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  • 1.
    Andersson, Frida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hagqvist, Astrid
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Design for Manufacturing of Composite Structures for Commercial Aircraft: The Development of a DFM strategy at SAAB Aerostructures2014In: Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271, Vol. 17, p. 362-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the aircraft industry, the use of composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is steadily increasing, especially in structural parts. Manufacturability needs to be considered in aircraft design to ensure a cost-effective manufacturing process. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new strategy for how SAAB Aerostructures addressing manufacturability issues during the development of airframe composite structures. Through literature review, benchmarking and company interviews, a design for manufacturing (DFM) strategy was developed. The strategy ensures that the important factors for successful DEM management are implemented on strategic, tactical and operational levels that contribute to a more cost-efficient product development process and aircraft design.

  • 2.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    End-of-Life Treatment from Technical and Economical Perspectives - A Cornerstone of Efficient Design for Recycling1999In: IEEE Int. Seminar on the Environment and Electronics,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    End-of-Life Treatment of Telecommunication/IT Products- A Joint Multi- Disciplinaary Project1999In: Int.Symp. on Electronics the Environment,1999, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Derelöv, Micael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detterfelt, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Engineering Design Methodology for Bio-Mechatronic Products2008In: Biotechnology progress (Print), ISSN 8756-7938, E-ISSN 1520-6033, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 232-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four complex biotechnology products/product systems (a protein purification system, a bioreactor system, a surface plasmon resonance biosensor, and an enzymatic glucose analyzer) are analyzed using conceptual design principles. A design model well-known in mechanical system design, the Hubka-Eder (HE) model, is adapted to biotechnology products that exemplify combined technical systems of mechanical, electronic, and biological components, here referred to as bio-mechatronic systems. The analysis concludes that an extension of the previous HE model with a separate biological systems entity significantly contributes to facilitating the functional and systematic analyses of bio-mechatronic systems.

  • 5.
    Diffner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Manufacturing Challenges Associated With the introduction of New Powertrain Vehicles2011In: Proceedings of 21st International Conference on Production Research ICPR21, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For the automotive industry, where the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) has had complete dominance, the transition to new powertrains will be challenging. The new powertrain vehicles must be manufactured with the same efficiency as ICE vehicles in order to reach a competitive price. This article explores some of the manufacturing challenges related to workload differences in current products and those associated with the introduction of new powertrain vehicles in a Mixed Model Assembly line for ICE vehicles. Three possible solutions to workload differences are described in theory, including how they are used in the current manufacturing system and how they might be used when introducing new powertrain vehicles. The solutions found were sequencing, dedicated assembly stations and modularity. In conclusion, it is suggested that modularity is the most efficient method in terms of flexibility and utilization, and some design approaches to facilitate efficient manufacturing are also suggested.

  • 6.
    Diffner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Successful Automotive Platform Strategy – Key Factors2011In: Proceedings of the 4th International Swedish Production Symposium, 2011, p. 85-92Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to describe the benefits, problems and challenges associated with a platform strategy. Based on theoretical and empirical studies, some key factors for a successful platform strategy are identified and discussed. This paper also explores how a successful platform strategy in the automotive industry should be designed. There is no stringent platform definition in the automotive industry, and the definition varies between different manufacturers and over time. A literature review has been completed to identify some key factors in successful platform strategies. The identified factors are as follows: Bill of Process, Hard Points, Wheelbase, Track Width, Powertrain Architecture and Drive Wheel Positioning. These factors were then investigated at both SAAB Automobile and Volvo Cars through the authors´ own observations conducted during factory visits and interviews. This was done in order to evaluate the identified factors from their effect on the production system and the final product. These factors are considered important to be able to get scale benefits from the use of common components and production processes, at the same time as they allow vehicles to be tailored for different markets and customer needs.

  • 7.
    Diffner, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    To stay competitive in future automotive assembly – Some challenges related to flexibility2011In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management (IEOM 2012), 2011, p. 62-67Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The undergoing adaptation of mass customization, alongside the development and demand for new power trains, is challenging the manufacturing system of automotive manufacturers. This, in combination with demands from emerging markets and constantly decreasing product lifecycles, calls for increased flexibility. Based on the research findings, key flexibility types for the automotive industry were identified as Mix, New Product, Modification and Volume flexibility. To achieve these flexibilities, the mixed model assembly, modularity and platform strategies are identified as important factors. A generic BOP as part of the platform strategy is central to enable transferring of production.

  • 8.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management .
    Employees at recycling centres in Sweden - Risks and Conditions,2005In: Nordic Ergonomics Society NES 37th Annual Conference,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Proceedings of the XVth Triennal Congress of the Int'l Ergonomics Association2003In: Congress Of the Intl ergonomics Association,2003, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 10.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Recycling centres - a new workplace.2006In: 16th World Congress on Ergonomics, IEA2006,2006, Maastricht: Elsevier Ltd , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 11.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Utmaningar inom återvinningsbranschen: En förstudie av problem- och utvecklingsområden vid återvinningscentraler och relaterade verksamheter2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Insamling, sortering och återvinning av uttjänta produkter är en snabbt växande industribransch. Det svenska samhällets kretsloppsanpassning har under 1990-talet medfört stora förändringar av samhällets avfallshantering. Nya lagar om vilket avfall som skall återvinnas tillkommer kontinuerligt. Denna kretsloppsanpassning i samhället har vanligen skett utan att några speciella krav har ställts på utformningen av produkterna eller på hur produkterna skall insamlas på bästa sätt för att kunna ta reda på materialet så effektivt och skonsamt som möjligt. Istället har man utgått från att de eventuella problem som kan uppstå när produkterna ska återvinnas får lösas när produkterna blir avfall och att producenterna via producentansvaret får ta kostnader och problem som uppstår i avfallshanteringen.

