humans.

    Methods

    Thirty healthy non-obese participants were randomized to either supplement the diet with fruits or nuts, each at +7 kcal/kg bodyweight/day for two months. Major endpoints were change of hepatic fat content (HFC, by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), basal metabolic rate (BMR, with indirect calorimetry) and cardiovascular risk markers.

    Results

    Weight gain was numerically similar in both groups although only statistically significant in the group randomized to nuts (fruit: from 22.15±1.61 kg/m2 to 22.30±1.7 kg/m2, p = 0.24 nuts: from 22.54±2.26 kg/m2 to 22.73±2.28 kg/m2, p = 0.045). On the other hand BMR increased in the nut group only (p = 0.028). Only the nut group reported a net increase of calories (from 2519±721 kcal/day to 2763±595 kcal/day, p = 0.035) according to 3-day food registrations. Despite an almost three-fold reported increased fructose-intake in the fruit group (from 9.1±6.0 gram/day to 25.6±9.6 gram/day, p<0.0001, nuts: from 12.4±5.7 gram/day to 6.5±5.3 gram/day, p = 0.007) there was no change of HFC. The numerical increase in fasting insulin was statistical significant only in the fruit group (from 7.73±3.1 pmol/l to 8.81±2.9 pmol/l, p = 0.018, nuts: from 7.29±2.9 pmol/l to 8.62±3.0 pmol/l, p = 0.14). Levels of vitamin C increased in both groups while α-tocopherol/cholesterol-ratio increased only in the fruit group.

    Conclusions

    Although BMR increased in the nut-group only this was not linked with differences in weight gain between groups which potentially could be explained by the lack of reported net caloric increase in the fruit group. In healthy non-obese individuals an increased fruit intake seems safe from cardiovascular risk perspective, including measurement of HFC by MRI.

  • 2.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Helen
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gunnarsson, Patrik
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skoglund, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elison, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis cleaves apoB-100 and increases the expression of apoM in LDL in whole blood leading to cell proliferation2008In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 263, no 5, p. 558-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Several studies support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis with a crucial role for the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. This study aims to investigate the proteolytic and oxidative activity of P. gingivalis on LDL in a whole blood system by using a proteomic approach and analyze the effects of P. gingivalis-modifed LDL on cell proliferation.

    Methods: The cellular effects of P. gingivalis in human whole blood were assessed using lumi-aggregometry analyzing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and aggregation. Blood was incubated for 30 min with P. gingivalis, whereafter LDL was isolated and a proteomic approach was applied to examine protein expression. LDL-oxidation was determined by analyzing the formation of protein carbonyls. The effects of P. gingivalis-modifed LDL on fibroblast proliferation were studied using the MTS-assay.

    Results: Incubation of whole blood with P. gingivalis caused an extensive aggregation and ROS-production, indicating platelet and leukocyte activation. LDL prepared from the bacteria-exposed blood showed an increased protein oxidation, elevated levels of apoM and formation of two apoB-100 N-terminal fragments. P. gingivalis-modified LDL markedly increased the growth of fibroblasts. Inhibition of gingipain R suppressed the modification of LDL by P. gingivalis.

    Conclusions: The ability of P. gingivalis to change the protein expression and the proliferative capacity of LDL may represent a crucial event in periodontitis-associated atherosclerosis.

  • 3. Bergman, Vivi
    et al.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Oncology UHL.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Urinary excretion of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and malondialdehyde after high dose radiochemotherapy preceding stem cell transplantation2004In: Free Radical Biology & Medicine, ISSN 0891-5849, E-ISSN 1873-4596, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 300-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The urinary excretion of the hydroxylated DNA base 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) was monitored in 11 patients with hematological malignancies undergoing total body irradiation and high-dose chemotherapy preceding bone marrow transplantation. Nine patients showed a prompt increase in urinary 8-OHdG (8-25 times the initial baseline level) on days 0-7 after irradiation onset, the excretion then decreased during the aplastic period and increased again when engraftment took place (in 7 patients). A significant positive correlation was found between urinary 8-OHdG and whole blood leukocyte count, both on day 5 (p = .04, r = .72) and on day 22 (p = .009, r = .80) after irradiation onset. One patient who lacked the first peak of 8-OHdG excretion showed low blood leukocyte counts (less than 2×109/l) before therapy onset, this patient, however, later had a successful engraftment and then also showed considerable increases in both 8-OHdG excretion and leukocyte count. These observations suggest leukocytes play a part in the excretion of 8-OHdG after conditioning therapy preceding bone marrow transplantation. As opposed to the biphasic 8-OHdG excretion, the excretion of MDA showed a single peak appearing on days 11-19 after radiochemotherapy onset, i.e., during the period in which the patients suffered from cytopenia, mucositis, and other side effects of the treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that these clinical manifestations are associated with increased lipid peroxidation. Altogether, these findings illustrate the utility of serial urinary samples for monitoring oxidative stress due to conditioning therapy in clinical practice. They also demonstrate that different oxidative stress markers may behave quite differently regarding their appearance in the urine after whole-body oxidative stress.