    Samhället av idag står inför flera stora utmaningar när systemen för återvinning av produkter och material ska utvecklas. Studien har visat att frågor som rör arbetsförhållanden, ekonomi och effektivitet samt miljönytta bör behandlas på ett integrerat sätt när branschen utvecklas för framtiden.

    Arbetsförhållandena för de som är verksamma inom återvinningsindustrin förväntas vara sådana att de anställda långsiktigt bibehåller god hälsa och välbefinnande. De arbetsplatser där avfallet sorteras och hanteras har utvecklats under kort tid och inom en avfallshanteringstradition där man inte utnyttjat kunskap från industrin och forskningen om arbetsplatsutformning och hantering av gods. Det finns påtagliga arbetsmiljöproblem i återvinningsbranschen som visar sig i statistiken både gällande olycksfall och arbetsrelaterade sjukdomar.

    Konsumenterna får bära mycket av kostnaderna för materialåtervinningen dels genom ett högre pris på nya produkter de köper, dels genom att de står för en del av arbetet med sortering och transporterna av avfallet till återvinningscentraler eller återvinningsstationer samt vidare via avfallstaxan. För kommunerna kan ökad sortering av avfall också medföra ökade kostnader. Det är angeläget att hålla nere dessa kostnader genom god utformning av anläggningar för återvinning.

    Syftet med denna förstudie var att identifiera förekommande problem- och utvecklingsområden inom återvinningsbranschen med focus på återvinningscentralernas roll.

    Studien utformades som en kartläggande och utforskande studie. Datainsamlingen genomfördes på totalt 7 anläggningar som representerar olika delar av återvinningsbranschen varav fyra återvinningscentraler (i kommuner med 32 000 till 135 000 invånare). Två av dem byggdes på mitten av 1990-talet medan de andra två har utvecklats från soptippar. Tre av anläggningarna drevs direkt i kommunal regi eller som kommunägt bolag och ett drevs på entreprenad. Anläggningarna valdes för att ge en variation mellan återvinningscentraler från större kommuner såväl som mindre, och också för att representera olika typer och byggnadsår. Dessutom besöktes en elektronikdemonteringsanläggning, en fragmenteringsanläggning samt en anläggning för rekonditionering av vitvaror. Detta möjliggjorde att ett par avfallsfraktioner kunnat följas från återvinningscentralen till efterbehandling i nästkommande steg.

    Besöken genomfördes av de forskare som är författare till denna rapport, och därmed representerade disciplinerna arbetsmiljö, hälsa, produktionssystem, säkerhet och miljö. Besöken inleddes med en presentation / rundvandring i anläggningen. Halvstrukturerade intervjuer genomfördes med de anställda och besökare. Observationer genomfördes av hur olika aktiviteter genomfördes av besökarna såväl som av de anställda. Med hjälp av digitalkamera med videofunktion dokumenterades layouter, materialfraktioner, skyltning etc. samt vissa rörelsemoment. Relevanta dokument som fanns tillgängliga samlades in. Respektive besök genomfördes under en dag, under januari - mars 2003.

    Återvinningscentralerna är ofta den första instansen för insamlandet av avfall och har en nyckelposition för hur avfallet kan hanteras på ett så produktivt och kostnadseffektivt sätt som möjligt. Det är därför viktigt att studera återvinningsproblematiken med ett helhetsperspektiv med utgångspunkt från såväl arbetsmiljö, säkerhet, produktionssystemutformning och yttre miljö. Vidare att betrakta återvinningscentraler utifrån en systemsyn, och se dess funktion också i relation till avnämarna, d.v.s. de behov och förutsättningar som efterföljande anläggningar i avfallskedjan har.

    Studien kan konkluderas enligt följande:

    Identifierade problemområden

    • Det föreligger olika typer av arbetsmiljörisker i de olika stegen av avfallshanteringen.
    • Vid återvinningscentraler idag finns risker för skada för de anställda såväl som för besökarna.
    • Återvinningscentralen har identifierats att inneha en nyckelroll i hanteringen av avfall.
    • Det brister i de ekonomiska incitament för förbättring av hanteringen av avfallet vid återvinningscentralerna.
    • Det föreligger dålig kommunikation mellan de olika aktörerna i återvinningskedjan om hur avfallet hanteras i respektive led och vilka förväntningar man har på det inkommande avfallet. Incitamentsbristen och den därav försämrade kommunikationen påverkar såväl arbetsmiljön, kvaliteten som ekonomin i efterföljande led.

    Utvecklingsområden

    • Goda möjligheter finns att utforma och organisera återvinningscentraler så att risken för skada påtagligt minskar för såväl personal som besökare.
    • Goda förbättringsmöjligheter finns att inom miljöområdet åstadkomma bättre sorteringskvalitet och därmed förbättra kvaliteten av det återvunna materialet.
    • Genom en bättre industrialisering av återvinningscentralerna kan effektiviteten och ekonomin förbättras, samtidigt som det finns möjligheter att också förbättra arbetsförhållanden och miljö i återvinningssystemen som helhet. Vissa enkla åtgärder, t.ex. tydlig skyltning och information till besökarna, kan ge avsevärd förenkling av arbetet i återvinningscentralerna och även senare i återvinningskedjan.
    • En bättre helhetsoptimering skulle erhållas genom förbättrad interorganisatorisk samverkan för ökad förståelse mellan de olika aktörerna i återvinningskedjan och därmed en bättre optimering av hur avfallet hanteras.

    En återvinningscentral ett viktigt ansikte utåt för kommunen. Om utformningen är anpassad till besökarna kan en positiv attityd till återvinning skapas med positiva miljöeffekter och en bättre arbetsmiljö för de anställda som följd.

  • 12.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments2016In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 57, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Division of Ergonomics, STH, Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial ergonomics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Joint investigation of working conditions, environmental and system performance at recycling centres - development of instruments and their usage2010In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 336-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling is a new and developing industry, which has only been researched to a limited extent. This article describes the development and use of instruments for data collection within a multidisciplinary research programme "Recycling centres in Swede - working conditions, environmental and system performance". The overall purpose of the programme was to form a basis for improving the function of recycling centres with respect to these three perspectives and the disciplines of: ergonomics, safety, external environment, and production systems. A total of 10 instruments were developed for collecting data from employees, managers and visitors at recucling centres, including one instrument for observing visitors. Validation tests were performed in several steps. This, along with the quality of the collected data, and experience from the data collection, showed that the instruments and methodology used were valid and suitable for their purpose.

  • 14.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Industriell ergonomi, KTH.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kihlstedt, Annika
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Planera, utforma och driva en återvinningscentral2009Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok baserar sig på de forskningsresultat och erfarenheter som kommit fram inom forskningsprogrammet ”Framtidens återvinningscentral” som är ett multidiciplinärt forskningsprogram som drivits vid Linköpings universitet under åren 2002-2007.Boken vänder sig till alla som är involverade vid planering, byggnation, ombyggnation och drift av återvinningscentraler. Dessa kan vara ansvariga inom kommuner, arkitekter, konsulter, arbetsledare på återvinningscentral, skyddsombud, fackliga förtroendemän med flera.

  • 15.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Krook, Joakim
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Kihlstedt, Annika
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Återvinningscentralen - sorteringsplats, arbetsplats, mötesplats2008Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Hedelind, Mikael
    et al.
    Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development Mälardalen University.
    Jackson, Mats
    Department of Innovation, Design and Product Development Mälardalen University.
    Funk, Peter
    Department of Computer Science and Engineering Mälardalen University.
    Stahre, Johan
    Department of Product and Production Development Chalmers University of Technology.
    Söderberg, Rikard
    Department of Product and Production Development Chalmers University of Technology.
    Carlsson, Johan
    Department of Industrial Mathematics Fraunhofer Chalmers Research Centre.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Winroth, Mats
    Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Jönköping University.
    Factory-in-a-Box - Solutions for Availability and Mobility of Flexible Production Capacity2007In: The Swedish Production Symposium,2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper is to present examples of how to realize a flexible and reconfigurable production system. An ongoing research project in Sweden called Factory-in-a-Box will be presented which is one research initiative within this area. The purpose of the Factory-in-a-Box project is to develop solutions for mobile production capacity on demand. Three key features have been identified as enablers for these kinds of production capabilities: mobility, flexibility, and speed. The concept consists of standardized modules that can be installed in e.g. containers and easily transported by trucks, rail vehicles, and boats. The modules can easily be combined into complete production systems and reconfigured for new products and/or scaled to handle new volumes. The goal of the Factory-in-a-Box project is to build fully operative production modules that are developed in close cooperation between different academic and industrial partners. This paper will present the results from these demonstrators giving examples of the usability of the Factory-in-a-Box concept in industry.

  • 17.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Conflicting goals in Concurrent Engineering: Case Studies from Product Introduction within Extended Enterprises2003In: Proceedings of the 10th ISPE International Conference on Concurrent Engineering: Research and Applications, July 26-30, Madeira, Portugal, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Product introduction within extended enterprises2002In: Proceedings of ISCE’02 International Symposium on Consumer Electronics, Ilmenau, Germany, 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outsourcing trend within the electronic industry during the last decade has founded new company networks - so called extended enterprises (EEs). Future products will, to a higher degree. be jointly developed and produced within these EEs consisting of product owners. producers and suppliers. The transfer of a design into production - product introduction (PI) or industrialization - needs to be suitable for co-operation within EEs with the aim of shorten the time from concept to volume production.

    This paper will describe PI within an EE relevant for the electronic industry. A definition of the PI process will be presented. Furthermore. a performed case study gives the following overall and fundamental criteria to consider working with PI within EEs. 1) A clear definition of what is included in PI, 2) Early participation of all participants in the product development project. 3) Clear cormmmication and information handling within the EE and 4) Business approach build on trust. reliability and respect for each other's competence.

  • 19.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Winroth, M.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    An economic analysis of investment in an assembly line: Case study at Ericsson Mobile Communications AB, Linköping, Sweden2001In: Proceedings of ICPR-16 / [ed] Daniel Hanus, Jaroslav Talácko, 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last four years the global annual production of mobile telephones has increased four times. To Ericsson Mobile Communications AB's supply unit in Linköping, Sweden, this has been a tremendous challenge. The supply unit has increased the produced volume of mobile telephones six times during this period at the same premises. The strategy for the production-engineering depattment was to change the manual assembly line into an automated assembly line. The automated assembly line was built up with SONY smart cells. During 1998 the volumes increased rapidly and the automation strategy where copied to the test stations for the mobile telephones.