  • 4.
    Flodin, Ulf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Paues, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Åkerlind, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Communicable Disease and Infection Control.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Sjögren, Bengt
    Karolinska Institutet, Arbetsmiljötoxikologi, Institutet för miljömedicin Stockholm, Sweden Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska Institutet - Arbetsmiljötoxikologi Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svetsare – en riskgrupp för septisk pneumoni [Welders - a risk group for septic pneumonia]: Vaccination mot pneumokocker kan vara motiverat för yrkesgruppen2017In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 114, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Fornander, Louise
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Graff, Pål
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Wåhlén, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ydreborg, Kjell
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center.
    Airway symptoms and biological markers in nasal lavage fluid in subjects exposed to metalworking fluids2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e83089-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDS: Occurrence of airway irritation among industrial metal workers was investigated. The aims were to study the association between exposures from water-based metal working fluids (MWF) and the health outcome among the personnel, to assess potential effects on the proteome in nasal mucous membranes, and evaluate preventive actions.

    METHODS: The prevalence of airway symptoms related to work were examined among 271 metalworkers exposed to MWF and 24 metal workers not exposed to MWF at the same factory. At the same time, air levels of potentially harmful substances (oil mist, morpholine, monoethanolamine, formaldehyde) generated from MWF was measured. Nasal lavage fluid was collected from 13 workers and 15 controls and protein profiles were determined by a proteomic approach.

    RESULTS: Airway symptoms were reported in 39% of the workers exposed to MWF although the measured levels of MWF substances in the work place air were low. Highest prevalence was found among workers handling the MWF machines but also those working in the same hall were affected. Improvement of the ventilation to reduce MWF exposure lowered the prevalence of airway problems. Protein profiling showed significantly higher levels of S100-A9 and lower levels of SPLUNC1, cystatin SN, Ig J and β2-microglobulin among workers with airway symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that upper airway symptoms among metal workers are a common problem and despite low levels of MWF-generated substances, effects on airway immune proteins are found. Further studies to clarify the role of specific MWF components in connection to airway inflammation and the identified biological markers are warranted.

  • 6.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjörs, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Interstitial concentration of serotonin is increased in myalgic human trapezius muscle during rest, repetitive work and mental stress - an in vivo microdialysis study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 478-486Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The pathophysiology of trapezius myalgia is not fully elucidated. Serotonin (5-HT) is involved in modulation of nociception and hyperalgesia. Our aim was to compare the interstitial 5-HT levels of the trapezius muscle in women with chronic trapezius myalgia and in pain-free controls.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Microdialysate of the trapezius muscle collected every 20 minutes during rest, work (100 min) and stress (20 min) was used to study the dynamics of 5-HT in women with chronic trapezius myalgia (MYA; n=18) and in pain-free controls (CON; n=30).

    RESULTS: MYA had higher levels of 5-HT than CON at baseline, during repetitive work, during mental stress and during recovery. There were no significant time effects on 5-HT levels.

    CONCLUSION: 5-HT has the potential of a biomarker of chronic myalgia. Elevated levels of 5-HT may be involved in maintenance of habitual chronic pain and might contribute to increased pain during exercise by facilitating the effect of released algesic substances linked to such muscle demands.

  • 7. Hagfors, Linda
    et al.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Sköldstam, Lars
    Andersson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Antioxidant intake, plasma antioxidants and oxidative stress in a randomized, controlled, parallel, Mediterranean dietary intervention study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis2003In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previously we have reported that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) obtained a significant reduction in disease activity by adopting a Mediterranean-type diet. The present study was carried out to investigate the antioxidant intake, the plasma levels of antioxidants and a marker of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) during the study presented earlier. Methods: RA patients randomized to either a Mediterranean type diet (MD group, n = 26) or a control diet (CD group, n = 25) were compared during a three month dietary intervention study. Their antioxidant intake was assessed by means of diet history interviews and their intake of antioxidant-rich foods by a self-administered questionnaire. The plasma levels of retinol, antioxidants (a- and ?-tocopherol, ▀-carotene, lycopene, vitamin C and uric acid) and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker for oxidative stress, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. The Student's t-test for independent samples and paired samples were used to test differences between and within groups. For variables with skewed distributions Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were performed. To evaluate associations between dietary intake of antioxidants, as well as between disease activity, MDA and antioxidants we used Pearson's product moment correlation or Spearman's rank correlation. Results: The MD group had significantly higher intake frequencies of antioxidant-rich foods, and also higher intakes of vitamin C (p = 0.014), vitamin E (p = 0.007) and selenium (p = 0.004), and a lower intake of retinol (p = 0.049), compared to the CD group. However, the difference between the groups regarding vitamin C intake was not significant when under- and over-repoters were excluded (p = 0.066). There were no changes in urine MDA or in the plasma levels of antioxidants (after p-lipid adjustments of the tocopherol results), from baseline to the end of the study. The levels of retinol, vitamin C and uric acid were negatively correlated to disease activity variables. No correlation was found between antioxidant intake and the plasma levels of antioxidants. Conclusions: Despite an increase in reported consumption of antioxidant-rich foods during the Mediterranean diet intervention, the levels of plasma antioxidants and urine MDA did not change. However, the plasma levels of vitamin C, retinol and uric acid were inversely correlated to variables related to RA disease activity.