    This paper discusses the importance of how to link a manufacturing strategy to economical calculations. A case study at Ericsson Mobile Communications AB shows how financial calculations was used when changing from manual testing to automated testing of mobile telephones. Even though all benefits were not accounted for. the studied automation project for automated board test had a calculated pay back period of 7 months. The decreasing production volumes for mobile telephones made that the real yearly cost for the investment increased dramatically compared to the calculated investment cost. The decision-makers need to analyze the risks in an investment calculation due to the uncettai.nty in data used in the calculations. For example, it can be difficult to analyze the risks depending on the difficulty to predict the development for the product market and the future product volumes. The investment calculation result can also differ depending on who is delivering the numerical data that are included in the calculations.

  • 20.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Concepts and definitions for product recovery: analysis and clarification of the terminology used in academia and industry2006In: Innovation in Life Cycle Engineering and Sustainable Development / [ed] Daniel Brissaud, Serge Tichkiewitch, Peggy Zwolinski, Dordrect, The Netherlands: Springer Verlag , 2006, p. 123-138Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this book is the consideration of environmental issues in engineering process and product design. It presents a selection of 30 papers ensuing from the 12th CIRP International seminar on Life Cycle Engineering. This book is of interest to academics, students and practitioners, specializing in environmental issues in mechanical engineering, design and manufacturing. This volume is recommended as a reference textbook for all researchers in the field.

  • 21.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Concepts and definitions for product recovery: analysis and clarification of the terminology used in academia and industry2006In: Innovation in Life Cycle Engineering and Sustainable Development / [ed] Daniel Brissaud, Serge Tichkiewitch, Peggy Zwolinski, Springer Netherlands, 2006, p. 123-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents and clarifies the academic and industrial terminology used in the area of product recovery. It is concluded that there exist many different concepts and definitions in academia and industry, several of which are unclearly defined. Given this, a new way to define product recovery is presented through the use of a model. This model is based on actual industrial product recovery cases, existing academic product recovery concepts and definitions and product design theory. The presentation contains a holistic model that can be used for describing and analyzing different product recovery scenarios. In addition, several industry cases are presented as a verification of the model.

  • 22.
    Lundmark, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Industrial Challenges within the Remanufacturing System2009In: Proceedings of the 3rd Swedish Production Symposium, Stockholm, Sweden, 2009, p. 132-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a literature review of challenges within the remanufacturing system. Thechallenges in the remanufacturing system has been categorised in a collection phase, aremanufacturing process phase and a redistribution phase which the challenges havebeen presented according to. The causes and effects of each challenge have beenexplored and are presented in this paper. The final result is a compilation figure with thechallenges for the whole remanufacturing system. In general uncertainties and complexitycan be seen as the main characteristics for the challenges within the remanufacturingsystem.

  • 23.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Cross-cultural communication challenges within international transfer of aircraft production2011In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Design (CSCWD), 2011, IEEE , 2011, p. 835-841Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research within this paper identifies three main categories of cross-cultural communication challenges within international transfer of aircraft production. The first category is organizational structure, hierarchy and delegation of responsibility the second category is consensus behavior and avoidance of conflicts and the third category is individual motivation factors. Furthermore, the paper discusses the need for specific types of cross-cultural training that can be one solution for reducing the problems and difficulties that cultural challenges may induce. The case study indicates that it is important for Aeronautics, a Swedish enterprise, to apply organized cross-cultural training in combination with technical training. To secure the presence of cross-cultural training, suitable types of cultural training could be included in the working process/routine for how to conduct a production transfer.

  • 24.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Saab Group, Business Area Aeronautics, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    International transfer of aircraft production: Problems and effects due to cultural differences2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In transfer of advanced industrial production in connection with offset business may not the selling organization be free to choose the most suitable subcontractor with respect to culture, organization, technical level etc. This paper discusses in specific Aeronautics (one of five business areas at Saab Group) and identifies different complications that can occur when different cultures meet during the transfer of production processes. The research is based on a case study utilizing interviews, observations and literature studies. Compilation and analysis of gathered empirical data indicates that many of the differences that emerge during transfer of production technology from Aeronautics to subcontractors in other countries can be exemplified by: -differences in hierarchal organization between different cultures, Swedes’ consensus behaviour and avoidance of conflicts and differences in individual motivation factors between cultures. All of these are considered from the perspective of different categories of employees such as; operators, engineers and management. For a successful transfer of production, the case study implies that important factors are; harmonization of production documentation between receiver and sender, and education of project team on receiving company’s culture before the production transfer is started.

  • 25.
    Malm, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Saab Group, Business Area Aeronautics, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Johansen, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fredriksson, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics.
    Rudlund, Mats
    Saab Group, Business Area Aeronautics, Linköping, Sweden.
    Production Start-up Phase: A Comparison between New Product Development and Production Relocation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A challenging situation due to a more global market is the increasing need for production relocation. New product development with constant increasing competition challenges the ways to perform production start-up and production relocation. Product development processes focus in general on function of the product and to avoid product quality problems. Production relocation processes also focus on avoiding product quality problems, but problems that occur within production relocation are mostly related to forgotten or misunderstood information. In this paper, a literature review is performed investigating these three areas and relate them to industrial experience. Existing relocation processes are often based on processes for product development. There are several similarities between the production start-up in product development and product relocation since the same result is requested. However, the way to achieve the results can differ within the literature, within the paper are the differences and similarities discussed.

  • 26.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Biomechatronic Design in Biotechnology: A Methodology for Development of Biotechnological Products2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This cutting-edge guide on the fundamentals, theory, and applications of biomechatronic design principles.

    Biomechatronic Design in Biotechnology presents a complete methodology of biomechatronics, an emerging variant of the mechatronics field that marries biology, electronics, and mechanics to create products where biological and biochemical, technical, human, management-and-goal, and information systems are combined and integrated in order to solve a mission that fulfills a human need. A biomechatronic product includes a biological, mechanical, and electronic part. Beginning with an overview of the fundamentals and theory behind biomechatronic technology, this book describes how general engineering design science theory can be applied when designing a technical system where biological species or components are integrated. Some research methods explored include schemes and matrices for analyzing the functionality of the designed products, ranking methods for screening and scoring the best design solutions, and structuring graphical tools for a thorough investigation of the subsystems and sub-functions of products. This insightful guide also:

    • Discusses tools for creating shorter development times, thereby reducing the need for prototype testing and verification
    • Presents case study-like examples of the technology used such as a surface plasmon resonance sensor and a robotic cell culturing system for human embryonic stem cells
    • Provides an interdisciplinary and unifying approach of the many fields of engineering and biotechnology used in biomechatronic design

    By combining designs between traditional electronic and mechanical subsystems and biological systems, this book demonstrates how biotechnology and bioengineering design can utilize and benefit from commonly used design tools-- and benefit humanity itself.

  • 27.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mechatronic design methodology for biotechnology products2009In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 1, p. S190-S190Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biotechnology products can be divided into (1) biologics, which comprise those metabolites, biopolymers, and cell structures that are produced through biological processes, and (2) biotechnical machines, which are apparatuses and devices that transform, change, or analyze ‘biological specimens’ for specific purposes, often by using the biological systems per se. The first category has been thoroughly treated in bioengineering theory and practice while the second has been very scarcely investigated.

    In this presentation is described how the general design science theory can be applied when designing a technical system where biological species or components have the key role in the engineering design solutions. We have named these systems bio-mechatronic systems, since they are combined design achievements between traditional electronic and mechanical sub-systems and the biological systems, and where biological molecules and/or active microbial or cellular components influence the design solutions in a complex way.

    The purpose is to demonstrate that biotechnology and bioengineering related design can utilize and benefit from other commonly used design tools in, for example, mechanical and electric engineering. These tools should result in shorter development times and a reduction of the need for prototype testing and verification.

    Four examples will be presented, all well-known biotechnology products in the pharmaceutical and clinical areas: (1) a protein purification system, (2) a bioreactor system, (3) a biosensor instrument, and (4) an embryonic stem cell manufacturing systems.

  • 28.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mechatronics design principles for biotechnology product development2010In: TRENDS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY, ISSN 0167-7799, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 230-236Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, biotechnology design has focused on the manufacture of chemicals and biologics. Still, a majority of biotechnology products that appear on the market today is the result of mechanical electric (mechatronic) construction. For these, the biological components play decisive roles in the design solution; the biological entities are either integral parts of the design, or are transformed by the mechatronic system. This article explains how the development and production engineering design principles used for typical mechanical products can be adapted to the demands of biotechnology products, and how electronics, mechanics and biology can be integrated more successfully. We discuss three emerging areas of biotechnology in which mechatronic design principles can apply: stem cell manufacture, artificial organs, and bioreactors.

  • 29.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Engineering . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    PAT and QbD aspects on stem cell manufacture2009In: European Pharmaceutical Review Digital, no 1, p. 32-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biotechnology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scale-up of cell culture bioreactors using biomechatronic design2012In: Biotechnology Journal, ISSN 1860-6768, E-ISSN 1860-7314, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 1026-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scale-up of cell culture bioreactors is a challenging engineering work that requires wide competence in cell biology, mechanical engineering and bioprocess design. In this article, a new approach for cell culture bioreactor scale-up is suggested that is based on biomechatronic design methodology. The approach differs from traditional biochemical engineering methodology by applying a sequential design procedure where the needs of the users and alternative design solutions are systematically analysed. The procedure is based on the biological and technical functions of the scaled-up bioreactor that are derived in functional maps, concept generation charts and scoring and interaction matrices. Basic reactor engineering properties, such as mass and heat transfer and kinetics are integrated in the procedure. The methodology results in the generation of alternative design solutions that are thoroughly ranked with help of the user needs. Examples from monoclonal antibodies and recombinant protein production illuminate the steps of the procedure. The methodology provides engineering teams with additional tools that can significantly facilitate the design of new production methods for cell culture processes.

  • 31.
    Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Derelöv, Micael
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Detterfelt, Jonas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    PAT and design science2007In: European Pharmaceutical Review, no 3, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process analyties. technology (PAT) and mechanical design science are interconnected. This article describes how a well-established design modelling approach. The Hubka-Eder model, is applied to the concepis of PAT end quality by design (QBD). The model connects PAT With quality management concepts as defined for PAT by lhe ICH guldelines for quaiity issues. Examples are taken fom biopharmaceutical applications. but lhese are also applicable to other pharmaceutical ingredients (API). Benefits of using a conceptual design modelling approach on PAT and related subjects are discussed and suggestecl as a complementary functionality analysis tool in PAT and quality design pharmaceutical processes.