  • 8.
    Jayawardena, Umesh
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tollemark, Linda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles2009In: Inhaled Particles X / [ed] Lee Kenny, Fintan Hurley, Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2009, Vol. 151, p. 012015-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 μm (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 μl of 1 - 106 ng/ml) were mixed with 50 μl whole blood and incubated at 37 °C overnight before IL-1β was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1β than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1β in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 μg/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1β at 1μg RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 μg /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  • 9.
    Karlsson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kartläggning av proteiner i LDL och HDL med två-dimensionell gelelektrofores samt masspektrometri.2003In: Svenska Läkaresällskapets Handlingar,2003, 2003, p. 11-26Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Karlsson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lipoproteomics I: Mapping of proteins in low-density lipoprotein using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 551-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and the risk of atherosclerosis are not clear. Therefore, detailed information about the protein composition of LDL may contribute to reveal its role in atherogenesis and the mechanisms that lead to coronary disease in humans. Here, we sought to map the proteins in human LDL by a proteomic approach. LDL was isolated by two-step discontinuous density-gradient ultracentrifugation and the proteins were separated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified with peptide mass fingerprinting, using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry and with amino acid sequencing using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. These procedures identified apo B-100, apo C-II, apo C-III (three isoforms), apo E (four isoforms), apo A-I (two isoforms), apo A-IV, apo J and apo M (three isoforms not previously described). In addition, three proteins that have not previously been identified in LDL were found: serum amyloid A-IV (two isoforms), calgranulin A, and lysozyme C. The identities of apo M, calgranulin A, and lysozyme C were confirmed by sequence information obtained after collision-induced dissociation fragmentation of peptides characteristic for these proteins. Moreover, the presence of lysozyme C was further corroborated by demonstrating enriched hydrolytic activity in LDL against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. These results indicate that in addition to the dominating apo B-100, LDL contains a number of other apolipoproteins, many of which occur in different isoforms. The demonstration, for the first time, that LDL contains calgranulin A and lysozyme C raises the possibility that LDL proteins may play hitherto unknown role(s) in immune and inflammatory reactions of the arterial wall.

  • 11.
    Karlsson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindahl, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lipoproteomics II: Mapping of proteins in high-density lipoprotein using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry2005In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1431-1445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is the most abundant lipoprotein particle in the plasma and a negative risk factor of atherosclerosis. By using a proteomic approach it is possible to obtain detailed information about its protein content and protein modifications that may give new information about the physiological roles of HDL. In this study the two subfractions; HDL2 and HDL3, were isolated by two-step discontinuous density-gradient ultracentrifugation and the proteins were separated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified with peptide mass fingerprinting, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry. Identified proteins in HDL were: the dominating apo A-I as six isoforms, four of them with a glycosylation pattern and one of them with retained propeptide, apolipoprotein (apo) A-II, apo A-IV, apo C-I, apo C-II, apo C-III (two isoforms), apo E (five isoforms), the recently discovered apo M (two isoforms), serum amyloid A (two isoforms) and serum amyloid A-IV (six isoforms). Furthermore, alpha-1-antitrypsin was identified in HDL for the first time. Additionally, salivary alpha-amylase was identified as two isoforms in HDL2, and apo L and a glycosylated apo A-II were identified in HDL3. Besides confirming the presence of different apolipoproteins, this study indicates new patterns of glycosylated apo A-I and apo A-II. Furthermore, the study reveals new proteins in HDL; alpha-1-antitrypsin and salivary alpha-amylase. Further investigations about these proteins may give new insight into the functional role of HDL in coronary artery diseases.

  • 12.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Socialmed FHVC.
    Kucinskiené, Zita
    Schäfer-Elinder, Liselotte
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Lower serum levels of beta-carotene in Lithuanian men are accompanied by higher urinary excretion of the oxidative DNA adduct, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine: The LiVicordia study.2003In: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), ISSN 0899-9007, E-ISSN 1873-1244, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In 1995, middle-aged Lithuanian men had a four-fold higher risk than Swedish men of dying from coronary heart disease. The cross-sectional LiVicordia study had reported significantly lower levels of the lipid-soluble antioxidants lycopene, ▀-carotene, and ?-tocopherol among Lithuanian men than among Swedish men. We examined whether there were differences in urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8OHdG), a marker of oxidative stress, between these groups of men. METHODS: Using automated coupled column high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we examined 50-y-old men randomly sampled from Link÷ping, Sweden (n = 99) and Vilnius, Lithuania (n = 109) with regard to urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG. RESULTS: Levels of 8-OHdG were higher in the Lithuanian men than in the Swedish men (20.9 ▒ 0.91 versus 14.9 ▒ 0.75 nM/L, P < 0.001), and this difference was evident in smokers (P < 0.01) and non-smokers (P < 0.001). Serum levels of a- and ▀-carotene were inversely correlated to urinary 8-OHdG levels (P < 0.05 in both cases). Habitual smoking and low levels of ▀-carotene contributed significantly to higher oxidative DNA damage expressed as urinary 8-OHdG. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that increased urinary 8-OHdG levels accompany lower serum levels of antioxidants in Lithuanian men. They supported previous suggestions that increased oxidative stress may be one factor behind the higher mortality in Lithuanian men. ⌐ Elsevier Science Inc. 2003.