  • 32.
    Nilsson, Sara
    et al.
    SAAB Aerostructures, Linköping.
    Jensen, Jonas
    Volvo Construction Equipment.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    11 Rules of Design for Manufacturing CFRP Components2018In: So You Want to Design Aircraft: Manufacturing with Composites / [ed] Jean Broge, SAE International , 2018, First, p. 29-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is one of the most commonly used materials in the aerospace industry today. CFRP in pre-impregnated form is an anisotropic material whose properties can be controlled to a high level by the designer. Sometimes, these properties make the material hard to predict with regards to how the geometry affects manufacturing aspects. This chapter describes 11 design rules that describe geometrical design choices and deals with manufacturability problems that are connected to them, why they are connected, and how they can be minimized or avoided. Examples of design choices dealt with in the rules include double curvature shapes, assembly of uncured CFRP components, and access for nondestructive testing.

  • 33.
    Olsson, Tomas
    et al.
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund and ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Haage, Mathias
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Kihlman, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. DELFOi, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Rolf
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Klas
    Department of Computer Science, Lund University, Sweden.
    Robertsson, Anders
    Department of Automatic Control, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Isaksson, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ossbahr, Gilbert
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brogardh, Torgny
    ABB Robotics, Department RC and ABB Corporate Research, Västerås, Sweden.
    Cost-efficient drilling using industrial robots with high-bandwidth force feedback2010In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 24-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present a method for high-precision drilling using an industrial robot with high-bandwidth force feedback which is used for building up pressure to clamp-up an end-effector to the work-piece surface prior to drilling, The focus is to eliminate the sliding movement (skating) of the end-effector during the clamp-up of the end-effector to the work-piece surface, an undesired effect that is due to the comparatively low mechanical stiffness of typical serial industrial robots. This compliance also makes the robot deflect due to the cutting forces, resulting in poor hole position accuracy and to some extent in poor hole quality. Recently, functionality for high-bandwidth force control has found its way into industrial robot control systems. This could potentially open up the possibility for robotic drilling systems with improved performance, using only standard systems without excessive extra hardware and calibration techniques. Instead of automation with expensive fixtures and precise machinery, our approach was to make use of standard low-cost robot equipment in combination with sensor feedback. The resulting sliding suppression control results in greatly improved hole positioning and quality. The conceptual idea behind the force control is useful also in many other robotic applications requiring external sensor feedback control.

  • 34.
    Ribeiro, Luis
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Transitioning From Standard Automation Solutions to Cyber-Physical Production Systems: An Assessment of Critical Conceptual and Technical Challenges2018In: IEEE Systems Journal, ISSN 1932-8184, E-ISSN 1937-9234, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 3816-3827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of Industry 4.0, or the Fourth Industrial Revolution, has the potential for radically increased system reconfigurability and flexibility. At its core, the notion of cyber-physical system, as the new generation of embedded systems with advanced artificial intelligence and improved communication capabilities, is seen as the key enabling concept that will render production activities more sustainable. The cyber-physical conceptualization dramatically reduces the integration effort by virtually eliminating the need, time, and cost for reprogramming. However, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed before one can start to design cyber-physical production systems consistently. These intertwine and are not as easily solvable as the popular science descriptions may suggest. This paper brings them forward and develops a critical comparative analysis between today’s automation solutions and their potential cyber-physical counterparts. The analysis considers the technical and conceptual challenges that are included in the process of migrating today’s, mostly bespoke, automation solutions to highly modularized, dynamic, and interactive cyber-physical production systems (CPPSs). In this context, this paper considers the interplay between form and function of industrial components, at the light of their cyber-physical formulation. At the same time, it addresses the system-level (de)composability and interaction design challenges that arise from the integration of modular CPPSs.

  • 35.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Berggren, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Engineering.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Industrial Marketing and Industrial Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olhager, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sandin, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Tang, Ou
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Production Economics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Thollander, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Energy Systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Research on Services in the Manufacturing Industry based on a Holistic Viewpoint and Interdisciplinary Approach2011In: Functional thinking for value creation : proceedings of the 3rd CIRP International Conference on Industrial Product Service Systems / [ed] Jürgen Hesselbach and Christoph Herrmann, Springer, 2011, p. 27-32Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper begins by consolidating industrial challenges and research issues concerning Product/Service Systems obtained through various activities by the authors. Based on this, it points out the importance of the holistic view in further research in this area so that PSS providers do not fall into local optimization. The intent of this contribution to our research community includes shedding light on interesting issues that thus far have been relatively invisible and with narrower scope.

  • 36.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Utformning och flöden2008In: Återvinningscentralen - Sorteringsplats-Arbetsplats-Mötesplats / [ed] Inga-Lill Engkvist, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2008, p. 35-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna bok presenteras resultat från forskningsprogrammet "Framtidens återvinningscentral" som har bedrivits vid Linköpings universitet under åren 2002-2007. Återvinningscentraler är en relativt ny företeelse i Sverige och antalet centraler ökar kontinuerligt. Ätervinningscentralerna ger service till kommuninnevånarna, men är även leverantörer av bland annat bränsle till värmeverk och råvaror, som exempelvis metallskrot

  • 37.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Utrustning och hjälpmedel2008In: Återvinningscentralen - Sorteringsplats-Arbetsplats-Mötesplats / [ed] Inga-Lill Engkvist, Linköping: Linköpings universitet , 2008, p. 99-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna bok presenteras resultat från forskningsprogrammet "Framtidens återvinningscentral" som har bedrivits vid Linköpings universitet under åren 2002-2007. Återvinningscentraler är en relativt ny företeelse i Sverige och antalet centraler ökar kontinuerligt. Ätervinningscentralerna ger service till kommuninnevånarna, men är även leverantörer av bland annat bränsle till värmeverk och råvaror, som exempelvis metallskrot.

  • 38.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Division of Ergonomics, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    Division of Ergonomics, School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Huddinge.
    Improving the layout of recycling centres by use of lean production principles2011In: WASTE MANAGEMENT, ISSN 0956-053X, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1121-1132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been increased focus on recycling in Sweden during recent years. This focus can be attributed to external environmental factors such as tougher legislation, but also to the potential gains for raw materials suppliers. Recycling centres are important components in the Swedish total recycling system. Recycling centres are manned facilities for waste collection where visitors can bring, sort and discard worn products as well as large-sized, hazardous, and electrical waste. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe the main flows and layout types at Swedish recycling centres. The aim was also to adapt and apply production theory for designing and managing recycling centre operations. More specifically, this means using lean production principles to help develop guidelines for recycling centre design and efficient control. Empirical data for this research was primarily collected through interviews and questionnaires among both visitors and employees at 16 Swedish recycling centres. Furthermore, adapted observation protocols have been used in order to explore visitor activities. There was also close collaboration with a local recycling centre company, which shared their layout experiences with the researchers in this project. The recycling centres studied had a variety of problems such as queues of visitors, overloading of material and improper sorting. The study shows that in order to decrease the problems, the recycling centres should be designed and managed according to lean production principles, i.e. through choosing more suitable layout choices with visible and linear flows, providing better visitor information, and providing suitable technical equipment. Improvements can be achieved through proper planning of the layout and control of the flow of vehicles, with the result of increased efficiency and capacity, shorter visits, and cleaner waste fractions. The benefits of a lean production mindset include increased visitor capacity, waste flexibility, improved sorting quality, shorter time for visits and improved working conditions.

  • 39.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology .
    Product Remanufacturing Facilitated by New Business Strategies2008In: Swedish Production Symposium,2008, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More and more companies are striving to expand their business strategies so that revenues and profitability emanates from a larger part of the product life cycle than just the product selling. One way of doing this is to have business offerings consisting of a combination of products and services, and where the selling companies retain the ownership of the physical product. Remanufacturing is often an important means for achieving profitable Product Service Systems. Remanufacturing is an industrial process of returning a used product to at least Original Equipment Manufacturer original performance specification, this from the customers- perspective. The resultant product is also given a warranty that is at least equal to that of a newly manufactured equivalent. Thus, by formulating a business strategy in a life cycle perspective, remanufacturing becomes a service in the product-s life cycle. Remanufacturing can help limit the life cycle costs. It is suggested that up to 85% by weight of remanufactured products may be obtained from used components, and that such products have comparable quality to equivalent new products but require 50% to 80% less energy to produce. It is shown that new business approaches like Product Service System facilitates remanufacturing and vice versa. 

  • 40.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Jacobsson, Nicholas
    International Institute for Industrial Environmental Economics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Analysis of service selling and design for remanufacturing2000In: Proceedings of the 2000 IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment, 2000. ISEE 2000., IEEE , 2000, p. 272-277Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A focus on selling services or functions instead of physical products can, through remanufacturing, be a way of closing material flows in present society. When a company decides to sell services, a closer connection with the customer can be established and a better control over the products can be achieved. This analysis shows that it is preferable that products aimed for service selling are designed for remanufacturing, since this facilitates the remanufacturing. With remanufacturing, economical and environmental benefits can be gained. Historical cases indicate this, and are described in this article along with an ongoing pilot project of service selling

  • 41.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Svensson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Innovation Potentials of Using Solvent-free Industrial Cleaning in Swedish Manufacturing Industry2008In: Proceedings of Sustainable Innovation 08 - Future products, technologies and industries: 13th International Conference part of the ‘Towards Sustainable Product Design’ series of conferences, 27-28 October 2008, Malmö, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this research collaboration project between SMEs and academia a new way of cleaning machine parts have been developed. The cleaning company Servicestaden and researchers at Linköping University have discovered new ways of cleaning without the use of solvents. In the research project called ‘Solvent-Free Industrial Cleaning’ (SOFIQ) it has been found that cleaning with the SOFIQ-technology is more environmentally sound than with traditional cleaning techniques. However, there is a major challenge to keep up the pace of cleaning within manufacturing since it often have high demands of short lead times. This is a challenge that will be constraining the use of the method.

  • 42.
    Sundin, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Östlin, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Why is Remanufacturing More Successful in the United States than in Sweden?2008In: CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering,2008, 2008, p. 247-251Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remanufacturing can be defined as a process of rebuilding a product, during which: the used product is cleaned, inspected and disassembled; defective components are replaced; and the product is reassembled,tested and inspected again to ensure it meets or exceeds newly manufactured product standards. Hence, remanufacturing would not only promote the multiple reuse of materials, but it would also allow for upgrading the quality and the functions of products steadily, without manufacturing completely new products and throwing away used ones. Remanufacturing is often seen as an environmentally sound way of salvaging the resources that are put into products when shaped. The methodology used was to study literature about American and Swedish remanufacturers. In this study,different kinds of success factors for remanufacturing were identified. Secondly, a qualitative research study was performed through visits to remanufacturers and to universities performing remanufacturing research.The interviews show that there are multiple reasons why remanufacturing is advantageous in the United States. These reasons are also dependant on what type of remanufacturing case that is considered. The potential sources identified for remanufacturing success potential in the USA compared to Sweden were cultural behaviour, closeness to a secondary market and a greater focus on price.