  • 13.
    Kälvegren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bylin, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, Arina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Chlamydia pneumoniae induces nitric oxide synthase and lipoxygenase-dependent production of reactive oxygen species in platelets — effects on oxidation of low-density lipoproteins.2005In: Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISSN 0340-6245, Vol. 94, no 2, p. 327-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is increasing evidence that Chlamydia pneumoniae is linked to atherosclerosis and thrombosis. In this regard, we have recently shown that C. pneumoniae stimulates platelet aggregation and secretion, which may play an important role in the progress of atherosclerosis and in thrombotic vascular occlusion. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of C. pneumoniae on platelet-mediated formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro. ROS production was registered as changes in 2´,7`-dichlorofluorescin- fluorescence in platelets with flow cytometry. LDL-oxidation was determined by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs). We found that C. pneumoniae stimulated platelet production of ROS.Polymyxin B treatment of C. pneumoniae, but not elevated temperature, abolished the stimulatory effects on platelet ROS- production, which suggests that chlamydial lipopolysaccharide has an important role. In hibition of nitric oxide synthase with nitro-L-arginine, lipoxygenase with 5,8,11-eicosatriynoic acid and protein kinase C with GF 109203X significantly lowered the production of radicals. In contrast, inhibition of NADPH-oxidase with di-phenyleneiodonium (DPI) did not affect the C. pneumoniae induced ROS-production. These findings suggest that the activities of nitric oxide synthase and lipoxygenase are the sources for ROS and that the generation is dependent of the activity of protein kinase C.The C. pneumoniae-induced ROS-production in platelets was associated with an extensive oxidation of LDL, which was significantly higher compared to the effect obtained by separate exposure of LDL to C. pneumoniae or platelets. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae interaction with platelets leading to aggregation, ROS-production and oxidative damage on LDL, may play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  • 14.
    Kälvegren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridfeldt (Berggren), Jonna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wind, Lena
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margaretha
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kihlström, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Richter, Arina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Correlation between rises in Chlamydia pneumoniae-specific antibodies, platelet activation and lipid peroxidation after percutaneous coronary intervention.2008In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 27, no 7, p. 503-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently showed that Chlamydia pneumoniae activates platelets in vitro, with an associated oxidation of low-density lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether C. pneumoniae is released during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and, thereby, causes platelet activation and lipid peroxidation. Seventy-three patients undergoing coronary angiography and following PCI or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and 57 controls were included in the study. C. pneumoniae antibodies, serotonin and lipid peroxidation were measured before and 24 h, 1 month and 6 months after angiography. The results show that serum C. pneumoniae IgA concentrations were significantly higher in patients than in the controls. Furthermore, in 38% of the C. pneumoniae IgG positive patients, the C. pneumoniae IgG concentration increased 1 month after PCI. The levels of C. pneumoniae IgG antibodies 1 month after PCI correlated with plasma-lipid peroxidation (r = 0.91, P < 0.0001) and platelet-derived serotonin (r = 0.62, P = 0.02). There was no elevation in the total serum IgG 1 month after PCI. In conclusion, the present results suggest that PCI treatment of coronary stenosis releases C. pneumoniae from the atherosclerotic lesions, which leads to platelet activation and lipid peroxidation.

  • 15.
    Leandersson, Per
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum, Yrkes-miljömedicin. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mineral fibers, cigarette smoke, and oxidative DNA damage: An experimental study1992Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns the ability of mineral fibers and cigarette smoke to generate reactive oxygen metabolites and to cause damage to DNA. The generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH") was demonstrated by using the DNA base, deoxyguanosine (dG) as a trapping agent for OH" and determining its hydroxylation to 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (80HdG), and oxidative DNA damage was assessed as formation of 80HdG in isolated DNA or in DNA of human lung cells in culture. Both asbestos (chrysotile) and manmade mineral fibers (~)were found to generate OH" and damage DNA in aqueous buffer solutions, andmore OH· was generated by the iron-containing rock and slag wools than by glass wool and ceramic fibers. The OH• generation by rock wool was decreased by treatment with heat, oxygen or desferrioxamine, indicating that chemical characteristics including iron on the fiber surface were important determinants of the OH" formation. A variety of natural mineral fibers (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) and MMMF (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibers) were found to stimulate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) togenerate OH" in the presence of exogenously added iron, and amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite caused OH" formation also in the absence of exogenously added iron. Cigarette smoke potentiated the damaging action of rock wool onisolated DNA, suggesting that iron-containing fibers might catalyze O:H" formation from hydrogen peroxide generated in the smoke. Cigarette smoke-induced damage to isolated DNA was inhibited by tyrosinase and catalase, indicating that polyphenols in the smoke,e.g. hydroquinone and catechol, were important for the hydrogen peroxide generation. Cigarette smoke was also found to cause oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand break formation in cultured human lung cells by mechanisms involving OH" attack on the DNAmolecule and endonuclease activation. Moreover, cigarette tar was demonstrated to promote P:MNL-mediated DNA strand-break formation in human lung cells, and tar loaded with iron was more damaging than regular tar.

    These fmdings indicate that mineral fibers, by producing OH· themselves and by stimulating PMNL to generate OH· in the presence of iron, may cause oxidative DNA damage under experimental conditions. They also indicate that cigarette smoke may cause DNA base hydroxylation and DNA strand-break formation in human lung cells via mechanisms involving OH", and that iron is important for the OH•-formation. Altogether, the findings point to the possibility that mineral fibers may promote OH" generation by cigarette smoke and inflammatory cells and so increase the risk of DNA damage in human lung cells.