  • 43.
    Svensson, Niclas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Potentials of Using Solvent-free Industrial Cleaning in Swedish Manufacturing Industry.2009In: Joint Actions on Climate Change, 8-10 June, 2009, Aalborg, Denmark, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing industry today uses different kinds of chemicals in its cleaning processes. The industrial cleaners often contain some sort of degreasing chemical to clean parts and components before for instance surface treatment processes. These types of cleaning methods imply expensive and dangerous handling of chemicals in the manufacturing process, as well as in the transportation of hazardous waste. Furthermore, the cleaning processes also uses a substanstial amount of energy for cleaning.

    “Ultra-clean water” is relatively new way of cleaning without the use of chemicals. The method has proven successful, for example, in the cleaning of building exteriors, transformer stations, and tunnels. The procedure has been to spray with low-pressure, thus better salvaging the paint yet removing dirt, oil and debris from surfaces such as walls. Successful projects, for example, include the cleaning of the above mentioned building exteriors and tunnel walls at and Södra Länken tunnel system in. The aim of this paper is to explore the potentials of how “ultra-clean” water cleaning can be used in the manufacturing industry. The overall goals of the project are to reduce manufacturers’ use of chemicals, and also the amount of emissions to landfills. Another goal with the project is to reduce the environmental effects on the manufacturing site, the amount of chemical emissions during manufacturing and the amount of chemical transports from the facility. Furthermore this innovation have a potential to improve the working environment within the industry and at the same time reduce the energy consumption used for cleaning. Two case studies will be presented in which environmental performance of a prototype of the solvent-free cleaning technology is compared with existing technologies. The first case is dealing with cleaning of circuit-boards with special attention to flux material residues. Furthermore the second case focuses on surface treatment industry and focuses more on the ability to clean oily and/or fatty surfaces.

    To summarize, this research project have a large economic and environmental potential in its unique constellation of university research and manufacturing company involvement. At this moment the potentials are preliminary but shows a lot of promise for the future.

  • 44.
    Svensson, Rickard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society.
    Engkvist, Inga-Lill
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Eklund, Jörgen
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Ergonomics.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Eklund, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Environmental Technique and Management.
    Identified Risks at Swedish Recycling Centres during Handling of Waste from Electric and Electronic Equipment2005In: EcoDesign 2005: 4th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing,2005, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45. Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering.
    Application of Manufacturing Strategies: The Influence of Manufacturing Strategies Upon the Decision process When Investing in New Assemblyfor2000In: Structural and multidisciplinary optimization (Print), ISSN 1615-147X, E-ISSN 1615-1488Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Aspects on Manufacturing Strategy: A Case Study At Saab Automobile, Sweden2001In: CIRP International Seminar on Manufacturing Systems,2001, Orlando, Florida: CIRP , 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 47. Winroth, Mats
    et al.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Assembly technology.
    Manufacturing strategies: A survey among medium sized enterprises in Sweden2001In: 34th CIRP International Seminar for Manufacturing Systems Technology and Challanges for the 21st Century,2001, Athens, Greece: CIRP , 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Östlin, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Mähl, M.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lean Remanufacturing: a Study Regarding Material Flow2008Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Östlin, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Business drivers for remanufacturing2008In: Proceedings of CIRP Life Cycle Engineering Seminar , 15th edition, Sidney, Australia, 2008, p. 581-586Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the aim is to explore what drives companies to get involved in the remanufacturing operations. In the previous research there have been numerous case studies that partly have addresses the issue of why a company is getting involved in remanufacturing. A main conclusion from this study is that the motives for remanufacturing a product are very case-dependent e.g. in what industry sector the company have business in and what product type being remanufactured. In this study it is found that there are mainly three general business drivers for remanufacturing. These are: profit, company policy and the environmental drivers. For remanufacturing to be successful, these drivers are crucial, although it does not propose that all of theses drivers have to be present for a successful remanufacturing system. When combining the profit, policy and environmental factors there is a great potential for a win-win-win situation, meaning that the customer gets a quality product at a lower price, the manufacturer reduces their manufacturing costs and the environment gains from a lower environmental impact.

  • 50.
    Östlin, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Björkman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Assembly technology . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Importance of Closed Loop Supply Chain Relationships for Product Remanufacturing2008In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 336-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remanufacturing is an industrial process where used products are restored (remanufactured) to useful life. In comparison to manufacturing, remanufacturing has some general characteristics that complicate the supply chain and production system. For example, a company must collect the used products from the customers, and thus the timing and quality of the used products are usually unknown. Remanufacturing companies are dependent on customers to return used products (cores). In this paper, seven different types of closed-loop relationships for gathering cores for remanufacturing have been identified. The relationships identified are ownership-based, service-contract, direct-order, deposit-based, credit-based, buy-back and voluntary-based relationships. Building theory around these different types of relationships, several disadvantages and advantages are described in the paper. By exploring these relationships, a better understanding can be gained about the management of the closed-loop supply chain and remanufacturing.

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