  • 16.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidebjer, Caroline
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology.
    Szymanowski, Aleksander
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Backteman, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    NK cell apoptosis in coronary artery disease. Relation to oxidative stress2008In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 199, no 1, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Natural killer (NK) cells, key elements in initiation and modulation of immune responses, were recently found to be reduced in coronary artery disease (CAD). To clarify mechanisms behind this reduction, we here investigated NK cell apoptosis in CAD patients. Since oxidative stress has been linked to NK cell apoptosis, we related the findings to oxidative stress in vivo and evaluated the ex vivo susceptibility of NK cells to oxidized lipids. Methods and results: The number of apoptotic NK cells in peripheral blood was significantly increased in CAD patients compared to controls. Purified NK cells from CAD patients also showed a higher rate of spontaneous apoptosis ex vivo. Dose- and time-dependent effects of oxidized LDL and 7β-hydroxycholesterol (7βOH) on apoptosis and ROS production were determined in NK cells from blood donors. Thereafter, purified NK cells from CAD patients and healthy controls were exposed to the oxidized lipids in a paired design. NK cells from patients were more susceptible to apoptosis induced by oxidized LDL, in particular 7βOH, compared to cells from controls. Plasma measurements of LDL protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation did not show any differences between patients and controls. On the other hand, plasma carotenoids were significantly decreased in patients and inversely correlated to NK cell apoptosis rate. Conclusion: The rate of spontaneous NK cell apoptosis was increased in CAD patients. Although NK cells in CAD patients were more sensitive to oxidized lipids ex vivo, indicating a mechanism contributing to the reduced NK cell activity in CAD, the data could not verify an obvious link between NK cell apoptosis and increased oxidative stress in vivo. © 2007 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Xu, Lihua
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology .
    Hellsten, A.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Pharmacology .
    Eaton, J.W.
    James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States.
    Yuan, Ximing
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Cytocidal effects of atheromatous plaque components: The death zone revisited2006In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 20, no 13, p. 2281-2290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Earlier we suggested that atheroma lesions constitute a "death zone" containing toxic materials that may cause dysfunction and demise of invading macrophages to prevent the removal of plaque materials. Here we have assessed the cytotoxic effects of nonfractionated gruel and insoluble (ceroid-like) material derived from advanced human atheroma. Methods and Results: The insoluble material within advanced atherosclerotic plaque was isolated following protease K digestion and extensive extraction with aqueous and organic solvents. FTIR, Raman, and atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that, despite its fluorescent nature, this material closely resembled hydroxyapatite and dentin, but also contained a significant amount of iron and calcium. When added to J774 cells and human macrophages in culture, this insoluble substance was phagocytosed, and progressive cell death followed. However, an even more cytotoxic activity was found in the atheromatous "gruel" that contains abundant carbonyls/aldehydes. Cell death caused by both crude gruel and ceroid could be blocked by preincubating cells with the lipophilic iron chelator salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone, apoferritin, BAPTA/AM, or sodium borohydride, indicating that cellular iron, calcium, and reactive aldehyde(s) are responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Toxic materials within atheromatous lesions include both ceroid and even more cytotoxic lipidaceous materials. The cytotoxic effects of these plaque components may help explain the persistence of atherosclerotic lesions. © FASEB.

  • 18.
    Li, Wei
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Östblom, Mattias
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Xu, Lihua
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Hellsten, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Brunk, Ulf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology.
    Eaton, John Wallace
    USA .
    Yuan, Xi Ming
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Pathology.
    Cytocidal effects of atheromatous plaque components: the death zone revisited.2006In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 20, p. 2281-2290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 19.
    Lidebjer, Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Low plasma levels of oxygenated carotenoids in patients with coronary artery disease2007In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 448-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Low circulating levels of carotenoids have been associated with cardiovascular disease. The distribution of different carotenoids in blood may have an impact on the cardioprotective capacity. The aim of the present study was to determine the plasma levels of 6 major carotenoids in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and relate the findings to clinical, metabolic and immune parameters. Methods and results: Plasma levels of oxygenated carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, β-cryptoxanthin) and hydrocarbon carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene) were determined in 39 patients with acute coronary syndrome, 50 patients with stable CAD and 50 controls. Serological assays for inflammatory activity and flow cytometrical analysis of lymphocyte subsets were performed. Both patient groups had significantly lower plasma levels of oxygenated carotenoids, in particular lutein + zeaxanthin, compared to controls. Low levels of oxygenated carotenoids were associated with smoking, high body mass index (BMI), low high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and, to a minor degree, inflammatory activity. Plasma levels of lutein + zeaxanthin were independently associated with the proportions of natural killer (NK) cells, but not with other lymphocytes, in blood. Conclusion: Among carotenoids, lutein + zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin were significantly reduced in CAD patients independent of clinical setting. The levels were correlated to a number of established cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, the relationship between NK cells and lutein + zeaxanthin may indicate a particular role for certain carotenoids in the immunological scenario of CAD. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 20. Malmberg, B.
    et al.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flodin, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Powdering floor polish and mucous membrane irritation in secondary school pupils2000In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, Vol. 73, no 7, p. 498-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Acrylate-styrene copolymer polish has been used to protect the surface of linoleum flooring since the 1960s. Problems with powdering of floor polish were observed at an early stage. In a secondary school in Linköping, Sweden, this phenomenon occurred in the winter of 1994–1995 and the pupils frequently reported irritative symptoms from the eyes and airways. This study was undertaken to assess the potential effect of powdering floor polish on the mucous membranes of the eyes and respiratory tract.

    Methods: Repeated questionnaire-based surveys were conducted with identical questions in the spring of 1995 (during the powdering period) and in the autumn of 1995 (after the polish was removed). The questions dealt with irritative symptoms from the nose, eye, throat and lower respiratory tract.

    Results: A preventive effect related to the removal of polish was found for irritative symptoms in all locations mentioned above, but was particularly clear for the lower respiratory tract (prevalence rate ratio=0.37, 95% CI=0.23–0.59).

    Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that the powdering of floor polish may cause irritative symptoms from the eyes and airways in school children.

  • 21.
    Nilsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nosratabadi, Ali Reza
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lagesson, Verner
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Murgia, Nicola
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Novel technique for measuring low molecular weight chemicals in indoor dust2002In: Indoor and Built Environment, ISSN 1420-326X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new technique is described which can measure low molecular weight compounds adsorbed onto dust particles in a simple yet accurate way. The technique, gas chromatography-ultraviolet spectrometry (GC-UV), comprises a one-stage thermal desorption oven, a gas flow cell with a miniaturised GC column, and a nitrogen-flushed photo diode array (PDA) detector for fast UV spectra recording. The dust sample is thermally desorbed in the oven and the compounds released are flushed onto the GC column by means of a carrier gas stream. The separated compounds are then registered by the PDA detector and identified by their characteristic gas-phase UV spectra. This method enables the analysis of volatile organic as well as inorganic compounds adsorbed onto dust particles, many of which are difficult to analyse together in one single analysis using conventional methods. For example, both nitric oxide and ammonia can be analysed, as well as hydrogen sulphide, pyridine, 2-furaldehyde, 2-methylfuran, and isoprene. It is concluded that GC-UV may be used as an alternative or to complement other methods for measuring chemicals in indoor dusts, thus improving survey and control of the human exposure to particle-bound irritants and other chemicals.

  • 22.
    Rydén, Mireille
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Provitamin A carotenoids are independently associated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma samples from a general population2012In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 272, no 4, p. 371-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aim:  Carotenoids in plasma are inversely associated with cardiovascular risk. Low levels can be explained by low dietary intake but also by a number of other factors including inflammatory activity. Given that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has an important role in inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we hypothesized that circulating MMP-9 levels would be inversely related to total or single carotenoids in a general population cohort. Methods:  A well-characterized population-based cohort of 285 Swedish men and women (45-69 years) was used for the present study. The intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Levels of MMP-9, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and six major carotenoids [β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein (+ zeaxanthin) and lycopene] were determined in plasma. Results:  Lower plasma levels of total and single carotenoids were associated with lower dietary intake of carotenoids, older age, male sex, lower physical activity, higher alcohol consumption, higher body mass index (BMI), higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, lower levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of CRP, IL-6 and MMP-9. After multivariate adjustments, plasma levels of total carotenoids and provitamin A carotenoids (β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene and β-carotene) remained independently associated with sex, dietary intake of carotenoids, BMI, HDL cholesterol and MMP-9, while associations with CRP and IL-6 were not maintained. Neither dietary intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, nor vitamin supplement use was associated with MMP-9, CRP or IL-6 levels. Conclusion:  Plasma carotenoids were associated with a variety of factors including age, sex, dietary intake and metabolic variables. A new finding was the independent relationship in plasma between low provitamin A carotenoids and high MMP-9, suggesting a link between these carotenoids, matrix turnover and arterial remodelling. © 2012 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  • 23.
    Rydén, Mireille
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Garvin, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Carotenoid levels in plasma: can dietary intake and inflammation explain variability?2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Low plasma levels of carotenoids and low dietary intake of carotenoids are both linked to increased cardiovascular risk. The supply of carotenoids depends on dietary sources. However, it has also been shown that inflammation may have major influence on plasma carotenoids. The aim of this study was to examine the association of plasma carotenoids with dietary intake of carotenoids and a panel of inflammatory markers including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9.

    Methods: A population-based cohort consisting of 285 Swedish men and women (45-69 years) was studied. Fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated from a validated 92-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Plasma levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, myeloperoxidase and MMP-9 were determined as were plasma concentrations of 5 major carotenoids: lutein, β-crypthoxanthine, lycopen, α-carotene and β-carotene.

    Result: Lower plasma levels of lipid-adjusted carotenoids (low vs top tertile) were significantly associated with higher age, male sex, higher body mass index (BMI), higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, higher IL-6 and MMP-9 levels and lower intake of carotenoid-rich food. Low dietary intake of carotenoids was related to male sex, smoking and low plasma carotenoids. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, blood pressure, physical activity, smoking, dietary intake, IL-6 and MMP-9, plasma carotenoids remained associated with age (Beta= -0.17, p<0.01), sex (Beta=0.19, p<0.01), BMI (Beta= -0.19, p<0.01), dietary intake (Beta=0.21, p<0.01) and MMP-9 (Beta= -0.13, p<0.05). However, these associations differed among individual carotenoids, e.g. the correlation to MMP-9 was restricted to α-carotene (Beta= -0.13, p<0.05) and the correlation to sex was restricted to α-carotene (Beta=0.23, p<0.001) and β-carotene (Beta=0.18, p<0.01).

    Conclusion: In this population-based study, plasma carotenoids reflected dietary intake of carotenoids but to a minor extent. Also, levels of inflammatory markers explained very little of the variability in plasma carotenoids. Instead, age, sex and BMI independently influenced the levels of carotenoids. In cardiovascular risk management, we need to better understand the potential determinants of carotenoid levels in plasma.

  • 24.
    Rydén, Mireille
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effects of simvastatin on carotenoid status in plasma2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and immunomodulators mainly transported in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction. It is well known that low plasma carotenoids are associated with cardiovascular disease incidence. We investigated whether simvastatin altered the carotenoid status in plasma.

    Methods: A randomized double-blind study design was used. Eighty volunteers with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia received either simvastatin 40 mg or placebo for 6 weeks. Lipids, inflammatory markers, oxygenated carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and hydrocarbon carotenoids (alphacarotene, beta-carotene and lycopene) were measured in plasma.

    Results: After simvastatin therapy, total cholesterol, LDL, apolipoprotein B (apo B), oxidized LDL and C-reactive protein were significantly reduced. Simvastatin therapy also resulted in significantly reduced plasma levels of all crude major carotenoids. However, after adjustment for total cholesterol, LDL or apo B, all carotenoids except beta-cryptoxanthin increased during statin therapy (see Table). The carotenoids were inversely correlated with inflammatory markers but these correlations were abolished during simvastatin therapy.

    Conclusions: The increase in lipid-adjusted levels of carotenoids during simvastatin therapy suggest that lipoproteins had become enriched with carotenoids. The data highlight the risk to misinterpret the carotenoid status in individuals with statin therapy if relying on absolute plasma levels.

  • 25.
    Rydén, Mireille
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kastbom, K.O.
    n/a.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effects of Simvastatin on carotenoid status in plasma2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Carotenoids are potent antioxidants mainly transported in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction. They may also influence the immune response and inverse associations with inflammatory markers have been reported. We investigated whether simvastatin, by exerting both lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects, altered the carotenoid status in plasma.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design was applied. Eighty volunteers with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia received either simvastatin 40 mg or placebo for 6 weeks. Lipids, oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, oxygenated carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and hydrocarbon carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene) were measured in plasma. Simvastatin use was associated with significant reductions in total cholesterol, LDL, ox-LDL and CRP. Simvastatin therapy also resulted in reduced plasma levels of both oxygenated and hydrocarbon carotenoids. However, when adjusted for lipids, all carotenoids except beta-cryptoxanthin showed significant increases after simvastatin therapy. Both crude and lipid-adjusted carotenoids were inversely correlated with CRP and IL-6 in plasma but the change in carotenoid status during simvastatin therapy was not specifically related to any changes in inflammatory markers.

    CONCLUSIONS: To summarize, the change in carotenoid status during simvastatin therapy was mainly attributed to the lowering of cholesterol and not to the suppression of inflammatory activity. After adjustment for lipids, the levels of lutein, lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene were significantly increased by simvastatin suggesting an increased ratio of carotenoids per particle.

  • 26.
    Rydén, Mireille
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kastbom, K-O
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Effects of simvastatin on carotenoid status in plasma2010In: NMCD. Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, ISSN 0939-4753, E-ISSN 1590-3729, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 66-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Carotenoids are potent antioxidants mainly transported in the low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction. They may also influence the immune response and inverse associations with inflammatory markers have been reported. We investigated whether simvastatin, by exerting both lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects, altered the carotenoid status in plasma.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design was applied. Eighty volunteers with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia received either simvastatin 40 mg or placebo for 6 weeks. Lipids, oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, oxygenated carotenoids (lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin) and hydrocarbon carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene) were measured in plasma. Simvastatin use was associated with significant reductions in total cholesterol, LDL, ox-LDL and CRP. Simvastatin therapy also resulted in reduced plasma levels of both oxygenated and hydrocarbon carotenoids. However, when adjusted for lipids, all carotenoids except beta-cryptoxanthin showed significant increases after simvastatin therapy. Both crude and lipid-adjusted carotenoids were inversely correlated with CRP and IL-6 in plasma but the change in carotenoid status during simvastatin therapy was not specifically related to any changes in inflammatory markers.

    CONCLUSIONS: To summarize, the change in carotenoid status during simvastatin therapy was mainly attributed to the lowering of cholesterol and not to the suppression of inflammatory activity. After adjustment for lipids, the levels of lutein, lycopene, alpha-carotene and beta-carotene were significantly increased by simvastatin suggesting an increased ratio of carotenoids per particle.

  • 27.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Diurnal saliva cortisol levels and relations to psychosocial factors in a population sample of middle-aged Swedish men and women2006In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 193-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas psychosocial risk factors increase the risk for disease, psychosocial resources reduce this risk. To examine a possible pathway for these effects, the relations between saliva cortisol levels and psychosocial factors were studied in a random sample of 257 men and women aged 30 to 64 years. Saliva samples were collected at home on waking, 30 min after waking, and in the evening. A flatter diurnal rhythm of cortisol, that is, lower deviations between awakening and evening cortisol levels, was related to high levels of psychosocial risk factors (cynicism, depression, and vital exhaustion), whereas a steeper diurnal rhythm was related to psychosocial resources (social support and coping), general health, and well-being (all p < .05). Our results support earlier suggestions that the capacity of the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal-axis to dynamically respond to stress is 1 pathway for observed effects of psychosocial factors regarding risk for disease development. Copyright © 2006 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

  • 28.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Interleukin-6 levels in relation to psychosocial factors: Studies on serum, saliva, and in vitro production by blood mononuclear cells2006In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 270-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychosocial factors and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are both related to risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate how a broad range of psychosocial factors related to levels of IL-6 in different media. Fifty-nine men and women aged 30-65 were recruited from a larger study and selected to cover a broad range of psychosocial status. IL-6 levels were analyzed in serum, in saliva collected at home at three different time points during a day, and in the supernatant of cell cultures stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide. After adjustments for age, gender, self-reported health problems, and lifestyle factors, IL-6-levels in serum were negatively correlated with coping and self-esteem, and positively correlated with cynicism, hostile affect, hopelessness, depression, and vital exhaustion. In saliva samples, at all time points, IL-6 levels were positively correlated to cynicism, and IL-6 levels 30 min after awakening were also positively correlated with hopelessness, depression, and vital exhaustion. After adjustment for age and gender, cynicism, depression, and vital exhaustion were negatively correlated to IL-6 levels in the supernatant of cell cultures stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide, but this effect was lost after control for self-reported health problems and lifestyle factors. In conclusion, we found that IL-6 levels in serum and saliva were negatively related to psychosocial resources and positively related to psychosocial risk factors. These data strengthen the argument that IL-6 is involved in mediating the risk for disease development that has been associated with psychosocial factors. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 29.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Interleukin 6 levels in serum, saliva and in vitro production by blood mononuclear cells and their relations to psychosocial factors2004In: Eighth International Congress of Behavioral Medicine,2004, London: Lawrence erlbaum associates publishers London , 2004, p. 353-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Sjögren, Elaine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Leandersson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Psycholsocial factors and biological mechanisms in stress2004In: The 26th World Congress of the International Federation of Biomedical Laboratory Science IFBLS,2004, Stockholm: ABCD Swedish Association of health professionals , 2004, p. 74-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Sun, Yi-Qian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Girgensone, Ilze
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of antioxidant vitamin supplements on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils2005In: Helicobacter, ISSN 1083-4389, E-ISSN 1523-5378, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.  Epidemiological studies show that high intake of food-bound vitamin C and E reduces the risk of gastric cancer. Whether dietary supplementation with antioxidant micronutrients interferes with Helicobacter pylori infection and associated diseases is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if dietary vitamin C or E supplementation influences the progression of gastritis, gastric mucosal nitrosative and oxidative protein damage, gastric mucosal lipid peroxidation, or gastric mucosal oxidative DNA damage in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Materials and methods.  Gerbils were divided into four groups: H. pylori-infected animals fed with vitamin C- or vitamin E-supplemented food, and infected and uninfected animals given standard rodent food. Subgroups of animals were killed at different time-points until 52 weeks postinfection. Concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) in the gastric mucosa were determined with an immunodot blot and a fluorometric method, respectively. Mucosal concentrations of carbonyl carbons on proteins and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gastritis was scored semiquantitatively.

    Results.  Vitamin supplements had no effect on the colonization with H. pylori. Vitamin C as well as vitamin E supplements reduced mucosal 3-nitrotyrosine concentrations to normal levels in infected animals. Vitamin E supplements decreased mucosal protein carbonyls and TBARS in short-term gastritis. In addition, vitamin C supplements caused attenuated mucosal oxidative DNA damage and milder mucosal inflammation in short-term gastritis.

    Conclusion.  Vitamin C or vitamin E supplementation leads to some short-term protective effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. These effects seem to subside over time when the infection persists.

  • 32.
    Wieslander, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Fabjan, Nina
    University of Ljubljana.
    Vogrincic, Maja
    University of Ljubljana.
    Kreft, Ivan
    University of Ljubljana.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University.
    Spetz-Nystrom, Ulrike
    Uppsala University.
    Vombergar, Blanka
    Vocat College.
    Tagesson, Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Norback, Dan
    Uppsala University.
    Eating Buckwheat Cookies Is Associated with the Reduction in Serum Levels of Myeloperoxidase and Cholesterol: A Double Blind Crossover Study in Day-Care Centre Staffs2011In: Tohoku journal of experimental medicine, ISSN 0040-8727, E-ISSN 1349-3329, Vol. 225, no 2, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buckwheat food is a good source of antioxidants, e.g. rutin, and other beneficial substances. Here we investigated the effects of the intake of common buckwheat (low rutin content) and tartary buckwheat cookies (high rutin content) on selected clinical markers. A double blind crossover study was performed among female day-care centre staffs (N = 62) from five day-care centres. Participants were randomly divided into two groups. The first group initially consumed four common buckwheat cookies per day (16.5 mg rutin equivalents/day) for two weeks, while the second group consumed four tartary buckwheat cookies per day (359.7 mg rutin equivalents/day). Then the groups switched their type of cookies and consumed them for another two weeks. We monitored selected clinical markers related to cardiovascular disease and lower airway inflammation, lung function, and subjective breathing difficulties in the staffs. Intake of tartary buckwheat cookies reduced the serum level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) by a factor 0.84 (p = 0.02). When grouping the two types of buckwheat cookies together, there was a reduction of total serum cholesterol (p andlt; 0.001) and HDL-cholesterol (p andlt; 0.001) during the study period, with improved lung vital capacity (p andlt; 0.001). The degree of reduction in total and HDL cholesterol levels was similar in staffs with low and high body mass index (cut off 25). In conclusion, intake of tartary buckwheat cookies with high level of the antioxidant rutin may reduce levels of MPO, an indicator of inflammation. Moreover, intake of both types of buckwheat cookies may lower cholesterol levels.

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